History Theatre / TheLastFiveYears

4th Jun '16 7:52:38 PM Eievie
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Added DiffLines:

-->'''Jamie''': All that I ask for\\
Is one little corner\\
One private room\\
At the back of my heart\\
Tell her I've found one\\
She sends out battalions\\
To claim it\\
And blow it apart
3rd Jun '16 8:12:17 AM Eievie
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Hang them back on the wall -\\

to:

Hang them back on the wall -\\wall--\\



Had no chance at all ...''

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Had no chance at all ...''all…''



->''No matter how I tried,''
->''All I could do was love you''
->''Hard''
->''[[TearJerker And let you go]]...''.

to:

->''No matter how I tried,''
->''All
tried,\\
All
I could do was love you''
->''Hard''
->''[[TearJerker
you\\
Hard\\
[[TearJerker
And let you go]]...''.go…]]''



A one-act, two-person [[TheMusical musical]] by Jason Robert Brown (the Tony-winning composer behind ''Theatre/{{Parade}}'' and, more lately, ''Theatre/{{Thirteen}}''), ''The Last Five Years'' tells the story of an ordinary couple as they fall in - and out of - love, inspired by Brown's own failed first marriage.

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A one-act, two-person [[TheMusical musical]] by Jason Robert Brown (the Tony-winning composer behind ''Theatre/{{Parade}}'' and, more lately, ''Theatre/{{Thirteen}}''), ''The Last Five Years'' tells the story of an ordinary couple as they fall in - and in--and out of - love, of--love, inspired by Brown's own failed first marriage.



* AdaptationExpansion: the film has an extremely minor case of this, as there are no new songs, no new singers, and only one other character who even has ''dialogue''. But it does add a couple dances (a diegetic one in "A Summer in Ohio" and a... less-diegetic one in "Moving Too Fast"), and some direct interaction between the characters during most songs. This was enough to offend some purists, who pointed out that part of the charm of the stage play is that, since the other character is absent, you are free (and, indeed, required!) to imagine for yourself what their side of the story is.

to:

* AdaptationExpansion: the film has an extremely minor case of this, as there are no new songs, no new singers, and only one other character who even has ''dialogue''. But it does add a couple dances (a diegetic one in "A Summer in Ohio" and a... a… less-diegetic one in "Moving Too Fast"), and some direct interaction between the characters during most songs. This was enough to offend some purists, who pointed out that part of the charm of the stage play is that, since the other character is absent, you are free (and, indeed, required!) to imagine for yourself what their side of the story is.



* AutoErotica: the movie throws this at "I Can Do Better Than That." For added amusement, it includes the lines, "You, and you, and nothing but you ... Fresh, undiluted and pure, top of the line, and totally mine!"

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* AutoErotica: the movie throws this at "I Can Do Better Than That." For added amusement, it includes the lines, "You, and you, and nothing but you ... you… Fresh, undiluted and pure, top of the line, and totally mine!"



* TheCastShowoff: {{Invoked}} by "Climbing Uphill". The line "...Who have been sitting like I have, and listening all day, to two hundred girls, ''belting as HIGH as they can''!" is usually used to show off the actress playing Cathy's vocal range. Also, from the same song, "Jesus Christ, I suck, I suck, I suck!" is often played ironically, having the actress sing the last "I suck" quite beautifully.
* ClingyJealousGirl: Jamie needs privacy in his daily life -- the entirety of "A Part of That" is about his constant trips to "[[ImagineSpot Jamie-Land]]," a place that is absolutely integral to his career, and how frustrated Cathy is that she can't allow herself to drag him back from them. Of course, there's also the fact that AllMenArePerverts, and Jamie ''is'' tempted by his deluge of female fans.

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* TheCastShowoff: {{Invoked}} by "Climbing Uphill". The line "...Who "…who have been sitting like I have, and listening all day, to two hundred girls, ''belting as HIGH '''high''' as they can''!" is usually used to show off the actress playing Cathy's vocal range. Also, from the same song, "Jesus Christ, I suck, I suck, I suck!" is often played ironically, having the actress sing the last "I suck" quite beautifully.
* ClingyJealousGirl: Jamie needs privacy in his daily life -- the life--the entirety of "A Part of That" is about his constant trips to "[[ImagineSpot Jamie-Land]]," [[ImagineSpot "Jamie-Land"]], a place that is absolutely integral to his career, and how frustrated Cathy is that she can't allow herself to drag him back from them. Of course, there's also the fact that AllMenArePerverts, and Jamie ''is'' tempted by his deluge of female fans.



** SelfDeprecatingHumor: ...as the pianist who isn't good enough to keep up with Cathy's sheet music.

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** SelfDeprecatingHumor: ...as SelfDeprecatingHumor: …as the pianist who isn't good enough to keep up with Cathy's sheet music.



** The first lines of the show are about how "Jamie is over and Jamie is gone... and I'm still hurting." Three songs later and five years ago, in "Moving Too Fast," Jamie sings about how "Some people analyze every detail... But I keep rolling on," using the same melody, if in a different key and tempo.
** The haunting, romantic waltz theme that plays throughout the show - and is even used as Jamie and Cathy's wedding dance - turns out to be "I Could Never Rescue You", Jamie's final farewell to his marriage.

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** The first lines of the show are about how "Jamie is over and Jamie is gone... gone… and I'm still hurting." Three songs later and five years ago, in "Moving Too Fast," Jamie sings about how "Some people analyze every detail... detail… But I keep rolling on," using the same melody, if in a different key and tempo.
** The haunting, romantic waltz theme that plays throughout the show - and show--and is even used as Jamie and Cathy's wedding dance - turns dance--turns out to be "I Could Never Rescue You", Jamie's final farewell to his marriage.



** Even worse, there's evidence that neither of them has learned from their mistakes. In "A Miracle Would Happen," Jamie mentions kinda-semi-flirting with an attractive woman... at least until Cathy shows up, "'cause she knows (they always know)", implying his unfaithful streak has gotten him in trouble before. Meanwhile, Cathy has a song about how she "gave up [her] life for the better part of a year" only to have the fellow blow her off "with a heartfelt letter"...

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** Even worse, there's evidence that neither of them has learned from their mistakes. In "A Miracle Would Happen," Jamie mentions kinda-semi-flirting with an attractive woman... woman… at least until Cathy shows up, "'cause she knows (they always know)", implying his unfaithful streak has gotten him in trouble before. Meanwhile, Cathy has a song about how she "gave up [her] life for the better part of a year" only to have the fellow blow her off "with a heartfelt letter"...letter".



* FirstLawOfTragicomedies: the show manages to use this arc, despite being, technically, neither a tragedy nor a comedy. This is primarily because Cathy is TheEeyore--out of her nine songs, there are only ''three'' where she's really happy (the wedding and then the final two of the show). In comparison, Jamie is something of a BlitheSpirit and only really starts to get frustrated around when she lightens up... but when he does, he goes so grimdark that he even manages to drag "I Can Do Better Than That" and "Goodbye Until Tomorrow" down with him.

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* FirstLawOfTragicomedies: the show manages to use this arc, despite being, technically, neither a tragedy nor a comedy. This is primarily because Cathy is TheEeyore--out of her nine songs, there are only ''three'' where she's really happy (the wedding and then the final two of the show). In comparison, Jamie is something of a BlitheSpirit and only really starts to get frustrated around when she lightens up... up… but when he does, he goes so grimdark that he even manages to drag "I Can Do Better Than That" and "Goodbye Until Tomorrow" down with him.



* HopeSpot: "See I'm Smiling" is one for Cathy. She is pleased (or trying to be) that Jamie has managed to make it out to Ohio, and is looking for ways to repair their marriage. Then she has that epic blowout...

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* HopeSpot: "See I'm Smiling" is one for Cathy. She is pleased (or trying to be) that Jamie has managed to make it out to Ohio, and is looking for ways to repair their marriage. Then she has that epic blowout...blowout…



--> '''Cathy:''' Why did I pick these shoes? Why did I pick this song? Why did I pick this career? Whyyyyyyyy?...\\
'''Pianist:''' *finally finds the next chord*\\
'''Cathy:''' ...yyyyy does this pianist '''''hate me'''''??
* InLoveWithLove: implied by "Nobody Needs To Know": "Since I need to be in love with someone... Since I ''need'' to be in love with someone..."

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--> '''Cathy:''' Why did I pick these shoes? Why did I pick this song? Why did I pick this career? Whyyyyyyyy?...\\
Whyyyyyyy…?\\
'''Pianist:''' *finally ''[finally finds the next chord*\\
'''Cathy:''' ...yyyyy
chord]''\\
'''Cathy:''' …yyyyy
does this pianist '''''hate me'''''??
'''hate me'''??
* InLoveWithLove: implied by "Nobody Needs To Know": "Since I need to be in love with someone... someone… Since I ''need'' to be in love with someone..."someone…"



** The opening riff of "Still Hurting" -- the I-VII♭-v(dim)-I sequence -- plays whenever Cathy is hurt by something Jamie does ("A Part of That" and ''all over'' "If I Didn't Believe In You").

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** The opening riff of "Still Hurting" -- the Hurting"--the I-VII♭-v(dim)-I sequence -- plays sequence--plays whenever Cathy is hurt by something Jamie does ("A Part of That" and ''all over'' "If I Didn't Believe In You").



** There's a two-note figure, the 7th of the key descending to a sharp 4th, always played on a bass instrument, which echoes through several songs. It is most prominent at the end of "A Miracle Would Happen" as Jamie is very specifically distracted by Elise, and represents his heart beginning to stray. Appropriately, it is woven throughout that entire song... and, perhaps most damningly, ''throughout "The Next Ten Minutes".''

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** There's a two-note figure, the 7th of the key descending to a sharp 4th, always played on a bass instrument, which echoes through several songs. It is most prominent at the end of "A Miracle Would Happen" as Jamie is very specifically distracted by Elise, and represents his heart beginning to stray. Appropriately, it is woven throughout that entire song... song… and, perhaps most damningly, ''throughout "The Next Ten Minutes".''



* MinimalistCast: in typical stage performances, the actors playing Jamie and Cathy are the entirety of the cast. Additionally, though there are written parts for two cellos, a violin, a guitar and an electric bass, all of them can be discarded and the entire score performed on piano, reducing the total number of performers in the show to ''three''.
* MoodWhiplash: inherent in the story's structure, since one character is always closer to the DownerEnding than the other.
* MotorMouth: the interior monologue version of "When You Come Home To Me" has about four times more lyrics than the normal one.

to:

* MinimalistCast: in In typical stage performances, the actors playing Jamie and Cathy are the entirety of the cast. Additionally, though there are written parts for two cellos, a violin, a guitar and an electric bass, all of them can be discarded and the entire score performed on piano, reducing the total number of performers in the show to ''three''.
* MoodWhiplash: inherent Inherent in the story's structure, since one character is always closer to the DownerEnding than the other.
* MotorMouth: the The interior monologue version of "When You Come Home To Me" has about four times more lyrics than the normal one.



* PepTalkSong: "The Schmuel Song", big time. It doesn't appear to be that way at first, but the story's moral is that when opportunity comes knocking, ''go for it'', even if it seems too good to be true -- you'll never know unless you try. The final verse is a direct address from Jamie to Cathy, encouraging her that she can make it as an actress.

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* PepTalkSong: "The Schmuel Song", big time. It doesn't appear to be that way at first, but the story's moral is that when opportunity comes knocking, ''go for it'', even if it seems too good to be true -- you'll true--you'll never know unless you try. The final verse is a direct address from Jamie to Cathy, encouraging her that she can make it as an actress.



* RageBreakingPoint: After ''years'' of gritting her teeth and [[StepfordSmiler smiling]] her way through various problems in her own career and marriage, Cathy finally ''snaps'' when Jamie comes to see her in Ohio and then tells her he has to leave early (in the movie, "early" is ''that night''), without seeing her show. Also, it's her birthday. She tries to calm as she calls him out ("You know what makes me crazy? I'm sorry -- can I say this? You know what makes me ''nuts''?"), but it's not long before she's screaming and crying, years of anger finally pouring out.

to:

* RageBreakingPoint: After ''years'' of gritting her teeth and [[StepfordSmiler smiling]] her way through various problems in her own career and marriage, Cathy finally ''snaps'' when Jamie comes to see her in Ohio and then tells her he has to leave early (in the movie, "early" is ''that night''), without seeing her show. Also, it's her birthday. She tries to calm as she calls him out ("You know what makes me crazy? I'm sorry -- can sorry--can I say this? You know what makes me ''nuts''?"), but it's not long before she's screaming and crying, years of anger finally pouring out.



* SettingUpdate: The 2014 film changes a few lyrics to make it clear that the show is set in the 2010s instead -- for example, Cathy sings "well-placed tattoos" instead of "looked like Creator/TomCruise" to describe an attractive guy and "these are the people who cast Creator/RussellCrowe [[Film/LesMiserables2012 in a musical]]" as opposed to "Linda Blair" to describe her frustrations with the theater industry. And she has to find Jamie's book in "a Target in Kentucky," since there are no longer any Borders open there (or, indeed, anywhere).
* ShiksaGoddess: A whole song by this title, in which Jamie rejoices that his new girlfriend is not Jewish and admits that he doesn't really care about anything else. If you were imply from this that Jamie's and Cathy's relationship is a little shallow... you might be right.

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* SettingUpdate: The 2014 film changes a few lyrics to make it clear that the show is set in the 2010s instead -- for instead--for example, Cathy sings "well-placed tattoos" instead of "looked like Creator/TomCruise" to describe an attractive guy and "these are the people who cast Creator/RussellCrowe [[Film/LesMiserables2012 in a musical]]" as opposed to "Linda Blair" to describe her frustrations with the theater industry. And she has to find Jamie's book in "a Target in Kentucky," since there are no longer any Borders open there (or, indeed, anywhere).
* ShiksaGoddess: A whole song by this title, in which Jamie rejoices that his new girlfriend is not Jewish and admits that he doesn't really care about anything else. If you were imply from this that Jamie's and Cathy's relationship is a little shallow... shallow… you might be right.



* StayInTheKitchen: defied by Cathy, who declares, "I will not be the girl stuck at home in the 'burbs / With the baby, the dog, and the garden of herbs." In the CareerVersusMan debate, she picks her career. Unfortunately, so does Jamie.

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* StayInTheKitchen: defied Defied by Cathy, who declares, "I will not be the girl stuck at home in the 'burbs / With the baby, the dog, and the garden of herbs." In the CareerVersusMan debate, she picks her career. Unfortunately, so does Jamie.



** Played With in "Moving Too Fast," Jamie's triumphant litany of newfound success. It ratchets up the half-step an astounding ''seven times times'', putting us a fifth above where we started... at which point Jason Robert Brown resolves it as a dominant, and lands us back in the original key. [[RuleOfSymbolism So, getting super excited just to go nowhere, huh?]]
*** Although also played straight with the final verse. "Out of control, ''out of control …"''

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** Played With in "Moving Too Fast," Jamie's triumphant litany of newfound success. It ratchets up the half-step an astounding ''seven times times'', putting us a fifth above where we started... started… at which point Jason Robert Brown resolves it as a dominant, and lands us back in the original key. [[RuleOfSymbolism So, getting super excited just to go nowhere, huh?]]
*** Although also played straight with the final verse. "Out of control, ''out of control …"''control…"''
25th May '16 9:50:34 AM SEGASister
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* AllMusicalsAreAdaptations: Averted; the plot is an original one, although inspired by Jason Robert Brown's failed marriage to his first wife.

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* AllMusicalsAreAdaptations: Averted; Subverted; the plot is an original one, although inspired by Jason Robert Brown's failed marriage to his first wife.
13th Apr '16 4:06:39 PM slvstrChung
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** Not to mention what ''leads'' to the aforementioned argument in "See, I'm Smiling". Jamie comes out to visit Cathy in Ohio like he promised, but tells her he "has" to leave early. That night. Without even seeing her show. ''On her birthday''. That's just plain mean, especially on any rewatches where you know that Jamie probably didn't "have" to be anywhere.

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** Not to mention what ''leads'' to the aforementioned argument in "See, I'm Smiling". Jamie comes out to visit Cathy in Ohio like he promised, but tells her he "has" to leave early. That night. Without even seeing her show. ''On her birthday''. That's just plain mean, especially on any rewatches where [[spoiler:On a rewatch, you know that Jamie probably didn't "have" he is only making a token effort to be anywhere.a supportive husband--remember, this song takes place ''after'' "Nobody Needs To Know" chronologically--making him look even more cowardly. And his reaction just confirms what she has already suspected.]]
13th Apr '16 4:00:14 PM slvstrChung
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Added DiffLines:

* TheOner: "Still Hurting" is only five shots, two short ones at either end and three stitched together using {{wipe}}s so that they appear to be a seamless whole. With the song itself over five minutes long, that's a lot of long takes. No wonder they got actors who have been on Broadway!


Added DiffLines:

** "If I Didn't Believe In You" is intended to be one, but Jamie's dissatisfaction with his marriage overwhelms it at times.
1st Apr '16 8:14:05 AM AdelePotter
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* ComplimentBackfire: in the film, Cathy has some extra lines of dialogue in "The Schmuel Song," including, "Wait, I'm ''Schmuel'' in this story?"

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* ComplimentBackfire: in the film, Cathy has some extra lines of dialogue in "The Schmuel Song," including, "Wait, I'm ''Schmuel'' in this story?"story?" By the end of the song, though, she's visibly touched.



* DownerEnding: Apart from the obvious--the breakdown of their marriage--in the end, Cathy is still trapped in the summer stock hell that is Ohio, and it's possible that Jamie's meteoric streak is waning.

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* DownerEnding: DownerEnding:
**
Apart from the obvious--the breakdown of their marriage--in the end, Cathy is still trapped in the summer stock hell that is Ohio, and it's possible that Jamie's meteoric streak is waning.



** Not to mention what ''leads'' to the aforementioned argument in "See, I'm Smiling". Jamie comes out to visit Cathy in Ohio like he promised, but tells her he "has" to leave early. That night. Without even seeing her show. ''On her birthday''. That's just plain mean, especially on any rewatches where you know that Jamie probably didn't "have" to be anywhere.



* LoveMartyr: Cathy.

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* LoveMartyr: Cathy. She puts up with a lot of shit for Jamie's sake. (Depending on your point of view, the reverse is also true.)



* RageBreakingPoint: After ''years'' of gritting her teeth and [[StepfordSmiler smiling]] her way through various problems in her own career and marriage, Cathy finally ''snaps'' when Jamie comes to see her in Ohio and then tells her he has to leave early (in the movie, "early" is ''that night''), without seeing her show. Also, it's her birthday. She tries to calm as she calls him out ("You know what makes me crazy? I'm sorry -- can I say this? You know what makes me ''nuts''?"), but it's not long before she's screaming and crying, years of anger finally pouring out.



* StylisticSuck: Cathy gets hit with this in the opening moments of "Climbing Uphill." In the Original Cast Recording and movie soundtrack, the accompanist takes off at a very sprightly pace and a half-step higher than written, forcing Sherie Rene Scott and/or Anna Kendrick to scramble in their wake. In the 2013 Off-Broadway Revival, Betsy Wolfe gets afflicted with someone who can't piano whatosever, taking some six beats before they consent to be in a key at all.
* SungThroughMusical: though not without at least a little bit of dialogue to set the scene for "If I Didn't Believe In You".

to:

* StylisticSuck: Cathy gets hit with this in the opening moments of "Climbing Uphill." In the Original Cast Recording and movie soundtrack, the accompanist takes off at a very sprightly pace and a half-step higher than written, forcing Sherie Rene Scott and/or Anna Kendrick to scramble in their wake. In the 2013 Off-Broadway Revival, Betsy Wolfe gets afflicted with someone who can't piano whatosever, whatsoever, taking some six beats before they consent to be in a key at all.
* SungThroughMusical: though not without at least a little bit of dialogue to set the scene for "If I Didn't Believe In You". Averted in the movie, which adds a bit of dialogue (though not much).
31st Mar '16 7:32:18 AM Sheepeditor
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* TheSomethingSong: "The Schmuel Song". (Strange when you consider that it could just as easily have been called "The Story of Schmuel", in accordance with the actual tale's name.)

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* TheSomethingSong: "The Schmuel Song". (Strange when you consider that Used very deliberately; while it could just as easily have would've been called easy to name the song "The Story of Schmuel", in accordance with Schmuel" after Jamie's short story, the actual tale's name.)song is ''actually'' about Cathy, who Jamie sees as a "Schmuel" because she's too afraid to pursue her dreams wholeheartedly.
31st Mar '16 7:29:13 AM Sheepeditor
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Added DiffLines:

** The sign outside Cathy's summer stock theatre is used several times as an establishing shot; however, these shots are so far apart from each other, and are so similar on first glance, it's easy to miss that the ''year'' on the sign keeps changing.
31st Mar '16 7:22:57 AM Sheepeditor
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31st Mar '16 7:17:29 AM Sheepeditor
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* {{Gaslighting}}: In "Nobody Needs To Know", Jamie admits to his unseen lover that he outright lies to Cathy about seeing another woman. In "See I'm Smiling", Cathy responds in anguish as he brushes off her (accurate) suspicions: "No I'm not, no I'm not!".

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* {{Gaslighting}}: In "Nobody Needs To Know", Jamie admits to his unseen lover that he outright lies to Cathy about seeing another woman. In the movie version of "See I'm Smiling", Cathy he goes a step further and responds in anguish as he brushes off her to Cathy's (accurate) suspicions: "No I'm not, no I'm not!".accusations by calling her "crazy".
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