History Trivia / StarTrekTheOriginalSeries

12th Dec '17 4:22:42 PM ClintEastwood
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* UnfinishedEpisode: More details [[http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Undeveloped_Star_Trek:_The_Original_Series_episodes here]].
2nd Dec '17 1:23:23 PM fruitstripegum
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** It's impossible to look at the [=PADD=]s and not be reminded of the Ipads. The same thing with isolinear chips and USB sticks.
30th Oct '17 9:27:40 AM ClintEastwood
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* ExecutiveMeddling:
** Much is made of the show’s diversity, but rarely is it acknowledged that NBC wanted that diversity [[http://web.mit.edu/21l.432/www/readings/NBC_Chapt12.pdf more than]] Creator/GeneRoddenberry.
** The network chiefs felt the initial pilot episode, "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E0TheCage The Cage]]", was too cerebral for the average viewer at home, and turned it down on those grounds. [[NetworkToTheRescue They gave the series another chance]] though, on the proviso that Gene Roddenberry gave them something with a bit more action and a bit less philosophy--and less sex. The concept of an Earthman kept in an environment where any fantasy could be brought to vivid life--with a woman (and then ''two more'' women) who could assume any form he chose--was simply too much for network execs at that time.
** The original script for " [[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E27TheAlternativeFactor}} The Alternative Factor]]" had a subplot about a romance between Lazarus and Lieutenant Masters (Janet [=MacLachlan=]). It was cut when network heads objected due to the actress playing Masters being black.[[note]]NBC's policy was notoriously ''pro''-diversity in terms of casting, but interracial romances were a different matter--they worried that it would lose Southern affiliates.[[/note]] At the same time, John Drew Barrymore, originally set to play Lazarus, quit abruptly after script rewrites changed his character too drastically. The last-minute casting of Robert Brown and the hasty rewrites that followed were one cause of the uneven story we ended up with.

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* ExecutiveMeddling:
Spock's pointed ears were almost the victim of panicky Creator/{{NBC}} executives, who were afraid that superstitious hordes of TV viewers would think he was Satanic. They went so far as to airbrush the points out of a number of promotional photographs. Creator/GeneRoddenberry managed to save Spock's ears by promising plastic surgery for the character if audience response was poor. As we know, it was anything ''but'' bad. After Spock's popularity was established, no one at NBC would ever admit to being anything but ''for'' pointed ears.
** Much is made Similarly, Roddenberry's original plan for perfect 50-50 gender equity among the crew of the show’s diversity, but rarely is ''Enterprise'' was scuttled by nervous suits who said, "Don't you see? It makes it acknowledged look like there's a lot of ''fooling around'' going on up there!" It was only with great effort that NBC wanted he was able to retain a 30% female crew.
** Uhura, the most visible female character, was denied a chance to command the ''Enterprise'' in one episode because an executive flat out told Roddenberry "we don't believe her in charge of anything". Creator/NichelleNichols got a lot of crap thrown her way by the executives for reasons
that diversity [[http://web.mit.edu/21l.432/www/readings/NBC_Chapt12.pdf today are obviously both racist and sexist; for the first season, she wasn't a regular member of the cast, and her ''fan mail was kept from her''. She almost left the show, until she met Martin Luther King Jr. at a party, who convinced her to stay on and serve as a black role model.
*** Though ironically enough, the part about not making her a regular meant she actually made
more than]] Creator/GeneRoddenberry.
money than her co-stars by getting a guest star's salary for every episode.
** The network chiefs felt original {{pilot}} episode for the initial pilot episode, "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E0TheCage original series, "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E0TheCage}} The Cage]]", was too cerebral for considered "too intellectual" by the average viewer at home, and turned it down on those grounds. [[NetworkToTheRescue They gave the series another chance]] though, on the proviso that executives, so a new one was made. Gene Roddenberry gave them something with then created the two-parter "The Menagerie" as a FramingDevice in order to utilize footage from "The Cage". "The Menagerie" won a Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation. And in a wonderful bit more action and a bit less philosophy--and less sex. The of serendipity, the story also established the concept of an Earthman kept in an environment where a "Star Trek universe" spanning decades which later became one spanning centuries with later revival series and spinoffs (with the exception of soap operas, TV series of the era rarely established any fantasy could be brought to vivid life--with a woman (and then ''two more'' women) who could assume any form he chose--was simply too much for network execs at that time.
sort of long-standing history of their fictional universes).
** The original script for " [[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E27TheAlternativeFactor}} The Alternative Factor]]" had David Gerrold suggested a subplot about for "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS2E15TheTroubleWithTribbles}} The Trouble with Tribbles]]" which would have involved two companies engaging in mutual corporate espionage, even each sabotaging the other's efforts to colonize Sherman's Planet (the tribbles would have been an element of this sabotage). This was rejected with a romance scrawl of "Big Business angle out" in the margin; in 1967 it was, at least in the eyes of the show's sponsors, utterly unacceptable to suggest that ''any'' corporation -- even centuries in the future -- might ''ever'' engage in behavior less than completely and shiningly ethical.
** The episode "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E21TheCloudMinders}} The Cloud Minders]]" was based on an outline by Gerrold, "Castles in the Sky". In his original outline, the planet's mine workers were rebelling, caught
between Lazarus and Lieutenant Masters (Janet [=MacLachlan=]). It was cut when network heads objected due to the actress playing Masters being black.[[note]]NBC's policy was notoriously ''pro''-diversity in terms of casting, but interracial romances were a two different matter--they worried that it leaders: a [[UsefulNotes/MalcolmX violent militant]] and a [[UsefulNotes/MartinLutherKingJr revolutionary pacifist]]. The story would lose Southern affiliates.[[/note]] At have culminated with Kirk literally sitting the same time, John Drew Barrymore, originally set to play Lazarus, quit abruptly after script rewrites changed his character too drastically. The last-minute casting of Robert Brown three leaders -- the militant, the pacifist, and the hasty rewrites overlords' leader -- down ''at phaserpoint'' and commanding them to talk to each other; the end would have had Kirk congratulating himself that followed at least they were one cause now ''talking'' to each other, so given enough time they'd work things out, and [=McCoy=] answering, [[WhamLine "Yes, but how many children will die in the meantime?"]] Gerrold was profoundly disappointed when the final script established that the mine-workers were only acting the way they were because of the uneven story pernicious effects of "zeenite gas" in the mines. Or as he put it, "If we ended can just get them troglytes to wear gas masks, then they'll be happy little darkies and they'll pick all the cotton we need."
*** It should be noted that some social commentary did show
up with.in the finished episode. Vanna, the miners' rep, says that now that the workers' heads will clear of the effects of the gas and they can think straight, things will change. They'll still work, but they want some equal rights...and they'll want them soon.
14th Oct '17 1:15:23 PM Sylderon
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** Possibly its ultimate triumph was that Creator/NichelleNichols's role on the show was the inspiration for Dr. Mae Jemison, ''America's first female African-American astronaut'', who later did a cameo on ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''.

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** Possibly its ultimate triumph was that Creator/NichelleNichols's role on the show was the inspiration for Dr. Mae Jemison, ''America's first female African-American astronaut'', who later did a cameo on ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''. Appropriately, Jemison contacted Houston with "Hailing frequencies open!"



** The show is often credited as the inspiration for Dr. Martin Cooper to invent the cell phone, but it also accurately predicted the tablet PC. Kirk is often shown using a stylus to sign a document on one, as we sign on electronic forms for credit card purchases today.

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** The show is often credited as the inspiration for Dr. Martin Cooper to invent the cell phone, phone (and who hasn't wished that their flip-phone made that sound effect when you snapped it open?), but it also accurately predicted the tablet PC. Kirk is often shown using a stylus to sign a document on one, as we sign on electronic forms for credit card purchases today.
3rd Oct '17 5:03:34 PM Kayube
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** During the making of "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS2E23TheOmegaGlory}} The Omega Glory]]", producer Robert Justman [[http://www.startrek.com/article/starfleet-insignia-explained informed]] costume designer William Theiss that he'd given Captain Ron Tracey an incorrect badge on his uniform; he should have had the same badge as the Enterprise crew. Justman allowed the error to stay in the episode, which may have led to the [[CommonKnowledge common fan misperception]] that the badge shapes are different for every ship, as opposed to representing the kind of assignment the character was on.
3rd Oct '17 6:55:53 AM ClintEastwood
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* CreatorsFavoriteEpisode: In a TV Guide interview two months before his death, Creator/GeneRoddenberry listed his ten favourite episodes - "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS2E1AmokTime}} Amok Time]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E14BalanceOfTerror}} Balance of Terror]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E28TheCityOnTheEdgeOfForever}} The City on the Edge of Forever]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E25TheDevilInTheDark}} The Devil in the Dark]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E5TheEnemyWithin}} The Enemy Within]]", "The Menagerie" (Two parter), "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E4TheNakedTime}} The Naked Time]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E21TheReturnOfTheArchons}} The Return of the Archons]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E3WhereNoManHasGoneBefore}} Where No Man Has Gone Before]]" and "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS2E15TheTroubleWithTribbles}} The Trouble with Tribbles]]"

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* CreatorsFavoriteEpisode: CreatorsFavoriteEpisode:
**
In a TV Guide interview two months before his death, Creator/GeneRoddenberry listed his ten favourite episodes - "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS2E1AmokTime}} Amok Time]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E14BalanceOfTerror}} Balance of Terror]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E28TheCityOnTheEdgeOfForever}} The City on the Edge of Forever]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E25TheDevilInTheDark}} The Devil in the Dark]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E5TheEnemyWithin}} The Enemy Within]]", "The Menagerie" (Two parter), "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E4TheNakedTime}} The Naked Time]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E21TheReturnOfTheArchons}} The Return of the Archons]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E3WhereNoManHasGoneBefore}} Where No Man Has Gone Before]]" and "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS2E15TheTroubleWithTribbles}} The Trouble with Tribbles]]"
2nd Oct '17 9:34:22 AM ClintEastwood
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* McLeaned / RoleEndingMisdemeanor: There are conflicting reasons as to why Janice Rand was written out of the series after only eight appearances during the first season. Creator/GeneRoddenberry has said it was a budgetary move, but others have claimed that as the show progressed her role as the Captain's Woman, or potential loved interest for Kirk became impractical. Other stories have claimed that Grace Lee Whitney was having issues with alcoholism, which was said to be affecting her work on the series. Whitney herself said she may have been let go to keep her quiet over accusations of a network executive having sexually assaulting her.

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* McLeaned / RoleEndingMisdemeanor: McLeaned[=/=]RoleEndingMisdemeanor: There are conflicting reasons as to why Janice Rand was written out of the series after only eight appearances during the first season. Creator/GeneRoddenberry has said it was a budgetary move, but others have claimed that as the show progressed her role as the Captain's Woman, or potential loved interest for Kirk became impractical. Other stories have claimed that Grace Lee Whitney was having issues with alcoholism, which was said to be affecting her work on the series. Whitney herself said she may have been let go to keep her quiet over accusations of a network executive having sexually assaulting her.



** The [[AnAesop aesop]] about the destructive futility of racial hatred in "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E15LetThatBeYourLastBattlefield}} Let That Be Your Last Battlefield]]" came shortly after the assassination of UsefulNotes/MartinLutherKingJr

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** The [[AnAesop aesop]] about the destructive futility of racial hatred in "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS3E15LetThatBeYourLastBattlefield}} Let That Be Your Last Battlefield]]" came shortly after the assassination of UsefulNotes/MartinLutherKingJrUsefulNotes/MartinLutherKingJr.
30th Sep '17 7:49:04 AM ClintEastwood
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* PostScriptSeason: After an unprecedented (at the time) letter-writing campaign saved the show from cancellation, fans were "rewarded" with a third season containing many of the show's weakest and/or goofiest episodes (even by the standards of the series), including the infamous ''[[Recap/StarTrekS3E1SpocksBrain Spock's Brain]]'' as season premiere. Since the series was always purely episodic, the usual reasons for a lackluster Post Script Season don't apply; what really killed the show was that the network promised a solid Tuesday night slot and then was moved to a [[FridayNightDeathSlot Friday... er, Saturday Night Death Slot]], violating a verbal contract with creator/producer Creator/GeneRoddenberry. He left the show in protest and had little involvement in the third season. That said, some strong episodes did churn out.
27th Sep '17 10:51:33 AM ClintEastwood
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* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Depending on the episode, the series has this going on alongside its {{Zeerust}}. Between the color palette, the miniskirts, the UsefulNotes/ColdWar Fed/Kling politics, the civil-rights-era Aesops and Chekhov's ''[[Music/TheMonkees Monkees]]'' hair, it comes across as some kind of Neo-'60s even when they aren't confronted with space hippies.
12th Sep '17 8:07:40 PM PatPayne
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** In a meta example, the actual colors for the three departments on the ship were blue (for sciences), red (for engineering, and security and miscellaneous operations) and ''lime green'' (for command/line officers). However, the velour costumes for Kirk and other green-shirts came up looking anywhere from a bright yellow to a greenish-tinged gold (as seen in the main page image) on film. A good representation of the color they were ''actually'' shooting for are the wraparound tunic and dress uniform Kirk wore on occasion, which were not made from the same material as the usual tunic. However, subsequent ''Trek'' productions have rolled with this when depicting TOS-era ''Trek'' and retroactively made gold the color, starting with ''WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries'', which colored the tunics a yellow-orange color, and the ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', which used a yellow fabric for the tunics.

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** In a meta example, the actual colors for the three departments on the ship were blue (for sciences), red (for engineering, and security and miscellaneous operations) and ''lime green'' (for command/line officers). However, the velour costumes for Kirk and other green-shirts came up looking anywhere from a bright yellow to a greenish-tinged gold (as seen in the main page image) on film. A good representation of the color they were ''actually'' shooting for are the wraparound tunic and dress uniform Kirk wore on occasion, which were not made from the same material as the usual tunic. However, subsequent ''Trek'' productions have rolled with this when depicting TOS-era ''Trek'' and retroactively made gold the color, starting with ''WesternAnimation/StarTrekTheAnimatedSeries'', which colored the tunics a yellow-orange color, and the ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode "Trials and Tribble-ations", which used a yellow fabric for the tunics.tunics that Sisko wore.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Trivia.StarTrekTheOriginalSeries