History UsefulNotes / GermanDialects

17th Apr '16 7:49:14 PM karstovich2
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** Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch: Or Pennsylvania German, spoken by the so-called "Pennsylvania Dutch" (who are actually German) and UsefulNotes/{{Amish}} communities of the United States. Since they moved to the US in the 18th and 19th centuries, there has been some divergence, but a Palatinate speaker can still carry a conversation with an Amish person if he/she sticks to dialect.

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** Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch: Or Pennsylvania German, spoken by the so-called "Pennsylvania Dutch" (who are actually German) and UsefulNotes/{{Amish}} communities of the United States. Since they moved to the US in the 18th and 19th centuries, there has been some divergence, but a Palatinate speaker can still carry a conversation with an Amish person or other speaker of Pennsylvania German if he/she sticks to dialect.
17th Apr '16 7:43:01 PM karstovich2
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** Austria itself has several distinct dialects, which confuses matters even more. "I hoaß" is the way it's said in Salzburg, northern Styria, northern Tyrol, parts of Upper and Lower Austria and Burgenland (when not yet superseded by the Viennese "â"), but not in Vienna and areas influenced by the Viennese dialect, where people say "I hâß".
*** Vienna itself has a few different dialects. The most distinguishable is the Meidlinger Dialect, which is the common, working class dialect, and famous for the "Meidlinger L", a sound even most non-Viennese Austrians can't replicate. The other major Viennese dialect, now almost extinct, is "Schönbrunner Deutsch", spoken by the nobility, which sounds completely different. The general Viennese dialect is rather closer to "understandable" German than the Alpine districts, having less vowel shifts and hardly any consonant shifts (also, being the capital, Viennese have more reason to be understandable internationally), but still has a lot of dialectal loanwords borrowing from any of the languages in the [[TheSoundOfMartialMusic Austro-Hungarian Empire]] and [[YiddishAsASecondLanguage Yiddish]].
*** There is also Tyrolean, which is a term used for the whole of Tyrol, but actually mostly applies to Innsbruck (the capital) and surrounding areas, where consonants almost underwent another consonant shift: several consonants hardened (f.e. "k" to almost "kch") and vowels darkened ("a" -> "o" instead of "â" (standard Oberbairisch)). Also, the Germanic "s" (pronounced as "sch") was retained in some areas, resulting in pronunciations of "bist" as "bischt".

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** Austria itself has several distinct dialects, which confuses matters even more. As an example: "I hoaß" (i.e. as in Bavaria) is the way it's said in Salzburg, northern Styria, northern Tyrol, parts of Upper and Lower Austria and Burgenland (when not yet superseded by the Viennese "â"), but not in Vienna and areas influenced by the Viennese dialect, where people say "I hâß".
*** ** The city of Vienna itself has a few different dialects. The most distinguishable is the Meidlinger Dialect, which is the common, working class dialect, and famous for the "Meidlinger L", a sound even most non-Viennese Austrians can't replicate. The other major Viennese dialect, now almost extinct, is "Schönbrunner Deutsch", spoken by the nobility, which sounds completely different. dialects:
***
The general Viennese dialect is rather closer to "understandable" German than the Alpine districts, having less vowel shifts and hardly any consonant shifts (also, being the capital, Viennese have more reason to be understandable internationally), but still has a lot of dialectal loanwords borrowing from any of the languages in the [[TheSoundOfMartialMusic Austro-Hungarian Empire]] and [[YiddishAsASecondLanguage Yiddish]].
*** The most distinct Viennese dialect is the Meidlinger Dialect, which is the common, working class dialect, and famous for the "Meidlinger L", a sound even most non-Viennese Austrians can't replicate.
*** The other major Viennese dialect, now almost extinct, is "Schönbrunner Deutsch", spoken by the nobility, which sounds completely different. It is named after the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sch%C3%B6nbrunn_Palace Schönbrunn Palace]], the former seat of the Habsburg monarchs, for it was their dialect of German as well.
**
There is also Tyrolean, which is a term used for the whole of Tyrol, but actually mostly applies to Innsbruck (the capital) and surrounding areas, where consonants almost underwent another consonant shift: several consonants hardened (f.e. "k" to almost "kch") and vowels darkened ("a" -> "o" instead of "â" (standard Oberbairisch)). Also, the Germanic "s" (pronounced as "sch") was retained in some areas, resulting in pronunciations of "bist" as "bischt".
8th Apr '16 2:40:56 PM Jhonny
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---> Hochdeutsch: Von Mellau bis nach Schoppernau nin ich gegangen - die Füße haben mir weh getan

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---> Hochdeutsch: Von Mellau bis nach Schoppernau nin bin ich gegangen - die Füße haben mir weh getan
7th Feb '16 6:37:05 AM Ulkomaalainen
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** Generally speaking, the former Low German speaking regions tend to speak High German with less of an accent than the traditional High German regions since there wasn't as much time to develop a unique accent (the language unification is often dated back to Luther's first bible translation).
25th Jan '16 12:18:37 AM demonfiren
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* [[YiddishAsASecondLanguage Yiddish]] is a collection of Jewish-specific High German dialects that--despite the lack of an army and a navy--came to be considered a language; the Hebrew loanwords and being written in the Hebrew alphabet probably had something to do with it. To be quite fair, the dialects of Yiddish that survived are the eastern ones, which contained a large portion of Slavic vocabulary, as well (western Yiddish died out as German Jews assimilated to mainstream German culture--[[ThoseWackyNazis or died out in a more literal sense]]).

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* [[YiddishAsASecondLanguage Yiddish]] is a collection of Jewish-specific High German dialects that--despite the lack of an army and a navy--came to be considered a language; the Hebrew loanwords and being written in the Hebrew alphabet probably had something to do with it. To be quite fair, the dialects of Yiddish that survived are the eastern ones, which contained a large portion of Slavic vocabulary, as well (western Yiddish died out as German Jews assimilated to mainstream German culture--[[ThoseWackyNazis culture--[[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany or died out in a more literal sense]]).
25th Jan '16 12:13:15 AM demonfiren
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** Diphtongs 'AU' or 'EI' are substituted by single vowels (usually 'A'). This is the most important difference to bavaria, there single vowels are substituted with diphtongs. For example the word "Arb'''ei'''t" (work,job) becomes "Ärb'''a'''d" in Franconian, while it would be "Oarbeit" in Bavarian. Using diphtongs in franconia makes you look suspicious, beacause Francons hate Bavarians.
** "Ja" ("Yes") becomes "Hoh" and "Nein" ("No") becomes "Nah". This may lead to confusions because "Nah" may be confused with "Ja".

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** Diphtongs 'AU' or 'EI' are substituted by single vowels (usually 'A'). This is the most important difference to bavaria, there single vowels are substituted with diphtongs. For example the word "Arb'''ei'''t" (work,job) becomes "Ärb'''a'''d" in Franconian, while it would be "Oarbeit" in Bavarian. Using diphtongs in franconia Franconia makes you look suspicious, beacause because Francons hate Bavarians.
** "Ja" ("Yes") becomes "Hoh" "Hoh"/"Joh" and "Nein" ("No") becomes "Nah". This may lead to confusions because "Nah" may be confused with "Ja".
25th Jan '16 12:11:54 AM demonfiren
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* Franconian: Spoken in the area between Thuringia, (Old) Bavaria and Hesse. Replaces P and T sounds by B and D respectively.

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* Franconian: Spoken in the area between Thuringia, (Old) Bavaria and Hesse.Hessen. Replaces P and T sounds by B and D respectively.



** Diphtongs 'AU' or 'EI' are substituted by single vovals (usually 'A'). This is the most important difference to bavaria, there single vovals are substituted with diphtongs. For example the word "Arb'''ei'''t" (work,job) becomes "Ärb'''a'''d" in Franconian, while it would be "Oarbeit" in Bavarian. Using diphtongs in franconia makes you look suspicious, beacause Francons hate Bavarians.

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** Diphtongs 'AU' or 'EI' are substituted by single vovals vowels (usually 'A'). This is the most important difference to bavaria, there single vovals vowels are substituted with diphtongs. For example the word "Arb'''ei'''t" (work,job) becomes "Ärb'''a'''d" in Franconian, while it would be "Oarbeit" in Bavarian. Using diphtongs in franconia makes you look suspicious, beacause Francons hate Bavarians.



** Single vovals are often substituted by diphtongs, so words often get more syllables and 'EI' is often substituted by 'OA'. For example "Eichhörnschenschwanz" bzw. "Eichkätzchenschweif" (tail of a squirrel) becomes "Oachkoatzelschwoaf". In general Bavarian has lots of 'OA'.

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** Single vovals vowels are often substituted by diphtongs, so words often get more syllables and 'EI' is often substituted by 'OA'. For example "Eichhörnschenschwanz" bzw. "Eichkätzchenschweif" (tail of a squirrel) becomes "Oachkoatzelschwoaf". In general Bavarian has lots of 'OA'.
25th Jan '16 12:06:16 AM demonfiren
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** The diphthong "au" can become a long "o", as in "ooch" for High German "auch,"[[note]]also, as well[[/note]] and "Oogen" (pronounced with a velar fricative sound like New Greek gamma) for "Augen"[[note]] eyes [[/note]].

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** The diphthong "au" can become a long "o", as in "ooch" for High German "auch,"[[note]]also, as well[[/note]] and "Oogen" (pronounced with a velar fricative sound like New the (Modern) Greek gamma) for "Augen"[[note]] eyes [[/note]].
25th Jan '16 12:03:10 AM demonfiren
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*** This is today largely untrue: Everyone can speak Standard German.[[note]]In Jerome's time it may have been true, as dialects were stronger back then: universal education in Standard German was a relatively recent phenomenon. Even if by the time Jerome got there everyone did speak Standard German, it was probably true earlier in his lifetime, which is probably where he got the idea.[[/note]] In Germany itself the joke is mostly "You have to go to Hanover to hear actual Standard German... the problem is: you'd be in Hanover..."

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*** This is today largely untrue: Everyone can speak Standard German.[[note]]In Jerome's time it may have been true, as dialects were stronger back then: universal education in Standard German was a relatively recent phenomenon. Even if by the time Jerome got there everyone did speak Standard German, it was probably true earlier in his lifetime, which is probably where he got the idea.[[/note]] In Germany itself the joke is mostly "You have to go to Hanover to hear actual Standard German... the problem is: you'd be in Hanover...[[PlaceWorseThanDeath Hanover]]..."
24th Jan '16 11:58:46 PM demonfiren
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** Like several accents of English, it is also nonrhotic and does not pronounce most Rs, often replacing them with an additioinal vowl. Turning the above example into ''hin'nea Tüe''.

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** Like several accents of English, it is also nonrhotic and does not pronounce most Rs, often replacing them with an additioinal vowl.vowel. Turning the above example into ''hin'nea Tüe''.
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