History UsefulNotes / CanadianPolitics

21st Sep '16 3:47:26 PM DavidDelony
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A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and fewer regulations, while remaining much more socially liberal compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson.

to:

A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and fewer regulations, local control, while remaining much more socially liberal and secular compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson.
21st Sep '16 9:13:56 AM DavidDelony
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A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and fewer regulations, while remaining much more socially liberal compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson

to:

A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders, Dennis Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and fewer regulations, while remaining much more socially liberal compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson
Johnson.
20th Sep '16 6:01:36 PM DavidDelony
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However 2015 had another shift. After the longest election campaign since the 19th century (78 days, which may seem quaint to other countries), the balance of power shifted ''again'', though unlike the previous election, many noted this to be more of a [[StatusQuoIsGod return to a previous equilibrium]]. In a stunning electoral win, the Liberal Party of Canada gained 184 seats from 34, a feat unprecedented in Canadian history, making Justin Trudeau Prime Minister, having won several seats in every province as well as sweeping the Atlantic Provinces and all three territories. The Conservatives were reduced to 99 seats with several influential ministers losing their seats. Finally, the NDP dropped to a mere 44 seats, losing to the Liberals several of what they considered very safe seats.

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However 2015 had another shift. After the longest election campaign since the 19th century (78 days, which may seem quaint to [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem other countries), countries]]), the balance of power shifted ''again'', though unlike the previous election, many noted this to be more of a [[StatusQuoIsGod return to a previous equilibrium]]. In a stunning electoral win, the Liberal Party of Canada gained 184 seats from 34, a feat unprecedented in Canadian history, making Justin Trudeau Prime Minister, having won several seats in every province as well as sweeping the Atlantic Provinces and all three territories. The Conservatives were reduced to 99 seats with several influential ministers losing their seats. Finally, the NDP dropped to a mere 44 seats, losing to the Liberals several of what they considered very safe seats.
20th Sep '16 5:45:21 PM DavidDelony
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A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]]. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders or Dennis Kucinich, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and fewer regulations, while remaining much more socially liberal compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson

to:

A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]].center]], as it is in Western Europe. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders or Sanders, Dennis Kucinich, Kucinich or Jill Stein, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and fewer regulations, while remaining much more socially liberal compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson
20th Sep '16 5:43:15 PM DavidDelony
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A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]]. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders or Dennis Kucinich, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers.

to:

A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]]. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders or Dennis Kucinich, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers.
backbenchers. Canadian conservatives tend to be fiscally conservative, supporting low taxes and fewer regulations, while remaining much more socially liberal compared to their American counterparts. Their closest relatives on the U.S. right are libertarians like UsefulNotes/RonPaul or Gary Johnson
20th Sep '16 5:35:30 PM DavidDelony
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A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]]. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate “Rockefeller Republicans” in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders or Dennis Kucinich, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers.

to:

A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]]. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate “Rockefeller Republicans” Democrats like UsefulNotes/BarackObama, UsefulNotes/JoeBiden or UsefulNotes/HillaryClinton in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders or Dennis Kucinich, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers.
20th Sep '16 5:31:59 PM DavidDelony
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A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]]. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate “Rockefeller Republicans” in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders or Dennis Kucinich, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers.

to:

A thing of note for American readers: as a rule, the Canadian political ‘centre’ (as used to describe parties here) is to the left of [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem the American center]]. Canadian conservatives might be right-leaning “Blue Dog Democrats” or moderate “Rockefeller Republicans” in the USA, while the Liberals’ politics are closer to those of the left wing of the Democrats (e.g. Nancy Pelosi).Pelosi or Elizabeth Warren). The NDP are to the left of anything mainstream in the USA; a few prominent names on the American version of the ‘extreme left’, such as Bernie Sanders or Dennis Kucinich, would probably be considered moderate progressives within the NDP. American-style social conservatism is conversely regarded as a fringe view, with the conservative politicians focusing on fiscal issues. Indeed, this was a bone of contention for some of Prime Minister Harper’s own, more [[MoralGuardians moralistic]], backbenchers.
11th Sep '16 3:40:14 AM shamblingdead2
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On the municipal level, in May 2013, reporters from the ''Toronto Star'' and gossip website ''Gawker'' reported that they had viewed and been offered a video showing Toronto Mayor Rob Ford [[DrugsAreBad smoking crack cocaine]] and making homophobic slurs. Though Ford had a well-documented history of mild to belligerent public intoxication, he [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial denied and evaded questions]] for several months — until, in October 2013, [[SeriousBusiness the Toronto police]] reported that they had recovered a deleted copy of what appears to be that same video from a hard drive seized in an anti-drug raid. Ford then changed his story and admitted to “probably” having used crack cocaine in the midst of a “drunken stupor,” while [[InsaneTrollLogic blaming the media for not asking the right questions]] (which they had, and he had ignored) and claiming to [[ImplausibleDeniability not be an addict]]. With Ford and several of his associates and assistants now under police investigation, Toronto City Council [[EnemyMine banded together]] to strip him of most of his powers (at least those which they could remove under provincial laws) along with his staff and budget, and shift them to the deputy mayor. Rob Ford has since responded by [[NeverMyFault playing the victim]] of a “coup d'état” while proudly going on to contest the 2014 municipal election. Not long after losing most of his mayoral powers, [[HereWeGoAgain another crack video surfaced, this time with screenshots]], forcing Mayor Ford to enter rehab. [[TenMinuteRetirement He continued to run for Mayor upon leaving rehab]], but a recent hospital visit has revealed an abdominal tumor. Mayor Ford withdrew from the mayoral race, opting to run for his old Ward 2 seat. Rob’s brother Doug (the current Ward 2 councillor) submitted his papers to run for mayor with one hour to spare before the nomination deadline. In the end, John Tory became the new mayor of Canada’s largest city.

to:

On the municipal level, in May 2013, reporters from the ''Toronto Star'' and gossip website ''Gawker'' reported that they had viewed and been offered a video showing Toronto Mayor Rob Ford [[DrugsAreBad smoking crack cocaine]] and making homophobic slurs. Though Ford had a well-documented history of mild to belligerent public intoxication, he [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial denied and evaded questions]] for several months — until, in October 2013, [[SeriousBusiness the Toronto police]] reported that they had recovered a deleted copy of what appears to be that same video from a hard drive seized in an anti-drug raid. Ford then changed his story and admitted to “probably” having used crack cocaine in the midst of a “drunken stupor,” while [[InsaneTrollLogic blaming the media for not asking the right questions]] (which they had, and he had ignored) and claiming to [[ImplausibleDeniability not be an addict]]. With Ford and several of his associates and assistants now under police investigation, Toronto City Council [[EnemyMine banded together]] to strip him of most of his powers (at least those which they could remove under provincial laws) along with his staff and budget, and shift them to the deputy mayor. Rob Ford has since responded by [[NeverMyFault playing the victim]] of a “coup d'état” while proudly going on to contest the 2014 municipal election. Not long after losing most of his mayoral powers, [[HereWeGoAgain another crack video surfaced, this time with screenshots]], forcing Mayor Ford to enter rehab. [[TenMinuteRetirement He continued to run for Mayor upon leaving rehab]], but a recent hospital visit has revealed an abdominal tumor. Mayor Ford withdrew from the mayoral race, opting to run for his old Ward 2 seat. He passed away March 22, 2016. Rob’s brother Doug (the current Ward 2 councillor) submitted his papers to run for mayor with one hour to spare before the nomination deadline. In the end, John Tory became the new mayor of Canada’s largest city.
5th Jul '16 11:08:40 AM trixus
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The environment has also become a [[IncrediblyLamePun hot]] topic in recent years. The Green Party has put environmental regulations at the center of their platforms, the NDP and Liberals also support reforms, and the Conservatives are more cautious, but still interested in, at minimum, seeming like they care. The Conservatives’ environment platform was effectively ‘We’ll Just See What the U.S. Does’, and the U.S. doesn’t seem to be doing much of anything, Canada won’t be doing much of anything with regards to the environment for the time being. It remains to be seen what the more explicitly pro-environment Liberal government will do on that file. In the meantime, the provinces are generally content to sit and bitch at each other about who gets what money. This has been described as “exactly like the European Union, just with more land”.

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The environment has also become a [[IncrediblyLamePun hot]] topic in recent years. The Green Party has put environmental regulations at the center of their platforms, the NDP and Liberals also support reforms, and the Conservatives are more cautious, but still interested in, at minimum, seeming like they care. The Conservatives’ environment platform was effectively ‘We’ll Just See What the U.S. Does’, and the U.S. doesn’t seem to be doing much of anything, Canada won’t be doing much of anything with regards to the environment for the time being. It remains to be seen what the more explicitly pro-environment Liberal government will do on that file. In the meantime, the provinces are generally content to sit and bitch at each other about who gets what money. This has been described as “exactly like the European Union, just with more land”.
land”. Under Harper, no provinces safe Québec reached their target for the Kyoto protocol and a few even skyrocketed their greenhouse gas emission since the Prime minister simply refused to follow the protocol's bindings.
20th Jun '16 5:21:22 AM MCanter89
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->''“If you put on too much weight? C’est la faute du fédéral!''[[note]]“It’s the fault of the federal [government]!” The song parodies the tendency of Canadian provincial governments (especially that of Quebec) to blame every little thing on the federal government.[[/note]]\\
''If you have a large prostate? C’est la faute du fédéral!”''

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->''“If you put on too much weight? C’est la faute du fédéral!''[[note]]“It’s the fault of the federal [government]!” The song parodies the tendency of Canadian provincial governments (especially that of Quebec) to blame every little thing on the federal government.[[/note]]\\
''If you have a large prostate? C’est la faute du fédéral!”''




* The '''House of Commons of Canada''' has 338 members,[[note]]From the 1993 elections until 2015, there were 308.[[/note]] all elected to represent districts known as “ridings” for a variable term not to exceed five years (in practice, it’s usually four for a majority government and less than two for a minority), with no limit on how often they may be re-elected. The size of this body varies, and in practice increases size every decade after each census. Since the Canadian government is much more centralized (in certain areas) compared to their American counterparts, the House of Commons is responsible for passing laws relating to the postal service, the census, the military, navigation and shipping, fishing, currency, banking, weights and measures, criminal law, bankruptcy, copyrights, patents, First Nations, and naturalization. Only education, provincial officers, municipal government, charitable institutions, and a few other strictly local or private avenues are at the jurisdiction of the local and provincial legislatures. (Of course, "private avenues" includes most of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_law private law]] in Canada, which as any lawyer will tell you forms the bulk of actual law in any country.)

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\n* The '''House of Commons of Canada''' has 338 members,[[note]]From the 1993 elections until 2015, there were 308.[[/note]] all elected to represent districts known as “ridings” for a variable term not to exceed five years (in practice, it’s usually four for a majority government and less than two for a minority), with no limit on how often they may be re-elected. The size of this body varies, and in practice practice, it increases size every decade after each census. Since the Canadian government is much more centralized (in certain areas) compared to their American counterparts, the House of Commons is responsible for passing laws relating to the postal service, the census, the military, navigation and shipping, fishing, currency, banking, weights and measures, criminal law, bankruptcy, copyrights, patents, First Nations, and naturalization. Only education, provincial officers, municipal government, charitable institutions, and a few other strictly local or private avenues are at the jurisdiction of the local and provincial legislatures. (Of course, "private avenues" includes most of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_law private law]] in Canada, which as any lawyer will tell you forms the bulk of actual law in any country.)



* The '''Canadian Senate''' has 105 members, all appointed — though in one case, the appointed Senator was chosen in a special election by the province he represents[[note]]That province is Alberta, and he joined the Red Chamber on the prime-ministerial watch of Stephen Harper, befitting the call for an elected upper chamber his old party regularly sounded.[[/note]] — and serving until age 75 (they were previously in for life; a law passed in 1965 changed this). The Senate has generally rubber-stamped legislation from the House of Commons for decades and is not allowed to introduce financial legislation. Technically, the Senate is the place for “sober second thought”, where the mobbish tendencies of democracy can be curbed and where legislation can be considered away from public pressure. The Senate can suggest changes to the bills, or delay a bill until it expires on the table, but it has almost never defeated one outright. The Senate, following a bit from its UsefulNotes/{{American|PoliticalSystem}} counterpart, also allows for some regional representation, where the number of senators from each province is much more equalized. Indeed, it's almost reversed in some ways, with the Western provinces having far fewer Senators than the Atlantic ones; as a result, Western premiers are the most likely to complain about Senatorial imbalance.\\

to:

* The '''Canadian Senate''' has 105 members, all appointed — though in one case, the appointed Senator was chosen in a special election by the province he represents[[note]]That province is Alberta, and he joined the Red Chamber on the prime-ministerial watch of Stephen Harper, befitting the call for an elected upper chamber his old party regularly sounded.[[/note]] — and serving until age 75 (they were previously in for life; a law passed in 1965 changed this). The Senate has generally rubber-stamped legislation from the House of Commons for decades and is not allowed to introduce financial legislation. Technically, the Senate is the place for “sober second thought”, where the mobbish tendencies of democracy can be curbed and where legislation can be considered away from public pressure. The Senate can suggest changes to the bills, bills or delay a bill until it expires on the table, but it has almost never defeated one outright. The Senate, following a bit from its UsefulNotes/{{American|PoliticalSystem}} counterpart, also allows for some regional representation, where the number of senators from each province is much more equalized. Indeed, it's almost reversed in some ways, with the Western provinces having far fewer Senators than the Atlantic ones; as a result, Western premiers are the most likely to complain about Senatorial imbalance.\\



* The '''Governor-General of Canada''', currently David Johnston, is the representative of the Sovereign, appointed in theory by the Sovereign and in practice by the Prime Minister, and has a mammoth assortment of powers, ranging from the ability to dissolve Parliament, appoint Senators, Supreme Court Justices, all high-ranking bureaucrats, and the Prime Minister and Cabinet, though they must keep the approval of the House of Commons. He is also Commander-in-Chief of the [[UsefulNotes/CanucksWithChinooks Canadian military]]. However, these powers are bound by a large amount of unwritten convention, and are almost never used except on instruction from the Prime Minister — the last time they were, in 1926, the resulting “King-Byng Affair” resulted in a massive public outcry that ended in the re-election of Prime Minister W.L. Mackenzie King, whom Governor-General Lord Byng had rejected[[note]]Mackenzie King was Prime MInister despite the fact that he didn't even have the most seats in the House of Commons. When he tried to ask Lord Byng to dissolve Parliament after it voted against his government and call an election, he refused and appointed Conservative Arthur Meighen as PM instead. Meighen fared no better, so an election was called, which Mackenzie King handily won[[/note]]. The Governor-General is, in theory, supposed to be chosen by the Sovereign from a list of candidates chosen by the Prime Minister. For quite some time now, the Prime Minister’s list of Governor-General appointees has been exactly one name long.

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* The '''Governor-General of Canada''', currently David Johnston, is the representative of the Sovereign, appointed in theory by the Sovereign and in practice by the Prime Minister, and has a mammoth assortment of powers, ranging from the ability to dissolve Parliament, appoint Senators, Supreme Court Justices, all high-ranking bureaucrats, and the Prime Minister and Cabinet, though they must keep the approval of the House of Commons. He is also Commander-in-Chief of the [[UsefulNotes/CanucksWithChinooks Canadian military]]. However, these powers are bound by a large amount of unwritten convention, and are almost never used except on instruction from the Prime Minister — the last time they were, in 1926, the resulting “King-Byng Affair” resulted in a massive public outcry that ended in the re-election of Prime Minister W.L. Mackenzie King, whom Governor-General Lord Byng had rejected[[note]]Mackenzie King was Prime MInister Minister despite the fact that he didn't even have the most seats in the House of Commons. When he tried to ask Lord Byng to dissolve Parliament after it voted against his government and call an election, he refused and appointed Conservative Arthur Meighen as PM instead. Meighen fared no better, so an election was called, which Mackenzie King handily won[[/note]]. The Governor-General is, in theory, supposed to be chosen by the Sovereign from a list of candidates chosen by the Prime Minister. For quite some time now, the Prime Minister’s list of Governor-General appointees has been exactly one name long.
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