History UsefulNotes / GermanDialects

7th Apr '17 12:44:38 PM MoonByte
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* ''Film/Shrek2'' has two german dubs: german (Hochdeutsch) and austrian german. Amusingly, it is literally the same, the only difference being the voice actress of the Fairy Godmother being an austrian musical singer instead of a german Schlager[[note]]a music style that could be described as "german country pop songs"[[/note]] singer.
7th Apr '17 12:38:58 PM MoonByte
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* ''Film/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' has Augustus Gloop as a fat german kid. While most english variants (the old and new movie as well as the musicals) usually simply give him a stereotypical "german" dialect, the german dub gives him what germans usually refer as ''very'' german sounding when the main language is german already - bavarian.
28th Jan '17 7:34:33 PM SmoCro
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* In Northern Germany there are both north German accents (spoken in cities and younger people) and Plattdeutsch ("Flat German"[[note]] i. e. the German of the "flat country"[[/note]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_German Low German]], spoken mostly by older people and in rural areas). While most people speak Standard German (or High German) with an accent strongly influenced by Plattdeutsch, ''Platt'' is recognized as a language distinct from Standard German, which even many people who grew up in the urban areas of northern Germany can not understand because not only the pronunciation, but also the vocabulary and grammar differs quite significantly. The northern dialects are spoken in the north, in UsefulNotes/{{Hamburg}}, Bremen and other Hanseatic cities, and extending south as far as the northern edge of the Ruhr in places. Associated with fishermen, sailors and other people dealing with the sea (if they speak at all - the cliché says that they're rather taciturn). Or with pimps in Hamburg, of the (in)famous Reeperbahn redlight district. As the historic ''Angles'' and ''Saxons'' who migrated to Britain were from the regions north and south of Hamburg, Plattdeutsch is a close relative of the English language, and shares much more words and a much more similar phonetics with it than modern Standard German; it is even more closely related to [[UsefulNotes/TheNetherlands Dutch]], with which it forms a continuum. When people speak a mixture of High and Low German, this is called ''Missingsch'', a word that some say is derived from ''Messing'' (brass), an alloy of two metals, copper and zinc, meaning that ''Missingsch'' is an alloy of the two forms of German. About a century ago it was said e. g. about Hamburg that members of the lower classes and of very old upper-class families spoke Platt among themselves while the middle-class and nouveau riches would try to speak ''Hochdeutsch''. The Plattdüütsch language region also extends into the northeastern Netherlands, where it is locally termed as Dutch Low Saxon. Similarly, the Dutch language region creeps into Germany (in the vicinity of Düsseldorf and Duisburg) where it is termed as Low Frankish. Generally speaking, the modern Netherlands and Germany have well-differentiated national identities, though their shared national border does not coincide at all with their traditional linguistic boundaries. Typical elements of northern German dialects:

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* In Northern Germany there are both north German accents (spoken in cities and younger people) and Plattdeutsch ("Flat German"[[note]] i. e. the German of the "flat country"[[/note]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_German Low German]], spoken mostly by older people and in rural areas). While most people speak Standard German (or High German) with an accent strongly influenced by Plattdeutsch, ''Platt'' is recognized as a language distinct from Standard German, which even many people who grew up in the urban areas of northern Germany can not understand because not only the pronunciation, but also the vocabulary and grammar differs quite significantly. The northern dialects are spoken in the north, in UsefulNotes/{{Hamburg}}, Bremen and other Hanseatic cities, and extending south as far as the northern edge of the Ruhr in places. It is also notable that Plattdeutsch varies strongly with different villages as close as 50 km together often using forms of it that are almost mutually unintelligible and different dialects spouting new words and different meanings to huge extents. Associated with fishermen, sailors and other people dealing with the sea (if they speak at all - the cliché says that they're rather taciturn). Or with pimps in Hamburg, of the (in)famous Reeperbahn redlight district. As the historic ''Angles'' and ''Saxons'' who migrated to Britain were from the regions north and south of Hamburg, Plattdeutsch is a close relative of the English language, and shares much more words and a much more similar phonetics with it than modern Standard German; it is even more closely related to [[UsefulNotes/TheNetherlands Dutch]], with which it forms a continuum. When people speak a mixture of High and Low German, this is called ''Missingsch'', a word that some say is derived from ''Messing'' (brass), an alloy of two metals, copper and zinc, meaning that ''Missingsch'' is an alloy of the two forms of German. About a century ago it was said e. g. about Hamburg that members of the lower classes and of very old upper-class families spoke Platt among themselves while the middle-class and nouveau riches would try to speak ''Hochdeutsch''. The Plattdüütsch language region also extends into the northeastern Netherlands, where it is locally termed as Dutch Low Saxon. Similarly, the Dutch language region creeps into Germany (in the vicinity of Düsseldorf and Duisburg) where it is termed as Low Frankish. Generally speaking, the modern Netherlands and Germany have well-differentiated national identities, though their shared national border does not coincide at all with their traditional linguistic boundaries. Typical elements of northern German dialects:
3rd Sep '16 7:08:48 AM Morgenthaler
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*** The general Viennese dialect is rather closer to "understandable" German than the Alpine districts, having less vowel shifts and hardly any consonant shifts (also, being the capital, Viennese have more reason to be understandable internationally), but still has a lot of dialectal loanwords borrowing from any of the languages in the [[TheSoundOfMartialMusic Austro-Hungarian Empire]] and [[YiddishAsASecondLanguage Yiddish]].

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*** The general Viennese dialect is rather closer to "understandable" German than the Alpine districts, having less vowel shifts and hardly any consonant shifts (also, being the capital, Viennese have more reason to be understandable internationally), but still has a lot of dialectal loanwords borrowing from any of the languages in the [[TheSoundOfMartialMusic [[UsefulNotes/TheSoundOfMartialMusic Austro-Hungarian Empire]] and [[YiddishAsASecondLanguage Yiddish]].
3rd Jul '16 2:14:15 PM gewunomox
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* On a related note, BAP made a version of several BobDylan's songs in their dialect of Cologne, i.e. Kölsch. They had told him about it, and allegedly he liked it, but as some people pointed out, Bob Dylan doesn't understand Kölsch.

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* On a related note, BAP made a version of several BobDylan's Music/BobDylan's songs in their dialect of Cologne, i.e. Kölsch. They had told him about it, and allegedly he liked it, but as some people pointed out, Bob Dylan doesn't understand Kölsch.
27th Jun '16 1:06:42 AM FurryKef
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German Dialects can be a problem even to native German speakers. It's especially problematic in more remote and rural areas, where schoolteachers who have moved from other regions can't understand their pupils at all. TV documentaries sometimes have Standard German subtitles or voice-over because the people featured in them speak a dialect that is incomprehensible to the majority of viewers.

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German Dialects dialects can be a problem even to native German speakers. It's especially problematic in more remote and rural areas, where schoolteachers who have moved from other regions can't understand their pupils at all. TV documentaries sometimes have Standard German subtitles or voice-over because the people featured in them speak a dialect that is incomprehensible to the majority of viewers.



** Was also spoken by noone lesser but Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe, as is visible in the lines "Ach neige / du Schmerzensreiche..." from ''Theatre/{{Faust}}''. In standard German, this would make a PainfulRhyme, but in Hessian, it's smooth. And the character saying it (Gretchen) would definitely speak dialect.

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** Was also spoken by noone lesser but no one less than Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe, as is visible in the lines "Ach neige / du Schmerzensreiche..." from ''Theatre/{{Faust}}''. In standard German, this would make a PainfulRhyme, but in Hessian, it's smooth. And the character saying it (Gretchen) would definitely speak dialect.
25th Jun '16 1:56:29 AM Morgenthaler
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* The German dub of ''CountDuckula'' has Goosewing speaking Saxon dialect. And in the episode when a Scottish guy appeared, they made him speak ''Bavarian'' dialect. "Ein Fuchzgerl!"

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* The German dub of ''CountDuckula'' ''WesternAnimation/CountDuckula'' has Goosewing speaking Saxon dialect. And in the episode when a Scottish guy appeared, they made him speak ''Bavarian'' dialect. "Ein Fuchzgerl!"
7th Jun '16 7:33:43 AM Doug86
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* Alemannisch: Another southwestern dialect, spoken in Baden (which prides itself on not being Swabian) and French Elsass/Alsace (Alsatian, as in the type of dog known as a German Shepherd in the United States for reasons relating to UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne). Since both Swabian and Alemannisch are spoken in the state of Baden-Württemberg (known for innovative science and industry), the state had a bit of fun with an ad campaign that ran, "Wir können alles. Außer Hochdeutsch." ("We can do anything. Except speak Standard German.") Alemannisch is related to...

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* Alemannisch: Another southwestern dialect, spoken in Baden (which prides itself on not being Swabian) and French Elsass/Alsace (Alsatian, as in the type of dog known as a German Shepherd in the United States for reasons relating to UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne).UsefulNotes/WorldWarI). Since both Swabian and Alemannisch are spoken in the state of Baden-Württemberg (known for innovative science and industry), the state had a bit of fun with an ad campaign that ran, "Wir können alles. Außer Hochdeutsch." ("We can do anything. Except speak Standard German.") Alemannisch is related to...



As a result of UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, several million Germans were kicked out from the area east of Oder-Neiße-line, the new German-Polish border, as well as from many other areas of Eastern and Eastern Central Europe. Thus, these dialects were from then on just spoken by older refugees and nowadays almost completely disappeared.

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As a result of UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, several million Germans were kicked out from the area east of Oder-Neiße-line, the new German-Polish border, as well as from many other areas of Eastern and Eastern Central Europe. Thus, these dialects were from then on just spoken by older refugees and nowadays almost completely disappeared.
17th Apr '16 7:49:14 PM karstovich2
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** Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch: Or Pennsylvania German, spoken by the so-called "Pennsylvania Dutch" (who are actually German) and UsefulNotes/{{Amish}} communities of the United States. Since they moved to the US in the 18th and 19th centuries, there has been some divergence, but a Palatinate speaker can still carry a conversation with an Amish person if he/she sticks to dialect.

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** Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch: Or Pennsylvania German, spoken by the so-called "Pennsylvania Dutch" (who are actually German) and UsefulNotes/{{Amish}} communities of the United States. Since they moved to the US in the 18th and 19th centuries, there has been some divergence, but a Palatinate speaker can still carry a conversation with an Amish person or other speaker of Pennsylvania German if he/she sticks to dialect.
17th Apr '16 7:43:01 PM karstovich2
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** Austria itself has several distinct dialects, which confuses matters even more. "I hoaß" is the way it's said in Salzburg, northern Styria, northern Tyrol, parts of Upper and Lower Austria and Burgenland (when not yet superseded by the Viennese "â"), but not in Vienna and areas influenced by the Viennese dialect, where people say "I hâß".
*** Vienna itself has a few different dialects. The most distinguishable is the Meidlinger Dialect, which is the common, working class dialect, and famous for the "Meidlinger L", a sound even most non-Viennese Austrians can't replicate. The other major Viennese dialect, now almost extinct, is "Schönbrunner Deutsch", spoken by the nobility, which sounds completely different. The general Viennese dialect is rather closer to "understandable" German than the Alpine districts, having less vowel shifts and hardly any consonant shifts (also, being the capital, Viennese have more reason to be understandable internationally), but still has a lot of dialectal loanwords borrowing from any of the languages in the [[TheSoundOfMartialMusic Austro-Hungarian Empire]] and [[YiddishAsASecondLanguage Yiddish]].
*** There is also Tyrolean, which is a term used for the whole of Tyrol, but actually mostly applies to Innsbruck (the capital) and surrounding areas, where consonants almost underwent another consonant shift: several consonants hardened (f.e. "k" to almost "kch") and vowels darkened ("a" -> "o" instead of "â" (standard Oberbairisch)). Also, the Germanic "s" (pronounced as "sch") was retained in some areas, resulting in pronunciations of "bist" as "bischt".

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** Austria itself has several distinct dialects, which confuses matters even more. As an example: "I hoaß" (i.e. as in Bavaria) is the way it's said in Salzburg, northern Styria, northern Tyrol, parts of Upper and Lower Austria and Burgenland (when not yet superseded by the Viennese "â"), but not in Vienna and areas influenced by the Viennese dialect, where people say "I hâß".
*** ** The city of Vienna itself has a few different dialects. The most distinguishable is the Meidlinger Dialect, which is the common, working class dialect, and famous for the "Meidlinger L", a sound even most non-Viennese Austrians can't replicate. The other major Viennese dialect, now almost extinct, is "Schönbrunner Deutsch", spoken by the nobility, which sounds completely different. dialects:
***
The general Viennese dialect is rather closer to "understandable" German than the Alpine districts, having less vowel shifts and hardly any consonant shifts (also, being the capital, Viennese have more reason to be understandable internationally), but still has a lot of dialectal loanwords borrowing from any of the languages in the [[TheSoundOfMartialMusic Austro-Hungarian Empire]] and [[YiddishAsASecondLanguage Yiddish]].
*** The most distinct Viennese dialect is the Meidlinger Dialect, which is the common, working class dialect, and famous for the "Meidlinger L", a sound even most non-Viennese Austrians can't replicate.
*** The other major Viennese dialect, now almost extinct, is "Schönbrunner Deutsch", spoken by the nobility, which sounds completely different. It is named after the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sch%C3%B6nbrunn_Palace Schönbrunn Palace]], the former seat of the Habsburg monarchs, for it was their dialect of German as well.
**
There is also Tyrolean, which is a term used for the whole of Tyrol, but actually mostly applies to Innsbruck (the capital) and surrounding areas, where consonants almost underwent another consonant shift: several consonants hardened (f.e. "k" to almost "kch") and vowels darkened ("a" -> "o" instead of "â" (standard Oberbairisch)). Also, the Germanic "s" (pronounced as "sch") was retained in some areas, resulting in pronunciations of "bist" as "bischt".
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