History Theatre / SeventeenSeventySix

24th May '18 8:49:40 PM OPALGARNET16
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** And then, of course, there’s [[WhatTheHellHero “The issue here is independence!”]]
23rd Mar '18 3:15:11 PM Anomalocaris20
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** While mostly accurate, the song "Cool, Cool Considerate Men" contains the line "Never to the left, forever to the right". The concept of Left and Right Wing politics came about due to the French Revolution, more than a decade later.

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** While mostly accurate, A muddied example with the song "Cool, Cool Considerate Men" contains the and its line "Never to the left, forever to the right". The concept of Left and Right Wing politics came about due to the French Revolution, more than a decade later.later, which would make this terminology an anachronism under normal circumstances. InUniverse, however, they are referring to the sliding board used to track their votes, which would bring it back into historical accuracy... if said board itself were not an invention of the play.



* HeatWave: "It's hot as Hell, in Philadelphia!"

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* HeatWave: "It's hot as Hell, in Philadelphia!"[[MidwordRhyme Philadel]]-phia!"
19th Mar '18 5:24:58 PM nombretomado
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Not to be confused with a ''[[ThreeHundred 300]]'' [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTcVNuNX8yY parody]] made by ''WesternAnimation/RobotChicken''.

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Not to be confused with a ''[[ThreeHundred 300]]'' ''Film/ThreeHundred'' [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTcVNuNX8yY parody]] made by ''WesternAnimation/RobotChicken''.
17th Mar '18 11:39:03 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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* SmartPeopleKnowLatin: Edward Rutledge, although in this context it's more a marker of social class. Col. [=McKean=] mistakes it for French.

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* SmartPeopleKnowLatin: Edward Rutledge, although in this context it's more a marker of social class. [[BookDumb Col. [=McKean=] McKean]] mistakes it for French.
6th Mar '18 1:07:10 PM RoseAndHeather
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** It's heavily implied that John Adams' obnoxious attitude is at least somewhat due to his not being able to be with Abigail.

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** It's heavily implied that John Adams' obnoxious attitude is at least somewhat due to his not being able to be with Abigail. ''Another'' piece of trivia lifted straight from history; John openly admitted in an early letter to Abigail that the longer he's apart from her, the crankier he gets, and he'd been away from her for quite awhile by the time the musical is set.
6th Jan '18 4:13:13 PM snichols1973
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* NiceJobBreakingItHero: John Adams's stubbornness in insisting that the anti-slavery clause remains in the Declaration results in the delegates from Georgia and the Carolinas walking out of the convention until the offending passage is removed, which almost makes Samuel Chase's of Maryland's decision to vote for independence pointless if the clause remained in the draft.
4th Jan '18 4:42:52 PM snichols1973
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** Just when things look bleak for George Washington, the saltpeter that John requested from Abigail early on arrives a day before the final vote to help Washington turn the tide against the British.



* {{Foil}}: John Dickinson and Edward Rutledge, to Adams, Franklin and Jefferson.



* {{Hypocrite}}: When Adams objects to slavery as being an offense against God and man in addition to the "filthy purse strings", Rutledge points out how the northern colonists have profited considerably from importing slaves into the northern colonies despite not owning any themselves:
-->'''John Adams''': Economy. Always economy. There's more to this than a filthy purse-string, Rutledge! It is an offense against man and God!\\
'''Hopkins''': It's a stinking business, Mr. Rutledge, a stinking business!\\
'''Edward Rutledge''': Is it really now, Mr. Hopkins? Then what's that I smell floating down from the North? Could it be the aroma of "hy-pocrisy"? For who holds the other end of that filthy purse-string, ''Mr. Adams''? Our northern brethren are feeling a bit tender toward our black slaves. They don't keep slaves! Oh, no. But they are willing to be considerable carriers of slaves to others. They're willin'! For the shillin'. Or haven't you heard, Mr. Adams? Clink, clink.



* NotSoDifferent: "Molasses to Rum" has Rutledge spotlight the North's complicity in the slave trade.

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* NotSoDifferent: "Molasses to Rum" Rum to Slaves" has Rutledge spotlight the North's complicity in the slave trade.


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* {{Tritagonist}}: John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson on the side of independence from Britain.
** Dickinson and Rutledge, in favor of having the colonies remaining as British territories, can be considered the deuteragonists and foils to Adams, Jefferson and Franklin.
27th Dec '17 6:28:00 PM RoseAndHeather
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* HappilyMarried: John and Abigail Adams, Thomas and Martha Jefferson. Both of them, incidentally, are TruthInTelevision; the Adamses in particular were quite happily married for ''fifty-four years.'' Sadly, despite how much in love they were, Jefferson and his wife didn't have nearly as much time together, as Martha died tragically young. (The Martha Jefferson listed as Jefferson's First Lady is actually his daughter.)

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* HappilyMarried: John and Abigail Adams, Thomas and Martha Jefferson. Both of them, incidentally, are TruthInTelevision; the TruthInTelevision.
** The
Adamses in particular were quite happily married for desperately in love with each other both before and during all ''fifty-four years.'' years'' of their marriage, and wrote some of the spiciest love letters known to history during their long separations. The ''title'' of "Yours, Yours, Yours" was lifted direct from several of John's letters to Abigail, and whole passages from those letters (including "write to me with sentimental effusion") were taken almost intact from their letters as well. If anything, the musical slightly ''underplays'' the depths of trust, love, and affection between them.
**
Sadly, despite how much in love they were, Jefferson and his wife didn't have nearly as much time together, as Martha died tragically young. (The Martha Jefferson listed as Jefferson's First Lady is actually his daughter.)
18th Dec '17 12:06:59 PM WillDraco
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-->'''Adams:''' I won't be in the history books anyway, only you. Franklin did this and Franklin did that and Franklin did some other damn thing. Franklin smote the ground and out sprang George Washington, fully grown and on his horse. Franklin then electrified him with his miraculous lightning rod and the three of them -- Franklin, Washington, and the horse -- conducted the entire revolution by themselves.

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-->'''Adams:''' I won't be in the history books anyway, only you. Franklin did this and Franklin did that and Franklin did some other damn thing. Franklin smote the ground and out sprang George Washington, fully grown and on his horse. Franklin then electrified him with his miraculous lightning rod and the three of them -- Franklin, Washington, and the horse -- conducted the entire revolution all by themselves.
4th Dec '17 3:09:46 PM Teakay
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* RhetoricalQuestionBlunder: "But, Mr. Adams" --
-->'''Adams:''' Now then, sir, will you be a patriot? Or a lover?\\
''(beat)''\\
'''Jefferson:''' A lover.\\
'''Adams:''' ''No!''
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