History ShownTheirWork / LiveActionTV

1st Jun '16 2:46:58 PM sanfranman91
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* According to [=LeVar=] Burton, one of the key reasons why''Series/{{Roots}}'' [[Series/{{Roots|2016}} was remade in 2016]] was that the intervening four decades' worth of historical scholarship have greatly refined understanding of the story's time periods (much of this scholarship was outright inspired by the original miniseries). Among these refinements:

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* According to [=LeVar=] Burton, one of the key reasons why''Series/{{Roots}}'' why ''Series/{{Roots}}'' [[Series/{{Roots|2016}} was remade in 2016]] was that the intervening four decades' worth of historical scholarship have greatly refined understanding of the story's time periods (much of this scholarship was outright inspired by the original miniseries). Among these refinements:
1st Jun '16 2:46:44 PM sanfranman91
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* According to [=LeVar=] Burton, one of the key reasons why''Series/{{Roots}}'' [[Series/{{Roots|2016}} was remade in 2016]] was that the intervening four decades' worth of historical scholarship have greatly refined understanding of the story's time periods (much of this scholarship was outright inspired by the original miniseries). Among these refinements:
** The original miniseries presented Juffre as a small village, which is what it was like when Alex Haley visited it in the 20th century. Subsequent research, however, has since proven that during the 18th century Juffre was a thriving large town and major port for commerce on the river. Many Europeans such as the Portugese and the English themselves had trading missions in or around Juffre - as the opening voiceover narration explains, they were trading European guns to the Mandinka tribes in exchange for slaves, which fueled an increasingly aggressive demand for more slaves. Thus the Mandinka were familiar with firearms and used them regularly. Kunta Kinte himself was also probably quite well educated, and would have to have been able to speak three or four different languages from living in a major trade hub.
** The original miniseries knew that the Mandinka were warriors, but subsequent research revealed that they were actually mounted warriors who regularly rode horses. Europeans even visited the Mandinka to learn horse-training techniques from the Africans. Thus in the remake, learning to ride a fiery stallion is a major step shown in warrior training, and the Mandinka are regularly shown riding horses. Even for the pivotal scene when Kunta is captured by slavers, in the remake he is fleeing riding his horse but it gets shot out from under him. This aspect of Mandinka culture continues to reverberate for Kunta and his family in America: Kunta makes his first escape attempt by stealing the plantation-owner's prize horse that few others can master. Later, he gets his new job as a coach rider again because he is skilled at dealing with horses. Kunta tries to impart as much of this aspect of Mandinka heritage to his daughter as he can, making Kizzy go through long hours of training so she can jump onto a horse at a moment's notice and ride it to freedom some day. Her training pays off and she does quickly steal and ride a horse, [[spoiler:[[YankTheDogsChain but like her father, even with a horse she doesn't get far]]]].
18th May '16 2:24:11 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/{{CSI}}'', similarly, has a reputation for HollywoodScience, but in a snippet of ''CSINewYork'' a tech taking out a hard drive for evaluation was shown switching the jumper before putting it in the external enclosure, a small detail anyone not in the know would not likely catch. Especially surprising given the sad prevalence of HollywoodHacking on the show.

to:

* ''Series/{{CSI}}'', similarly, has a reputation for HollywoodScience, but in a snippet of ''CSINewYork'' ''Series/{{CSINY}}'' a tech taking out a hard drive for evaluation was shown switching the jumper before putting it in the external enclosure, a small detail anyone not in the know would not likely catch. Especially surprising given the sad prevalence of HollywoodHacking on the show.
6th Mar '16 10:29:52 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''FoylesWar'' creator Creator/AnthonyHorowitz ensured that all the WWII period details in this show were thoroughly researched. Most episodes are inspired or directly based off actual people, events, or wartime organizations.

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* ''FoylesWar'' ''Series/FoylesWar'' creator Creator/AnthonyHorowitz ensured that all the WWII period details in this show were thoroughly researched. Most episodes are inspired or directly based off actual people, events, or wartime organizations.



* ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'' is frequently praised as one of the more accurate portrayals of police work, with a good eye and ear for details and dialogue often found within the Baltimore Homicide Unit as well as the cases they worked and the chain of command in the police department. Similar to ''TheWire'', many lines of dialogue are taken word for word from David Simon's book.

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* ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'' is frequently praised as one of the more accurate portrayals of police work, with a good eye and ear for details and dialogue often found within the Baltimore Homicide Unit as well as the cases they worked and the chain of command in the police department. Similar to ''TheWire'', ''Series/TheWire'', many lines of dialogue are taken word for word from David Simon's book.



* ''{{Underbelly}}'', based on the book series and newspaper article, actually worked with members of Task Force Purana to get the story right, [[RuleOfDrama except when it wasn't]].

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* ''{{Underbelly}}'', ''Series/{{Underbelly}}'', based on the book series and newspaper article, actually worked with members of Task Force Purana to get the story right, [[RuleOfDrama except when it wasn't]].



* ''TheWestWing'', although not without its errors, was a surprisingly candid and realistic portrayal as the sorts of conflicts and obstacles any presidential administration must run into on a daily basis, no doubt due to the fact that former Clinton Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers and former Reagan speechwriter Peggy Noonan were advisers to the show. Some episodes were based on one character having to teach another character (and, by extension, the audience) about certain aspects of the federal government (e.g. Sam teaching C.J. everything she needs to know about the U.S. Census).\\

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* ''TheWestWing'', ''Series/TheWestWing'', although not without its errors, was a surprisingly candid and realistic portrayal as the sorts of conflicts and obstacles any presidential administration must run into on a daily basis, no doubt due to the fact that former Clinton Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers and former Reagan speechwriter Peggy Noonan were advisers to the show. Some episodes were based on one character having to teach another character (and, by extension, the audience) about certain aspects of the federal government (e.g. Sam teaching C.J. everything she needs to know about the U.S. Census).\\



* ''TheWire'' is known for its accurate portrayal of Baltimore, police procedure, slang, and based many of its characters on actual police and criminals of the Baltimore area. Furthermore, its portrayal of a newsroom has been touted as the most accurate ever shown on television. And this says nothing of its portrayal of politics, schools, and unions.

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* ''TheWire'' ''Series/TheWire'' is known for its accurate portrayal of Baltimore, police procedure, slang, and based many of its characters on actual police and criminals of the Baltimore area. Furthermore, its portrayal of a newsroom has been touted as the most accurate ever shown on television. And this says nothing of its portrayal of politics, schools, and unions.



** ''TheWire'' is currently being taught in a number of universities in a variety of fields, from law to sociology to film studies. A sociologist has described ''TheWire'' as the best sociological text ever written.

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** ''TheWire'' The series is currently being taught in a number of universities in a variety of fields, from law to sociology to film studies. A sociologist has described ''TheWire'' it as the best sociological text ever written.
16th Sep '15 8:19:47 AM dmcreif
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* ''Series/HouseOfCardsUS'' may take some liberties with the American government, but various aspects of UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC area culture are portrayed accurately. For instance, in season 2, when Frank Underwood goes to throw the ceremonial first pitch at a Baltimore Orioles game, the crowd shouts "OH!" in the middle of the national anthem, a tradition at all Maryland and DC area sports.
16th Sep '15 8:15:29 AM dmcreif
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** On the audio commentary for the DVD set, writer Terence Winter recalls how during the filming of the first episode he had to ask Creator/MartinScorsese to reshoot a scene because one of the male characters was wearing a cap in a room full of women. In the 1920s a man who entered a room with women present would take off his cap.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'' pays careful attention to the authenticity of its Albuquerque setting, often to the level only a resident would notice. The geography is accurate, and the stores mentioned (save the fictional ''Los Pollos Hermanos'') all exist in Albuquerque. In one good example, the 5th season opens inside a Denny's, then cuts to the exterior. Although the exterior shot never actually shows the Denny's, viewers familiar with the University area will recognize that it truly is in front of a Denny's.

to:

** On the audio commentary for the DVD set, writer Terence Winter recalls how during the filming of the first pilot episode he had to ask Creator/MartinScorsese to reshoot a scene because one of the male characters was wearing a cap in a room full of women. In the 1920s a man who entered a room with women present would take off his cap.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'' ''Series/BreakingBad'', and its spinoff ''Series/BetterCallSaul'', pays careful attention to the authenticity of its Albuquerque setting, often to the level only a resident would notice. The geography is accurate, and the stores mentioned or shown (save for the fictional ''Los Pollos Hermanos'') Hermanos'', which itself is represented by a Twisters restaurant) all exist in Albuquerque. In one good example, the 5th season opens inside a Denny's, then cuts to the exterior. Although the exterior shot never actually shows the Denny's, viewers familiar with the University area will recognize that it truly is in front of a Denny's.



* ''Series/MadMen'' appears to take pride in this. Given that the show is about an advertising agency in the 1960s with scads of ProductPlacement using past ad campaigns, they are remarkably free of major errors. One notable example: An early episode (set in 1962) shows the secretarial pool all gushing over a new office machine: a Xerox photocopier. The episode noted the month, so with a little digging, you'll discover it's the right machine, at the right time and place. (How they got their hands on that specific ancient device is beyond us.)

to:

* ''Series/MadMen'' series creator Matthew Weiner appears to take pride in this. Given that the show is about an advertising agency in the 1960s with scads of ProductPlacement using past ad campaigns, they are remarkably free of major errors. One notable example: An early episode (set in 1962) shows the secretarial pool all gushing over a new office machine: a Xerox photocopier. The episode noted the month, so with a little digging, you'll discover it's the right machine, at the right time and place. (How they got their hands on that specific ancient device is beyond us.)



* ''Series/{{Monk}}'' has an InUniverse example in the episode ''Mr. Monk Goes to a Wedding''. After Monk had to take Natalie with him to a mud spa due to it becoming a crime scene from a body being discovered in one of the stalls, he also took a male stripper with him, having mistook him for an actual cop. When telling the cop of the situation via police terms, the stripper responded with "That bad, huh?", implying that the stripper in question knew enough about police terms to understand the situation (presumably to allow him to play the role of a cop as realistically as possible).

to:

* ''Series/{{Monk}}'' ''Series/{{Monk}}'':
**The show
has an InUniverse example in the episode ''Mr. Monk Goes to a Wedding''. After Monk had to take Natalie with him to a mud spa due to it becoming a crime scene from a body being discovered in one of the stalls, he also took a male stripper with him, having mistook him for an actual cop. When telling the cop "cop" of the situation via police terms, the stripper responded with "That bad, huh?", implying that the stripper in question knew enough about police terms to understand the situation (presumably to allow him to play the role of a cop as realistically as possible).possible).
** In "Mr. Monk and the Big Game", Julie interviews Captain Stottlemeyer and Lieutenant Disher for a project on DNA evidence. All of the information given is practically straight on. One example: Stottlemeyer mentions that no two siblings will have the same DNA -- it's ''close'' to, but not exactly identical, with the exception for identical twins. Another example: one of Julie's questions is why DNA cannot be used to close every case, and Stottlemeyer replies that this is because 1) DNA is not found at every crime scene, and 2) even if there is usable DNA, there needs to be a match in the computer records to compare it to.
**The set designers for the season 5 episode "Mr. Monk Goes to a Rock Concert" [[http://www2.usanetwork.com/series/monk/webexclusives/blogs/ep_rockconcert.html put a lot of work into recreating the environment of an actual rock concert]]. They used actual port-a-potties, with one that they could remove the back end from so that they could shoot scenes inside the tight space. The stage set was constructed based on research for real rock concerts, including Woodstock. An acupuncture tent that Monk, Natalie, and Kendra Frank visit to interview a witness used real acupuncture benches, and the first aid tent where Monk and Natalie examine the body is stocked with actual supplies.
** In "Mr. Monk and the Big Game," many of the girls on the basketball teams were actual players, and the final goal was a shot that was accomplished in a single take.
** One reviewer who [[http://www.eviltwinltd.com/Monk/reviews/santa.htm reviewed]] "Mr. Monk and the Secret Santa" observed that the episode accurately portrays the effects of strychnine poisoning.
** If you look at the author's notes for each of the novels, you'll notice that Lee Goldberg did a lot of extra research to make the stories and settings as realistic as possible.
*** In ''Mr. Monk in Outer Space'', to create the parody show ''Beyond Earth'' and some background on the burger chain Burgerville, Goldberg did his homework by looking into ''Franchise/StarTrek'' and [=McDonald=]'s, respectively. Mr. Snork is like Mr. Spock, while a couple of real [=McDonald=]'s controversies are referenced, just with Burgerville in their place - namely, the ''Liebeck vs. [=McDonald=]'s Restaurants'' lawsuit (the Hot Coffee case), and the discovery in 2000 that [=McDonald=]'s was secretly using beef flavoring in their French fries which angered a lot of vegetarians. Additionally, the Burgerville financial scandal is compared by the forensics accountant as being identical to the Enron scandal.
*** In ''Mr. Monk is Miserable'', he did a lot of reading to create a very accurate impression of Paris. In ''Mr. Monk Goes to Germany'', its prequel, a lot of research was done on Lohr, Germany, the main setting, for information on the hotel that the psychiatric conference is held at, and also nods to "Literature/SnowWhite" (such as Natalie mentioning the town's old glass factories).
*** In ''Mr. Monk in Trouble'', Goldberg poured plenty of research on old mining towns in California around the time of the 1849 Gold Rush in order to recreate the atmosphere realistically to make Abigail Guthrie's journal entries about the tales of Artemis Monk seem realistic. Such information included stuff about train heists, various methods of salting mines, a disease known as Greeley's Cure, and a miner's lodgings.
*** In ''Mr. Monk On the Couch'', Goldberg created Natalie's subplot with a lot of background information about housing architectural styles and research about binoculars and optical lenses.
*** In ''Mr. Monk on the Road'', there was plenty of research done into the Mystery Spot in Santa Cruz, and painstakingly researched information on the physics of the Bixby Creek Bridge is shown. And many of the landmarks are ones you can encounter if you took a real road trip through the area.
** The USA Network blog entries written by Stottlemeyer provide a realistic insight into some of the minor types of incidents a police officer of his rank would encounter.
28th Aug '15 5:51:38 PM nombretomado
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* ''MysteryScienceTheater3000'' ends its final episode with Mike and the bots watching television in an apartment in Milwaukee, WI. The TV announcer refers to the station as WTMJ channel 4. [[http://www.todaystmj4.com/ This is a real TV station in Milwaukee]].
* ''TheOffice'' often shows Utz brand potato chips and pretzel snacks can be seen in its breakroom vending machines. Utz is a Lancover, PA product widely distributed in the northeastern United States, and would indeed be seen in a Scranton, PA workplace.

to:

* ''MysteryScienceTheater3000'' ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' ends its final episode with Mike and the bots watching television in an apartment in Milwaukee, WI. The TV announcer refers to the station as WTMJ channel 4. [[http://www.todaystmj4.com/ This is a real TV station in Milwaukee]].
* ''TheOffice'' ''Series/TheOfficeUS'' often shows Utz brand potato chips and pretzel snacks can be seen in its breakroom vending machines. Utz is a Lancover, PA product widely distributed in the northeastern United States, and would indeed be seen in a Scranton, PA workplace.
23rd Aug '15 9:01:31 PM nombretomado
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* ''MadMen'' appears to take pride in this. Given that the show is about an advertising agency in the 1960s with scads of ProductPlacement using past ad campaigns, they are remarkably free of major errors. One notable example: An early episode (set in 1962) shows the secretarial pool all gushing over a new office machine: a Xerox photocopier. The episode noted the month, so with a little digging, you'll discover it's the right machine, at the right time and place. (How they got their hands on that specific ancient device is beyond us.)

to:

* ''MadMen'' ''Series/MadMen'' appears to take pride in this. Given that the show is about an advertising agency in the 1960s with scads of ProductPlacement using past ad campaigns, they are remarkably free of major errors. One notable example: An early episode (set in 1962) shows the secretarial pool all gushing over a new office machine: a Xerox photocopier. The episode noted the month, so with a little digging, you'll discover it's the right machine, at the right time and place. (How they got their hands on that specific ancient device is beyond us.)



* ''{{Monk}}'' has an InUniverse example in the episode ''Mr. Monk Goes to a Wedding''. After Monk had to take Natalie with him to a mud spa due to it becoming a crime scene from a body being discovered in one of the stalls, he also took a male stripper with him, having mistook him for an actual cop. When telling the cop of the situation via police terms, the stripper responded with "That bad, huh?", implying that the stripper in question knew enough about police terms to understand the situation (presumably to allow him to play the role of a cop as realistically as possible).

to:

* ''{{Monk}}'' ''Series/{{Monk}}'' has an InUniverse example in the episode ''Mr. Monk Goes to a Wedding''. After Monk had to take Natalie with him to a mud spa due to it becoming a crime scene from a body being discovered in one of the stalls, he also took a male stripper with him, having mistook him for an actual cop. When telling the cop of the situation via police terms, the stripper responded with "That bad, huh?", implying that the stripper in question knew enough about police terms to understand the situation (presumably to allow him to play the role of a cop as realistically as possible).
2nd Aug '15 4:18:01 AM pinkdalek
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* ''Series/DoctorWho'' started out as an educational program, and hence there would be historical stories where a lot of research was done. There is a myth about "The Aztecs" that for the sake of decency the costumes weren't accurate, when in fact they were thoroughly researched.

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'' ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** The show
started out as an educational program, and hence there would be historical stories where a lot of research was done. There is a myth about "The Aztecs" that for the sake of decency the costumes weren't accurate, when in fact they were thoroughly researched.


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** "Pyramids of Mars" is based around the myth of Set/Sutekh from Myth/EgyptianMythology, but in the broadest possible strokes (for the sake of fitting it into a ''Doctor Who'' plot), incorporating plenty of influence from Christian {{Satan}} mythology and CosmicHorror. However, Robert Holmes was a keen researcher and snuck in several GeniusBonus references to the original myth. For instance, Set in mythology was the god of 'deserts and storms', and when the Doctor takes Sarah to Sutekh's version of 1980, the planet is a stormy desert. Later, Sutekh growls that his brother Horus condemned him to 'a life of darkness and impotence', when in the original myth Set was believed to be impotent, and Horus had ripped off one of Sutekh's testicles.
7th Jul '15 7:03:42 AM Midna
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* ''Series/AdamTwelve'': Produced by Jack Webb's company, depicted police procedures so accurately that episodes were used as instructional films in police academies.

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* ''Series/AdamTwelve'': Produced ''Series/AdamTwelve'', produced by Jack Webb's company, depicted police procedures so accurately that episodes were used as instructional films in police academies.



* ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'': Being a show about three extremely nerdy scientists ([[MyFriendsAndZoidberg and an engineer]]), pays unusual amounts of attention to getting scientific jargon and such correct. All of the equations seen in the background are accurate and scientifically provable and written up by a professor of physics and astronomy who makes sure everything's scientifically accurate.
* ''Series/TheBill'': Early episodes were extremely accurate in their depiction of the various aspects of police work. One in particular, featuring by-the-book DS Alistair Greig questioning a local hard case with a reputation for being uncrackable and getting him to crack without a threat or a harsh word spoken, was so accurate with regard to suspect questioning techniques that for many years it was used to ''teach'' them.
* ''Series/ABitOfFryAndLaurie'': This show was very good about being accurate about details in even the most absurd sketches, for instance, Laurie walks into a model shop in the "Dalliard/Models" sketch and asks for a Messerschmitt 109E, whereupon the clerk hands him... a fully assembled 109E. In the same episode, Fry begins to complain about the show TopGear trying to be funny, while you never see comedy shows reviewing Nissan Micras, whereupon Laurie immediately gets up and begins reviewing a Nissan Micra parked in the studio, accurately listing the powertrain options and door layouts available. In the "Major Donaldson" sketch, Fry reads out Laurie's character's rank as "Hauptsturmfuhrer (Captain) Freidrich von Stilch," which accurately reflects the rank on Laurie's collar tab. Also, Laurie wears the field-gray SS uniform, correct as the black Allgemaine uniform had been phased out in 1939.
* ''Series/BlueHeelers'': Does this to an impressive degree, from procedure in the event of a shooting to the actors playing the role of an officer go through the academy.
* ''Series/BoardwalkEmpire'': Does a painstaking job of accurately recreating the look of 1920's Atlantic City with the sets and costumes designed to reflect the time period. The creators have also done thorough research on their subjects and make sure that the personalities seen onscreen reflect the ones in real life, most notably with Arnold Rothstein. Many of the automobiles used on the show are actually vintage 1920 cars that were bought and restored for use on the show.

to:

* ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'': Being ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'', being a show about three extremely nerdy scientists ([[MyFriendsAndZoidberg and an engineer]]), pays unusual amounts of attention to getting scientific jargon and such correct. All of the equations seen in the background are accurate and scientifically provable and written up by a professor of physics and astronomy who makes sure everything's scientifically accurate.
* ''Series/TheBill'': Early episodes were ''Series/TheBill'' was extremely accurate in their its early episodes' depiction of the various aspects of police work. One in particular, featuring by-the-book DS Alistair Greig questioning a local hard case with a reputation for being uncrackable and getting him to crack without a threat or a harsh word spoken, was so accurate with regard to suspect questioning techniques that for many years it was used to ''teach'' them.
* ''Series/ABitOfFryAndLaurie'': This show ''Series/ABitOfFryAndLaurie'' was very good about being accurate about details in even the most absurd sketches, for instance, Laurie walks into a model shop in the "Dalliard/Models" sketch and asks for a Messerschmitt 109E, whereupon the clerk hands him... a fully assembled 109E. In the same episode, Fry begins to complain about the show TopGear trying to be funny, while you never see comedy shows reviewing Nissan Micras, whereupon Laurie immediately gets up and begins reviewing a Nissan Micra parked in the studio, accurately listing the powertrain options and door layouts available. In the "Major Donaldson" sketch, Fry reads out Laurie's character's rank as "Hauptsturmfuhrer (Captain) Freidrich von Stilch," which accurately reflects the rank on Laurie's collar tab. Also, Laurie wears the field-gray SS uniform, correct as the black Allgemaine uniform had been phased out in 1939.
* ''Series/BlueHeelers'': Does ''Series/BlueHeelers'' does this to an impressive degree, from procedure in the event of a shooting to the actors playing the role of an officer go through the academy.
* ''Series/BoardwalkEmpire'': Does ''Series/BoardwalkEmpire'' does a painstaking job of accurately recreating the look of 1920's Atlantic City with the sets and costumes designed to reflect the time period. The creators have also done thorough research on their subjects and make sure that the personalities seen onscreen reflect the ones in real life, most notably with Arnold Rothstein. Many of the automobiles used on the show are actually vintage 1920 cars that were bought and restored for use on the show.



* ''Series/BreakingBad'': Pays careful attention to the authenticity of its Albuquerque setting, often to the level only a resident would notice. The geography is accurate, and the stores mentioned (save the fictional ''Los Pollos Hermanos'') all exist in Albuquerque. In one good example, the 5th season opens inside a Denny's, then cuts to the exterior. Although the exterior shot never actually shows the Denny's, viewers familiar with the University area will recognize that it truly is in front of a Denny's.

to:

* ''Series/BreakingBad'': Pays ''Series/BreakingBad'' pays careful attention to the authenticity of its Albuquerque setting, often to the level only a resident would notice. The geography is accurate, and the stores mentioned (save the fictional ''Los Pollos Hermanos'') all exist in Albuquerque. In one good example, the 5th season opens inside a Denny's, then cuts to the exterior. Although the exterior shot never actually shows the Denny's, viewers familiar with the University area will recognize that it truly is in front of a Denny's.



* ''Series/BurnNotice'': Based its main character Michael Westen on the technical advisor for the show, retired espionage expert Michael Wilson. All the MacGyvering gadgets and explosives are accurate as can reasonably be (They aren't going to give all the [[AndSomeOtherStuff ingredients and steps in making thermite]] on the show, 'cause everyone knows that one mixes rust and aluminum dust, the ratios are somewhat obscure though). And then when you get into items that might be outside Wilson's expertise they call in others. They consulted a radiology expert on how he could make a one-time use x-ray machine in the trunk of his car. Fans love that every [[StuffBlowingUp explosion]] comes with a line that justifies it: they taped acetone to a gas tank so it actually would explode when you shoot it; Michael used incendiary ammo on barrels with inflammable water sealant, etc.
* ''Series/CallTheMidwife'': Has drawn critical praise for its attention to detail in building the world of the 1950s' East End, and for their accuracy during birthing scenes. The latter in particular are closely supervised by a trained midwife who actually worked with Jennifer Worth, the author of the memoirs the programme was based on.
* ''Series/{{Carnivale}}'': Demonstrates extensive knowledge of Tarot as well as biblical mythology, and the plot tends to hinge on obscure symbolism that the viewer is supposed to [[ViewersAreGeniuses figure out themselves]] with little guidance.

to:

* ''Series/BurnNotice'': Based ''Series/BurnNotice'' based its main character Michael Westen on the technical advisor for the show, retired espionage expert Michael Wilson. All the MacGyvering gadgets and explosives are accurate as can reasonably be (They aren't going to give all the [[AndSomeOtherStuff ingredients and steps in making thermite]] on the show, 'cause everyone knows that one mixes rust and aluminum dust, the ratios are somewhat obscure though). And then when you get into items that might be outside Wilson's expertise they call in others. They consulted a radiology expert on how he could make a one-time use x-ray machine in the trunk of his car. Fans love that every [[StuffBlowingUp explosion]] comes with a line that justifies it: they taped acetone to a gas tank so it actually would explode when you shoot it; Michael used incendiary ammo on barrels with inflammable water sealant, etc.
* ''Series/CallTheMidwife'': Has drawn ''Series/CallTheMidwife'' drew critical praise for its attention to detail in building the world of the 1950s' East End, and for their accuracy during birthing scenes. The latter in particular are closely supervised by a trained midwife who actually worked with Jennifer Worth, the author of the memoirs the programme was based on.
* ''Series/{{Carnivale}}'': Demonstrates ''Series/{{Carnivale}}'' demonstrates extensive knowledge of Tarot as well as biblical mythology, and the plot tends to hinge on obscure symbolism that the viewer is supposed to [[ViewersAreGeniuses figure out themselves]] with little guidance.



* ''Series/TheCloser'': This show is a PoliceProcedural with a surprising number of accurate details. Established in the opening scene when the titular character, Deputy Chief Brenda Johnson, insists on a separate search warrant for the garage as it is a "stand alone structure." She goes on to be careful about legal and procedural minutiae. Over the years, when her tactics slide into CowboyCop-y occasionally, she gets called out on it in a massive lawsuit--just like real life.

to:

* ''Series/TheCloser'': This show ''Series/TheCloser'' is a PoliceProcedural with a surprising number of accurate details. Established in the opening scene when the titular character, Deputy Chief Brenda Johnson, insists on a separate search warrant for the garage as it is a "stand alone structure." She goes on to be careful about legal and procedural minutiae. Over the years, when her tactics slide into CowboyCop-y occasionally, she gets called out on it in a massive lawsuit--just like real life.



* ''Series/{{CSI}}'': Similarly, this show has a reputation for HollywoodScience, but in a snippet of ''CSINewYork'' a tech taking out a hard drive for evaluation was shown switching the jumper before putting it in the external enclosure, a small detail anyone not in the know would not likely catch. Especially surprising given the sad prevalence of HollywoodHacking on the show.

to:

* ''Series/{{CSI}}'': Similarly, this show ''Series/{{CSI}}'', similarly, has a reputation for HollywoodScience, but in a snippet of ''CSINewYork'' a tech taking out a hard drive for evaluation was shown switching the jumper before putting it in the external enclosure, a small detail anyone not in the know would not likely catch. Especially surprising given the sad prevalence of HollywoodHacking on the show.



* ''Series/TheDevilsWhore'': This show is pretty good with these. It even features Prince Rupert of the Rhine's ''war poodle''.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'': ** When "Doctor Who" started out it was intended as educational. Hence there would be historical stories where a lot of research was done. There is a myth about "The Aztecs" that for the sake of decency the costumes weren't accurate, when in fact they were thoroughly researched.

to:

* ''Series/TheDevilsWhore'': This show ''Series/TheDevilsWhore'' is pretty good with these. It even features Prince Rupert of the Rhine's ''war poodle''.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'': ** When "Doctor Who" ''Series/DoctorWho'' started out it was intended as educational. Hence an educational program, and hence there would be historical stories where a lot of research was done. There is a myth about "The Aztecs" that for the sake of decency the costumes weren't accurate, when in fact they were thoroughly researched.



* ''Series/{{Emergency}}'': Webb's other well-known production is also recognized for the attention to detail it gave to emergency medical response, firefighting, and hospital emergency rooms. Randolph Mantooth and Kevin Tighe (Gage and [=DeSoto=]) had actually received paramedic training prior to filming. You can tell that in many of the scenes there's no script and they're simply doing what a paramedic would do in that situation, including reminding each other of things that have to be done or checked. The captain of the station in season one was an actual Los Angeles County Fire Department captain, Mike Stoker basically played himself (he was also an LA County firefighter), and the dispatcher was Sam Lanier, an actual dispatcher for the department.
* ''Series/{{Firefly}}'': This show is one of the few SciFi shows/movies that has no sound in space. This actually adds atmosphere to the show and does not lessen the action.

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* ''Series/{{Emergency}}'': ''Series/{{Emergency}}'', Webb's other well-known production production, is also recognized for the attention to detail it gave to emergency medical response, firefighting, and hospital emergency rooms. Randolph Mantooth and Kevin Tighe (Gage and [=DeSoto=]) had actually received paramedic training prior to filming. You can tell that in many of the scenes there's no script and they're simply doing what a paramedic would do in that situation, including reminding each other of things that have to be done or checked. The captain of the station in season one was an actual Los Angeles County Fire Department captain, Mike Stoker basically played himself (he was also an LA County firefighter), and the dispatcher was Sam Lanier, an actual dispatcher for the department.
* ''Series/{{Firefly}}'': This show ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' is one of the few SciFi shows/movies that has no sound in space. This actually adds atmosphere to the show and does not lessen the action.



* ''FoylesWar'': Creator Creator/AnthonyHorowitz ensured that all the WWII period details in this show were thoroughly researched. Most episodes are inspired or directly based off actual people, events, or wartime organizations.

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* ''FoylesWar'': Creator ''FoylesWar'' creator Creator/AnthonyHorowitz ensured that all the WWII period details in this show were thoroughly researched. Most episodes are inspired or directly based off actual people, events, or wartime organizations.



* ''Series/FreaksAndGeeks'': Does this perfectly with both the time period (early '80s) and the location (anyone from southeast Michigan will enjoy the references to Faygo and the Auto Show, and the frequent use of "pop").
* ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'': This show is frequently praised as one of the more accurate portrayals of police work, with a good eye and ear for details and dialogue often found within the Baltimore Homicide Unit as well as the cases they worked and the chain of command in the police department. Similar to ''TheWire'', many lines of dialogue are taken word for word from David Simon's book.
* ''Series/TheITCrowd'': This show is ridiculously exaggerated slapstick. But the writers put in lots of little details and shout-outs that shows they Did The Research into what IT workers are actually like and into. As a result, actual IT workers love it.

to:

* ''Series/FreaksAndGeeks'': Does ''Series/FreaksAndGeeks'' does this perfectly with both the time period (early '80s) and the location (anyone from southeast Michigan will enjoy the references to Faygo and the Auto Show, and the frequent use of "pop").
* ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'': This show ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'' is frequently praised as one of the more accurate portrayals of police work, with a good eye and ear for details and dialogue often found within the Baltimore Homicide Unit as well as the cases they worked and the chain of command in the police department. Similar to ''TheWire'', many lines of dialogue are taken word for word from David Simon's book.
* ''Series/TheITCrowd'': This show ''Series/TheITCrowd'' is ridiculously exaggerated slapstick. But the writers put in lots of little details and shout-outs that shows they Did The Research into what IT workers are actually like and into. As a result, actual IT workers love it.



* ''Series/{{JAG}}'': The research and accuracy became better through the years the show was running, though inaccuracies could always be found. Having a [[SemperFi Marine Corps]] veteran as its [[DonaldPBellisario creator, executive producer, and show runner]] probably helped. Being BackedByThePentagon probably helped a great deal too. They did sometimes cite real military case law.

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* ''Series/{{JAG}}'': The ''Series/{{JAG}}'''s research and accuracy became better through the years the show was running, though inaccuracies could always be found. Having a [[SemperFi Marine Corps]] veteran as its [[DonaldPBellisario creator, executive producer, and show runner]] probably helped. Being BackedByThePentagon probably helped a great deal too. They did sometimes cite real military case law.



* ''Series/LawAndOrder'': Despite a lot of script-kludging, when a case is cited on this show it's a real case, and usually on point. Whether the judge's ruling or the defense counter-point is realistic is another matter, but the show does cite real case law.

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* ''Series/LawAndOrder'': Despite ''Series/LawAndOrder'', despite a lot of script-kludging, when a case is cited on this show it's a always cites real case, cases, and usually on point. Whether the judge's ruling or the defense counter-point is realistic is another matter, but the show does cite real case law.



* ''Series/{{Leverage}}'': Has an actual pickpocket as a consultant so that all of Parker's FiveFingerDiscount maneuvers are pulled off as realistically subtle as possible--sometimes, it's not even clear that she's robbed someone until the scene is shown from her perspective in flashback. Sometimes it was not even clear to ''other people on the set''. During one blocking run-through, the director asked the actress to repeat a scene, but "really do the lift this time." She responded by holding up the item, which she'd already stolen on the last run.

to:

* ''Series/{{Leverage}}'': Has ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' has an actual pickpocket as a consultant so that all of Parker's FiveFingerDiscount maneuvers are pulled off as realistically subtle as possible--sometimes, it's not even clear that she's robbed someone until the scene is shown from her perspective in flashback. Sometimes it was not even clear to ''other people on the set''. During one blocking run-through, the director asked the actress to repeat a scene, but "really do the lift this time." She responded by holding up the item, which she'd already stolen on the last run.



* ''Series/LieToMe'': The show is based off of Paul Ekman's promising, but not-yet-complete, research. It doesn't acknowledge many of the shortcomings in the research (unlike Ekman himself), and doesn't have time to explain the intricacies of the findings, but the principles are quite sound. Anyone familiar with Paul Ekman's research will recognize things in this show lifted directly from the man's lectures and experiments.

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* ''Series/LieToMe'': The show ''Series/LieToMe'' is based off of Paul Ekman's promising, but not-yet-complete, research. It doesn't acknowledge many of the shortcomings in the research (unlike Ekman himself), and doesn't have time to explain the intricacies of the findings, but the principles are quite sound. Anyone familiar with Paul Ekman's research will recognize things in this show lifted directly from the man's lectures and experiments.



* ''MadMen'': Appears to take pride in this. Given that the show is about an advertising agency in the 1960s with scads of ProductPlacement using past ad campaigns, they are remarkably free of major errors. One notable example: An early episode (set in 1962) shows the secretarial pool all gushing over a new office machine: a Xerox photocopier. The episode noted the month, so with a little digging, you'll discover it's the right machine, at the right time and place. (How they got their hands on that specific ancient device is beyond us.)

to:

* ''MadMen'': Appears ''MadMen'' appears to take pride in this. Given that the show is about an advertising agency in the 1960s with scads of ProductPlacement using past ad campaigns, they are remarkably free of major errors. One notable example: An early episode (set in 1962) shows the secretarial pool all gushing over a new office machine: a Xerox photocopier. The episode noted the month, so with a little digging, you'll discover it's the right machine, at the right time and place. (How they got their hands on that specific ancient device is beyond us.)



* ''{{Monk}}'': InUniverse example in the episode ''Mr. Monk Goes to a Wedding''. After Monk had to take Natalie with him to a mud spa due to it becoming a crime scene from a body being discovered in one of the stalls, he also took a male stripper with him, having mistook him for an actual cop. When telling the cop of the situation via police terms, the stripper responded with "That bad, huh?", implying that the stripper in question knew enough about police terms to understand the situation (presumably to allow him to play the role of a cop as realistically as possible).
* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'': Owns this trope; as befits a show written by a group of {{Oxbridge}} graduates, it often parodies writers such as Jean-Paul Sartre and Marcel Proust, and frequently mentions philosophy. Even the Creator/MontyPython films show their workings; Holy Grail for example steers away from well-known legends such as the Sword in the Stone and concentrates on parodying lesser known Arthurian tales (for example Galahad's temptation in Castle Anthrax is based on actual legends of castles designed to cause knights to stray).

to:

* ''{{Monk}}'': ''{{Monk}}'' has an InUniverse example in the episode ''Mr. Monk Goes to a Wedding''. After Monk had to take Natalie with him to a mud spa due to it becoming a crime scene from a body being discovered in one of the stalls, he also took a male stripper with him, having mistook him for an actual cop. When telling the cop of the situation via police terms, the stripper responded with "That bad, huh?", implying that the stripper in question knew enough about police terms to understand the situation (presumably to allow him to play the role of a cop as realistically as possible).
* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'': Owns ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' owns this trope; as befits a show written by a group of {{Oxbridge}} graduates, it often parodies writers such as Jean-Paul Sartre and Marcel Proust, and frequently mentions philosophy. Even the Creator/MontyPython films show their workings; Holy Grail for example steers away from well-known legends such as the Sword in the Stone and concentrates on parodying lesser known Arthurian tales (for example Galahad's temptation in Castle Anthrax is based on actual legends of castles designed to cause knights to stray).



* ''MysteryScienceTheater3000'': The final episode has Mike and the bots watching television in an apartment in Milwaukee, WI. The TV announcer refers to the station as WTMJ channel 4. [[http://www.todaystmj4.com/ This is a real TV station in Milwaukee]].
* ''TheOffice'': Often Utz brand potato chips and pretzel snacks can be seen in this show's breakroom vending machines. Utz is a Lancover, PA product widely distributed in the northeastern United States, and would indeed be seen in a Scranton, PA workplace.

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* ''MysteryScienceTheater3000'': The ''MysteryScienceTheater3000'' ends its final episode has with Mike and the bots watching television in an apartment in Milwaukee, WI. The TV announcer refers to the station as WTMJ channel 4. [[http://www.todaystmj4.com/ This is a real TV station in Milwaukee]].
* ''TheOffice'': Often ''TheOffice'' often shows Utz brand potato chips and pretzel snacks can be seen in this show's its breakroom vending machines. Utz is a Lancover, PA product widely distributed in the northeastern United States, and would indeed be seen in a Scranton, PA workplace.



* ''Series/{{Portlandia}}'': Aspects of the hipster culture of {{UsefulNotes/Portland}}, Oregon in this show are all amazingly accurate. The show even gets details of the culture, look and attitude of individual ''streets'' correct.

to:

* ''Series/{{Portlandia}}'': Aspects ''Series/{{Portlandia}}'' has amazingly accurate depictions of the hipster culture of {{UsefulNotes/Portland}}, Oregon in this show are all amazingly accurate.Oregon. The show even gets details of the culture, look and attitude of individual ''streets'' correct.



* ''RobinOfSherwood'': Somewhat surprisingly considering its blatant 'sword-and-sorcery' elements and occasional new age mysticism, the 1980s TV series version is by far one of the most accurate depictions of the European middle ages ever to appear in a popular culture context, right down to citing obscure historical events and studying genealogies of particular noble families. Furthermore, most of the elements of the Robin Hood legend that it depicts are well-grounded in (at times obscure) earlier literature.
* ''Series/{{Rome}}'': Featured a rather odd case of this trope meeting RealityIsUnrealistic, at least according to the director's commentary. At least one reviewer took the time to complain about Atia's unrealistic bikini line, when apparently they'd gone to the trouble of finding out exactly ''how'' the Romans looked after that sort of thing. Apparently it involved sharp seashells....
* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'': Despite some of the more cartoony personalities that make up the staff of Sacred Heart Hospital, this show has been touted as being one of the most realistic portrayals of life as a medical intern compared to all the other medical shows on television. Not only do they have doctors on staff as medical advisers (including the "Real J.D."), but they frequently receive stories of odd medical instances from doctors that they then work into the show. People have gotten into medicine because of the show.

to:

* ''RobinOfSherwood'': Somewhat ''Series/RobinOfSherwood'', somewhat surprisingly considering its blatant 'sword-and-sorcery' elements and occasional new age mysticism, the 1980s TV series version is by far one of the most accurate depictions of the European middle ages ever to appear in a popular culture context, right down to citing obscure historical events and studying genealogies of particular noble families. Furthermore, most of the elements of the Robin Hood legend that it depicts are well-grounded in (at times obscure) earlier literature.
* ''Series/{{Rome}}'': Featured ''Series/{{Rome}}'' featured a rather odd case of this trope meeting RealityIsUnrealistic, at least according to the director's commentary. At least one reviewer took the time to complain about Atia's unrealistic bikini line, when apparently they'd gone to the trouble of finding out exactly ''how'' the Romans looked after that sort of thing. Apparently it involved sharp seashells....
* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'': Despite ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'', despite some of the more cartoony personalities that make up the staff of Sacred Heart Hospital, this show has been touted as being one of the most realistic portrayals of life as a medical intern compared to all the other medical shows on television. Not only do they have doctors on staff as medical advisers (including the "Real J.D."), but they frequently receive stories of odd medical instances from doctors that they then work into the show. People have gotten into medicine because of the show.



* ''Series/{{Southland}}'': Gets a lot of praise for this with former police officers saying it is exactly what their job was like.

to:

* ''Series/{{Southland}}'': Gets ''Series/{{Southland}}'' gets a lot of praise for this with former police officers saying it is exactly what their job was like.



* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'': While it has created its own mythology, the writing staff started out researching actual folklore and urban legends. [[FanDumb Some people]] claim that this is a case of poor research because "everything's wrong," but folklore and urban legends are usually spread orally, so the details of each story change depending on who's telling it, but the writers kept the core elements the same. This is especially evident in the early episodes of the first season.

to:

* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'': While it ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' has created its own mythology, but the writing staff started out researching actual folklore and urban legends. [[FanDumb Some people]] claim that this is a case of poor research because "everything's wrong," but folklore and urban legends are usually spread orally, so the details of each story change depending on who's telling it, but the writers kept the core elements the same. This is especially evident in the early episodes of the first season.



* ''Series/TheThickOfIt'': Displays a very extensive and realistic documentation of the inner workings of the offices of Whitehall, and has many fictional counterparts for real politicians. Politicians themselves have commented on the realism, noting that the only thing unrealistic about it is the show's infamous [[ClusterFBomb amount of profanity]]. In real life, it's [[UpToEleven worse]].

to:

* ''Series/TheThickOfIt'': Displays ''Series/TheThickOfIt'' displays a very extensive and realistic documentation of the inner workings of the offices of Whitehall, and has many fictional counterparts for real politicians. Politicians themselves have commented on the realism, noting that the only thing unrealistic about it is the show's infamous [[ClusterFBomb amount of profanity]]. In real life, it's [[UpToEleven worse]].



* ''{{Underbelly}}'': Based on the book series and newspaper article, actually worked with members of Task Force Purana to get the story right, [[RuleOfDrama except when it wasn't]].

to:

* ''{{Underbelly}}'': Based ''{{Underbelly}}'', based on the book series and newspaper article, actually worked with members of Task Force Purana to get the story right, [[RuleOfDrama except when it wasn't]].



* ''TheWestWing'': This show by Aaron Sorkin (in its first few seasons anyway) was a surprisingly candid and realistic portrayal as the sorts of conflicts and obstacles any presidential administration must run into on a daily basis, no doubt due to the fact that former Clinton Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers and former Reagan speechwriter Peggy Noonan were advisers to the show. Some episodes were based on one character having to teach another character (and, by extension, the audience) about certain aspects of the federal government (e.g. Sam teaching C.J. everything she needs to know about the U.S. Census).
** Not without its errors, though.
** The show actually got a lot more politically accurate after Sorkin left - in particular, the final couple of seasons consist of a VERY meticulous election cycle, with polling numbers and electoral college projections tracked with stunning accuracy. Sorkin didn't care much for the minutiae of elections, to the detriment of the first full campaign depicted on the show.
*** Though they did the entire run-up to a brokered Democratic Convention, without mentioning "super-delegates" even once.
**** It's generally accepted that in the West Wing-verse, Ford (having not actually been elected as Vice President) managed to push for a special election in November 1974, permanently altering the electoral calendar (hence the Santos/Vinick contest in 2006), and therefore the people leading the parties. Because of this, it's possible that the Hunt Commission, even if it formed with the same membership (or indeed at all), did not propose the creation of superdelegates.
* ''TheWire'': This show is known for its accurate portrayal of Baltimore, police procedure, slang, and based many of its characters on actual police and criminals of the Baltimore area. Furthermore, its portrayal of a newsroom has been touted as the most accurate ever shown on television. And this says nothing of its portrayal of politics, schools, and unions.

to:

* ''TheWestWing'': This show by Aaron Sorkin (in ''TheWestWing'', although not without its first few seasons anyway) errors, was a surprisingly candid and realistic portrayal as the sorts of conflicts and obstacles any presidential administration must run into on a daily basis, no doubt due to the fact that former Clinton Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers and former Reagan speechwriter Peggy Noonan were advisers to the show. Some episodes were based on one character having to teach another character (and, by extension, the audience) about certain aspects of the federal government (e.g. Sam teaching C.J. everything she needs to know about the U.S. Census).
** Not without its errors, though.
**
Census).\\
\\
The show actually got a lot more politically accurate after Aaron Sorkin left - in particular, the final couple of seasons consist of a VERY meticulous election cycle, with polling numbers and electoral college projections tracked with stunning accuracy. Sorkin didn't care much for the minutiae of elections, to the detriment of the first full campaign depicted on the show.
*** Though they did the entire run-up to a brokered Democratic Convention, without mentioning "super-delegates" even once.
**** It's generally accepted that in the West Wing-verse, Ford (having not actually been elected as Vice President) managed to push for a special election in November 1974, permanently altering the electoral calendar (hence the Santos/Vinick contest in 2006), and therefore the people leading the parties. Because of this, it's possible that the Hunt Commission, even if it formed with the same membership (or indeed at all), did not propose the creation of superdelegates.
* ''TheWire'': This show ''TheWire'' is known for its accurate portrayal of Baltimore, police procedure, slang, and based many of its characters on actual police and criminals of the Baltimore area. Furthermore, its portrayal of a newsroom has been touted as the most accurate ever shown on television. And this says nothing of its portrayal of politics, schools, and unions.



** Fifth Season: Pearlman was quoting 18 USC chapter 47 section 1014. It pertained to wire fraud.

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** Fifth Season: In the fifth season, Pearlman was quoting 18 USC chapter 47 section 1014. It pertained to wire fraud.
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