History UsefulNotes / BritishPoliticalSystem

20th May '17 4:28:32 PM nombretomado
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In most rural parts and some urban areas of England the districts are sub-divided into Civil Parishes which are run by Parish Councils despite which, despite what it looks like in the {{BritCom}} {{The Vicar of Dibley}}, have nothing to do with the Church Of England (which is also divided into parishes which are run by Parochial Church Councils). Sometimes the 2 councils may have the same people on them but they are totally separate entities. Parish Councils have very little power normally but if they cover a small town the local district or county council may devolve certain matters to them - e.g. public parks. Parish Councils that cover towns are called Town Councils and some are even City Councils these councils are led by a Town or City Mayors. Some parishes have too small a population to have a council and instead have an annual parish meeting where the whole parish is invited to discuss local matters. Wales has similar bodies called Community Councils. The equivalent bodies no longer exist in Scotland or Northern Ireland.

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In most rural parts and some urban areas of England the districts are sub-divided into Civil Parishes which are run by Parish Councils despite which, despite what it looks like in the {{BritCom}} {{The Vicar of Dibley}}, ''Series/TheVicarOfDibley'', have nothing to do with the Church Of England (which is also divided into parishes which are run by Parochial Church Councils). Sometimes the 2 councils may have the same people on them but they are totally separate entities. Parish Councils have very little power normally but if they cover a small town the local district or county council may devolve certain matters to them - e.g. public parks. Parish Councils that cover towns are called Town Councils and some are even City Councils these councils are led by a Town or City Mayors. Some parishes have too small a population to have a council and instead have an annual parish meeting where the whole parish is invited to discuss local matters. Wales has similar bodies called Community Councils. The equivalent bodies no longer exist in Scotland or Northern Ireland.
20th May '17 12:27:50 PM ironballs16
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With the UK voting in a 2016 referendum to leave the European Union, thereby removing the party's entire reason for existence, they are now in the process of wondering what on Earth to do now. Following the referendum the party had a disastrous few months in which long-standing leader Nigel Farage retired, only for his favoured successor to be unable to stand to replace him due to not filing the correct paperwork in time (and subsequently resigning from the party following a physical altercation with another MEP). Farage's eventual successor, Diane James resigned from the leadership after just a few weeks, leaving Farage back in charge until ''another'' leadership election installed Paul Nuttall as leader. While Nuttall's appointment was widely praised by the press and claimed by some to be what the party needed to finally displace Labour, his attempt at getting into parliament via a by-election in February 2017 ended in failure, putting the party back to square one. After numerous reports of party in-fighting, their only MP, Douglas Carswell eventually decided in 2017 that he'd had enough, and left the party to sit as an indepdendent. This means UKIP now no longer has any representation in Westminster. Worse was to follow at the 2017 local elections, in which ''every single UKIP councillor'' standing for re-election was defeated, and the party only managed to gain a single councillor of the other parties.

to:

With the UK voting in a 2016 referendum to leave the European Union, thereby removing the party's entire reason for existence, they are now in the process of [[AndThenWhat wondering what on Earth to do now.now]]. Following the referendum the party had a disastrous few months in which long-standing leader Nigel Farage retired, only for his favoured successor to be unable to stand to replace him due to not filing the correct paperwork in time (and subsequently resigning from the party following a physical altercation with another MEP). Farage's eventual successor, Diane James resigned from the leadership after just a few weeks, leaving Farage back in charge until ''another'' leadership election installed Paul Nuttall as leader. While Nuttall's appointment was widely praised by the press and claimed by some to be what the party needed to finally displace Labour, his attempt at getting into parliament via a by-election in February 2017 ended in failure, putting the party back to square one. After numerous reports of party in-fighting, their only MP, Douglas Carswell eventually decided in 2017 that he'd had enough, and left the party to sit as an indepdendent. This means UKIP now no longer has any representation in Westminster. Worse was to follow at the 2017 local elections, in which ''every single UKIP councillor'' standing for re-election was defeated, and the party only managed to gain a single councillor of the other parties.
18th May '17 7:02:59 AM hszmv1
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Mostly, however, the monarch drinks tea and acts as a source of advice to the Prime Minister. Several prime ministers have attested that this is typically ''not'' just ceremony: the Queen has access to most significant government documents, and apparently, has spent several hours a day '''every''' day for the last fifty or so years going through them. There's very little she doesn't know about government policy, and her advice has proven invaluable to several Prime Ministers (UsefulNotes/TonyBlair in particular noted this, much to the annoyance of his republican wife; this is portrayed quite clearly in ''Film/TheQueen''). The current monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, is reportedly a [[OneOfUs fan]] of the new series of ''Series/DoctorWho'' and plays the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}. Contrary to popular belief, UsefulNotes/BarackObama's gift of an iPod to the Queen was not an ill-informed ''faux pas''; while it is true she already had one, she had previously mentioned that it was out of date and would really appreciate a more up to date one.

to:

Mostly, however, the monarch drinks tea and acts as a source of advice to the Prime Minister. Several prime ministers have attested that this is typically ''not'' just ceremony: the Queen has access to most significant government documents, and apparently, has spent several hours a day '''every''' day for the last fifty or so years going through them. There's very little she doesn't know about government policy, and her advice has proven invaluable to several Prime Ministers (UsefulNotes/TonyBlair in particular noted this, much to the annoyance of his republican wife; this is portrayed quite clearly in ''Film/TheQueen''). The current monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, is reportedly a [[OneOfUs fan]] of the new series of ''Series/DoctorWho'' and plays the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}. Contrary to popular belief, UsefulNotes/BarackObama's gift of an iPod to the Queen was not an ill-informed ''faux pas''; while it is true she already had one, she had previously mentioned that it was out of date and would really appreciate a more up to date one.
one.[[note]]US and UK dignitaries of late have an odd tradition of giving rather silly or somewhat tacky gifts to the visiting dignitary. There is typically the more traditional and special gift (Obama gave the Queen a rare song book signed by the creator to go with the iPod, but the sillier ones tend to get more press.[[/note]]
7th May '17 12:51:12 PM OlfinBedwere
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'''[--(329 [=MPs=], 244 Lords, 20 [=MEPs=], 30 [=MSPs=], 12 Wales [=AMs=], 8 London [=AMs=], 1 Mayor, 8,292 local.)--]'''\\

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'''[--(329 [=MPs=], 244 Lords, 20 [=MEPs=], 30 [=MSPs=], 12 Wales [=AMs=], 8 London [=AMs=], 1 Mayor, 8,292 4 Mayors, 8,850 local.)--]'''\\



'''[--(231 [=MPs=], 208 Lords, 20 [=MEPs=], 24 [=MSPs=], 29 Wales [=AMs=], 12 London [=AMs=], 13 Mayors, 7,087 local.)--]'''\\

to:

'''[--(231 [=MPs=], 208 Lords, 20 [=MEPs=], 24 [=MSPs=], 29 Wales [=AMs=], 12 London [=AMs=], 13 9 Mayors, 7,087 6,767 local.)--]'''\\



'''[--(9 [=MPs=], 105 Lords, 1 [=MEP=], 5 [=MSPs=], 1 Wales [=AM=], 1 London [=AM=], 2 elected Mayors, 2,355 local.)--]'''\\

to:

'''[--(9 [=MPs=], 105 Lords, 1 [=MEP=], 5 [=MSPs=], 1 Wales [=AM=], 1 London [=AM=], 2 elected Mayors, 2,355 2,328 local.)--]'''\\



'''[--(54 [=MPs=], 2 [=MEPs=], 63 [=MSPs=], 398 local.)--]'''\\

to:

'''[--(54 [=MPs=], 2 [=MEPs=], 63 [=MSPs=], 398 429 local.)--]'''\\



'''[--(3 [=MPs=], 1 [=MEP=], 11 Wales [=AMs=], 171 local.)--]'''\\

to:

'''[--(3 [=MPs=], 1 [=MEP=], 11 Wales [=AMs=], 171 197 local.)--]'''\\



'''[--(3 Lords, 20 [=MEPs=], 5 Wales [=AMs=], 2 London [=AMs=], 490 local.)--]'''\\

to:

'''[--(3 Lords, 20 [=MEPs=], 5 Wales [=AMs=], 2 London [=AMs=], 490 259 local.)--]'''\\



With the UK voting in a 2016 referendum to leave the European Union, thereby removing the party's entire reason for existence, they are now in the process of wondering what on Earth to do now. Following the referendum the party had a disastrous few months in which long-standing leader Nigel Farage retired, only for his favoured successor to be unable to stand to replace him due to not filing the correct paperwork in time (and subsequently resigning from the party following a physical altercation with another MEP). Farage's eventual successor, Diane James resigned from the leadership after just a few weeks, leaving Farage back in charge until ''another'' leadership election installed Paul Nuttall as leader. While Nuttall's appointment was widely praised by the press and claimed by some to be what the party needed to finally displace Labour, his attempt at getting into parliament via a by-election in February 2017 ended in failure, putting the party back to square one. After numerous reports of party in-fighting, their only MP, Douglas Carswell eventually decided in 2017 that he'd had enough, and left the party to sit as an indepdendent. This means UKIP now no longer has any representation in Westminster.

to:

With the UK voting in a 2016 referendum to leave the European Union, thereby removing the party's entire reason for existence, they are now in the process of wondering what on Earth to do now. Following the referendum the party had a disastrous few months in which long-standing leader Nigel Farage retired, only for his favoured successor to be unable to stand to replace him due to not filing the correct paperwork in time (and subsequently resigning from the party following a physical altercation with another MEP). Farage's eventual successor, Diane James resigned from the leadership after just a few weeks, leaving Farage back in charge until ''another'' leadership election installed Paul Nuttall as leader. While Nuttall's appointment was widely praised by the press and claimed by some to be what the party needed to finally displace Labour, his attempt at getting into parliament via a by-election in February 2017 ended in failure, putting the party back to square one. After numerous reports of party in-fighting, their only MP, Douglas Carswell eventually decided in 2017 that he'd had enough, and left the party to sit as an indepdendent. This means UKIP now no longer has any representation in Westminster.
Westminster. Worse was to follow at the 2017 local elections, in which ''every single UKIP councillor'' standing for re-election was defeated, and the party only managed to gain a single councillor of the other parties.
24th Apr '17 11:39:32 AM DarcyFoster
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Parliamentary debates and question times are far more rowdy than the (modern) United States Congress, with creative insults and heckling being the order of the day, but {{Floor Fight}}s are very rare. The chamber is presided over by the Speaker or one of his/her deputies. The Speaker is a non-partisan figure (once elected Speaker, they drop their party affiliation, and ascend to the Lords after retiring as an MP), and during debates in the Commons, all remarks are addressed to the Speaker; speaking directly to your opposite number and using words like "you" gets you a slapped wrist. Particularly controversial media issues may be raised in Parliament, including [[http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmhansrd/vo050117/debtext/50117-03.htm#50117-03_spnew10 this particular gem]] [[Series/BrassEye from a Conservative MP]]. The current Speaker is John Bercow, a (former) Conservative from Buckingham. The Speaker, in the event of a tie, will nearly always vote to keep debate open and will almost never vote for a bill, as doing so would create a majority where one did not exist; the main exception is if the bill is a confidence or supply measure--i.e., if the bill fails, the government collapses and either a new PM and new government must be chosen or new elections must be held--in which case the Speaker will generally vote in favor.

to:

Parliamentary debates and question times are far more rowdy than the (modern) United States Congress, with creative insults and heckling being the order of the day, but {{Floor Fight}}s are very rare. The chamber is presided over by the Speaker or one of his/her deputies. The Speaker is a non-partisan figure (once elected Speaker, they drop their party affiliation, and ascend to the Lords after retiring as an MP), and during debates in the Commons, all remarks are addressed to the Speaker; speaking directly to your opposite number and using words like "you" gets you a slapped wrist. Particularly controversial media issues may be raised in Parliament, including [[http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmhansrd/vo050117/debtext/50117-03.htm#50117-03_spnew10 this particular gem]] [[Series/BrassEye from a Conservative MP]]. The current Speaker is John Bercow, a (former) Conservative from Buckingham. The Speaker, in the event of a tie, will nearly always vote to keep debate open and will almost never vote for a bill, as doing so would create a majority where one did not exist; the main exception is if the bill is a confidence or supply measure--i.e., if the bill fails, the government collapses and either a new PM and new government must be chosen or new elections must be held--in which case the Speaker will generally vote in favor.
favour.



The Scottish Parliament, Welsh National Assembly, Northern Ireland Assembly, and the Greater London Assembly are elected for fixed terms of four years[[labelnote:although...]]For all intents and purposes they are now operating for five years each. After the Conservative/[=LibDem=] coalition passed the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin fixing the term of the Westminster Parliament to 5 years]], the date of the following Westminster Election (then 2015) coincided with the scheduled year of the next devolved elections. Westminster and devolved elections aren't allowed to happen in the same year, because apparently [[ViewersAreMorons this is confusing for the voters]]. But [[ViewersAreGeniuses referenda are seemingly okay to mix]]. Anyway. The four devolved governments were given a one-time choice of either shortening their term to three years and having elections in 2014, or extending for five years and having the elections in 2016. Doing the first option and taking the cut of one year would have solved the four-year problem until 2030 (assuming no early Westminster elections), but naturally when given the option of having a year more or a year less in power, you know which one a politician is going to choose. As it stands currently, devolved elections will *always* coincide with Westminster ones, necessitating extending the devolved government term to five years every time, unless either they decide to take the three-year option (unlikely at best), or Westminster calls an early election (difficult since the Fixed Term Act came in, but possible in certain conditions - no-confidence votes; or temporarily/permanently repealing the Act, but this requires a two-thirds majority, which the current government do not have, and Labour are unlikely to give them). However, the calling of a general election in 2017 thoretically means that this won't become an issue again until 2032.[[/labelnote]]. All devolved legislatures have an element of proportional representation in the electoral process (or in the case of Northern Ireland, are ''entirely'' proportional) to ensure that the eventual composition of the elected assembly more nearly reflects the proportion of votes cast for the various parties e.g. the Welsh Assembly has 60 members, 40 of whom are elected for geographical constituencies which match the 40 House of Commons seats which Wales has; the other 20 members are elected from regional lists to adjust the overall seat distribution in each region in line with the proportion of votes cast between the parties.

to:

The Scottish Parliament, Welsh National Assembly, Northern Ireland Assembly, and the Greater London Assembly are elected for fixed terms of four years[[labelnote:although...]]For all intents and purposes they are now operating for five years each. After the Conservative/[=LibDem=] coalition passed the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin fixing the term of the Westminster Parliament to 5 years]], the date of the following Westminster Election (then 2015) coincided with the scheduled year of the next devolved elections. Westminster and devolved elections aren't allowed to happen in the same year, because apparently [[ViewersAreMorons this is confusing for the voters]]. But [[ViewersAreGeniuses referenda are seemingly okay to mix]]. Anyway. The four devolved governments were given a one-time choice of either shortening their term to three years and having elections in 2014, or extending for five years and having the elections in 2016. Doing the first option and taking the cut of one year would have solved the four-year problem until 2030 (assuming no early Westminster elections), but naturally when given the option of having a year more or a year less in power, you know which one a politician is going to choose. As it stands currently, devolved elections will *always* coincide with Westminster ones, necessitating extending the devolved government term to five years every time, unless either they decide to take the three-year option (unlikely at best), or Westminster calls an early election (difficult since the Fixed Term Act came in, but possible in certain conditions - no-confidence votes; or temporarily/permanently repealing the Act, but this requires a two-thirds majority, which the current government do not have, and Labour are unlikely to give them). However, the calling of a general election in 2017 thoretically alongside the Scottish Government and Welsh Assembly passing legislation delaying their next elections until 2021 - and then presumably every four years afterwards - means that this issue won't become an issue come up again until 2032.[[/labelnote]].2032 for London and 2037 for the Scottish and Welsh bodies, assuming no General Elections outside of years ending in 2 or 7[[/labelnote]]. All devolved legislatures have an element of proportional representation in the electoral process (or in the case of Northern Ireland, are ''entirely'' proportional) to ensure that the eventual composition of the elected assembly more nearly reflects the proportion of votes cast for the various parties e.g. the Welsh Assembly has 60 members, 40 of whom are elected for geographical constituencies which match the 40 House of Commons seats which Wales has; the other 20 members are elected from regional lists to adjust the overall seat distribution in each region in line with the proportion of votes cast between the parties.
23rd Apr '17 7:33:09 AM DarcyFoster
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The Scottish Parliament, Welsh National Assembly, Northern Ireland Assembly, and the Greater London Assembly are elected for fixed terms of four years[[labelnote:although...]]For all intents and purposes they are now operating for five years each. After the Conservative/[=LibDem=] coalition passed the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin fixing the term of the Westminster Parliament to 5 years]], the date of the following Westminster Election (then 2015) coincided with the scheduled year of the next devolved elections. Westminster and devolved elections aren't allowed to happen in the same year, because apparently [[ViewersAreMorons this is confusing for the voters]]. But [[ViewersAreGeniuses referenda are seemingly okay to mix]]. Anyway. The four devolved governments were given a one-time choice of either shortening their term to three years and having elections in 2014, or extending for five years and having the elections in 2016. Doing the first option and taking the cut of one year would have solved the four-year problem until 2030 (assuming no early Westminster elections), but naturally when given the option of having a year more or a year less in power, you know which one a politician is going to choose. As it stands currently, devolved elections will *always* coincide with Westminster ones, necessitating extending the devolved government term to five years every time, unless either they decide to take the three-year option (unlikely at best), or Westminster calls an early election (difficult since the Fixed Term Act came in, but possible in certain conditions - no-confidence votes; or temporarily/permanently repealing the Act, but this requires a two-thirds majority, which the current government do not have, and Labour are unlikely to give them).[[/labelnote]]. All devolved legislatures have an element of proportional representation in the electoral process (or in the case of Northern Ireland, are ''entirely'' proportional) to ensure that the eventual composition of the elected assembly more nearly reflects the proportion of votes cast for the various parties e.g. the Welsh Assembly has 60 members, 40 of whom are elected for geographical constituencies which match the 40 House of Commons seats which Wales has; the other 20 members are elected from regional lists to adjust the overall seat distribution in each region in line with the proportion of votes cast between the parties.

to:

The Scottish Parliament, Welsh National Assembly, Northern Ireland Assembly, and the Greater London Assembly are elected for fixed terms of four years[[labelnote:although...]]For all intents and purposes they are now operating for five years each. After the Conservative/[=LibDem=] coalition passed the Fixed Term Parliaments Act, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin fixing the term of the Westminster Parliament to 5 years]], the date of the following Westminster Election (then 2015) coincided with the scheduled year of the next devolved elections. Westminster and devolved elections aren't allowed to happen in the same year, because apparently [[ViewersAreMorons this is confusing for the voters]]. But [[ViewersAreGeniuses referenda are seemingly okay to mix]]. Anyway. The four devolved governments were given a one-time choice of either shortening their term to three years and having elections in 2014, or extending for five years and having the elections in 2016. Doing the first option and taking the cut of one year would have solved the four-year problem until 2030 (assuming no early Westminster elections), but naturally when given the option of having a year more or a year less in power, you know which one a politician is going to choose. As it stands currently, devolved elections will *always* coincide with Westminster ones, necessitating extending the devolved government term to five years every time, unless either they decide to take the three-year option (unlikely at best), or Westminster calls an early election (difficult since the Fixed Term Act came in, but possible in certain conditions - no-confidence votes; or temporarily/permanently repealing the Act, but this requires a two-thirds majority, which the current government do not have, and Labour are unlikely to give them). However, the calling of a general election in 2017 thoretically means that this won't become an issue again until 2032.[[/labelnote]]. All devolved legislatures have an element of proportional representation in the electoral process (or in the case of Northern Ireland, are ''entirely'' proportional) to ensure that the eventual composition of the elected assembly more nearly reflects the proportion of votes cast for the various parties e.g. the Welsh Assembly has 60 members, 40 of whom are elected for geographical constituencies which match the 40 House of Commons seats which Wales has; the other 20 members are elected from regional lists to adjust the overall seat distribution in each region in line with the proportion of votes cast between the parties.
23rd Apr '17 7:16:55 AM DarcyFoster
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The House of Commons is elected for a period of 5 years (elections used to be called at any earlier time at the Prime Minister's whim, but this practice has been recently abolished in favour of fixed-term Parliaments) or can be earlier if the government loses a vote of confidence. [=MPs=] are elected on the basis that the candidate winning the most votes is declared the winner, even if they only have one more vote than the next candidate when there are multiple candidates; i.e. it is not necessary to win more than 50% of the votes cast.

to:

The House of Commons is elected for a period of 5 years (elections used to be called at any earlier time at the Prime Minister's whim, but this practice has been recently abolished in favour of fixed-term Parliaments) or can be earlier if either (a) the government loses a vote of confidence.confidence or (b) 2/3rds of the entire House of Commons votes in favour of dissolving it[[note]]this is how 2017's general election was called[[/note]]. [=MPs=] are elected on the basis that the candidate winning the most votes is declared the winner, even if they only have one more vote than the next candidate when there are multiple candidates; i.e. it is not necessary to win more than 50% of the votes cast.
9th Apr '17 1:05:17 AM Karl304
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[[AC: Current Leader: Mike Nesbitt (MLA, Strangford).]]\\

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[[AC: Current Leader: Mike Nesbitt Robin Swann (MLA, Strangford).North Antrim).]]\\
6th Apr '17 7:54:03 AM Karl304
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'''[--(5 [=MPs=][[note]]Sylvia Hermon (North Down), Michelle Thomson (Edinburgh West), Natalie [=McGarry=] (Glasgow East), Simon Danczuk (Rochdale), Douglas Carswell (Clacton)[[/note]], 1 [=MEP=][[note]]Janice Atkinson (Southeast England)[[/note]], 28 Lords [[note]]"Non-Affiliated" Lords - a distinct entity from Crossbenchers (see below)[[/note]], 3 [=MSPs=][[note]]John Finnie (Highlands and Islands), Jean Urquhart (Highlands and Islands), John Wilson (Central Scotland)[[/note]], 2 Wales [=AM=][[note]]Nathan Gill (North Wales), Dafydd Ellis-Thomas (Dwyfor Meirionnydd) [[/note]], 1 [=MLA=][[note]]Claire Sugden (East Londonderry)[[/note]], 2 Mayors [[note]]Mike Starkey (Copeland), Kate Allsop (Mansfield)[[/note]], 1,674 local--]'''\\

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'''[--(5 [=MPs=][[note]]Sylvia Hermon (North Down), Michelle Thomson (Edinburgh West), Natalie [=McGarry=] (Glasgow East), Simon Danczuk (Rochdale), Douglas Carswell (Clacton)[[/note]], 1 [=MEP=][[note]]Janice Atkinson (Southeast England)[[/note]], 28 Lords [[note]]"Non-Affiliated" Lords - a distinct entity from Crossbenchers (see below)[[/note]], 3 [=MSPs=][[note]]John Finnie (Highlands and Islands), Jean Urquhart (Highlands and Islands), John Wilson (Central Scotland)[[/note]], 2 Wales [=AM=][[note]]Nathan [=AMs=][[note]]Nathan Gill (North Wales), Dafydd Ellis-Thomas (Dwyfor Meirionnydd) [[/note]], 1 [=MLA=][[note]]Claire Sugden (East Londonderry)[[/note]], 2 Mayors [[note]]Mike Starkey (Copeland), Kate Allsop (Mansfield)[[/note]], 1,674 local--]'''\\
6th Apr '17 7:52:42 AM Karl304
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'''[--(3 [=MPs=], 1 [=MEP=], 12 Wales [=AMs=], 171 local.)--]'''\\

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'''[--(3 [=MPs=], 1 [=MEP=], 12 11 Wales [=AMs=], 171 local.)--]'''\\



'''[--(5 [=MPs=][[note]]Sylvia Hermon (North Down), Michelle Thomson (Edinburgh West), Natalie [=McGarry=] (Glasgow East), Simon Danczuk (Rochdale), Douglas Carswell (Clacton)[[/note]], 1 [=MEP=][[note]]Janice Atkinson (Southeast England)[[/note]], 28 Lords [[note]]"Non-Affiliated" Lords - a distinct entity from Crossbenchers (see below)[[/note]], 3 [=MSPs=][[note]]John Finnie (Highlands and Islands), Jean Urquhart (Highlands and Islands), John Wilson (Central Scotland)[[/note]], 1 Wales [=AM=][[note]]Nathan Gill (North Wales)[[/note]], 1 [=MLA=][[note]]Claire Sugden (East Londonderry)[[/note]], 2 Mayors [[note]]Mike Starkey (Copeland), Kate Allsop (Mansfield)[[/note]], 1,674 local--]'''\\

to:

'''[--(5 [=MPs=][[note]]Sylvia Hermon (North Down), Michelle Thomson (Edinburgh West), Natalie [=McGarry=] (Glasgow East), Simon Danczuk (Rochdale), Douglas Carswell (Clacton)[[/note]], 1 [=MEP=][[note]]Janice Atkinson (Southeast England)[[/note]], 28 Lords [[note]]"Non-Affiliated" Lords - a distinct entity from Crossbenchers (see below)[[/note]], 3 [=MSPs=][[note]]John Finnie (Highlands and Islands), Jean Urquhart (Highlands and Islands), John Wilson (Central Scotland)[[/note]], 1 2 Wales [=AM=][[note]]Nathan Gill (North Wales)[[/note]], Wales), Dafydd Ellis-Thomas (Dwyfor Meirionnydd) [[/note]], 1 [=MLA=][[note]]Claire Sugden (East Londonderry)[[/note]], 2 Mayors [[note]]Mike Starkey (Copeland), Kate Allsop (Mansfield)[[/note]], 1,674 local--]'''\\
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