History UsefulNotes / BritishPoliticalSystem

1st Aug '16 8:32:59 AM Karl304
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Sinn Féin is an abstentionist party, i.e. when its candidates win an election to the House of Commons, they refuse to take their seats as they would have to swear an oath of allegiance to the Crown. Sinn Féin also fields candidates across the border in the Republic of Ireland (where they do take their seats, but have historically done far worse; the 2011 elections did see a large improvement, however, and their candidate finished third, out of seven candidates, in the 2011 Presidential election). It is currently the only political party to actively operate in both the UK and Ireland.[[note]]Fianna Fáil are registered on both sides of the border but have never fielded candidates in Northern Ireland; while the Green Party in Northern Ireland is officially a branch office of the Republic's Green Party, but is completely autonomous.[[/note]]

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Sinn Féin is an abstentionist party, i.e. when its candidates win an election to the House of Commons, they refuse to take their seats as they would have to swear an oath of allegiance to the Crown. Sinn Féin also fields candidates across the border in the Republic of Ireland (where they do take their seats, but have historically done far worse; the 2011 elections did see a large improvement, however, and their candidate finished third, out of seven candidates, in the 2011 Presidential election). It is currently the only one of two political party parties to actively operate in both the UK and Ireland.[[note]]Fianna [[note]]The other being the People Before Profit Alliance, which contests elections in both Northern Ireland and the Republic. Fianna Fáil are registered on both sides of the border but have never fielded candidates in Northern Ireland; while the Green Party in Northern Ireland is officially a branch office of the Republic's Green Party, but is completely autonomous.autonomous of it.[[/note]]
29th Jul '16 6:53:06 PM JamesAustin
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->"Since [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reform_Act_1832 1832]] we have been gradually excluding the voter from government."
-->--Sir Humphrey Appleby, ''[[Series/YesMinister Yes, Prime Minister]]''
27th Jul '16 12:52:19 AM Karl304
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There are 650 elected [=MPs=], all but six of whom [[note]]Sylvia Hermon, Michelle Thomson, Natalie [=McGarry=], Simon Danczuk, Naz Shah and the Speaker[[/note]] are also members of a political party. Westminster is most near to a "two-and-a-half party" system, with the dominant parties being Labour and the Conservatives, and the perpetual third party the Liberal Democrats.

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There are 650 elected [=MPs=], all but six five of whom [[note]]Sylvia Hermon, Michelle Thomson, Natalie [=McGarry=], Simon Danczuk, Naz Shah Danczuk and the Speaker[[/note]] are also members of a political party. Westminster is most near to a "two-and-a-half party" system, with the dominant parties being Labour and the Conservatives, and the perpetual third party the Liberal Democrats.



* The '''Labour Party''' (231 [=MPs=], 20 [=MEPs=], 29 [=AMs=], 24 [=MSPs=]).\\

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* The '''Labour Party''' (231 (232 [=MPs=], 20 [=MEPs=], 29 [=AMs=], 24 [=MSPs=]).\\



* '''Independents''' (5 [=MPs=][[note]]Sylvia Hermon (North Down), Michelle Thomson (Edinburgh West), Natalie [=McGarry=] (Glasgow East), Simon Danczuk (Rochdale), Naz Shah (Bradford West)[[/note]], 1 [=MEP=][[note]]Janice Atkinson (Southeast England)[[/note]], 3 [=MSPs=][[note]]John Finnie (Highlands and Islands), Jean Urquhart (Highlands and Islands), John Wilson (Central Scotland)[[/note]], 2 [=MLAs=][[note]]John [=McCallister=] (South Down), Claire Sugden (East Londonderry)[[/note]]): a small part of political process, mostly being in the legislatures from elected for local issues (such as Dr. Richard Taylor, who was elected an MP in 2001 and 2005 to save his local hospital), from leaving their own party in protest to some issue (such as Sylvia Hermon, who was an ex-UUP member), or being kicked out of their own party for misbehaviour.

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* '''Independents''' (5 (4 [=MPs=][[note]]Sylvia Hermon (North Down), Michelle Thomson (Edinburgh West), Natalie [=McGarry=] (Glasgow East), Simon Danczuk (Rochdale), Naz Shah (Bradford West)[[/note]], (Rochdale)[[/note]], 1 [=MEP=][[note]]Janice Atkinson (Southeast England)[[/note]], 3 [=MSPs=][[note]]John Finnie (Highlands and Islands), Jean Urquhart (Highlands and Islands), John Wilson (Central Scotland)[[/note]], 2 [=MLAs=][[note]]John [=McCallister=] (South Down), Claire Sugden (East Londonderry)[[/note]]): a small part of political process, mostly being in the legislatures from elected for local issues (such as Dr. Richard Taylor, who was elected an MP in 2001 and 2005 to save his local hospital), from leaving their own party in protest to some issue (such as Sylvia Hermon, who was an ex-UUP member), or being kicked out of their own party for misbehaviour.
18th Jul '16 1:42:54 AM mrthischarmingman2
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They are traditionally popular in the South-East of England and rural areas. The party colour is blue, and their icon appears to be a child's drawing of a tree, supposedly an attempt by Cameron to emphasise the party's environmentalist credentials; it also harks back to the traditional symbol of Toryism, the Royal Oak. From 1975 to 2006, the symbol was a torch of liberty. They are popularly known as the "'''Tories'''", a term that [[AppropriatedAppellation originally was an insult against Irish cattle thieves]] and which was the name of the modern party's forebear. The current leader is UsefulNotes/DavidCameron, who has modernised the party, but the most famous member is probably former Mayor of London, UsefulNotes/BorisJohnson, famous for [[ColbertBump his appearances on the show]] ''Series/HaveIGotNewsForYou''. Has a substantial {{Hatedom}} they gained under UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher that they've never got rid off, to the point where the Tories are seriously seen by a substantial amount (mainly northerners and the working class) of the population as evil incarnate.\\

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They are traditionally popular in the South-East of England and rural areas. The party colour is blue, and their icon appears to be a child's drawing of a tree, supposedly an attempt by Cameron to emphasise the party's environmentalist credentials; it also harks back to the traditional symbol of Toryism, the Royal Oak. From 1975 to 2006, the symbol was a torch of liberty. They are popularly known as the "'''Tories'''", a term that [[AppropriatedAppellation originally was an insult against Irish cattle thieves]] and which was the name of the modern party's forebear. The current leader is UsefulNotes/TheresaMay, who assumed leadership after the resignation of UsefulNotes/DavidCameron, who has modernised the party, but the most famous member is probably former Mayor of London, UsefulNotes/BorisJohnson, famous for [[ColbertBump his appearances on the show]] ''Series/HaveIGotNewsForYou''. Has a substantial {{Hatedom}} they gained under UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher that they've never got rid off, to the point where the Tories are seriously seen by a substantial amount (mainly northerners and the working class) of the population as evil incarnate.\\
11th Jul '16 1:57:11 PM Karl304
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* The Scottish Parliament and Government is run by the Scottish National Party (SNP), who've managed to win a reasonable majority and give up their supply-and-confidence agreements with the Greens and Lib Dems. Rather impressive given the mixed constituency/list system specifically meant to prevent majority governments (a virtually identical one has done so in [[PoliticalSystemOfGermany Germany]] for ''sixty-three years'', with only one exception).
* The Welsh Assembly Government is run by Labour. Labour won exactly 30 seats in the 60 seat assembly, falling one short of the 50% + 1 traditional majority. Since there wouldn't be much point sacrificing most of their power to a kingmaker just for a single seat, Labour runs as a minority government.
* The Northern Ireland Assembly and Executive is run by a coalition of the Democratic Unionist Party and Sinn Féin. Northern Irish politics virtually require that the Executive must always be formed from a Unionist (or Protestant) and a Nationalist (or Catholic) party, although the DUP and SF (being at rather polar ends of unionism and republicanism respectively) make rather strange bedfellows. The DUP supplanted the UUP as the main Unionist party, and Sinn Féin supplanted the SDLP as the main Nationalist party over the 2000s.

The last GLA elections were in 2016. The Assembly is under no overall control (the biggest party is Labour with 12 out of the 25 seats). The current Mayor of London is Labour's Sadiq Khan, who upon election in May 2016 became the first Muslim mayor of a major Western capital, as well as the politician with the largest personal mandate in the history of the United Kingdom.

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* The Scottish Parliament and Government is run by the Scottish National Party (SNP), who've managed to win a reasonable who lost their overall majority in the 2016 elections, and give up their supply-and-confidence agreements with the Greens and Lib Dems. Rather impressive given the mixed constituency/list system specifically meant to prevent majority governments (a virtually identical one has done so in [[PoliticalSystemOfGermany Germany]] for ''sixty-three years'', with only one exception).
now operate as a single-party minority government, holding 63 out of 129 seats.
* The Welsh Assembly Government is run by Labour. Labour won exactly 30 29 seats in the 60 seat assembly, falling one short of the 50% + 1 traditional majority. Since there wouldn't be much point sacrificing most of their power to a kingmaker just for a single seat, To get round this, Labour runs as a minority government.
have incorporated Wales' only remaining Liberal Democrat AM into the Cabinet.
* The Northern Ireland Assembly and Executive is run by a coalition of the Democratic Unionist Party and Sinn Féin. Northern Irish politics virtually require that the Executive must always be formed from a Unionist (or Protestant) and a Nationalist (or Catholic) party, although the DUP and SF (being at rather polar ends of unionism and republicanism respectively) make rather strange bedfellows. The DUP supplanted the UUP as the main Unionist party, and Sinn Féin supplanted the SDLP as the main Nationalist party over in the 2000s.

mid-2000s.
*
The last GLA elections were in 2016. The Greater London Assembly is under no overall control (the control, but with Labour as the biggest party is Labour with party, holding 12 out of the 25 seats).seats. The current Mayor of London is Labour's Sadiq Khan, who upon election in May 2016 became the first Muslim mayor of a major Western capital, as well as the politician with the largest personal mandate in the history of the United Kingdom.
11th Jul '16 9:31:35 AM Karl304
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* The '''Conservative Party''' (331 [=MPs=][[note]]Including the Speaker[[/note]], 19 [=MEPs=], 31 [=MSPs=], 11 [=AMs=]): Formally the Conservative and Unionist Party, indicating their position on UsefulNotes/TheIrishQuestion, although hardly anyone ever remembers this. The party which currently has the PM and the Cabinet (Executive Branch). The traditional party for rural voters, suburban voters, middle classes, the aspirational working class/Nouveau Riche types, and the wealthy. For a long time associated with the "ruling class" and the "establishment", they have tended to take a more populist approach to politics in recent years, especially during the UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher years and under Cameron's leadership, and are usually perceived these days as a centre-right party with a middle-class focus and classical liberal economic tendencies.[[note]]And they actually mean their rhetoric. Especially under Thatcher and Cameron, the Tories enacted/are enacting wide-ranging cuts to attempt to close the deficit.[[/note]] They've moved towards the middle in recent years, although they still have some right-wing traditionalist opinions. The popular opinion between 1997 and 2015 was that there was very little difference between them and Labour.\\

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* The '''Conservative Party''' (331 [=MPs=][[note]]Including the Speaker[[/note]], 19 [=MEPs=], 31 [=MSPs=], 11 [=AMs=]): [=AMs=]).\\
[[AC:Current Leader: Theresa May (MP, Maidenhead).]]\\
Formally the Conservative and Unionist Party, indicating their position on UsefulNotes/TheIrishQuestion, although hardly anyone ever remembers this. The party which currently has the PM and the Cabinet (Executive Branch). The traditional party for rural voters, suburban voters, middle classes, the aspirational working class/Nouveau Riche types, and the wealthy. For a long time associated with the "ruling class" and the "establishment", they have tended to take a more populist approach to politics in recent years, especially during the UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher years and under Cameron's leadership, and are usually perceived these days as a centre-right party with a middle-class focus and classical liberal economic tendencies.[[note]]And they actually mean their rhetoric. Especially under Thatcher and Cameron, the Tories enacted/are enacting wide-ranging cuts to attempt to close the deficit.[[/note]] They've moved towards the middle in recent years, although they still have some right-wing traditionalist opinions. The popular opinion between 1997 and 2015 was that there was very little difference between them and Labour.\\



* The '''Labour Party''' (231 [=MPs=], 20 [=MEPs=], 29 [=AMs=], 24 [=MSPs=]): Started off as a socialist, working man's party (hence the name) but became increasingly concerned with more liberal middle-class issues in the late 1980s and moved closer to the centre under Neil Kinnock and especially Tony Blair.[[note]]We've skipped over a thumping great chuck of their history here, but it's not something you'd make movies about. Apart from the Miners and General Strikes of UsefulNotes/JamesCallaghan's time, but that's another story.[[/note]] They're now generally regarded as a centrist/centre-left social democratic party. In the mid 1990s, Blair dubbed this new vision for the party "New Labour", a piece of branding designed to distance Labour from its crazed infighting and somewhat radical left-wing early 1980s incarnation which the image-obsessed Blair thought had a negative perception amongst voters; this label has actually came to be used more as a term of abuse by the party's enemies rather than a badge of honour, and the party itself has dropped it. There was between 1994 and 2010 a dangerous divide between the Blairites, named after UsefulNotes/TonyBlair, and Brownites, named after UsefulNotes/GordonBrown, and no one was quite sure what the difference was; the general consensus was that Brown is slightly more socialist and rather more Eurosceptic.\\

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* The '''Labour Party''' (231 [=MPs=], 20 [=MEPs=], 29 [=AMs=], 24 [=MSPs=]): [=MSPs=]).\\
[[AC:Current Leader: Jeremy Corbyn (MP, Islington North).]]\\
Started off as a socialist, working man's party (hence the name) but became increasingly concerned with more liberal middle-class issues in the late 1980s and moved closer to the centre under Neil Kinnock and especially Tony Blair.[[note]]We've skipped over a thumping great chuck of their history here, but it's not something you'd make movies about. Apart from the Miners and General Strikes of UsefulNotes/JamesCallaghan's time, but that's another story.[[/note]] They're now generally regarded as a centrist/centre-left social democratic party. In the mid 1990s, Blair dubbed this new vision for the party "New Labour", a piece of branding designed to distance Labour from its crazed infighting and somewhat radical left-wing early 1980s incarnation which the image-obsessed Blair thought had a negative perception amongst voters; this label has actually came to be used more as a term of abuse by the party's enemies rather than a badge of honour, and the party itself has dropped it. There was between 1994 and 2010 a dangerous divide between the Blairites, named after UsefulNotes/TonyBlair, and Brownites, named after UsefulNotes/GordonBrown, and no one was quite sure what the difference was; the general consensus was that Brown is slightly more socialist and rather more Eurosceptic.\\



* The '''Liberal Democrats''': (8 [=MPs=], 1 [=MEPs=], 5 [=MSPs=], 1 [=AMs=]) Traditionally a centrist, liberal (in the European sense) party, they were widely (mis)perceived as being slightly to the left of post-Blair Labour, and are sometimes treated as simply [[HilariousInHindsight a "trendier" version of Labour]]. Formed from the merger of the old Liberal Party -- itself a descendent of the original Whig party -- which saw its vote collapse after the rise of the Labour party, and the Social Democratic Party, which was formed of former Labour [=MPs=] who quit the party during their left wing phase in the '80s. Notable for having a very favourable educational policy and for getting rid of their alcoholic leader in 2006, then the one after him within two years.\\

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* The '''Liberal Democrats''': (8 [=MPs=], 1 [=MEPs=], 5 [=MSPs=], 1 [=AMs=]) [=AMs=]).\\
[[AC:Current Leader: Tim Farron (MP, Westmorland and Lonsdale).]]\\
Traditionally a centrist, liberal (in the European sense) party, they were widely (mis)perceived as being slightly to the left of post-Blair Labour, and are sometimes treated as simply [[HilariousInHindsight a "trendier" version of Labour]]. Formed from the merger of the old Liberal Party -- itself a descendent of the original Whig party -- which saw its vote collapse after the rise of the Labour party, and the Social Democratic Party, which was formed of former Labour [=MPs=] who quit the party during their left wing phase in the '80s. Notable for having a very favourable educational policy and for getting rid of their alcoholic leader in 2006, then the one after him within two years.\\



* The '''Scottish National Party''' (''Pàrtaidh Nàiseanta na h-Alba'' in Gaelic/''Scottis Naitional Pairtie'' in Scots; 54 [=MPs=], 2 [=MEPs=], 63 [=MSPs=]): AKA the SNP. The social democratic centre-left party's raison d'être is Scottish independence. Formed in 1934 after the amalgamation of the National Party with the Scottish Party. 8 years after the re-congregation of the Scottish Parliament, the SNP emerged as the largest party and formed a minority administration. In 2011, it won an overall majority, something the electoral system was specially designed to prevent. The SNP held a referendum on independence on 18 September 2014, with Scotland choosing to retain the United Kingdom. In 2016, they retained dominance as Scotland's largest party, but fell short of an overall majority. The Conservatives reclaimed their traditional role as second party of Scotland, reclaiming seats that had converted to Tony Blair's New Labour, and leaving the historic positions of SNP and Labour now thoroughly flipped as a result of Labour becoming the third party of Scotland.\\

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* The '''Scottish National Party''' (''Pàrtaidh Nàiseanta na h-Alba'' in Gaelic/''Scottis Naitional Pairtie'' in Scots; 54 [=MPs=], 2 [=MEPs=], 63 [=MSPs=]): [=MSPs=]).\\
[[AC:Current Leader: Nicola Sturgeon (MSP, Glasgow Southside).]]\\
AKA the SNP. The social democratic centre-left party's raison d'être is Scottish independence. Formed in 1934 after the amalgamation of the National Party with the Scottish Party. 8 years after the re-congregation of the Scottish Parliament, the SNP emerged as the largest party and formed a minority administration. In 2011, it won an overall majority, something the electoral system was specially designed to prevent. The SNP held a referendum on independence on 18 September 2014, with Scotland choosing to retain the United Kingdom. In 2016, they retained dominance as Scotland's largest party, but fell short of an overall majority. The Conservatives reclaimed their traditional role as second party of Scotland, reclaiming seats that had converted to Tony Blair's New Labour, and leaving the historic positions of SNP and Labour now thoroughly flipped as a result of Labour becoming the third party of Scotland.\\



* '''Plaid Cymru''' (3 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 12 [=AMs=]): "The Party of Wales" in English, a Welsh nationalist and [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen republican]] party who campaign for full Welsh independence and an expansion of the Welsh language, among other things. Like the SNP, they're a centre-left party, but not so keen on independence; although the Welsh are fiercely independent in ''cultural'' matters, ''political'' independence is highly unpopular, seeing as England and Wales have been joined at the hip since the thirteenth century. They only field candidates in Wales. Since the formation of the National Assembly for Wales, Welsh Labour has governed in all five electoral terms. However, it has never had a strong majority, either only just reaching the majority (30 seats) or being the largest party in a minority government. As a result, Welsh Labour have relied heavily on Plaid Cymru for most of the Assembly's existence for either formal coalition partnership or less formal "agreements" to get policies through the Senedd. For those not versed in the Welsh language, the party's name is pronounced "Plide Cumree" and the seat of power is pronounced "SEN-eth"[[note]]the 'dd' is pronounced like the 'th' in 'then'[[/note]]. And you thought that ''English'' spelling was weird. The current party leader is Leanne Wood.

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* '''Plaid Cymru''' (3 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 12 [=AMs=]): [=AMs=]).\\
[[AC:Current Leader: Leanne Wood (AM, Rhondda)]]\\
"The Party of Wales" in English, a Welsh nationalist and [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen republican]] party who campaign for full Welsh independence and an expansion of the Welsh language, among other things. Like the SNP, they're a centre-left party, but not so keen on independence; although the Welsh are fiercely independent in ''cultural'' matters, ''political'' independence is highly unpopular, seeing as England and Wales have been joined at the hip since the thirteenth century. They only field candidates in Wales. Since the formation of the National Assembly for Wales, Welsh Labour has governed in all five electoral terms. However, it has never had a strong majority, either only just reaching the majority (30 seats) or being the largest party in a minority government. As a result, Welsh Labour have relied heavily on Plaid Cymru for most of the Assembly's existence for either formal coalition partnership or less formal "agreements" to get policies through the Senedd. For those not versed in the Welsh language, the party's name is pronounced "Plide Cumree" and the seat of power is pronounced "SEN-eth"[[note]]the 'dd' is pronounced like the 'th' in 'then'[[/note]]. And you thought that ''English'' spelling was weird. The current party leader is Leanne Wood.



* '''Democratic Unionist Party''' (DUP; 8 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 38 [=MLAs=]): presently the largest party in UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland to favour the continued union with Britain, and the biggest NI party as a whole. While their economic policies are broadly socialist due to the influence of the party's working class grassroots support, they're strongly right-wing virtually everywhere else, mostly as a result of the leadership of Reverend Ian Paisley, the founder of the fundamentalist Free Presbyterian Church. Although they're most famous for being stringently reactionary, the party seems to have mellowed out a bit since Paisley (and then his successor, Peter Robinson) became First Minister of Northern Ireland in 2005. Recently, they've been involved in a bit of a feud with the [[UpToEleven even ''more'' hardline]] Traditional Unionist Voice.

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* '''Democratic Unionist Party''' (DUP; 8 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 38 [=MLAs=]): presently [=MLAs=]).\\
[[AC:Current Leader: Arlene Foster (MLA, Fermanagh and South Tyrone)]].\\
Presently
the largest party in UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland to favour the continued union with Britain, and the biggest NI party as a whole. While their economic policies are broadly socialist due to the influence of the party's working class grassroots support, they're strongly right-wing virtually everywhere else, mostly as a result of the leadership of Reverend Ian Paisley, the founder of the fundamentalist Free Presbyterian Church. Although they're most famous for being stringently reactionary, the party seems to have mellowed out a bit since Paisley (and then his successor, Peter Robinson) became First Minister of Northern Ireland in 2005. Recently, they've been involved in a bit of a feud with the [[UpToEleven even ''more'' hardline]] Traditional Unionist Voice.



* '''Sinn Féin''' (pronounced "shin fane", Irish for "we ourselves"; 4 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 28 [=MLAs=]): The second largest party in Northern Ireland and the main nationalist (favouring Irish unification) grouping in the NI assembly. While they've been elected to the House of Commons, they don't actually take their seats as they see NI's membership of the UK as illegitimate.[[note]]Also, if they did take their seats, they'd have to swear an oath of loyalty to the Crown.[[/note]] The cheeky buggers still [[http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/local-national/northern-ireland/sinn-fein-under-fire-over-westminster-expense-claims-16175256.html claim the Crown's expenses, however]]. During UsefulNotes/TheTroubles, they were perceived as the political wing of the Provisional IRA -- which, to be honest, is true; when the then-leader Martin [=McGuinness=] said in negotiations "We'll have to consult the [IRA] army council on this", the then Foreign Minister (later Taoiseach) of Ireland, Brian Cowen, spat back "Yeah, well, there's a mirror in the toilet if you want to go in there and talk to them" -- but like the DUP they've generally managed to distance themselves from their more radical past.
* '''Social Democratic and Labour Party''' (SDLP; Irish language: ''Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre''; 3 [=MPs=], 12 [=MLAs=]): Moderate NI nationalist party, historically linked to both the British and Irish Labour Parties, its members take the Labour whip in Westminster.
* '''Alliance Party''' (8 [=MLAs=]): A non-sectarian and very weakly-unionist party linked to the Liberal Democrats but not taking their whip.

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* '''Sinn Féin''' (pronounced "shin fane", Irish for "we ourselves"; 4 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 28 [=MLAs=]): [=MLAs=]).\\
[[AC:Current Leader: Gerry Adams (TD, Louth).]]\\
The second largest party in Northern Ireland and the main nationalist (favouring Irish unification) grouping in the NI assembly. While they've been elected to the House of Commons, they don't actually take their seats as they see NI's membership of the UK as illegitimate.[[note]]Also, if they did take their seats, they'd have to swear an oath of loyalty to the Crown.[[/note]] The cheeky buggers still [[http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/local-national/northern-ireland/sinn-fein-under-fire-over-westminster-expense-claims-16175256.html claim the Crown's expenses, however]]. During UsefulNotes/TheTroubles, they were perceived as the political wing of the Provisional IRA -- which, to be honest, is true; when the then-leader Martin [=McGuinness=] said in negotiations "We'll have to consult the [IRA] army council on this", the then Foreign Minister (later Taoiseach) of Ireland, Brian Cowen, spat back "Yeah, well, there's a mirror in the toilet if you want to go in there and talk to them" -- but like the DUP they've generally managed to distance themselves from their more radical past.
* '''Social Democratic and Labour Party''' (SDLP; Irish language: ''Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre''; 3 [=MPs=], 12 [=MLAs=]): [=MLAs=]).\\
[[AC:Current Leader: Colum Eastwood (MLA, Foyle).]]\\
Moderate NI nationalist party, historically linked to both the British and Irish Labour Parties, its members take the Labour whip in Westminster.
* '''Alliance Party''' (8 [=MLAs=]): [=MLAs=]).\\
[[AC: Current Leader: David Ford (MLA, South Antrim).]]\\
A non-sectarian and very weakly-unionist party linked to the Liberal Democrats but not taking their whip.



* '''Ulster Unionist Party''' (UUP; 2 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 16 [=MLAs=]): Moderate NI unionist party, they were the majority in the Northern Ireland Parliament for all 51 years of the first Home Rule period (1921–72). Traditionally linked to the Conservative Party, they distanced themselves from the Tories after the Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1985. They agreed in 2009 to run on a common ticket and possibly take the Conservative whip should the Tories win government in 2010. As it is, the UUP won no seats at Westminster anyway, so even though the Conservatives got Number 10, the agreement was more or less a dead letter.

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* '''Ulster Unionist Party''' (UUP; 2 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 16 [=MLAs=]): [=MLAs=]).\\
[[AC: Current Leader: Mike Nesbitt (MLA, Strangford).]]\\
Moderate NI unionist party, they were the majority in the Northern Ireland Parliament for all 51 years of the first Home Rule period (1921–72). Traditionally linked to the Conservative Party, they distanced themselves from the Tories after the Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1985. They agreed in 2009 to run on a common ticket and possibly take the Conservative whip should the Tories win government in 2010. As it is, the UUP won no seats at Westminster anyway, so even though the Conservatives got Number 10, the agreement was more or less a dead letter.



* The '''Green Party''' (1 [=MP=], 3 [=MEPs=], 6 [=MSPs=], 2 [=MLAs=]): originally an environmental single-issue party, they have attempted to branch-out into other areas of policy in which they tend to take a standard British-left-wing viewpoint. They used to differ from other left-wing parties with regard to science, where they Greens embraced many "alternative" (and scientifically rubbished) ideas such as homeopathy, partially as a result of their manifesto being completely democratic, even to people not versed in either science or politics. Nowadays, their only "anti-science" policies are opposition to nuclear power and scepticism of GM crops - though many of their members still favour "alternative" medicines. Their position on Europe is to take a reformist Eurosceptic view - they would prefer to stay in the EU, but want to see it massively reformed. Technically three parties: the party has separate branches in England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland; the Scottish Greens are pro-independence (and have the backing of Music/FranzFerdinand). The English and Welsh Greens won the first Green seat at Westminster in 2010, its leader Caroline Lucas beating Labourite Nancy Platts to win the seat of Brighton Pavilion in East Sussex. They held the seat in 2015, winning only one seat, despite getting well over one million votes nationally. The Greens' colour, [[SarcasmMode surprisingly]], is green, and the English and Wales party's icon is a sunflower. The Scottish, English and Welsh, and Irish branches of the Greens use variations on the theme.

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* The '''Green Party''' (1 [=MP=], 3 [=MEPs=], 6 [=MSPs=], 2 [=MLAs=]): originally [=MLAs=]).\\
[[AC: Current Leader (England and Wales): Natalie Bennett.\\
Current Leader (Scotland): Patrick Harvie (MSP, Glasgow) and Maggie Chapman.\\
Current Leader (Northern Ireland): Steven Agnew (MLA, North Down).]]\\
Originally
an environmental single-issue party, they have attempted to branch-out into other areas of policy in which they tend to take a standard British-left-wing viewpoint. They used to differ from other left-wing parties with regard to science, where they Greens embraced many "alternative" (and scientifically rubbished) ideas such as homeopathy, partially as a result of their manifesto being completely democratic, even to people not versed in either science or politics. Nowadays, their only "anti-science" policies are opposition to nuclear power and scepticism of GM crops - though many of their members still favour "alternative" medicines. Their position on Europe is to take a reformist Eurosceptic view - they would prefer to stay in the EU, but want to see it massively reformed. Technically three parties: the party has separate branches in England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland; the Scottish Greens are pro-independence (and have the backing of Music/FranzFerdinand). The English and Welsh Greens won the first Green seat at Westminster in 2010, its leader Caroline Lucas beating Labourite Nancy Platts to win the seat of Brighton Pavilion in East Sussex. They held the seat in 2015, winning only one seat, despite getting well over one million votes nationally. The Greens' colour, [[SarcasmMode surprisingly]], is green, and the English and Wales party's icon is a sunflower. The Scottish, English and Welsh, and Irish branches of the Greens use variations on the theme.



* The '''UK Independence Party''' (UKIP; 1 [=MPs=], 24 [=MEPs=], 7 [=AMs=]): a party which has attained victories primarily in Britain's elections for members of the European Parliament, but ironically want to change that situation by pulling the UK out of the EU altogether. Although founded as a "wide-spectrum" single-issue party united by opposition to British membership of the European Union, they have since emerged as a populist, nationalist, anti-immigration grouping of disgruntled Thatcherite Conservatives disillusioned with their "home" party, and their general outlook is very similar to that of the right "[[PrivateEye Sir Bufton Tufton]]" wing of the Conservative Party that was dominant in the '80s but unofficially marginalised post 2005. In recent years however they have made a play for disgruntled Lib-Dem and Labour voters, and in the 2015 elections arguably emerged as the main opposition party in traditionally Labour areas, picking a large number of second places in Labour safe seats. The party's first European parliamentarians had a tendency to make embarrassing jingoistic far-right gaffes, although the current leadership has made effective efforts to improve the party's image. Their party colour is purple, and their icon is a pound symbol (£)—representing their opposition to the Euro—with the party initials "UKIP" forming the bar across the middle. They have three members in the House of Lords, who defected from the Conservatives, along with one Northern Ireland Assembly Member, who joined UKIP after his suspension from the Ulster Unionist Party. Following the defection of Douglas Carswell in 2014 and his subsequent win for their party in the Clacton by-election, they gained their first MP; Mark Reckless defected shortly afterwards, won his seat in the by-election, but lost it in the subsequent general election). The party was the third largest in vote share in the 2015 general election (with the best part of four million votes), but won only one seat - Douglas Carswell's. In the 2016 devolved elections, they won 7 seats in the Welsh elections, mostly off the regional vote which is based on proportional representation. Most of their votes came from disgruntled Conservative, Labour and Lib-Dem voters in regions that combine high levels of poverty, unemployment and immigration. Several of these new UKIP [=AMs=] are former Tories, including the aforementioned Mark Reckless.

to:

* The '''UK Independence Party''' (UKIP; 1 [=MPs=], 24 [=MEPs=], 7 [=AMs=]): a [=AMs=]).\\
[[AC: Current Leader: Nigel Farage (MEP, South East England).]]\\
A
party which has attained victories primarily in Britain's elections for members of the European Parliament, but ironically want to change that situation by pulling the UK out of the EU altogether. Although founded as a "wide-spectrum" single-issue party united by opposition to British membership of the European Union, they have since emerged as a populist, nationalist, anti-immigration grouping of disgruntled Thatcherite Conservatives disillusioned with their "home" party, and their general outlook is very similar to that of the right "[[PrivateEye Sir Bufton Tufton]]" wing of the Conservative Party that was dominant in the '80s but unofficially marginalised post 2005. In recent years however they have made a play for disgruntled Lib-Dem and Labour voters, and in the 2015 elections arguably emerged as the main opposition party in traditionally Labour areas, picking a large number of second places in Labour safe seats. The party's first European parliamentarians had a tendency to make embarrassing jingoistic far-right gaffes, although the current leadership has made effective efforts to improve the party's image. Their party colour is purple, and their icon is a pound symbol (£)—representing their opposition to the Euro—with the party initials "UKIP" forming the bar across the middle. They have three members in the House of Lords, who defected from the Conservatives, along with one Northern Ireland Assembly Member, who joined UKIP after his suspension from the Ulster Unionist Party. Following the defection of Douglas Carswell in 2014 and his subsequent win for their party in the Clacton by-election, they gained their first MP; Mark Reckless defected shortly afterwards, won his seat in the by-election, but lost it in the subsequent general election). The party was the third largest in vote share in the 2015 general election (with the best part of four million votes), but won only one seat - Douglas Carswell's. In the 2016 devolved elections, they won 7 seats in the Welsh elections, mostly off the regional vote which is based on proportional representation. Most of their votes came from disgruntled Conservative, Labour and Lib-Dem voters in regions that combine high levels of poverty, unemployment and immigration. Several of these new UKIP [=AMs=] are former Tories, including the aforementioned Mark Reckless.
24th Jun '16 8:54:42 PM SamCurt
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The Privy Council also has a Judicial Committee, consisting of the Justices of the Supreme Court and a few other judges. Its domestic jurisdiction, once wide-ranging, is now limited to a few random tribunals which for the most part almost nobody has heard of or cares about (the ecclesiastical courts? the High Court of Chivalry? ''The Disciplinary Committee of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons''?[[note]]This jurisdiction is still alive as of 2014 in [[http://jcpc.uk/decided-cases/docs/JCPC_2013_0030_Judgment.pdf a case]] involving evidential standards for "unfit to practice" hearings![[/note]]); the main exception is that it hears cases on appeal in admiralty--that is, the law of seagoing vessels--from certain courts. It may also give "advice" should the Government ask for it[[note]]The last time this jurisdiction was used was in 2016 in ''[[https://www.jcpc.uk/cases/jcpc-2015-0079.html In the matter of the Baronetcy of Pringle of Stichill]]''; the administration, handling the troublesome issue on whether a DNA evidence can be used to unseat three whole generations of a major Scottish clan, refers the case to JCPC to make a judicial determination.[[/note]]. However, it serves as the highest court of appeal for Britain's Crown Dependencies (UsefulNotes/TheChannelIslands and the Isle of Man) and Overseas Territories (numerous, most notably UsefulNotes/{{Gibraltar}} and UsefulNotes/TheFalklandIslands), certain Commonwealth Realms, certain Commonwealth Republics, and the Sultanate of Brunei. When sitting for this purpose, jurists from the country in question are appointed to the Privy Council to hear the case. This procedure has been abolished in the more developed Commonwealth Realms, although it existed more recently than you might think--Australia abolished it so recently that one of the most famous Judicial Committee decisions, the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overseas_Tankship_(UK)_Ltd_v_Morts_Dock_and_Engineering_Co_Ltd Wagon Mound]]" case of 1961, was actually an appeal from the Supreme Court of New South Wales.

to:

The Privy Council also has a Judicial Committee, consisting of the Justices of the Supreme Court and a few other judges. Its domestic jurisdiction, once wide-ranging, is now limited to a few random tribunals which for the most part almost nobody has heard of or cares about (the ecclesiastical courts? the High Court of Chivalry? ''The Disciplinary Committee of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons''?[[note]]This jurisdiction is still alive as of 2014 in [[http://jcpc.uk/decided-cases/docs/JCPC_2013_0030_Judgment.pdf a case]] involving evidential standards for "unfit to practice" hearings![[/note]]); the main exception is that it hears cases on appeal in admiralty--that is, the law of seagoing vessels--from certain courts. It may also give "advice" should the Government ask for it[[note]]The last time this jurisdiction was used was in 2016 in ''[[https://www.jcpc.uk/cases/jcpc-2015-0079.html In the matter of the Baronetcy of Pringle of Stichill]]''; the administration, handling Government refers to the JCPC the troublesome issue case on whether a DNA evidence can be used to unseat three whole generations of a major Scottish clan, refers the case to JCPC to make so that it can have a judicial determination.[[/note]]. However, it serves as the highest court of appeal for Britain's Crown Dependencies (UsefulNotes/TheChannelIslands and the Isle of Man) and Overseas Territories (numerous, most notably UsefulNotes/{{Gibraltar}} and UsefulNotes/TheFalklandIslands), certain Commonwealth Realms, certain Commonwealth Republics, and the Sultanate of Brunei. When sitting for this purpose, jurists from the country in question are appointed to the Privy Council to hear the case. This procedure has been abolished in the more developed Commonwealth Realms, although it existed more recently than you might think--Australia abolished it so recently that one of the most famous Judicial Committee decisions, the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overseas_Tankship_(UK)_Ltd_v_Morts_Dock_and_Engineering_Co_Ltd Wagon Mound]]" case of 1961, was actually an appeal from the Supreme Court of New South Wales.
24th Jun '16 8:52:03 PM SamCurt
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The Privy Council also has a Judicial Committee, consisting of the Justices of the Supreme Court and a few other judges. Its domestic jurisdiction, once wide-ranging, is now limited to a few random tribunals which for the most part almost nobody has heard of or cares about (the ecclesiastical courts? the High Court of Chivalry? ''The Disciplinary Committee of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons''?[[note]]This jurisdiction is still alive as of 2014 in [[http://jcpc.uk/decided-cases/docs/JCPC_2013_0030_Judgment.pdf a case]] involving evidential standards for "unfit to practice" hearings![[/note]]); the main exception is that it hears cases on appeal in admiralty--that is, the law of seagoing vessels--from certain courts. It may also give "advice" should the Government ask for it. However, it serves as the highest court of appeal for Britain's Crown Dependencies (UsefulNotes/TheChannelIslands and the Isle of Man) and Overseas Territories (numerous, most notably UsefulNotes/{{Gibraltar}} and UsefulNotes/TheFalklandIslands), certain Commonwealth Realms, certain Commonwealth Republics, and the Sultanate of Brunei. When sitting for this purpose, jurists from the country in question are appointed to the Privy Council to hear the case. This procedure has been abolished in the more developed Commonwealth Realms, although it existed more recently than you might think--Australia abolished it so recently that one of the most famous Judicial Committee decisions, the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overseas_Tankship_(UK)_Ltd_v_Morts_Dock_and_Engineering_Co_Ltd Wagon Mound]]" case of 1961, was actually an appeal from the Supreme Court of New South Wales.

to:

The Privy Council also has a Judicial Committee, consisting of the Justices of the Supreme Court and a few other judges. Its domestic jurisdiction, once wide-ranging, is now limited to a few random tribunals which for the most part almost nobody has heard of or cares about (the ecclesiastical courts? the High Court of Chivalry? ''The Disciplinary Committee of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons''?[[note]]This jurisdiction is still alive as of 2014 in [[http://jcpc.uk/decided-cases/docs/JCPC_2013_0030_Judgment.pdf a case]] involving evidential standards for "unfit to practice" hearings![[/note]]); the main exception is that it hears cases on appeal in admiralty--that is, the law of seagoing vessels--from certain courts. It may also give "advice" should the Government ask for it.it[[note]]The last time this jurisdiction was used was in 2016 in ''[[https://www.jcpc.uk/cases/jcpc-2015-0079.html In the matter of the Baronetcy of Pringle of Stichill]]''; the administration, handling the troublesome issue on whether a DNA evidence can be used to unseat three whole generations of a major Scottish clan, refers the case to JCPC to make a judicial determination.[[/note]]. However, it serves as the highest court of appeal for Britain's Crown Dependencies (UsefulNotes/TheChannelIslands and the Isle of Man) and Overseas Territories (numerous, most notably UsefulNotes/{{Gibraltar}} and UsefulNotes/TheFalklandIslands), certain Commonwealth Realms, certain Commonwealth Republics, and the Sultanate of Brunei. When sitting for this purpose, jurists from the country in question are appointed to the Privy Council to hear the case. This procedure has been abolished in the more developed Commonwealth Realms, although it existed more recently than you might think--Australia abolished it so recently that one of the most famous Judicial Committee decisions, the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overseas_Tankship_(UK)_Ltd_v_Morts_Dock_and_Engineering_Co_Ltd Wagon Mound]]" case of 1961, was actually an appeal from the Supreme Court of New South Wales.
9th Jun '16 10:40:40 PM gewunomox
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* The '''Green Party''' (1 [=MP=], 3 [=MEPs=], 6 [=MSPs=], 2 [=MLAs=]): originally an environmental single-issue party, they have attempted to branch-out into other areas of policy in which they tend to take a standard British-left-wing viewpoint. They used to differ from other left-wing parties with regard to science, where they Greens embraced many "alternative" (and scientifically rubbished) ideas such as homeopathy, partially as a result of their manifesto being completely democratic, even to people not versed in either science or politics. Nowadays, their only "anti-science" policies are opposition to nuclear power and scepticism of GM crops - though many of their members still favour "alternative" medicines. Their position on Europe is to take a reformist Eurosceptic view - they would prefer to stay in the EU, but want to see it massively reformed. Technically three parties: the party has separate branches in England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland; the Scottish Greens are pro-independence (and have the backing of FranzFerdinand). The English and Welsh Greens won the first Green seat at Westminster in 2010, its leader Caroline Lucas beating Labourite Nancy Platts to win the seat of Brighton Pavilion in East Sussex. They held the seat in 2015, winning only one seat, despite getting well over one million votes nationally. The Greens' colour, [[SarcasmMode surprisingly]], is green, and the English and Wales party's icon is a sunflower. The Scottish, English and Welsh, and Irish branches of the Greens use variations on the theme.

to:

* The '''Green Party''' (1 [=MP=], 3 [=MEPs=], 6 [=MSPs=], 2 [=MLAs=]): originally an environmental single-issue party, they have attempted to branch-out into other areas of policy in which they tend to take a standard British-left-wing viewpoint. They used to differ from other left-wing parties with regard to science, where they Greens embraced many "alternative" (and scientifically rubbished) ideas such as homeopathy, partially as a result of their manifesto being completely democratic, even to people not versed in either science or politics. Nowadays, their only "anti-science" policies are opposition to nuclear power and scepticism of GM crops - though many of their members still favour "alternative" medicines. Their position on Europe is to take a reformist Eurosceptic view - they would prefer to stay in the EU, but want to see it massively reformed. Technically three parties: the party has separate branches in England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland; the Scottish Greens are pro-independence (and have the backing of FranzFerdinand).Music/FranzFerdinand). The English and Welsh Greens won the first Green seat at Westminster in 2010, its leader Caroline Lucas beating Labourite Nancy Platts to win the seat of Brighton Pavilion in East Sussex. They held the seat in 2015, winning only one seat, despite getting well over one million votes nationally. The Greens' colour, [[SarcasmMode surprisingly]], is green, and the English and Wales party's icon is a sunflower. The Scottish, English and Welsh, and Irish branches of the Greens use variations on the theme.
9th Jun '16 8:30:11 PM Doug86
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* There are also several communist and socialist parties, mainly notable for their sheer number; most famously the '''Socialist Worker's Party''', but also including '''[[WeAreStrugglingTogether the Communist Party of Great Britain, the Communist Party of Britain, the Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist), and the Revolutionary Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist)]]'''. Totally insignificant from a practical point of view, having membership in the hundreds rather than thousands. Came in for a ''lot'' of ribbing in ''Film/MontyPythonsLifeOfBrian'', where the Judean separatist movements and their in-fighting[[note]]the Judean People's Front, the Judean Popular People's Front, the People's Front for Judea, and the Judean Popular People's Front]] (the last is an old man, and the rest are all splitters)[[/note]] were a parody of this. The CPGB actually won two seats back in 1945 before news of [[JosefStalin Stalin's]] purges made communism unpopular, and they lost them both at the 1950 election and proceeded to collapse into irrelevance thanks to their following the Moscow party line (their support for the 1956 invasion of Hungary revolted leftists and earned them the pejorative nickname "tankies") and eventually disbanded in 1991. Since 2010, many of these far-left groups have stood for election under the banner of TUSC (the Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition). This is more a flag of convenience than a genuine party, though.

to:

* There are also several communist and socialist parties, mainly notable for their sheer number; most famously the '''Socialist Worker's Party''', but also including '''[[WeAreStrugglingTogether the Communist Party of Great Britain, the Communist Party of Britain, the Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist), and the Revolutionary Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist)]]'''. Totally insignificant from a practical point of view, having membership in the hundreds rather than thousands. Came in for a ''lot'' of ribbing in ''Film/MontyPythonsLifeOfBrian'', where the Judean separatist movements and their in-fighting[[note]]the Judean People's Front, the Judean Popular People's Front, the People's Front for Judea, and the Judean Popular People's Front]] (the last is an old man, and the rest are all splitters)[[/note]] were a parody of this. The CPGB actually won two seats back in 1945 before news of [[JosefStalin [[UsefulNotes/JosefStalin Stalin's]] purges made communism unpopular, and they lost them both at the 1950 election and proceeded to collapse into irrelevance thanks to their following the Moscow party line (their support for the 1956 invasion of Hungary revolted leftists and earned them the pejorative nickname "tankies") and eventually disbanded in 1991. Since 2010, many of these far-left groups have stood for election under the banner of TUSC (the Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition). This is more a flag of convenience than a genuine party, though.
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