History Theatre / InheritTheWind

31st Oct '17 5:36:52 AM cynicalcylon
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Originally a 1955 play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee, then filmed in 1960 (and adapted for television three times between 1965 and 1999), ''Inherit The Wind'' is a very (''very'') fictionalized account of the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scopes_Trial Scopes Monkey Trial]]," a 1925 Tennessee court case which revolved around the teaching of UsefulNotes/CharlesDarwin's Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection in public schools. The whole thing was actually a publicity stunt by the backwater town of Dayton, TN, leading to the trial being sensationalized beyond belief. It kind of went OffTheRails from there, bringing many (at the time) 'incontrovertible' tenets of American thought, such as a literal interpretation of Literature/TheBible, into question.

The play revolves primarily around Bert Cates, a schoolteacher in the small, "simple" town of Hillsboro. Bert is arrested for teaching the theory of evolution in his class in violation of a state law, and the film opens with him being placed under arrest before his class by the police. The town's mayor initially wants to keep the whole affair quiet, and some of the more prominent members of the community urge him to drop the matter entirely...but others (especially in the film; see below) agitate for ''more'' publicity, hoping to raise their town's profile to the national stage. That side wins when Matthew Harrison Brady -- [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed the analogue of]] William Jennings Bryan -- announces that he's coming to Hillsboro to assist the prosecution. Cates writes to a newspaper in Baltimore for assistance, and is presented with Henry Drummond (Clarence Darrow by another name) as his defense attorney, and E.K. Hornbeck (standing in for Creator/HLMencken) [[LemonyNarrator as a chronicler]].

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Originally a 1955 play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee, then filmed in 1960 (and adapted for television three times between 1965 and 1999), ''Inherit The Wind'' is a very (''very'') fictionalized account of the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scopes_Trial Scopes Monkey Trial]]," a 1925 Tennessee court case which revolved around the teaching of UsefulNotes/CharlesDarwin's Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection in public schools. The whole thing was actually a publicity stunt by the backwater town of Dayton, TN, leading to the trial being sensationalized beyond belief. It kind of went OffTheRails from there, bringing many (at the time) 'incontrovertible' tenets of American thought, such as a literal interpretation of Literature/TheBible, into question.

The play revolves primarily around Bert Bertram Cates, a schoolteacher in the small, "simple" town of "Heavenly" Hillsboro. Bert is arrested for teaching the theory of evolution in his class in violation of a state law, and the film opens with him being placed under arrest before his class by the police. The town's mayor initially wants to keep the whole affair quiet, and some of the more prominent members of the community urge him to drop the matter entirely...but others (especially in the film; see below) agitate for ''more'' publicity, hoping to raise their town's profile to the national stage. That side wins when Matthew Harrison Brady -- [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed the analogue of]] William Jennings Bryan -- announces that he's coming to Hillsboro to assist the prosecution. Cates writes to a newspaper in Baltimore for assistance, and is presented with Henry Drummond (Clarence Darrow by another name) as his defense attorney, and E.K. Hornbeck (standing in for Creator/HLMencken) [[LemonyNarrator as a chronicler]].
4th Jul '17 12:37:12 AM dbdude01
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Added DiffLines:

* NeverMyFault: In this case it's more "never my side's fault" after the crowd calls for Cates's death and Rev. Brown prays for his daughter to be damned, Brady tells Drummond that it was wrong, "but they were driven to it by the world around them, your world."
1st Jul '17 4:44:11 PM nombretomado
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The film version was well received, directed by Creator/StanleyKramer with Creator/SpencerTracy as Drummond, Creator/FredricMarch as Brady, [[TheOtherDarrin Dick York]] as Cates, Creator/HarryMorgan as the judge, and ([[PlayingAgainstType surprisingly]]) Creator/GeneKelly as the all-snarking, never-dancing Hornbeck. It takes a few more liberties with the real story than the play does, but also incorporates more of the trial transcript; [[RealityIsUnrealistic today, most people thinking of the real trial instead remember details from the film]]. The film also has the distinction of being the first in-flight movie, according to TheOtherWiki.

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The film version was well received, directed by Creator/StanleyKramer with Creator/SpencerTracy as Drummond, Creator/FredricMarch as Brady, [[TheOtherDarrin Dick York]] as Cates, Creator/HarryMorgan as the judge, and ([[PlayingAgainstType surprisingly]]) Creator/GeneKelly as the all-snarking, never-dancing Hornbeck. It takes a few more liberties with the real story than the play does, but also incorporates more of the trial transcript; [[RealityIsUnrealistic today, most people thinking of the real trial instead remember details from the film]]. The film also has the distinction of being the first in-flight movie, according to TheOtherWiki.
Wiki/TheOtherWiki.
27th Jun '17 1:30:55 AM SoapheadChurch
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* AntiVillain: The worst you could say about Brady is that he's a pompous blowhard. Despite his posturing and sanctimonious oratory, he's a decent enough man, especially when compared to the madly fanatical Reverend Brown. Likewise with Hornbeck; he may be a misanthropic {{Jerkass}}, but he's only barely antagonistic enough to qualify as a villain at all.

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* AntiVillain: The worst you could say about Brady is that he's a pompous blowhard.blowhard; his fundamentalism is motivated by his affection for the common man rather than ignorance or intolerance. Despite his posturing and sanctimonious oratory, he's a decent enough man, especially when compared to the madly fanatical Reverend Brown. Likewise with Hornbeck; he may be a misanthropic {{Jerkass}}, but he's only barely antagonistic enough to qualify as a villain at all.



** Hornbeck goes too far with his [[HollywoodAtheist cynicism]] when he refuses to show [[DueToTheDead due respect after the death]] of [[spoiler:Brady]] at the end of the movie.

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** Hornbeck goes too far with his [[HollywoodAtheist cynicism]] when he refuses to show [[DueToTheDead due respect after the death]] of [[spoiler:Brady]] Brady at the end of the movie.



** Drummond is portrayed as an old friend of Brady and his wife. In real life, Darrow nursed a serious grudge against Bryan due to a political rivalry early in their careers and his hatred of fundamentalism on principle. Bryan himself didn't think much of Darrow and for her part, Mary Bryan absolutely despised Darrow. Darrow expressed little of Drummond's reverence at [[spoiler: Bryan/Brady's death.]]

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** Drummond is portrayed as an old friend of Brady and his wife. In real life, Darrow nursed a serious grudge against Bryan due to a political rivalry early in their careers and his hatred of fundamentalism on principle. Bryan himself didn't think much of Darrow and for her part, Mary Bryan absolutely despised Darrow. When Bryan died, Darrow expressed little of mocked him remorselessly, as opposed to Drummond's reverence at [[spoiler: Bryan/Brady's death.]]Brady's death.



** Brady loses it in court and starts yelling the names of all the books in the Old Testament even though no one is listening to him anymore. The breakdown continues to the next day and [[spoiler: up to his death. As he dies, all the pent-up speeches he was to make if elected President finally come out]]. This may also count as a HeroicBSOD.
** Hornbeck, previously a DeadpanSnarker with no real emotional attachment to anything, gets really pissed off when Drummond chews him out for [[spoiler: insulting Brady after his death]]. He even slips up in insulting Drummond, calling him an "atheist who believes in God!"

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** Brady loses it in court and starts yelling the names of all the books in the Old Testament even though no one is listening to him anymore. The breakdown continues to the next day and [[spoiler: up to his death. As he dies, all the pent-up speeches he was to make if elected President finally come out]].out. This may also count as a HeroicBSOD.
** Hornbeck, previously a DeadpanSnarker with no real emotional attachment to anything, gets really pissed off when Drummond chews him out for [[spoiler: insulting Brady after his death]].death. He even slips up in insulting Drummond, calling him an "atheist who believes in God!"
15th Apr '17 10:46:45 PM dbdude01
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* PunchClockVillain: One interpretation of Brady. This was certainly true of his real life counterpart (the "Punch-Clock" part, anyway): as much as Bryan was an anti-evolutionist crusader, the affair in Dayton was more or less something to occupy his time in retirement.

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* PunchClockVillain: One interpretation of Brady. This was certainly true of his real life counterpart (the "Punch-Clock" part, anyway): as much as Bryan was an anti-evolutionist crusader, the affair in Dayton was more or less something to occupy his time in retirement. The local prosecutor who happily takes a backseat to Brady also qualifies.
9th Oct '16 4:38:17 PM AnotherGuy
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Added DiffLines:

* WhatYouAreInTheDark: A TropeCodifier with the "lonelist" speech:
-->'''Robert:''' It's the loneliest feeling in the world-to find yourself standing up when everybody else is sitting down. To have everybody look at you and say, "What's the matter with him?" I know. I know what it feels like. Walking down an empty street, listening to the sound of your own footsteps. Shutters closed, blinds drawn, doors locked against you. And you aren't sure whether you're walking toward something, or if you're just walking away.
23rd Aug '16 2:31:10 PM margdean56
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* BadassPacifist: Drummond is an aging man who takes a lot heat from everybody, but he never loses his cool demeanor and instead turns words into weapons to defend his cause with a respect-worthy dignity. All in the middle of a hostile town where death threats are matter-of-factly sung.

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* BadassPacifist: Drummond is an aging man who takes a lot of heat from everybody, but he never loses his cool demeanor and instead turns words into weapons to defend his cause with a respect-worthy dignity. All in the middle of a hostile town where death threats are matter-of-factly sung.



* CoolTeacher: The implication is Cates is one and well-respected by his students. There is even a switch moment when Drummond and Hornbeck see a group of young men staring at them and approach, ask if they are there to help Mr. Cates, then ask if they need help carrying their luggage.

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* CoolTeacher: The implication is that Cates is one and well-respected by his students. There is even a switch moment when Drummond and Hornbeck see a group of young men staring at them and approach, ask if they are there to help Mr. Cates, then ask if they need help carrying their luggage.



* EurekaMoment: When Hornbeck jokingly notes the only book and area of expertise Brady and the prosecutor would permit to be allowed in the court is the Bible, Drummond realizes his next attack should be on the literal interpretation of the Bible and breakdown Brady's view.

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* EurekaMoment: When Hornbeck jokingly notes the only book and area of expertise Brady and the prosecutor would permit to be allowed in the court is the Bible, Drummond realizes his next attack should be on the literal interpretation of the Bible and the breakdown of Brady's view.



* HeelRealization: While it doesn't stop him from participating in the trial in any sense, Brady has a serious OhCrap moment when his wife screams at him in the middle of his verbal beat down of Rachel. On snapping out of his righteous fury and realizing that he's driven her to tears, Brady sheepishly backs away and suggests the witness should be excused.

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* HeelRealization: While it doesn't stop him from participating in the trial in any sense, Brady has a serious OhCrap moment when his wife screams at him in the middle of his verbal beat down beatdown of Rachel. On snapping out of his righteous fury and realizing that he's driven her to tears, Brady sheepishly backs away and suggests the witness should be excused.



* PrayerOfMalice: Reverend Brown delivered a fiery sermon praying God will damn Cates to Hell for teaching "evil-lution" and later a mob crowd uses a hymn's tune to claim they want to hang Cates and Drummond from a sour apple tree, because their God is right.

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* PrayerOfMalice: Reverend Brown delivered delivers a fiery sermon praying God will damn Cates to Hell for teaching "evil-lution" and later a mob crowd uses a hymn's tune to claim they want to hang Cates and Drummond from a sour apple tree, because their God is right.
27th Jul '16 8:44:30 AM SoapheadChurch
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** Scopes was not a lone renegade teaching evolution in open defiance of the law. Every teacher in the state taught from the same biology textbook -- Civic Biology -- and thus every teacher in Dayton was violating the law. Any of them could have been a potential defendant. When the law passed, the state university openly declared they would not stop teaching evolution, and were never punished for it. The law itself seems to have simply a means of "looking" good by the politicians to the fundamentalist Tennesseans.

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** Scopes was not a lone renegade teaching evolution in open defiance of the law. Every teacher in the state taught was required to teach from the same biology textbook -- Civic Biology -- and thus every teacher in Dayton was violating the law. Any of them could have been a potential defendant.defendant, but Scopes volunteered after some convincing. When the law passed, the state university openly declared they would not stop teaching evolution, and were never punished for it. The law itself seems to have simply a means of "looking" good by the politicians to the fundamentalist Tennesseans.
** In the play, Cates is a HollywoodAtheist and a full time science teacher/part time amateur scientist. Scopes was a football coach who occasionally substituted when other teachers were off work.[[note]]His only training in science was some minor coursework in geology. He actually had a law degree.[[/note]] He was also a lapsed Episcopalian who didn't care one bit about the Fundamentalism vs. Evolution controversy, and had in fact skipped the evolution part of his biology class so he didn't have to deal with it.



** Likewise, Bryan eagerly jumped on the bandwagon despite not having practiced law for 36 years by that point. The extent of his political failures is exaggerated as well, although he did participate in the trial in the twilight of his career, with his voice and oratory both fading.

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** Likewise, Bryan eagerly jumped on the bandwagon despite not having practiced law for 36 years by that point. The extent of his political failures is exaggerated as well, although he did participate in the trial in the twilight of his career, with his voice and oratory both fading. He was also not at all hostile to John Scopes, and even offered to pay his fine if he was convicted.


Added DiffLines:

** The townsfolk of Dayton, TN were far more welcoming of Clarence Darrow than the people of Hillsboro were of Henry Drummond. Far from hanging him in effigy, the people of Dayton welcomed him with the same fervor as they welcomed William Jennings Bryan, because his celebrity status would help put the town on the map.
11th Jul '16 5:27:05 PM SoapheadChurch
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* WantingIsBetterThanHaving: Attorney Henry Drummond tells a story about a rocking horse he wanted when he was a child. It was far too expensive for his family to get for him, but his father scrimped and saved and managed to purchase the rocking horse for Drummond as a Christmas present. And the first time Drummond got on it to ride, it fell apart from dry rot. The Horse looked shiny, new and wonderful on the outside, but was really rotten to the core. This is a metaphor for his view on the fundamentalist literal interpretation of the Bible. The scrimping and saving, and the grief of the realization, might also be part of the analogy, respectively standing for the hardship and hopes stored up in the struggle for salvation, and the possible overwhelming sadness that comes from realizing that work was wasted and those hopes false if it turns out they were.

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* WantingIsBetterThanHaving: Attorney Henry Drummond tells a story about a rocking horse he wanted when he was a child. It was far too expensive for his family to get for him, but his father scrimped and saved and managed to purchase the rocking horse for Drummond as a Christmas present. And the first time Drummond got on it to ride, it fell apart from dry rot. The Horse looked shiny, new and wonderful on the outside, but was really rotten to the core. This is a metaphor for his view on the fundamentalist literal interpretation of the Bible. The scrimping Bible: the outward displays of piety and saving, and righteousness do nothing more than hide the grief moral decay of the realization, might also be part of the analogy, respectively standing for the hardship and hopes stored up in the struggle for salvation, and the possible overwhelming sadness that comes from realizing that work was wasted and those hopes false if it turns out they were.community.
11th Jul '16 4:40:52 PM SoapheadChurch
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* AntiVillain: The worst you could say about Brady is that he's a pompous blowhard. Despite his posturing and sanctimonious oratory, he's a decent enough man, especially when compared to the madly fanatical Reverend Brown. Likewise with Hornbeck; he may be a misanthropic {{Jerkass}}, but he's only barely antagonistic enough to qualify for this trope.

to:

* AntiVillain: The worst you could say about Brady is that he's a pompous blowhard. Despite his posturing and sanctimonious oratory, he's a decent enough man, especially when compared to the madly fanatical Reverend Brown. Likewise with Hornbeck; he may be a misanthropic {{Jerkass}}, but he's only barely antagonistic enough to qualify for this trope.as a villain at all.
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