History Theatre / InheritTheWind

11th Jul '16 5:27:05 PM SoapheadChurch
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* WantingIsBetterThanHaving: Attorney Henry Drummond tells a story about a rocking horse he wanted when he was a child. It was far too expensive for his family to get for him, but his father scrimped and saved and managed to purchase the rocking horse for Drummond as a Christmas present. And the first time Drummond got on it to ride, it fell apart from dry rot. The Horse looked shiny, new and wonderful on the outside, but was really rotten to the core. This is a metaphor for his view on the fundamentalist literal interpretation of the Bible. The scrimping and saving, and the grief of the realization, might also be part of the analogy, respectively standing for the hardship and hopes stored up in the struggle for salvation, and the possible overwhelming sadness that comes from realizing that work was wasted and those hopes false if it turns out they were.

to:

* WantingIsBetterThanHaving: Attorney Henry Drummond tells a story about a rocking horse he wanted when he was a child. It was far too expensive for his family to get for him, but his father scrimped and saved and managed to purchase the rocking horse for Drummond as a Christmas present. And the first time Drummond got on it to ride, it fell apart from dry rot. The Horse looked shiny, new and wonderful on the outside, but was really rotten to the core. This is a metaphor for his view on the fundamentalist literal interpretation of the Bible. The scrimping Bible: the outward displays of piety and saving, and righteousness do nothing more than hide the grief moral decay of the realization, might also be part of the analogy, respectively standing for the hardship and hopes stored up in the struggle for salvation, and the possible overwhelming sadness that comes from realizing that work was wasted and those hopes false if it turns out they were.community.
11th Jul '16 4:40:52 PM SoapheadChurch
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* AntiVillain: The worst you could say about Brady is that he's a pompous blowhard. Despite his posturing and sanctimonious oratory, he's a decent enough man, especially when compared to the madly fanatical Reverend Brown. Likewise with Hornbeck; he may be a misanthropic {{Jerkass}}, but he's only barely antagonistic enough to qualify for this trope.

to:

* AntiVillain: The worst you could say about Brady is that he's a pompous blowhard. Despite his posturing and sanctimonious oratory, he's a decent enough man, especially when compared to the madly fanatical Reverend Brown. Likewise with Hornbeck; he may be a misanthropic {{Jerkass}}, but he's only barely antagonistic enough to qualify for this trope.as a villain at all.
11th Jul '16 4:38:28 PM SoapheadChurch
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[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inherit_the_Wind Speaking of what the other wiki says,]] the play was intended as a criticism of of the [[RedScare anti-Communist hysteria]] of TheFifties. However, with the newly-reborn debate on evolution versus creationism, the film is often shown at face value without the [=McCarthyism=] subtext being considered. ''And it still works beautifully.''

to:

[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inherit_the_Wind Speaking of what the other wiki says,]] the play was intended as a criticism of of the [[RedScare anti-Communist hysteria]] of TheFifties. However, with the newly-reborn debate on evolution versus creationism, the film is often shown at face value without the [=McCarthyism=] subtext being considered. ''And it still works beautifully.''
2nd Jun '16 5:38:32 PM PaulA
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* RippedFromTheHeadlines: Play is based on the actual Scopes Monkey Trial in the 1920s, but is supposed to be an allegory for the then-current McCarthy witch-hunts that dominated the headlines.

to:

* RippedFromTheHeadlines: Play is based on the actual Scopes Monkey Trial in the 1920s, but is supposed to be an allegory for the then-current McCarthy [[UsefulNotes/JosephMcCarthy McCarthy]] witch-hunts that dominated the headlines.
2nd May '16 11:02:06 PM SoapheadChurch
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* PunchClockVillain: One interpretation of Brady. This was certainly true of his real life counterpart: as much as Bryan was an anti-evolutionist crusader, the affair in Dayton was more or less something to occupy his time in retirement.

to:

* PunchClockVillain: One interpretation of Brady. This was certainly true of his real life counterpart: counterpart (the "Punch-Clock" part, anyway): as much as Bryan was an anti-evolutionist crusader, the affair in Dayton was more or less something to occupy his time in retirement.
2nd May '16 8:19:22 PM SoapheadChurch
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* AmoralAttorney: Brady's more interested in preaching than prosecuting and his religious devotion is more or less a way to be famous, compensating for all the times he's failed to become president. In contrast, the town accuses Drummond of taking the case solely to denounce religion, though Drummond is an agnostic who has nothing against religion save for the fundamentalists' literal interpretation of the Bible.
** The ending, by showing Drummond's familiarity with Biblical passages and Hornbeck's disgusted reaction, shows that the former is quite familiar with and respectful of the Bible, having taken up the case not out of hostility to religion but because of his devotion to freedom of thought. Earlier, Drummond makes this plain: "The Bible is a book. It's a good book, but it is not the ''only'' book."

to:

* AmoralAttorney: Brady's more interested in preaching than prosecuting and his religious devotion is more or less a way to be famous, compensating for all the times he's failed to become president. In contrast, the town accuses Drummond of taking the case solely to denounce religion, though Drummond is an agnostic who has nothing against religion save for the fundamentalists' literal interpretation of the Bible.
**
Bible. The ending, by showing Drummond's familiarity with Biblical passages and Hornbeck's disgusted reaction, shows that the former is quite familiar with and respectful of the Bible, having taken up the case not out of hostility to religion but because of his devotion to freedom of thought. Earlier, Drummond makes this plain: "The Bible is a book. It's a good book, but it is not the ''only'' book."



* CourtroomAntic: A lot of them. Badgering witnesses, limiting the defense's options by claiming areas of science irrelevant to the case at hand, and of course, direct-examining the prosecutor. TruthInTelevision for the real case too-it was an absolute ''circus''.

to:

* CourtroomAntic: A lot of them. Badgering witnesses, limiting the defense's options by claiming areas of science irrelevant to the case at hand, and of course, direct-examining the prosecutor. TruthInTelevision for the real case too-it too: it was an absolute ''circus''.



* HolierThanThou: Reverend Brown.

to:

* HolierThanThou: Reverend Brown. Even Brady is appalled by his display.



* HollywoodLaw: There are so, so many instances of this (however much of it's actually TruthInTelevision (the entire trial was staged).

to:

* HollywoodLaw: There are so, so many instances of this (however much of it's actually TruthInTelevision (the TruthInTelevision, since the entire trial was staged).



* PenultimateOutburst: Drummond's brush with a contempt charge.

to:

* PenultimateOutburst: Drummond's brush with a contempt charge. This also happened in the real trial, but in a far more subdued manner than in the play.



* PunchClockVillain: One interpretation of Brady.

to:

* PunchClockVillain: One interpretation of Brady. This was certainly true of his real life counterpart: as much as Bryan was an anti-evolutionist crusader, the affair in Dayton was more or less something to occupy his time in retirement.



* RippedFromTheHeadlines

to:

* RippedFromTheHeadlinesRippedFromTheHeadlines: Play is based on the actual Scopes Monkey Trial in the 1920s, but is supposed to be an allegory for the then-current McCarthy witch-hunts that dominated the headlines.



* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Deliberately dramatized from the actual trial, which naturally means that many aspect of the film contradict the actual facts of the Scopes trial:

to:

* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Deliberately dramatized from the actual trial, which naturally means that many aspect aspects of the film contradict the actual facts of the Scopes trial:



** H.L. Mencken's participation in the whole affair is magnified. In reality, he merely commentated irreverently from the sidelines for the ''Baltimore Sun'' and actually left Dayton before the trial was over. He thus also missed Darrow's examination of Bryan, something he sorely regretted.

to:

** H.L. Mencken's participation in the whole affair is magnified. In reality, he merely commentated irreverently from the sidelines for the ''Baltimore Sun'' and actually left Dayton before the trial was over. He thus also therefore missed Darrow's examination of Bryan, something he sorely regretted.



* WantingIsBetterThanHaving: Attorney Henry Drummond tells a story about a rocking horse he wanted when he was a child. It was far too expensive for his family to get for him, but his father scrimped and saved and managed to purchase the rocking horse for Drummond as a Christmas present. And the first time Drummond got on it to ride, it fell apart from dry rot. The Horse looked shiny, new and wonderful on the outside, but was really rotten to the core. This is a metaphor for his view on the fundamentalist literal interpretation of the Bible. The scrimping and saving, and the depressiveness of the realization, might also be part of the analogy, respectively standing for the hardship and hopes stored up in the struggle for salvation, and the possible overwhelming sadness that comes from realizing that work was wasted and those hopes false if it turns out they were.

to:

* WantingIsBetterThanHaving: Attorney Henry Drummond tells a story about a rocking horse he wanted when he was a child. It was far too expensive for his family to get for him, but his father scrimped and saved and managed to purchase the rocking horse for Drummond as a Christmas present. And the first time Drummond got on it to ride, it fell apart from dry rot. The Horse looked shiny, new and wonderful on the outside, but was really rotten to the core. This is a metaphor for his view on the fundamentalist literal interpretation of the Bible. The scrimping and saving, and the depressiveness grief of the realization, might also be part of the analogy, respectively standing for the hardship and hopes stored up in the struggle for salvation, and the possible overwhelming sadness that comes from realizing that work was wasted and those hopes false if it turns out they were.
1st May '16 9:35:22 PM Fireblood
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* YouCanNotKillAnIdea: Works both ways. The Fundamentalists do their spiteful best to "kill" the concept of evolution because, for some, they fear science will come and "kill" their literal view of the Bible.

to:

* YouCanNotKillAnIdea: Works both ways. The Fundamentalists fundamentalists do their spiteful best to "kill" the concept of evolution because, for some, they fear science will come and "kill" their literal view of the Bible.
Bible.
1st May '16 6:05:18 PM Fireblood
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** Scopes was not a lone renegade teaching evolution in open defiance of the law. Every teacher in the state taught from the same biology textbook -- Civil Biology -- and thus every teacher in Dayton was violating the law. Any of them could have been a potential defendant.

to:

** Scopes was not a lone renegade teaching evolution in open defiance of the law. Every teacher in the state taught from the same biology textbook -- Civil Civic Biology -- and thus every teacher in Dayton was violating the law. Any of them could have been a potential defendant. When the law passed, the state university openly declared they would not stop teaching evolution, and were never punished for it. The law itself seems to have simply a means of "looking" good by the politicians to the fundamentalist Tennesseans.



** H.L. Mencken's participation in the whole affair is maginified. In reality, he merely commentated irreverently from the sidelines for the ''Baltimore Sun'' and actually left Dayton before the trial was over. He also missed Darrow's examination of Bryan, something he sorely regretted.

to:

** H.L. Mencken's participation in the whole affair is maginified.magnified. In reality, he merely commentated irreverently from the sidelines for the ''Baltimore Sun'' and actually left Dayton before the trial was over. He thus also missed Darrow's examination of Bryan, something he sorely regretted.
1st May '16 5:18:47 PM Fireblood
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Originally a 1955 play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee, then filmed in 1960 (and adapted for television three times between 1965 and 1999), ''Inherit The Wind'' is a very (''very'') fictionalized account of the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scopes_Trial Scopes Monkey Trial]]," a 1925 Tennessee court case which revolved around the teaching of UsefulNotes/CharlesDarwin's Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection in public schools. The whole thing was actually a publicity stunt by the backwater town of Dayton, TN, leading to the trial being sensationalized beyond belief. It kind of went OffTheRails from there, bringing many (at the time) 'incontrovertible' tenets of American thought, such as a literal interpretation of Literature/TheBible, to question.

The play revolves primarily around Bert Cates, a schoolteacher in the small, "simple" town of Hillsboro. Bert is arrested for teaching the theory of evolution in his class in violation of a state law, and the film opens with him being hauled bodily out of his classroom by the police. The town's mayor initially wants to keep the whole affair quiet, some of the more prominent members of the community urge him to drop the matter entirely...but others (especially in the film; see below) agitate for ''more'' publicity, hoping to raise their town's profile to the national stage. That side wins when Matthew Harrison Brady -- [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed the analogue of]] William Jennings Bryan -- announces that he's coming to Hillsboro to assist the prosecution. Cates writes to a newspaper in Baltimore for assistance, and is presented with Henry Drummond (Clarence Darrow by another name) as his defense attorney, and E.K. Hornbeck (standing in for Creator/HLMencken) [[LemonyNarrator as a chronicler]].

The film version was well received, directed by Creator/StanleyKramer with Creator/SpencerTracy as Drummond, Creator/FredricMarch as Brady, [[TheOtherDarrin Dick York]] as Cates, Creator/HarryMorgan as the judge, and ([[PlayingAgainstType surprisingly]]) Creator/GeneKelly as the all-snarking, never-dancing Hornbeck. It takes a few more liberties from the real trial than the play does, but also incorporates more of the trial transcript; [[RealityIsUnrealistic today, most people thinking of the real trial instead remember details from the film]]. The film also has the distinction of being the first in-flight movie, according to TheOtherWiki.

to:

Originally a 1955 play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee, then filmed in 1960 (and adapted for television three times between 1965 and 1999), ''Inherit The Wind'' is a very (''very'') fictionalized account of the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scopes_Trial Scopes Monkey Trial]]," a 1925 Tennessee court case which revolved around the teaching of UsefulNotes/CharlesDarwin's Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection in public schools. The whole thing was actually a publicity stunt by the backwater town of Dayton, TN, leading to the trial being sensationalized beyond belief. It kind of went OffTheRails from there, bringing many (at the time) 'incontrovertible' tenets of American thought, such as a literal interpretation of Literature/TheBible, to into question.

The play revolves primarily around Bert Cates, a schoolteacher in the small, "simple" town of Hillsboro. Bert is arrested for teaching the theory of evolution in his class in violation of a state law, and the film opens with him being hauled bodily out of placed under arrest before his classroom class by the police. The town's mayor initially wants to keep the whole affair quiet, and some of the more prominent members of the community urge him to drop the matter entirely...but others (especially in the film; see below) agitate for ''more'' publicity, hoping to raise their town's profile to the national stage. That side wins when Matthew Harrison Brady -- [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed the analogue of]] William Jennings Bryan -- announces that he's coming to Hillsboro to assist the prosecution. Cates writes to a newspaper in Baltimore for assistance, and is presented with Henry Drummond (Clarence Darrow by another name) as his defense attorney, and E.K. Hornbeck (standing in for Creator/HLMencken) [[LemonyNarrator as a chronicler]].

The film version was well received, directed by Creator/StanleyKramer with Creator/SpencerTracy as Drummond, Creator/FredricMarch as Brady, [[TheOtherDarrin Dick York]] as Cates, Creator/HarryMorgan as the judge, and ([[PlayingAgainstType surprisingly]]) Creator/GeneKelly as the all-snarking, never-dancing Hornbeck. It takes a few more liberties from with the real trial story than the play does, but also incorporates more of the trial transcript; [[RealityIsUnrealistic today, most people thinking of the real trial instead remember details from the film]]. The film also has the distinction of being the first in-flight movie, according to TheOtherWiki.



* AlasPoorVillain: Brady's downfall is played completely tragically, as he inadvertently makes himself look like a fool in front of the courtroom audience, suffers a massive VillainousBreakdown, and suffers a heart attack right in the court room. Drummond especially doesn't take any joy in seeing his WorthyOpponent die in such a pathetic fashion.
* AntiVillain: The worst you could say about Brady is that he's a pompous blowhard. Despite his posturing and sanctimonious oratory, he's a decent enough man, especially when compared to the madly fanatical Reverend Brown. Likewise with Hornbeck; he may be a misanthropic {{Jerkass}}, but he's only barely antagonistic enough to qualify for this trope..

to:

* AlasPoorVillain: Brady's downfall is played completely tragically, as he inadvertently makes himself look like a fool in front of the courtroom audience, suffers a massive VillainousBreakdown, and suffers a heart attack right in the court room. Drummond especially doesn't take any joy in seeing his WorthyOpponent die in such a pathetic fashion.
fashion, especially since they had been friends and allies during his presidential campaigns of the past.
* AntiVillain: The worst you could say about Brady is that he's a pompous blowhard. Despite his posturing and sanctimonious oratory, he's a decent enough man, especially when compared to the madly fanatical Reverend Brown. Likewise with Hornbeck; he may be a misanthropic {{Jerkass}}, but he's only barely antagonistic enough to qualify for this trope..trope.



* CollapsedMidSpeech: Brady is giving his closing speech, which his old and weary voice tries and fails to make sound passionate. After the microphone is taken away from him, he desperately tries to continue, but suddenly falls silent and collapses. As he is carried out of the courtroom in a semi-conscious state, he strangely starts speaking on being inaugurated as President. He dies offstage soon after. TruthInTelevision, as Bryan actually did die (in his sleep) five days later.

to:

* CollapsedMidSpeech: Brady is giving his closing speech, which his old and weary voice tries and fails to make sound passionate. After the microphone is taken away from him, he desperately tries to continue, but suddenly falls silent and collapses. As he is carried out of the courtroom in a semi-conscious state, he strangely starts speaking on being inaugurated as President.President, reflecting his failed hopes. He dies offstage soon after. TruthInTelevision, as Bryan actually did die (in his sleep) five days later.



* CourtroomAntic: A lot of them. Badgering witnesses, limiting the defense's options by claiming areas of science not relevant to the case at hand, and of course, direct-examining the prosecutor.

to:

* CourtroomAntic: A lot of them. Badgering witnesses, limiting the defense's options by claiming areas of science not relevant irrelevant to the case at hand, and of course, direct-examining the prosecutor.prosecutor. TruthInTelevision for the real case too-it was an absolute ''circus''.



* FamedInStory: Brady and Drummond are respectively the champions of tradition and secularism in the United States.

to:

* FamedInStory: Brady and Drummond are respectively the champions of tradition traditional religion and secularism in the United States.



* HeelRealization: While it doesn't stop him from participating in the trial in any sense, Brady has a serious OhCrap moment when his wife screams at him in the middle of his verbal beatdown of Rachel. Upon snapping out of his righteous fury and realizing that he's driven her to tears, Brady sheepishly backs away and suggests the witness should be excused.

to:

* HeelRealization: While it doesn't stop him from participating in the trial in any sense, Brady has a serious OhCrap moment when his wife screams at him in the middle of his verbal beatdown beat down of Rachel. Upon On snapping out of his righteous fury and realizing that he's driven her to tears, Brady sheepishly backs away and suggests the witness should be excused.



* HollywoodAtheist: Hornbeck. Interestingly, his views aren't all that different from his real life counterpart.

to:

* HollywoodAtheist: Hornbeck. Interestingly, his His views aren't all that different from his real life counterpart.



** Also, Brady badgering Rachel (though that may have been allowed because the town adores him).

to:

** Also, Brady badgering Rachel (though that may have been allowed because the town adores him).
18th Mar '16 7:40:39 PM SoapheadChurch
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** The cross-examination is mis-characterized as well. The point of the the cross-examination was not to reveal Bryan's ignorance of the Bible, but to make the point that a literal interpretation of the Bible was at odds with common sense and well-established facts, that Bryan himself did not actually believe in a literal interpretation in many areas, and that many of Bryan's beliefs were not based on the Bible, but traditions that emerged centuries later. This was legally relevant, as the statute required the offender to teach the theory of evolution '''and''' contradict the Bible; if it could be proven that the theory of evolution did not necessarily contradict the Bible, then Scopes was not guilty.
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