History UsefulNotes / JapaneseLanguage

19th Feb '18 7:03:33 AM Anduryen
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* The fact that Japanese lacks the "L"/"R" sounds that English has is now [[TheJapaneseRanguage the stuff of legend]], of course. However, Japanese does have a flap, which is much more prevalent in the world's languages. (The American English 'r' is an rhotic alveolar approximate and is much rarer.) Many Japanese speakers have a retroflex flap; however, a non-retroflex flap is present in the phonetic inventory of (American) English, but it's usually written as "t," "d," or "dd" (e.g. "city," "ready," "pudding"). When you say the word "pudding" at normal conversational speed, without enunciating carefully, the middle consonant is the same as the Japanese 'r' (indeed, the word "pudding" is written "purin" in Japanese).

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* The fact that Japanese lacks the "L"/"R" sounds that English has is now [[TheJapaneseRanguage [[JapaneseRanguage the stuff of legend]], of course. However, Japanese does have a flap, which is much more prevalent in the world's languages. (The American English 'r' is an rhotic alveolar approximate and is much rarer.) Many Japanese speakers have a retroflex flap; however, a non-retroflex flap is present in the phonetic inventory of (American) English, but it's usually written as "t," "d," or "dd" (e.g. "city," "ready," "pudding"). When you say the word "pudding" at normal conversational speed, without enunciating carefully, the middle consonant is the same as the Japanese 'r' (indeed, the word "pudding" is written "purin" in Japanese).
19th Feb '18 7:03:08 AM Anduryen
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* The fact that Japanese lacks the "L"/"R" sounds that English has is now the stuff of legend, of course. However, Japanese does have a flap, which is much more prevalent in the world's languages. (The American English 'r' is an rhotic alveolar approximate and is much rarer.) Many Japanese speakers have a retroflex flap; however, a non-retroflex flap is present in the phonetic inventory of (American) English, but it's usually written as "t," "d," or "dd" (e.g. "city," "ready," "pudding"). When you say the word "pudding" at normal conversational speed, without enunciating carefully, the middle consonant is the same as the Japanese 'r' (indeed, the word "pudding" is written "purin" in Japanese).

to:

* The fact that Japanese lacks the "L"/"R" sounds that English has is now [[TheJapaneseRanguage the stuff of legend, legend]], of course. However, Japanese does have a flap, which is much more prevalent in the world's languages. (The American English 'r' is an rhotic alveolar approximate and is much rarer.) Many Japanese speakers have a retroflex flap; however, a non-retroflex flap is present in the phonetic inventory of (American) English, but it's usually written as "t," "d," or "dd" (e.g. "city," "ready," "pudding"). When you say the word "pudding" at normal conversational speed, without enunciating carefully, the middle consonant is the same as the Japanese 'r' (indeed, the word "pudding" is written "purin" in Japanese).
27th Jan '18 10:53:38 AM nombretomado
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* Japanese has a good bit of reduplication; there's even a character used to indicate repetition of the previous kanji (々). As such, you end up with words like 時々 "tokidoki" (sometimes, "time-time"), 黙々 "mokumoku" (mute, "silence-silence"), 中々 "nakanaka" (rather), 次々 "tsugitsugi" (one after another, "next-next"), or 我々 [[JapanesePronouns "wareware"]] (we, "I-I").

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* Japanese has a good bit of reduplication; there's even a character used to indicate repetition of the previous kanji (々). As such, you end up with words like 時々 "tokidoki" (sometimes, "time-time"), 黙々 "mokumoku" (mute, "silence-silence"), 中々 "nakanaka" (rather), 次々 "tsugitsugi" (one after another, "next-next"), or 我々 [[JapanesePronouns [[UsefulNotes/JapanesePronouns "wareware"]] (we, "I-I").
15th Oct '17 3:39:50 PM Malady
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* StockJapanesePhrases
17th Jun '17 5:27:53 PM Wuz
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* UsefulNotes/Baka

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* UsefulNotes/BakaUsefulNotes/{{Baka}}
10th Apr '17 9:57:38 AM Brick3621
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Added DiffLines:

* UsefulNotes/Baka
23rd Mar '17 5:26:05 AM Adept
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** Irohazaka, which shows up in ''Manga/InitialD'', comes from "Iroha" and "zaka", the latter meaning "trail", from a series of distance markers along the original road which were Hiragana letters placed in the old alphabetical order. If the name was translated, it would be something like "Alphabet Road". The original is a scenic road in the famous resort town of Nikko, Tochigi prefecture, which leads from the Tokugawa Ieyasu's mausoleum in the foothills to the lake Chuzenji and Kegon falls up in the mountains. It has 48 (which is why they are marked by Hiragana letters) extremely tight hairpin turns that are extremely challenging to drift through and this is the reason for its inclusion into the InitialD franchise.

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** Irohazaka, which shows up in ''Manga/InitialD'', comes from "Iroha" and "zaka", the latter meaning "trail", from a series of distance markers along the original road which were Hiragana letters placed in the old alphabetical order. If the name was translated, it would be something like "Alphabet Road". The original is a scenic road in the famous resort town of Nikko, Tochigi prefecture, which leads from the Tokugawa Ieyasu's mausoleum in the foothills to the lake Chuzenji and Kegon falls up in the mountains. It has 48 (which is why they are marked by Hiragana letters) extremely tight hairpin turns that are extremely challenging to drift through and this is the reason for its inclusion into the InitialD ''Initial D'' franchise.
7th Jan '17 1:23:00 PM SeptimusHeap
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Added DiffLines:

* UsefulNotes/VisualNovelFanspeak
8th Oct '16 5:34:49 PM MitchellProductions
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* In Japanese, pitch accent can alter the meaning of the word. ''Ame'', for example, can mean either rain or (hard) candy, depending on which syllable takes the higher pitch. However, the Kanto regional accent (the Tokyo accent) uses different pitch-accent than the KansaiRegionalAccent. Context is (usually) the important key here. However, not having a good grasp of the pitch system won't lead to a faux pas - 'it's raining candy outside'[[note]]incidentally, just saying "it's raining" in Japanese would sound odd, along the lines of "there's rain outside" in English - technically true, but eyebrow-raising[[/note]] is a highly unlikely phrase in real life, after all.

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* In Japanese, pitch accent can alter the meaning of the word. ''Ame'', for example, can mean either rain or (hard) candy, depending on which syllable takes the higher pitch. However, the Kanto regional accent (the Tokyo accent) uses different pitch-accent than the KansaiRegionalAccent. Context is (usually) the important key here. However, [[MyHovercraftIsFullOfEels not having a good grasp of the pitch system won't lead to a faux pas - 'it's raining candy outside'[[note]]incidentally, outside']][[note]]incidentally, just saying "it's raining" in Japanese would sound odd, along the lines of "there's rain outside" in English - technically true, but eyebrow-raising[[/note]] is a highly unlikely phrase in real life, after all.
22nd Sep '16 6:38:42 PM SantosLHalper
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The Japanese language is considered an extremely "complicated" language to an English speaker's ear. While certain concepts are simplified (very few real plurals, for instance), the grammar is switched around, and both the words and wording are often grounded in concepts that are either different or entirely external to the English language. And let's not even ''start'' getting into things like [[{{Keigo}} etiquette and connotation]].

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The Japanese language is considered an extremely "complicated" ''complicated'' language to an English speaker's ear. While certain concepts are simplified (very few real plurals, for instance), the grammar is switched around, and both the words and wording are often grounded in concepts that are either different or entirely external to the English language. And let's not even ''start'' getting into things like [[{{Keigo}} etiquette and connotation]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.JapaneseLanguage