History UsefulNotes / CanadianPolitics

20th Mar '17 6:34:51 AM Rationalinsanity
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A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be "Rockefeller Republicans" when there was still such a thing in Congress, right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and local control, while remaining much more socially liberal and secular compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson.

to:

A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be "Rockefeller Republicans" when there was still such a thing in Congress, right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, Sanders,, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and local control, while remaining much more socially liberal and secular compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson.
9th Feb '17 11:30:54 AM Jhonny
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A real sex scandal occurred in 2016 when Liberal Fisheries minister Hunter Tootoo was resigned from his cabinet post and removed from the Liberal caucus (thus sitting as an independent MP). While the initial reports were that it was due to issues with alcohol (for which Tootoo entered rehab), it later surfaced that a significant factor earning Prime Minister Trudeau's ire had been Tootoo sleeping with a staffer, who had been found by security trashing his parliamentary office. While the affair alone would generally been dismissed as a minor offense, it was soon reported that the reason she was trashing the office in fury was her discovery that Tootoo had also been sleeping with ''her mother''. The government has never officially commented on the story and, in Canadian fashion, once he'd resigned and thrown out of caucus to become an unimportant independent backbencher, the media didn't bother pursuing the case as it was considered a private matter and no longer relevant.

to:

A real sex scandal occurred in 2016 when Liberal Fisheries minister Hunter Tootoo was resigned from his cabinet post and removed from the Liberal caucus (thus sitting as an independent MP). While the initial reports were that it was due to issues with alcohol (for which Tootoo entered rehab), it later surfaced that a significant factor earning Prime Minister Trudeau's ire had been Tootoo sleeping with a staffer, who had been found by security trashing his parliamentary office. While the affair alone would generally have been dismissed as a minor offense, it was soon reported that the reason she was trashing the office in fury was her discovery that Tootoo had also been sleeping with ''her mother''. The government has never officially commented on the story and, in Canadian fashion, once he'd resigned and thrown out of caucus to become an unimportant independent backbencher, the media didn't bother pursuing the case as it was considered a private matter and no longer relevant.
8th Feb '17 10:03:21 PM KeithM
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Added DiffLines:

A real sex scandal occurred in 2016 when Liberal Fisheries minister Hunter Tootoo was resigned from his cabinet post and removed from the Liberal caucus (thus sitting as an independent MP). While the initial reports were that it was due to issues with alcohol (for which Tootoo entered rehab), it later surfaced that a significant factor earning Prime Minister Trudeau's ire had been Tootoo sleeping with a staffer, who had been found by security trashing his parliamentary office. While the affair alone would generally been dismissed as a minor offense, it was soon reported that the reason she was trashing the office in fury was her discovery that Tootoo had also been sleeping with ''her mother''. The government has never officially commented on the story and, in Canadian fashion, once he'd resigned and thrown out of caucus to become an unimportant independent backbencher, the media didn't bother pursuing the case as it was considered a private matter and no longer relevant.
8th Oct '16 10:13:00 PM DustSnitch
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One significant difference when it comes to individual politicians compared to the United States is that there is no equivalent in Canadian constitutional law to the “natural-born citizen” requirement for President and Vice-President, and in general Parliament (and some of the provincial legislatures) will have a higher number of naturalized immigrants than jurisdictions in the United States. As of February 2010, there were more Muslims sitting in Parliament (all of them foreign-born, including one who was a veteran combat pilot in the Pakistani Air Force) than had ever been in Congress, as well as 15 Sikhs, most of them immigrants as well. Four prime ministers (including the first, John A. Macdonald, and most recently John Turner, PM for less than three months in 1984[[note]]He succeeded Pierre Trudeau when the latter resigned the Liberal leadership, and in that fall’s election, the Progressive Conservatives [[CurbStompBattle cleaned his clock]].[[/note]]) were born outside Canada, albeit all in the United Kingdom. The previous two Governors-General (Adrienne Clarkson and Michaëlle Jean) were also immigrants (from China — well, UsefulNotes/HongKong[[note]]Clarkson, born Adrienne Poy, was married to the English-born academic Stephen Clarkson from 1963 to 1965 and retained his name after their divorce.[[/note]] — and Haiti, respectively). As well, following the 2015 election, five ministers are immigrants to Canada, including the first Sikh to command a regiment in the Canadian Forces ([[http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/11/06/harjit-sajjan-defence-min_0_n_8486412.html who is a major]] {{Badass}})[[note]]Fun fact: There are currently more Sikhs in the Canadian cabinet than in the Indian cabinet[[/note]].

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One significant difference when it comes to individual politicians compared to the United States is that there is no equivalent in Canadian constitutional law to the “natural-born citizen” requirement for President and Vice-President, and in general Parliament (and some of the provincial legislatures) will have a higher number of naturalized immigrants than jurisdictions in the United States. As of February 2010, there were more Muslims sitting in Parliament (all of them foreign-born, including one who was a veteran combat pilot in the Pakistani Air Force) than had ever been in Congress, as well as 15 Sikhs, most of them immigrants as well. Four prime ministers (including the first, John A. Macdonald, and most recently John Turner, PM for less than three months in 1984[[note]]He succeeded Pierre Trudeau when the latter resigned the Liberal leadership, and in that fall’s election, the Progressive Conservatives [[CurbStompBattle cleaned his clock]].[[/note]]) were born outside Canada, albeit all in the United Kingdom. The previous two Governors-General (Adrienne Clarkson and Michaëlle Jean) were also immigrants (from China — well, UsefulNotes/HongKong[[note]]Clarkson, born Adrienne Poy, was married to the English-born academic Stephen Clarkson from 1963 to 1965 and retained his name after their divorce.[[/note]] — and Haiti, respectively). As well, following the 2015 election, five ministers are immigrants to Canada, including the first Sikh to command a regiment in the Canadian Forces ([[http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/11/06/harjit-sajjan-defence-min_0_n_8486412.html who is a major]] {{Badass}})[[note]]Fun badass)[[note]]Fun fact: There are currently more Sikhs in the Canadian cabinet than in the Indian cabinet[[/note]].
8th Oct '16 7:22:52 PM DavidDelony
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A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and local control, while remaining much more socially liberal and secular compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson.

to:

A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be "Rockefeller Republicans" when there was still such a thing in Congress, right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and local control, while remaining much more socially liberal and secular compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson.
30th Sep '16 7:13:00 PM craigbear
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Provincial politics tends to also have the Conservatives, Liberals, and NDP as the primary parties, though there are exceptions: the Conservative Party of Saskatchewan imploded in corruption scandals and [[SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute was replaced by]] the Saskatchewan Party, the B.C. Liberal Party is in practice [[EnemyMine a merger between the Liberals and Conservatives]] in opposition to the powerful B.C. NDP, the 2012 Alberta provincial election saw the rise of the ultraconservative Wild Rose Party to counter the leftward shift of the provincial Progressive Conservatives, and Quebec politics is [[MindScrew just plain weird]].[[note]]It features the Parti Québécois (PQ), the Quebec Liberal Party (PLQ), and the recently-formed Coalition Avenir Québec ([[FunWithAcronyms CAQ]]). The first is the separatist party, and is slightly left-leaning. The second is federalist, and is slightly right-leaning. The third is vaguely described as either centre-right (according to the media) or [[BlueAndOrangeMorality neither of the right or left]] (according to their own leadership). The CAQ claims to eschew the entire federalism-separatism debate, and has lately been poaching voter support and [=MNAs=] from the Liberals, the PQ, and the defunct ADQ. One thing to note: Quebec is somewhat to the left of Canada in general, notably on social issues, and as such, the Quebec Liberal Party is very similar to the federal Conservative Party; indeed, the former Premier of Quebec, Jean Charest, rose to prominence as a Progressive Conservative Cabinet minister in the 1980s government of Brian Mulroney — and even became the leader of the party after the 1993 wipeout — before becoming leader of the Quebec Liberals.[[/note]] The NDP does frequently win in provincial elections, especially in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and B.C. Alberta is also an interesting case — having been a province since 1905, they have experienced only three changes of government, one during the Depression, one after popular premier Ernest Manning (father of Reform Party founder Preston Manning) resigned and succeeded by Harry Strom, who was not nearly as skillful, and the latest being because of the introduction of an unpopular budget that resulted in the shocking election of a NDP majority government. From 1971 to 2015, a string of PC leaders [[LandslideElection won a majority in every election]], to the point where Alberta was routinely considered a one-party state, and it was [[SeriousBusiness only half a joke]].[[note]]Alberta had never gone back to a party after voting it out of power and the Conservative Party had the longest string of elections, the only comparable run being the 1935–71 Social Creditors, whom the [=PCs=] had themselves eliminated.[[/note]]

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Provincial politics tends to also have the Conservatives, Liberals, and NDP as the primary parties, though there are exceptions: the Conservative Party of Saskatchewan imploded in corruption scandals and [[SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute was replaced by]] the Saskatchewan Party, the B.C. Liberal Party is in practice [[EnemyMine a merger between the Liberals and Conservatives]] in opposition to the powerful B.C. NDP, the 2012 Alberta provincial election saw the rise of the ultraconservative Wild Rose Party to counter the leftward shift of the provincial Progressive Conservatives, and Quebec politics is [[MindScrew just plain weird]].[[note]]It features the Parti Québécois (PQ), the Quebec Liberal Party (PLQ), and the recently-formed Coalition Avenir Québec ([[FunWithAcronyms CAQ]]). The first is the separatist party, and is slightly left-leaning. The second is federalist, and is slightly right-leaning. The third is vaguely described as either centre-right (according to the media) or [[BlueAndOrangeMorality neither of the right or left]] (according to their own leadership). In actual effect, however, the provincial parties in Quebec all have left, right and moderate factions, united more by their position on the sovereignty question than anything else. The CAQ claims to eschew the entire federalism-separatism debate, and has lately been poaching voter support and [=MNAs=] from the Liberals, the PQ, and the defunct ADQ. One thing to note: Quebec is somewhat to the left of Canada in general, notably on social issues, and as such, the Quebec Liberal Party is very similar to the federal Conservative Party; indeed, the former Premier of Quebec, Jean Charest, rose to prominence as a Progressive Conservative Cabinet minister in the 1980s government of Brian Mulroney — and even became the leader of the party after the 1993 wipeout — before becoming leader of the Quebec Liberals.[[/note]] The NDP does frequently win in provincial elections, especially in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and B.C. Alberta is also an interesting case — having been a province since 1905, they have experienced only three changes of government, one during the Depression, one after popular premier Ernest Manning (father of Reform Party founder Preston Manning) resigned and succeeded by Harry Strom, who was not nearly as skillful, and the latest being because of the introduction of an unpopular budget that resulted in the shocking election of a NDP majority government. From 1971 to 2015, a string of PC leaders [[LandslideElection won a majority in every election]], to the point where Alberta was routinely considered a one-party state, and it was [[SeriousBusiness only half a joke]].[[note]]Alberta had never gone back to a party after voting it out of power and the Conservative Party had the longest string of elections, the only comparable run being the 1935–71 Social Creditors, whom the [=PCs=] had themselves eliminated.[[/note]]
30th Sep '16 7:00:58 PM craigbear
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In practice, Canadians know what candidate a party will nominate for Prime Minister during the election cycle: by [[LikeYouWouldReallyDoIt so-far-unbroken]] convention, it is the party leader. In the readily possible event that the Prime Minister loses his/her riding, a junior member of the party will typically resign his/her seat for the party leader to win in a by-election, as the Prime Minister must have a seat to serve in the government. This happened as early as the 1870s, after John A. Macdonald’s Conservative government collapsed over the Canadian Pacific Railway scandal (see below) and he lost his own seat in Kingston, Ontario. From 1878 to 1882, he represented the riding of Victoria in British Columbia, since he couldn’t get elected in the part of the country he came from.

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In practice, Canadians know what candidate a party will nominate for Prime Minister during the election cycle: by [[LikeYouWouldReallyDoIt so-far-unbroken]] convention, it is the party leader. In the readily possible event that the Prime Minister loses his/her riding, a junior member of the party will typically resign his/her seat for the party leader to win in a by-election, as the Prime Minister must is normally expected to have a seat to serve in the government. government.[[note]]although it is possible for a prime minister to serve without holding a seat in the House of Commons (see John Turner, 1984), a prime minister without a seat would face public concern about his democratic legitimacy.[[/note]] This happened as early as the 1870s, after John A. Macdonald’s Conservative government collapsed over the Canadian Pacific Railway scandal (see below) and he lost his own seat in Kingston, Ontario. From 1878 to 1882, he represented the riding of Victoria in British Columbia, since he couldn’t get elected in the part of the country he came from.
30th Sep '16 6:56:44 PM craigbear
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* The '''House of Commons of Canada''' has 338 members,[[note]]From the 1993 elections until 2015, there were 308.[[/note]] all elected to represent districts known as “ridings” for a variable term not to exceed five years (in practice, it’s usually four for a majority government and less than two for a minority), with no limit on how often they may be re-elected. The size of this body varies, and in practice, it increases size every decade after each census. Since the Canadian government is much more centralized (in certain areas) compared to their American counterparts, the House of Commons is responsible for passing laws relating to the postal service, the census, the military, navigation and shipping, fishing, currency, banking, weights and measures, criminal law, bankruptcy, copyrights, patents, First Nations, and naturalization. Only education, provincial officers, municipal government, charitable institutions, and a few other strictly local or private avenues are at the jurisdiction of the local and provincial legislatures. (Of course, "private avenues" includes most of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_law private law]] in Canada, which as any lawyer will tell you forms the bulk of actual law in any country.)

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* The '''House of Commons of Canada''' has 338 members,[[note]]From the 1993 2004 elections until 2015, there were 308.[[/note]] all elected to represent districts known as “ridings” for a variable term not to exceed five years (in practice, it’s usually four for a majority government and less than two for a minority), with no limit on how often they may be re-elected. The size of this body varies, and in practice, it increases size every decade after each census. Since the Canadian government is much more centralized (in certain areas) compared to their American counterparts, the House of Commons is responsible for passing laws relating to the postal service, the census, the military, navigation and shipping, fishing, currency, banking, weights and measures, criminal law, bankruptcy, copyrights, patents, First Nations, and naturalization. Only education, provincial officers, municipal government, charitable institutions, and a few other strictly local or private avenues are at the jurisdiction of the local and provincial legislatures. (Of course, "private avenues" includes most of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_law private law]] in Canada, which as any lawyer will tell you forms the bulk of actual law in any country.)
21st Sep '16 3:47:26 PM DavidDelony
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A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and fewer regulations, while remaining much more socially liberal compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson.

to:

A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and fewer regulations, local control, while remaining much more socially liberal and secular compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson.
21st Sep '16 9:13:56 AM DavidDelony
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A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and fewer regulations, while remaining much more socially liberal compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson

to:

A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and fewer regulations, while remaining much more socially liberal compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson
Johnson.
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