History UsefulNotes / GermanDialects

20th Mar '18 3:47:18 PM nombretomado
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** One of the most {{egregious}} example may be the dub of ''Film/{{Airplane}}'', where the JiveTurkey guys talk ''Bavarian'' dialect.

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** One of the most {{egregious}} JustForFun/{{egregious}} example may be the dub of ''Film/{{Airplane}}'', where the JiveTurkey guys talk ''Bavarian'' dialect.
26th Nov '17 10:36:31 AM nombretomado
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** Kölsch: A specific variant of Rhenish, spoken in the city of Cologne. Associated with the [[GermanHumor Cologne Carnival festivities]]. May be more famous than other Rhenish variants because some of Germany's most important [[GermanTVStations TV stations]] are located in Cologne. Not to be confused with the beer from that area [[NamesTheSame which is also called Kölsch]]...although the similarity of names has led to a German joke about how Kölsch is the only dialect you can drink.)

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** Kölsch: A specific variant of Rhenish, spoken in the city of Cologne. Associated with the [[GermanHumor Cologne Carnival festivities]]. May be more famous than other Rhenish variants because some of Germany's most important [[GermanTVStations [[UsefulNotes/GermanTVStations TV stations]] are located in Cologne. Not to be confused with the beer from that area [[NamesTheSame which is also called Kölsch]]...although the similarity of names has led to a German joke about how Kölsch is the only dialect you can drink.)
24th Nov '17 9:59:17 AM nombretomado
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* Saxon[[note]]Not to be confused with the Saxon in Anglo-Saxon; the Old Saxon language comes from the northern part of the country and is the ancestor of Low German[[/note]]: According to a 2008 poll (here: http://www.ifd-allensbach.de/news/prd_0804.html), by far the most unpopular German dialect. Was spoken by many prominent politicians of EastGermany (like Walter Ulbricht, head of the SED Central Committee from 1950 to 1971), and their border guards, which didn't help its popularity. The Saxon dialect replaces P, T, K sounds by B, D, G (and several vowels too, but that's too complicated to explain). Thuringian (the area west of Saxony) is a bit like it. Most notable for the invention or adoption of new vocab (as "Plinsen" (pancakes), a loanword from Slavic languages, specifically Sorbic) and new meanings to vocabs (mentioned "Pfannkuchen" in Saxon are Plinsen. In other regions pancakes are called pancakes, "Pfannkuchen" - in Saxon, however "Pfannkuchen" is what in other regions in Germany is a "Krapfen" - a fried doughy pastry filled with jelly ... what an American would call a "jelly donut".[[note]]This type of pastry, which in many parts of Germany is called a "Berliner", "Berliner Ballen" or "Berliner Pfannkuchen", is also known as a "Pfannkuchen" in Berlin; there a pancake is usually referred to as an "Eierkuchen" (egg-cake).[[/note]] HilarityEnsues when a Saxonian orders Pfannkuchen in a Bavarian bakery). Also known as typical Saxon is "Nu" - the universially used word for approval, yes, maybe, scepticism ("Nu, nu...") etc. - there are cases known where entire conversations were held only by using "Nu".)

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* Saxon[[note]]Not to be confused with the Saxon in Anglo-Saxon; the Old Saxon language comes from the northern part of the country and is the ancestor of Low German[[/note]]: According to a 2008 poll (here: http://www.ifd-allensbach.de/news/prd_0804.html), by far the most unpopular German dialect. Was spoken by many prominent politicians of EastGermany UsefulNotes/EastGermany (like Walter Ulbricht, head of the SED Central Committee from 1950 to 1971), and their border guards, which didn't help its popularity. The Saxon dialect replaces P, T, K sounds by B, D, G (and several vowels too, but that's too complicated to explain). Thuringian (the area west of Saxony) is a bit like it. Most notable for the invention or adoption of new vocab (as "Plinsen" (pancakes), a loanword from Slavic languages, specifically Sorbic) and new meanings to vocabs (mentioned "Pfannkuchen" in Saxon are Plinsen. In other regions pancakes are called pancakes, "Pfannkuchen" - in Saxon, however "Pfannkuchen" is what in other regions in Germany is a "Krapfen" - a fried doughy pastry filled with jelly ... what an American would call a "jelly donut".[[note]]This type of pastry, which in many parts of Germany is called a "Berliner", "Berliner Ballen" or "Berliner Pfannkuchen", is also known as a "Pfannkuchen" in Berlin; there a pancake is usually referred to as an "Eierkuchen" (egg-cake).[[/note]] HilarityEnsues when a Saxonian orders Pfannkuchen in a Bavarian bakery). Also known as typical Saxon is "Nu" - the universially used word for approval, yes, maybe, scepticism ("Nu, nu...") etc. - there are cases known where entire conversations were held only by using "Nu".)
27th Oct '17 9:16:03 PM karstovich2
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* In Northern Germany there are both north German accents (spoken in cities and younger people) and Plattdeutsch ("Flat German"[[note]] i. e. the German of the "flat country"[[/note]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_German Low German]], spoken mostly by older people and in rural areas). While most people speak Standard German (or High German) with an accent strongly influenced by Plattdeutsch, ''Platt'' is recognized as a language distinct from Standard German, which even many people who grew up in the urban areas of northern Germany can not understand because not only the pronunciation, but also the vocabulary and grammar differs quite significantly. The northern dialects are spoken in the north, in UsefulNotes/{{Hamburg}}, Bremen and other Hanseatic cities, and extending south as far as the northern edge of the Ruhr in places. It is also notable that Plattdeutsch varies strongly with different villages as close as 50 km together often using forms of it that are almost mutually unintelligible and different dialects spouting new words and different meanings to huge extents. Associated with fishermen, sailors and other people dealing with the sea (if they speak at all - the cliché says that they're rather taciturn). Or with pimps in Hamburg, of the (in)famous Reeperbahn redlight district. As the historic ''Angles'' and ''Saxons'' who migrated to Britain were from the regions north and south of Hamburg, Plattdeutsch is a close relative of the English language, and shares much more words and a much more similar phonetics with it than modern Standard German; it is even more closely related to [[UsefulNotes/TheNetherlands Dutch]], with which it forms a continuum. When people speak a mixture of High and Low German, this is called ''Missingsch'', a word that some say is derived from ''Messing'' (brass), an alloy of two metals, copper and zinc, meaning that ''Missingsch'' is an alloy of the two forms of German. About a century ago it was said e. g. about Hamburg that members of the lower classes and of very old upper-class families spoke Platt among themselves while the middle-class and nouveau riches would try to speak ''Hochdeutsch''. The Plattdüütsch language region also extends into the northeastern Netherlands, where it is locally termed as Dutch Low Saxon. Similarly, the Dutch language region creeps into Germany (in the vicinity of Düsseldorf and Duisburg) where it is termed as Low Frankish. Generally speaking, the modern Netherlands and Germany have well-differentiated national identities, though their shared national border does not coincide at all with their traditional linguistic boundaries. Typical elements of northern German dialects:

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* In Northern Germany there are both north German accents (spoken in cities and younger people) and Plattdeutsch ("Flat German"[[note]] i. e. the German of the "flat country"[[/note]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_German Low German]], spoken mostly by older people and in rural areas). While most people speak Standard German (or High German) with an accent strongly influenced by Plattdeutsch, ''Platt'' is recognized as a language distinct from Standard German, which even many people who grew up in the urban areas of northern Germany can not cannot understand because not only the pronunciation, but also the vocabulary and grammar differs quite significantly. \\
\\
The northern dialects are spoken in the north, in UsefulNotes/{{Hamburg}}, Bremen and other Hanseatic cities, and extending south as far as the northern edge of the Ruhr in places. It is also notable that Plattdeutsch varies strongly with different villages as close as 50 km together often using forms of it that are almost mutually unintelligible and different dialects spouting new words and different meanings to huge extents. Associated with fishermen, sailors and other people dealing with the sea (if they speak at all - the cliché says that they're rather taciturn). Or with pimps in Hamburg, of the (in)famous Reeperbahn redlight district.district\\
\\
.
As the historic ''Angles'' and ''Saxons'' who migrated to Britain were from the regions north and south of Hamburg, Plattdeutsch is a close relative of the English language, and shares much more words and a much more similar phonetics with it than modern Standard German; it is even more closely related to [[UsefulNotes/TheNetherlands Dutch]], with which it forms a continuum. When people speak a mixture of High and Low German, this is called ''Missingsch'', a word that some say is derived from ''Messing'' (brass), an alloy of two metals, copper and zinc, meaning that ''Missingsch'' is an alloy of the two forms of German. About a century ago it was said e. g. about Hamburg that members of the lower classes and of very old upper-class families spoke Platt among themselves while the middle-class and nouveau riches would try to speak ''Hochdeutsch''. The Plattdüütsch language region also extends into the northeastern Netherlands, where it is locally termed as Dutch Low Saxon. Similarly, the Dutch language region creeps into Germany (in the vicinity of Düsseldorf and Duisburg) where it is termed as Low Frankish. Generally speaking, the modern Netherlands and Germany have well-differentiated national identities, though their shared national border does not coincide at all with their traditional linguistic boundaries. Typical elements of northern German dialects:
25th Oct '17 3:48:07 PM Unknownlight
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** If you fly [[UsefulNotes/AirTravel Lufthansa]], you'll probably stop in Frankfurt. While they do their best to cover it up, there's a definite Hessian tinge to the German spoken among the people manning FRA security, so if you've been there, that's what it's like (if you can tell).

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** If you fly [[UsefulNotes/AirTravel Lufthansa]], Lufthansa, you'll probably stop in Frankfurt. While they do their best to cover it up, there's a definite Hessian tinge to the German spoken among the people manning FRA security, so if you've been there, that's what it's like (if you can tell).
25th Jul '17 6:27:24 PM jormis29
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* In the German dub, Wasabi from ''Film/BigHero6'' speaks [[UnexplainedAccent Berlinerisch]] [[RuleOfFunny for some reason.]]

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* In the German dub, Wasabi from ''Film/BigHero6'' ''Disney/BigHero6'' speaks [[UnexplainedAccent Berlinerisch]] [[RuleOfFunny for some reason.]]
30th Jun '17 2:43:36 PM LtFedora
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* ''Film/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' has Augustus Gloop as a fat german kid. While most english variants (the old and new movie as well as the musicals) usually simply give him a stereotypical "german" dialect, the german dub gives him what germans usually refer as ''very'' german sounding when the main language is german already - bavarian.

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* ''Film/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' has Augustus Gloop as a fat german German kid. While most english English variants (the old and new movie as well as the musicals) usually simply give him a stereotypical "german" "German" dialect, the german German dub gives him what germans Germans usually refer as ''very'' german German sounding when the main language is german German already - bavarian.Bavarian.
30th Jun '17 11:44:12 AM Jhonny
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* A number of other languages came to Germany with larger groups of immigrants, for instance French; the biggest wave occurred after UsefulNotes/LouisXIV expelled the Huguenots from France, a smaller one during the UsefulNotes/FrenchRevolution, but eventually they were linguistically absorbed into the German-speaking population. This is how you get German families with names like de Mazière; as mentioned, it's also responsible for the French influence on the Berlin dialect. After World War II the "Economic Miracle" in West Germany led to the immigration of millions of "guest workers" from Italy, Spain, Portugal, former Yugoslavia, Greece and Turkey, most of whom eventually settled down in Germany, but quite a number of whom keep speaking their native languages and pass them on to their children. The end of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar also led to an influx of ethnic Germans from Eastern Europe and also not a few Russian Jews, which is one of the reason there are now e. g. some Russian-language newspapers in Germany.


to:

* A number of other languages came to Germany with larger groups of immigrants, for instance French; the biggest wave occurred after UsefulNotes/LouisXIV expelled the Huguenots from France, a smaller one during the UsefulNotes/FrenchRevolution, but eventually they were linguistically absorbed into the German-speaking population. This is how you get German families with names like de Mazière; as mentioned, it's also responsible for the French influence on the Berlin dialect. After World War II the "Economic Miracle" in West Germany led to the immigration of millions of "guest workers" from Italy, Spain, Portugal, former Yugoslavia, Greece and Turkey, most of whom eventually settled down in Germany, but quite a number of whom keep speaking their native languages and pass them on to their children. The end of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar also led to an influx of ethnic Germans from Eastern Europe and also not a few Russian Jews, which is one of the reason reasons there are now e. g. some Russian-language newspapers in Germany.




* Most of Bully Herbig's comedy troupe's output, including ''Die Bullparade'', ''Film/DerSchuhDesManitu'' and ''Traumschiff Surprise'' feature three core type of dialects: Bully often performs in his native ''Oberbairisch'', occasionally with a CampGay intonation. Christian Tramitz, who is half-Bavarian, half-Austrian, will usually go either for Bavarian or a camp Viennese (so very posh Austrian) dialect. Rick Kavanian (who is an Armenian raised in Bavaria) on the other hand, often summons a camp ''Saxon'' dialect (and appropriately East German archetypes).

to:

* Most of Bully Herbig's comedy troupe's output, including ''Die Bullparade'', Bullyparade'', ''Film/DerSchuhDesManitu'' and ''Traumschiff Surprise'' feature three core type of dialects: Bully often performs in his native ''Oberbairisch'', occasionally with a CampGay intonation. Christian Tramitz, who is half-Bavarian, half-Austrian, will usually go either for Bavarian or a camp Viennese (so very posh Austrian) dialect. Rick Kavanian (who is an Armenian raised in Bavaria) on the other hand, often summons a camp ''Saxon'' dialect (and appropriately East German archetypes).
27th Jun '17 3:32:57 AM LarsT.
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* Most of Bully Herbig's comedy troupe's output, including ''Die Bullparade'', ''Film/DerSchuhDesManitu'' and ''Traumschiff Surprise'' feature three core type of dialects: Bully often performs in his native ''Oberbairisch'', occasionally with a CampGay intonation. Christian Tramitz, who is half-Bavarian, half-Austrian, will usually go either for Bavarian or a camp Viennese (so very posh Austrian) dialect. Rick Kavanian (who is Greek-Bavarian) on the other hand, often summons a camp ''Saxon'' dialect (and appropriately East German archetypes).

to:

* Most of Bully Herbig's comedy troupe's output, including ''Die Bullparade'', ''Film/DerSchuhDesManitu'' and ''Traumschiff Surprise'' feature three core type of dialects: Bully often performs in his native ''Oberbairisch'', occasionally with a CampGay intonation. Christian Tramitz, who is half-Bavarian, half-Austrian, will usually go either for Bavarian or a camp Viennese (so very posh Austrian) dialect. Rick Kavanian (who is Greek-Bavarian) an Armenian raised in Bavaria) on the other hand, often summons a camp ''Saxon'' dialect (and appropriately East German archetypes).
12th Jun '17 2:46:22 PM karstovich2
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* A number of other languages came to Germany with larger groups of immigrants, for instance French; the biggest wave occurred after UsefulNotes/LouisXIV expelled the Huguenots from France, a smaller one during the UsefulNotes/FrenchRevolution, but eventually they were linguistically absorbed into the German-speaking population. After World War II the "Economic Miracle" in West Germany led to the immigration of millions of "guest workers" from Italy, Spain, Portugal, former Yugoslavia, Greece and Turkey, most of whom eventually settled down in Germany, but quite a number of whom keep speaking their native languages and pass them on to their children. The end of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar also led to an influx of ethnic Germans from Eastern Europe and also not a few Russian Jews, which is one of the reason there are now e. g. some Russian-language newspapers in Germany.


to:

* A number of other languages came to Germany with larger groups of immigrants, for instance French; the biggest wave occurred after UsefulNotes/LouisXIV expelled the Huguenots from France, a smaller one during the UsefulNotes/FrenchRevolution, but eventually they were linguistically absorbed into the German-speaking population. This is how you get German families with names like de Mazière; as mentioned, it's also responsible for the French influence on the Berlin dialect. After World War II the "Economic Miracle" in West Germany led to the immigration of millions of "guest workers" from Italy, Spain, Portugal, former Yugoslavia, Greece and Turkey, most of whom eventually settled down in Germany, but quite a number of whom keep speaking their native languages and pass them on to their children. The end of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar also led to an influx of ethnic Germans from Eastern Europe and also not a few Russian Jews, which is one of the reason there are now e. g. some Russian-language newspapers in Germany.

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