History UsefulNotes / BritishPoliticalSystem

27th Apr '16 9:54:23 AM Karl304
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There are 650 elected [=MPs=], all but five of whom [[note]]Sylvia Hermon, Michelle Thomson, Natalie [=McGarry=], Simon Danczuk and the Speaker[[/note]] are also members of a political party. Westminster is most near to a "two-and-a-half party" system, with the dominant parties being Labour and the Conservatives, and the perpetual third party the Liberal Democrats.

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There are 650 elected [=MPs=], all but five six of whom [[note]]Sylvia Hermon, Michelle Thomson, Natalie [=McGarry=], Simon Danczuk Danczuk, Naz Shah and the Speaker[[/note]] are also members of a political party. Westminster is most near to a "two-and-a-half party" system, with the dominant parties being Labour and the Conservatives, and the perpetual third party the Liberal Democrats.



* '''Independents''' (4 [=MPs=][[note]]Sylvia Hermon (North Down), Michelle Thomson (Edinburgh West), Natalie [=McGarry=] (Glasgow East), Simon Danczuk (Rochdale)[[/note]], 1 [=MEP=][[note]]Janice Atkinson (Southeast England)[[/note]], 3 [=MSPs=][[note]]John Finnie (Highlands and Islands), Jean Urquhart (Highlands and Islands), John Wilson (Central Scotland)[[/note]], 2 [=MLAs=][[note]]John [=McCallister=] (South Down), Claire Sugden (East Londonderry)[[/note]]): a small part of political process, mostly being in the legislatures from elected for local issues (such as Dr. Richard Taylor, who was elected an MP in 2001 and 2005 to save his local hospital), from leaving their own party in protest to some issue (such as Sylvia Hermon, who was an ex-UUP member), or being kicked out of their own party for misbehaviour.

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* '''Independents''' (4 (5 [=MPs=][[note]]Sylvia Hermon (North Down), Michelle Thomson (Edinburgh West), Natalie [=McGarry=] (Glasgow East), Simon Danczuk (Rochdale)[[/note]], (Rochdale), Naz Shah (Bradford West)[[/note]], 1 [=MEP=][[note]]Janice Atkinson (Southeast England)[[/note]], 3 [=MSPs=][[note]]John Finnie (Highlands and Islands), Jean Urquhart (Highlands and Islands), John Wilson (Central Scotland)[[/note]], 2 [=MLAs=][[note]]John [=McCallister=] (South Down), Claire Sugden (East Londonderry)[[/note]]): a small part of political process, mostly being in the legislatures from elected for local issues (such as Dr. Richard Taylor, who was elected an MP in 2001 and 2005 to save his local hospital), from leaving their own party in protest to some issue (such as Sylvia Hermon, who was an ex-UUP member), or being kicked out of their own party for misbehaviour.
15th Apr '16 4:25:14 PM karstovich2
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* The Foreign And Commonwealth Office: Formerly the Foreign Office, which people often call it today, it's run by the Foreign Secretary and its job is rather obvious.

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* The Foreign And and Commonwealth Office: Formerly the Foreign Office, which people often call it today, it's run by the Foreign Secretary and its job is rather obvious.obvious. (The bit about the "Commonwealth" is because Commonwealth countries, and especially Commonwealth Realms--which do, after all, have the same head of state as Britain--are not technically "foreign"--witness how Britain has an Ambassador to the U.S. but a High Commissioner to Canada and India).
15th Apr '16 4:16:23 PM karstovich2
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* '''Lords Spiritual''': the 26 most senior bishops in the Church of England, their membership is due to Anglicanism being the official religion of Britain. Generally don't vote on anything but ecclesiastical matters, but modern secularism and their hand in immensely watering down a Government bill in 2010 are gradually making this arrangement... unpopular.

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* '''Lords Spiritual''': the 26 most senior bishops in the Church of England, their membership is due to Anglicanism being the official religion "established church" of Britain.England (i.e. it is partially funded by the Treasury and the Government has some input in the selection of bishops). Generally don't vote on anything but ecclesiastical matters, but modern secularism and their hand in immensely watering down a Government bill in 2010 are gradually making this arrangement... unpopular.
7th Apr '16 11:13:07 AM costanton11
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* '''Democratic Unionist Party''' (DUP; 8 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 35 [=MLAs=]): presently the largest party in UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland to favour the continued union with Britain, and the biggest NI party as a whole. While their economic policies are broadly socialist due to the influence of the party's working class grassroots support, they're strongly right-wing virtually everywhere else, mostly as a result of the leadership of Reverend Ian Paisley, the founder of the fundamentalist Free Presbyterian Church. Although they're most famous for being stringently reactionary, the party seems to have mellowed out a bit since Paisley (and then his successor, Peter Robinson) became First Minister of Northern Ireland in 2005. Recently, they've been involved in a bit of a feud with the [[UpToEleven even ''more'' hardline]] Traditonal Unionist Voice.

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* '''Democratic Unionist Party''' (DUP; 8 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 35 [=MLAs=]): presently the largest party in UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland to favour the continued union with Britain, and the biggest NI party as a whole. While their economic policies are broadly socialist due to the influence of the party's working class grassroots support, they're strongly right-wing virtually everywhere else, mostly as a result of the leadership of Reverend Ian Paisley, the founder of the fundamentalist Free Presbyterian Church. Although they're most famous for being stringently reactionary, the party seems to have mellowed out a bit since Paisley (and then his successor, Peter Robinson) became First Minister of Northern Ireland in 2005. Recently, they've been involved in a bit of a feud with the [[UpToEleven even ''more'' hardline]] Traditonal Traditional Unionist Voice.



* '''Ulster Unionist Party''' (UUP; 2 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 17 [=MLAs=]): Moderate NI unionist party, they were the majority in the Northern Ireland Parliament for all 51 years of the first Home Rule period (1921–72). Traditionally linked to the Conservative Party, they distanced themselves from the Tories after the Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1985. They agreed in 2009 to run on a common ticket and possibly take the Conservative whip should the Tories win government in 2010. As it is, the UUP won no seats at Westminister anyway, so even though the Conservatives got Number 10, the agreement was more or less a dead letter.

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* '''Ulster Unionist Party''' (UUP; 2 [=MPs=], 1 MEP, 17 [=MLAs=]): Moderate NI unionist party, they were the majority in the Northern Ireland Parliament for all 51 years of the first Home Rule period (1921–72). Traditionally linked to the Conservative Party, they distanced themselves from the Tories after the Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1985. They agreed in 2009 to run on a common ticket and possibly take the Conservative whip should the Tories win government in 2010. As it is, the UUP won no seats at Westminister Westminster anyway, so even though the Conservatives got Number 10, the agreement was more or less a dead letter.



** During the 2015, election, it put up 8 candidates and got less than two thousand votes nationwide. And it gets better: in January 2016, the Electoral Commission deregistered the British National Party after it had failed to pay its annual registration fee of £25. At this time, it was estimated that BNP assets totalled less than £50,000. According to the Commission, "BNP candidates cannot, at present, use the party’s name, descriptions or emblems on the ballot paper at elections." AndThereWasMuchRejoicing.

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** During the 2015, election, it put up 8 candidates and got less than two thousand votes nationwide. And it gets better: in January 2016, the Electoral Commission deregistered the British National Party after it had failed to pay its annual registration fee of £25. At this time, it was estimated that BNP assets totalled totaled less than £50,000. According to the Commission, "BNP candidates cannot, at present, use the party’s name, descriptions or emblems on the ballot paper at elections." AndThereWasMuchRejoicing.



* There are also several communist and socialist parties, mainly notable for their sheer number; most famously the '''Socialist Worker's Party''', but also including '''[[WeAreStrugglingTogether the Communist Party of Great Britain, the Communist Party of Britain, the Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist), and the Revolutionary Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist)]]'''. Totally insignificant from a practical point of view, having membership in the hundreds rather than thousands. Came in for a ''lot'' of ribbing in ''Film/MontyPythonsLifeOfBrian'', where the Judean seperatist movements and their in-fighting[[note]]the Judean People's Front, the Judean Popular People's Front, the People's Front for Judea, and the Judean Popular People's Front]] (the last is an old man, and the rest are all splitters)[[/note]] were a parody of this. The CPGB actually won two seats back in 1945 before news of [[JosefStalin Stalin's]] purges made communism unpopular, and they lost them both at the 1950 election and proceeded to collapse into irrelevance thanks to their following the Moscow party line (their support for the 1956 invasion of Hungary revolted leftists and earned them the pejorative nickname "tankies") and eventually disbanded in 1991.\\

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* There are also several communist and socialist parties, mainly notable for their sheer number; most famously the '''Socialist Worker's Party''', but also including '''[[WeAreStrugglingTogether the Communist Party of Great Britain, the Communist Party of Britain, the Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist), and the Revolutionary Communist Party of Great Britain (Marxist-Leninist)]]'''. Totally insignificant from a practical point of view, having membership in the hundreds rather than thousands. Came in for a ''lot'' of ribbing in ''Film/MontyPythonsLifeOfBrian'', where the Judean seperatist separatist movements and their in-fighting[[note]]the Judean People's Front, the Judean Popular People's Front, the People's Front for Judea, and the Judean Popular People's Front]] (the last is an old man, and the rest are all splitters)[[/note]] were a parody of this. The CPGB actually won two seats back in 1945 before news of [[JosefStalin Stalin's]] purges made communism unpopular, and they lost them both at the 1950 election and proceeded to collapse into irrelevance thanks to their following the Moscow party line (their support for the 1956 invasion of Hungary revolted leftists and earned them the pejorative nickname "tankies") and eventually disbanded in 1991.\\



* '''Lords Spiritual''': the 26 most senior bishops in the Church of England, their membership is due to Anglicanism being the official religion of Britain. Generally don't vote on anything but ecclesiastial matters, but modern secularism and their hand in immensely watering down a Government bill in 2010 are gradually making this arrangement... unpopular.

to:

* '''Lords Spiritual''': the 26 most senior bishops in the Church of England, their membership is due to Anglicanism being the official religion of Britain. Generally don't vote on anything but ecclesiastial ecclesiastical matters, but modern secularism and their hand in immensely watering down a Government bill in 2010 are gradually making this arrangement... unpopular.



** While having few seats, they in fact get a suprisingly large amount of votes, considering their stance.

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** While having few seats, they in fact get a suprisingly surprisingly large amount of votes, considering their stance.



The Lords consist of 741 active members and have the power to veto or delay any move by the Commons, which explains why they still exist. However, there are restrictions; the Lords cannot permanently affect any bill that seeks to fulfill promises made in the Government's manifesto, nor can they affect any bill that is concerned solely with public money or taxation. The Government can also force a bill past the House of Lords via the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, although this is rare, being last done over foxhunting. If you were wondering how a bill allowing the Commons to bypass the Lords was created, the Lords voted in favour of it (eventually; the Prime Minister got the King to threaten to stack the House in his favour by appointing more Lords).

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The Lords consist of 741 active members and have the power to veto or delay any move by the Commons, which explains why they still exist. However, there are restrictions; the Lords cannot permanently affect any bill that seeks to fulfill promises made in the Government's manifesto, nor can they affect any bill that is concerned solely with public money or taxation. The Government can also force a bill past the House of Lords via the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, although this is rare, being last done over foxhunting.fox-hunting. If you were wondering how a bill allowing the Commons to bypass the Lords was created, the Lords voted in favour of it (eventually; the Prime Minister got the King to threaten to stack the House in his favour by appointing more Lords).



Each of the three devolved administations also contains a distinguishable nationalist element. The Scottish Parliament has the SNP, the Welsh Assembly has Plaid Cymru, and the Northern Ireland Assembly has Sinn Féin and the SDLP. These parties all advocate a separation of their respective country from the United Kingdom in some form or another. With the exception of the Scottish Parliament, however, these elements have not usually been in the majority in devolved elections.

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Each of the three devolved administations administrations also contains a distinguishable nationalist element. The Scottish Parliament has the SNP, the Welsh Assembly has Plaid Cymru, and the Northern Ireland Assembly has Sinn Féin and the SDLP. These parties all advocate a separation of their respective country from the United Kingdom in some form or another. With the exception of the Scottish Parliament, however, these elements have not usually been in the majority in devolved elections.
10th Mar '16 9:20:25 PM Scoutstr295
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[[quoteright:205:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/205px-conservative_logo_2006_svg_3233.png]]

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[[quoteright:205:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/205px-conservative_logo_2006_svg_3233.org/pmwiki/pub/images/conservative_logo_2006svg.png]]
26th Feb '16 10:44:33 AM DarkPhoenix94
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They have currently been superseded by the Scottish National Party as the third-largest party in Westminster (though maintaining a much larger presence than the SNP at local government level), bringing the traditional idea of the "Big Three" parties into serious contention.\\

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They have currently been superseded by the Scottish National Party as the third-largest party in Westminster (though maintaining a much larger presence than the SNP at local government level), bringing the traditional idea of the "Big Three" parties into serious contention.contention, something ironically lampshaded every now and then by new leader Tim Farron.\\



* '''Mebyon Kernow''' (''Sons of Cornwall''): left-of-centre party agitating for Cornish autonomy, in the style of Celtic region devolution. Nothing more than a handful of members of Cornwall County Council.

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* '''Mebyon Kernow''' (''Sons of Cornwall''): left-of-centre party agitating for Cornish autonomy, in the style of Celtic region devolution. Nothing more than a handful of members of Cornwall County Council.
Council. Generally regarded as nothing more than a joke.



** During the 2015, election, it put up 8 candidates and got less than two thousand votes nationwide. And it gets better: in January 2016, the Electoral Commission deregistered the British National Party after it had failed to pay its annual registration fee of £25. At this time, it was estimated that BNP assets totalled less than £50,000. According to the Commission, "BNP candidates cannot, at present, use the party’s name, descriptions or emblems on the ballot paper at elections." AndThereWasMuchRejoicing.



The devolution of Scotland has brought something called "The West Lothian Question" to greater prominence[[note]]The term dates from November 1977, when Tam Dalyell, Labour MP for the Scottish constituency of West Lothian, lampshaded the matter in a debate about Scottish devolution, and in response Enoch Powell referred to it as "the West Lothian Question"[[/note]]. This is the rather odd situation in which a Scottish MP can vote on English education policy, but not vice versa (despite Scottish education being devolved and there being no restriction on English [=MPs=] also running as MSPs): this was exactly how top-up fees got introduced in 2004; Scottish Labour [=MPs=], who wouldn't be affected by their introduction, voted overwhelmingly in favour for them, giving the party their majority (of 5!) votes to push the legislation through. The Conservatives want Scottish [=MPs=] to be barred from these sorts of votes, while the SNP argue that that will create two tiers of [=MP]=, and as a UK party, they should vote on UK issues.

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The devolution of Scotland has brought something called "The West Lothian Question" to greater prominence[[note]]The term dates from November 1977, when Tam Dalyell, Labour MP for the Scottish constituency of West Lothian, lampshaded the matter in a debate about Scottish devolution, and in response Enoch Powell referred to it as "the West Lothian Question"[[/note]]. This is the rather odd situation in which a Scottish MP can vote on English education policy, but not vice versa (despite Scottish education being devolved and there being no restriction on English [=MPs=] also running as MSPs): this was exactly how top-up fees got introduced in 2004; Scottish Labour [=MPs=], who wouldn't be affected by their introduction, voted overwhelmingly in favour for them, giving the party their majority (of 5!) votes to push the legislation through. The Conservatives want Scottish [=MPs=] to be barred from these sorts of votes, while the SNP argue that that will create two tiers of [=MP]=, [=MP=], and as a UK party, they should vote on UK issues.



In most rural parts and some urban areas of England the districts are sub-divided into Civil Parishes which are run by Parish Councils despite which, despite what it looks like in the {{BritCom}} {{The Vicar of Dibley}}, have nothing to do with the Church Of England (which is also divided into parishes which are run by Parochial Church Councils). Sometimes the 2 councils may have the same people on them but they are totally seperate identies. Parish Councils have very little power normally but if they cover a small town the local district or county council may devolve certain matters to them - eg public parks. Parish Councils that cover towns are called Town Councils and some are even City Councils these councils are led by a Town or City Mayors. Some parishes have too small a population to have a council and instead have an annual parish meeting where the whole parish is invited to discuss local matters. Wales has similar bodies called Community Councils. The equivalent bodies no longer exist in Scotland or Northern Ireland.

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In most rural parts and some urban areas of England the districts are sub-divided into Civil Parishes which are run by Parish Councils despite which, despite what it looks like in the {{BritCom}} {{The Vicar of Dibley}}, have nothing to do with the Church Of England (which is also divided into parishes which are run by Parochial Church Councils). Sometimes the 2 councils may have the same people on them but they are totally seperate identies. separate entities. Parish Councils have very little power normally but if they cover a small town the local district or county council may devolve certain matters to them - eg e.g. public parks. Parish Councils that cover towns are called Town Councils and some are even City Councils these councils are led by a Town or City Mayors. Some parishes have too small a population to have a council and instead have an annual parish meeting where the whole parish is invited to discuss local matters. Wales has similar bodies called Community Councils. The equivalent bodies no longer exist in Scotland or Northern Ireland.
4th Feb '16 6:04:37 PM bluesno1fann
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* The '''Labour Party''' (231 [=MPs=], 20 [=MEPs=], 37 [=MSPs=], 26 [=AMs=]): Started off as a socialist, working man's party (hence the name) but became increasingly concerned with more liberal middle-class issues in the late 1980s and moved closer to the centre under Neil Kinnock and especially Tony Blair.[[note]]We've skipped over a thumping great chuck of their history here, but it's not something you'd make movies about. Apart from the Miners and General Strikes of UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher's time, but that's another story.[[/note]] They're now generally regarded as a centrist/centre-left social democratic party. In the mid 1990s, Blair dubbed this new vision for the party "New Labour", a piece of branding designed to distance Labour from its crazed infighting and somewhat radical left-wing early 1980s incarnation which the image-obsessed Blair thought had a negative perception amongst voters; this label has actually came to be used more as a term of abuse by the party's enemies rather than a badge of honour, and the party itself has dropped it. There was between 1994 and 2010 a dangerous divide between the Blairites, named after UsefulNotes/TonyBlair, and Brownites, named after UsefulNotes/GordonBrown, and no one was quite sure what the difference was; the general consensus was that Brown is slightly more socialist and rather more Eurosceptic.\\

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* The '''Labour Party''' (231 [=MPs=], 20 [=MEPs=], 37 [=MSPs=], 26 [=AMs=]): Started off as a socialist, working man's party (hence the name) but became increasingly concerned with more liberal middle-class issues in the late 1980s and moved closer to the centre under Neil Kinnock and especially Tony Blair.[[note]]We've skipped over a thumping great chuck of their history here, but it's not something you'd make movies about. Apart from the Miners and General Strikes of UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher's UsefulNotes/JamesCallaghan's time, but that's another story.[[/note]] They're now generally regarded as a centrist/centre-left social democratic party. In the mid 1990s, Blair dubbed this new vision for the party "New Labour", a piece of branding designed to distance Labour from its crazed infighting and somewhat radical left-wing early 1980s incarnation which the image-obsessed Blair thought had a negative perception amongst voters; this label has actually came to be used more as a term of abuse by the party's enemies rather than a badge of honour, and the party itself has dropped it. There was between 1994 and 2010 a dangerous divide between the Blairites, named after UsefulNotes/TonyBlair, and Brownites, named after UsefulNotes/GordonBrown, and no one was quite sure what the difference was; the general consensus was that Brown is slightly more socialist and rather more Eurosceptic.\\
15th Jan '16 5:36:55 AM Anddrix
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* The '''British National Party''' (BNP, colloquially known as the [[ANaziByAnyOtherName British Nazi Party]]): Proof that the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Second World War]] didn't really teach [[ViewersAreMorons some]] British people anything, they are an ultra-populist far-right (so far-right [[CriticalResearchFailure they believe the Conservatives to be Marxist]]) party and believe in withdrawal from the European Union, isolationism, strongly authoritarian anti-crime measures, "better rights" for "native" (i.e. white) Britons, and "voluntary repatriation" of what they regard as "non-native" Britons (i.e. deporting anyone who isn't white).[[note]]Nick Griffin indeed said that black Britons and Asian Britons "do not exist".[[/note]] They are usually elected in areas with high levels of racial tension. They are derided by other far-right groups such as the National Front for trying to make themselves appear respectable. They have recently been playing up their anti-immigration policies in order to gain popular support, but remain very niche and have no [=MPs=], although they have several councillors and had a few [=MEPs=] in the European Parliament from 2009 to 2014. Their colours are red white and blue, and the party's logo is a heart with a Union Jack pattern beneath.\\

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* The '''British National Party''' (BNP, colloquially known as the [[ANaziByAnyOtherName British Nazi Party]]): Proof that the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Second World War]] didn't really teach [[ViewersAreMorons some]] some British people anything, they are an ultra-populist far-right (so far-right [[CriticalResearchFailure they believe the Conservatives to be Marxist]]) party and believe in withdrawal from the European Union, isolationism, strongly authoritarian anti-crime measures, "better rights" for "native" (i.e. white) Britons, and "voluntary repatriation" of what they regard as "non-native" Britons (i.e. deporting anyone who isn't white).[[note]]Nick Griffin indeed said that black Britons and Asian Britons "do not exist".[[/note]] They are usually elected in areas with high levels of racial tension. They are derided by other far-right groups such as the National Front for trying to make themselves appear respectable. They have recently been playing up their anti-immigration policies in order to gain popular support, but remain very niche and have no [=MPs=], although they have several councillors and had a few [=MEPs=] in the European Parliament from 2009 to 2014. Their colours are red white and blue, and the party's logo is a heart with a Union Jack pattern beneath.\\
5th Jan '16 9:20:31 AM Karl304
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* '''Independents''' (4 [=MPs=][[note]]Sylvia Hermon (North Down), Michelle Thomson (Edinburgh West), Natalie [=McGarry=] (Glasgow East), Simon Danczuk (Rochdale)[[/note]], 1 [=MEP=][[note]]Janice Atkinson (Southeast England)[[/note]], 3 [=MSPs=][[note]]John Finnie (Highlands and Islands), Jean Urquhart (Highlands and Islands), John Wilson (Central Scotland)[[/note]], 2 [=MLAs=][[note]]John McCallister (South Down), Claire Sugden (East Londonderry)[[/note]]): a small part of political process, mostly being in the legislatures from elected for local issues (such as Dr. Richard Taylor, who was elected an MP in 2001 and 2005 to save his local hospital), from leaving their own party in protest to some issue (such as Sylvia Hermon, who was an ex-UUP member), or being kicked out of their own party for misbehaviour.

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* '''Independents''' (4 [=MPs=][[note]]Sylvia Hermon (North Down), Michelle Thomson (Edinburgh West), Natalie [=McGarry=] (Glasgow East), Simon Danczuk (Rochdale)[[/note]], 1 [=MEP=][[note]]Janice Atkinson (Southeast England)[[/note]], 3 [=MSPs=][[note]]John Finnie (Highlands and Islands), Jean Urquhart (Highlands and Islands), John Wilson (Central Scotland)[[/note]], 2 [=MLAs=][[note]]John McCallister [=McCallister=] (South Down), Claire Sugden (East Londonderry)[[/note]]): a small part of political process, mostly being in the legislatures from elected for local issues (such as Dr. Richard Taylor, who was elected an MP in 2001 and 2005 to save his local hospital), from leaving their own party in protest to some issue (such as Sylvia Hermon, who was an ex-UUP member), or being kicked out of their own party for misbehaviour.
5th Jan '16 9:19:48 AM Karl304
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* '''Independents''' (4 MPs, 1 [=MEP=], 3 [=MSPs=], 2 [=MLAs=]): a small part of political process, mostly being in the legislatures from elected for local issues (such as Dr. Richard Taylor, who was elected an MP in 2001 and 2005 to save his local hospital), from leaving their own party in protest to some issue (such as Sylvia Hermon, who was an ex-UUP member), or being kicked out of their own party for misbehaviour. Currently, 4 [=MPs=] (Sylvia Hermon, Michelle Thomson, Natalie [=McGarry=] and Simon Danczuk), 1 MSP, 1 MLA, and 2 [=AMs=] are officially Independent.

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* '''Independents''' (4 MPs, [=MPs=][[note]]Sylvia Hermon (North Down), Michelle Thomson (Edinburgh West), Natalie [=McGarry=] (Glasgow East), Simon Danczuk (Rochdale)[[/note]], 1 [=MEP=], [=MEP=][[note]]Janice Atkinson (Southeast England)[[/note]], 3 [=MSPs=], [=MSPs=][[note]]John Finnie (Highlands and Islands), Jean Urquhart (Highlands and Islands), John Wilson (Central Scotland)[[/note]], 2 [=MLAs=]): [=MLAs=][[note]]John McCallister (South Down), Claire Sugden (East Londonderry)[[/note]]): a small part of political process, mostly being in the legislatures from elected for local issues (such as Dr. Richard Taylor, who was elected an MP in 2001 and 2005 to save his local hospital), from leaving their own party in protest to some issue (such as Sylvia Hermon, who was an ex-UUP member), or being kicked out of their own party for misbehaviour. Currently, 4 [=MPs=] (Sylvia Hermon, Michelle Thomson, Natalie [=McGarry=] and Simon Danczuk), 1 MSP, 1 MLA, and 2 [=AMs=] are officially Independent.
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