History UsefulNotes / JapaneseLanguage

27th Jan '16 12:28:07 PM Morgenthaler
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No Circular Links, please.
The UsefulNotes/JapaneseLanguage is considered an extremely "complicated" language to an English speaker's ear. While certain concepts are simplified (very few real plurals, for instance), the grammar is switched around, and both the words and wording are often grounded in concepts that are either different or entirely external to the English language. And let's not even ''start'' getting into things like [[{{Keigo}} etiquette and connotation]].
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The UsefulNotes/JapaneseLanguage Japanese language is considered an extremely "complicated" language to an English speaker's ear. While certain concepts are simplified (very few real plurals, for instance), the grammar is switched around, and both the words and wording are often grounded in concepts that are either different or entirely external to the English language. And let's not even ''start'' getting into things like [[{{Keigo}} etiquette and connotation]].
18th Dec '15 6:37:13 PM DAN004
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* GoroawaseNumber

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* StockJapanesePhrases
14th Nov '15 6:37:39 AM Prfnoff
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Correction
* Japanese has a good bit of reduplication, usually used to indicate some degree of vagueness; there's even a character used to indicate repetition of the previous kanji (々). As such, you end up with words like 時々 "tokidoki" (sometimes, "time-time"), 黙々 "mokumoku" (mute, "silence-silence"), 中々 "nakanaka" (rather), 次々 "tsukitsugi" (one after another, "next-next"), or 我々 [[JapanesePronouns "wareware"]] (we, "I-I").
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* Japanese has a good bit of reduplication, usually used to indicate some degree of vagueness; there's even a character used to indicate repetition of the previous kanji (々). As such, you end up with words like 時々 "tokidoki" (sometimes, "time-time"), 黙々 "mokumoku" (mute, "silence-silence"), 中々 "nakanaka" (rather), 次々 "tsukitsugi" "tsugitsugi" (one after another, "next-next"), or 我々 [[JapanesePronouns "wareware"]] (we, "I-I").
14th Nov '15 6:32:39 AM Prfnoff
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Superfluous semicolon
* Japanese has a good bit of reduplication, usually used to indicate some degree of vagueness; there's even a character used to indicate repetition of the previous kanji (々). As such, you end up with words like 時々 "tokidoki" (sometimes, "time-time"), 黙々 "mokumoku" (mute, "silence-silence"), 中々 "nakanaka" (rather), 次々; "tsukitsugi" (one after another, "next-next"), or 我々 [[JapanesePronouns "wareware"]] (we, "I-I").
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* Japanese has a good bit of reduplication, usually used to indicate some degree of vagueness; there's even a character used to indicate repetition of the previous kanji (々). As such, you end up with words like 時々 "tokidoki" (sometimes, "time-time"), 黙々 "mokumoku" (mute, "silence-silence"), 中々 "nakanaka" (rather), 次々; 次々 "tsukitsugi" (one after another, "next-next"), or 我々 [[JapanesePronouns "wareware"]] (we, "I-I").
14th Nov '15 6:31:27 AM Prfnoff
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* Japanese has a good bit of reduplication, usually used to indicate some degree of vagueness; there's even a character used to indicate repetition of the previous kanji (々). As such, you end up with words like 時々 "tokidoki" (sometimes, "time-time"), 黙々 "mokumoku" (mute, "silence-silence"), 中々 "nakanaka" (rather) or 我々 [[JapanesePronouns "wareware"]] (we "I-I").
to:
* Japanese has a good bit of reduplication, usually used to indicate some degree of vagueness; there's even a character used to indicate repetition of the previous kanji (々). As such, you end up with words like 時々 "tokidoki" (sometimes, "time-time"), 黙々 "mokumoku" (mute, "silence-silence"), 中々 "nakanaka" (rather) (rather), 次々; "tsukitsugi" (one after another, "next-next"), or 我々 [[JapanesePronouns "wareware"]] (we (we, "I-I").
1st Nov '15 12:20:29 PM TomSFox
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"Future tense of the verb" - as opposed to what?
* Japanese verbs take two basic tenses, past and non-past. There is no future tense of the verb, so future actions either rely on conversational context or can be specified with time-related words.
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* Japanese verbs take two basic tenses, past and non-past. There is no future tense of the verb, tense, so future actions either rely on conversational context or can be specified with time-related words.
8th Sep '15 11:03:23 AM Willbyr
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** An example would be the Dojin created by the ''{{Genshiken}}'' crew. Its title is ''Iroha gokko'', which could mean roughly "Playing at [=ABCs=]". However, "Iro" doesn't just mean "color". It also is used in a bunch of combinations to mean things like "sensual", or "sexy" (same character too, fun language). "Playtime" is obviously a bit naughty (well it ''is'' a dojinshi). ** In ''RanmaOneHalf'', the sign on the wall of the Tendo Dojo reads "iroha", although it is sometimes shown in reverse in the anime. ** In ''TsubasaReservoirChronicle'', the heroes go to the country of Oto, which uses the first line of the "Iroha" poem to sort the [[GoddamnedBats demons]] according to their strength. ** Irohazaka, which shows up in ''InitialD'', comes from "Iroha" and "zaka", the latter meaning "trail", from a series of distance markers along the original road which were Hiragana letters placed in the old alphabetical order. If the name was translated, it would be something like "Alphabet Road".
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** An example would be the Dojin created by the ''{{Genshiken}}'' ''Manga/{{Genshiken}}'' crew. Its title is ''Iroha gokko'', which could mean roughly "Playing at [=ABCs=]". However, "Iro" doesn't just mean "color". It also is used in a bunch of combinations to mean things like "sensual", or "sexy" (same character too, fun language). "Playtime" is obviously a bit naughty (well it ''is'' a dojinshi). ** In ''RanmaOneHalf'', ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'', the sign on the wall of the Tendo Dojo reads "iroha", although it is sometimes shown in reverse in the anime. ** In ''TsubasaReservoirChronicle'', ''Manga/TsubasaReservoirChronicle'', the heroes go to the country of Oto, which uses the first line of the "Iroha" poem to sort the [[GoddamnedBats demons]] according to their strength. ** Irohazaka, which shows up in ''InitialD'', ''Manga/InitialD'', comes from "Iroha" and "zaka", the latter meaning "trail", from a series of distance markers along the original road which were Hiragana letters placed in the old alphabetical order. If the name was translated, it would be something like "Alphabet Road".

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** An example would be the Dojin created by the ''{{Genshiken}}'' crew. Its title is ''Iroha gokko'', which could mean roughly "Playing at [=ABCs=]". However, "Iro" doesn't just mean "color". It also is used in a bunch of combinations to mean things like "sensual", or "sexy" (same character too, fun language). "Playtime" is obviously a bit naughty (well it ''is'' a dojinshi). ** In ''RanmaOneHalf'', the sign on the wall of the Tendo Dojo reads "iroha", although it is sometimes shown in reverse in the anime. ** In ''TsubasaReservoirChronicle'', the heroes go to the country of Oto, which uses the first line of the "Iroha" poem to sort the [[GoddamnedBats demons]] according to their strength. ** Irohazaka, which shows up in ''InitialD'', comes from "Iroha" and "zaka", the latter meaning "trail", from a series of distance markers along the original road which were Hiragana letters placed in the old alphabetical order. If the name was translated, it would be something like "Alphabet Road".
29th May '15 4:53:32 AM cephalopod
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* JapaneseRanguage: A common stereotypical depection of Japanese speak, which is not entirely accurate.
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* JapaneseRanguage: A common stereotypical depection of Japanese speak, which is not entirely accurate.JapaneseRanguage
2nd Mar '15 9:20:48 AM general_tiu
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* JapaneseDialectsAndAccents
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* JapaneseDialectsAndAccentsUsefulNotes/JapaneseDialects
2nd Mar '15 9:17:28 AM general_tiu
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* JapaneseDialectsAndAccents
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