History ShownTheirWork / LiveActionTV

22nd Apr '17 9:35:45 AM Fireblood
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* ''Series/ChicagoJustice'': {{Subverted}} {{in universe}} by "See Everything". The defense attorney, knowing that wearing a niqab can increase the risk of getting diabetes, and consequently increase the risk of vision problems, attempts to discredit an eyewitness who regularly wears a niqab while in public. Stone takes a risk and asks her more about her condition. She's had Type I diabetes for at least thirteen years before she started wearing the niqab, and her vision is still good.
4th Nov '16 5:08:54 PM PhysicsPhil
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** The show's spiritual predecessor, ''Series/YesMinister'', was also equally realistic of its portrayal of Whitehall and Civil Service machinations, due to the fact that they actually had inside information and anecdotes from senior civil servants. A good example is the episode "The Moral Dimension", where the main plot point - smuggling in alcohol to a diplomatic conference in [[{{Qurac}} Qumran]] - is based on an actual event.

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** The show's spiritual predecessor, ''Series/YesMinister'', was also equally realistic of its portrayal of Whitehall and Civil Service machinations, due to the fact that they actually had inside information and anecdotes from senior civil servants. A good example is the episode "The Moral Dimension", where the main plot point - smuggling in alcohol to a diplomatic conference in [[{{Qurac}} Qumran]] - is based on an actual event. Even most of the minor characters were [[{{NoCelebritiesWereHarmed}} recognisable pastiches]] of real people or groups.
20th Oct '16 1:09:36 PM CheeseDogX
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** While the physics in Stargate are a bit wonky they clearly put work into keep consistency. For instance ordinary Stargates can only dial within a galaxy so their limits are probably in the tens of thousands of light-years. When they build the McKay-Carter Gate Bridge to join the Milky Way and Pegasus galaxies they use with 34 Stargates, which matches perfectly since the distance between the two galaxies is 3 million light years which means, 34 times the diameter of the Milky Way.

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** While the physics in Stargate are a bit wonky they clearly put work into keep consistency. For instance ordinary Stargates can only dial within a galaxy so their limits are probably in the tens of thousands of light-years. When they build the McKay-Carter Gate Bridge to join the Milky Way and Pegasus galaxies they use with 34 Stargates, which matches perfectly since the distance between the two galaxies is 3 million light years which means, 34 times the diameter of the Milky Way. Carter also had a pretty accurate (if dumbed-down) explanation of red shift in one episode.
2nd Oct '16 12:41:21 PM ErikModi
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** One episode featured the creepy, haunting call of the loon to cap off one action scene. Horror movies and TV shows frequently use loon calls to add a creepy atmosphere, [[MisplacedWildlife even when set in areas where there are no loons.]] This episode was set in Duluth, Minnesota, and the loon is the Minnesota state bird (no, not the mosquito).
1st Jun '16 2:46:58 PM sanfranman91
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* According to [=LeVar=] Burton, one of the key reasons why''Series/{{Roots}}'' [[Series/{{Roots|2016}} was remade in 2016]] was that the intervening four decades' worth of historical scholarship have greatly refined understanding of the story's time periods (much of this scholarship was outright inspired by the original miniseries). Among these refinements:

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* According to [=LeVar=] Burton, one of the key reasons why''Series/{{Roots}}'' why ''Series/{{Roots}}'' [[Series/{{Roots|2016}} was remade in 2016]] was that the intervening four decades' worth of historical scholarship have greatly refined understanding of the story's time periods (much of this scholarship was outright inspired by the original miniseries). Among these refinements:
1st Jun '16 2:46:44 PM sanfranman91
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* According to [=LeVar=] Burton, one of the key reasons why''Series/{{Roots}}'' [[Series/{{Roots|2016}} was remade in 2016]] was that the intervening four decades' worth of historical scholarship have greatly refined understanding of the story's time periods (much of this scholarship was outright inspired by the original miniseries). Among these refinements:
** The original miniseries presented Juffre as a small village, which is what it was like when Alex Haley visited it in the 20th century. Subsequent research, however, has since proven that during the 18th century Juffre was a thriving large town and major port for commerce on the river. Many Europeans such as the Portugese and the English themselves had trading missions in or around Juffre - as the opening voiceover narration explains, they were trading European guns to the Mandinka tribes in exchange for slaves, which fueled an increasingly aggressive demand for more slaves. Thus the Mandinka were familiar with firearms and used them regularly. Kunta Kinte himself was also probably quite well educated, and would have to have been able to speak three or four different languages from living in a major trade hub.
** The original miniseries knew that the Mandinka were warriors, but subsequent research revealed that they were actually mounted warriors who regularly rode horses. Europeans even visited the Mandinka to learn horse-training techniques from the Africans. Thus in the remake, learning to ride a fiery stallion is a major step shown in warrior training, and the Mandinka are regularly shown riding horses. Even for the pivotal scene when Kunta is captured by slavers, in the remake he is fleeing riding his horse but it gets shot out from under him. This aspect of Mandinka culture continues to reverberate for Kunta and his family in America: Kunta makes his first escape attempt by stealing the plantation-owner's prize horse that few others can master. Later, he gets his new job as a coach rider again because he is skilled at dealing with horses. Kunta tries to impart as much of this aspect of Mandinka heritage to his daughter as he can, making Kizzy go through long hours of training so she can jump onto a horse at a moment's notice and ride it to freedom some day. Her training pays off and she does quickly steal and ride a horse, [[spoiler:[[YankTheDogsChain but like her father, even with a horse she doesn't get far]]]].
18th May '16 2:24:11 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/{{CSI}}'', similarly, has a reputation for HollywoodScience, but in a snippet of ''CSINewYork'' a tech taking out a hard drive for evaluation was shown switching the jumper before putting it in the external enclosure, a small detail anyone not in the know would not likely catch. Especially surprising given the sad prevalence of HollywoodHacking on the show.

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* ''Series/{{CSI}}'', similarly, has a reputation for HollywoodScience, but in a snippet of ''CSINewYork'' ''Series/{{CSINY}}'' a tech taking out a hard drive for evaluation was shown switching the jumper before putting it in the external enclosure, a small detail anyone not in the know would not likely catch. Especially surprising given the sad prevalence of HollywoodHacking on the show.
6th Mar '16 10:29:52 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''FoylesWar'' creator Creator/AnthonyHorowitz ensured that all the WWII period details in this show were thoroughly researched. Most episodes are inspired or directly based off actual people, events, or wartime organizations.

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* ''FoylesWar'' ''Series/FoylesWar'' creator Creator/AnthonyHorowitz ensured that all the WWII period details in this show were thoroughly researched. Most episodes are inspired or directly based off actual people, events, or wartime organizations.



* ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'' is frequently praised as one of the more accurate portrayals of police work, with a good eye and ear for details and dialogue often found within the Baltimore Homicide Unit as well as the cases they worked and the chain of command in the police department. Similar to ''TheWire'', many lines of dialogue are taken word for word from David Simon's book.

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* ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'' is frequently praised as one of the more accurate portrayals of police work, with a good eye and ear for details and dialogue often found within the Baltimore Homicide Unit as well as the cases they worked and the chain of command in the police department. Similar to ''TheWire'', ''Series/TheWire'', many lines of dialogue are taken word for word from David Simon's book.



* ''{{Underbelly}}'', based on the book series and newspaper article, actually worked with members of Task Force Purana to get the story right, [[RuleOfDrama except when it wasn't]].

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* ''{{Underbelly}}'', ''Series/{{Underbelly}}'', based on the book series and newspaper article, actually worked with members of Task Force Purana to get the story right, [[RuleOfDrama except when it wasn't]].



* ''TheWestWing'', although not without its errors, was a surprisingly candid and realistic portrayal as the sorts of conflicts and obstacles any presidential administration must run into on a daily basis, no doubt due to the fact that former Clinton Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers and former Reagan speechwriter Peggy Noonan were advisers to the show. Some episodes were based on one character having to teach another character (and, by extension, the audience) about certain aspects of the federal government (e.g. Sam teaching C.J. everything she needs to know about the U.S. Census).\\

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* ''TheWestWing'', ''Series/TheWestWing'', although not without its errors, was a surprisingly candid and realistic portrayal as the sorts of conflicts and obstacles any presidential administration must run into on a daily basis, no doubt due to the fact that former Clinton Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers and former Reagan speechwriter Peggy Noonan were advisers to the show. Some episodes were based on one character having to teach another character (and, by extension, the audience) about certain aspects of the federal government (e.g. Sam teaching C.J. everything she needs to know about the U.S. Census).\\



* ''TheWire'' is known for its accurate portrayal of Baltimore, police procedure, slang, and based many of its characters on actual police and criminals of the Baltimore area. Furthermore, its portrayal of a newsroom has been touted as the most accurate ever shown on television. And this says nothing of its portrayal of politics, schools, and unions.

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* ''TheWire'' ''Series/TheWire'' is known for its accurate portrayal of Baltimore, police procedure, slang, and based many of its characters on actual police and criminals of the Baltimore area. Furthermore, its portrayal of a newsroom has been touted as the most accurate ever shown on television. And this says nothing of its portrayal of politics, schools, and unions.



** ''TheWire'' is currently being taught in a number of universities in a variety of fields, from law to sociology to film studies. A sociologist has described ''TheWire'' as the best sociological text ever written.

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** ''TheWire'' The series is currently being taught in a number of universities in a variety of fields, from law to sociology to film studies. A sociologist has described ''TheWire'' it as the best sociological text ever written.
16th Sep '15 8:19:47 AM dmcreif
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* ''Series/HouseOfCardsUS'' may take some liberties with the American government, but various aspects of UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC area culture are portrayed accurately. For instance, in season 2, when Frank Underwood goes to throw the ceremonial first pitch at a Baltimore Orioles game, the crowd shouts "OH!" in the middle of the national anthem, a tradition at all Maryland and DC area sports.
16th Sep '15 8:15:29 AM dmcreif
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** On the audio commentary for the DVD set, writer Terence Winter recalls how during the filming of the first episode he had to ask Creator/MartinScorsese to reshoot a scene because one of the male characters was wearing a cap in a room full of women. In the 1920s a man who entered a room with women present would take off his cap.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'' pays careful attention to the authenticity of its Albuquerque setting, often to the level only a resident would notice. The geography is accurate, and the stores mentioned (save the fictional ''Los Pollos Hermanos'') all exist in Albuquerque. In one good example, the 5th season opens inside a Denny's, then cuts to the exterior. Although the exterior shot never actually shows the Denny's, viewers familiar with the University area will recognize that it truly is in front of a Denny's.

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** On the audio commentary for the DVD set, writer Terence Winter recalls how during the filming of the first pilot episode he had to ask Creator/MartinScorsese to reshoot a scene because one of the male characters was wearing a cap in a room full of women. In the 1920s a man who entered a room with women present would take off his cap.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'' ''Series/BreakingBad'', and its spinoff ''Series/BetterCallSaul'', pays careful attention to the authenticity of its Albuquerque setting, often to the level only a resident would notice. The geography is accurate, and the stores mentioned or shown (save for the fictional ''Los Pollos Hermanos'') Hermanos'', which itself is represented by a Twisters restaurant) all exist in Albuquerque. In one good example, the 5th season opens inside a Denny's, then cuts to the exterior. Although the exterior shot never actually shows the Denny's, viewers familiar with the University area will recognize that it truly is in front of a Denny's.



* ''Series/MadMen'' appears to take pride in this. Given that the show is about an advertising agency in the 1960s with scads of ProductPlacement using past ad campaigns, they are remarkably free of major errors. One notable example: An early episode (set in 1962) shows the secretarial pool all gushing over a new office machine: a Xerox photocopier. The episode noted the month, so with a little digging, you'll discover it's the right machine, at the right time and place. (How they got their hands on that specific ancient device is beyond us.)

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* ''Series/MadMen'' series creator Matthew Weiner appears to take pride in this. Given that the show is about an advertising agency in the 1960s with scads of ProductPlacement using past ad campaigns, they are remarkably free of major errors. One notable example: An early episode (set in 1962) shows the secretarial pool all gushing over a new office machine: a Xerox photocopier. The episode noted the month, so with a little digging, you'll discover it's the right machine, at the right time and place. (How they got their hands on that specific ancient device is beyond us.)



* ''Series/{{Monk}}'' has an InUniverse example in the episode ''Mr. Monk Goes to a Wedding''. After Monk had to take Natalie with him to a mud spa due to it becoming a crime scene from a body being discovered in one of the stalls, he also took a male stripper with him, having mistook him for an actual cop. When telling the cop of the situation via police terms, the stripper responded with "That bad, huh?", implying that the stripper in question knew enough about police terms to understand the situation (presumably to allow him to play the role of a cop as realistically as possible).

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* ''Series/{{Monk}}'' ''Series/{{Monk}}'':
**The show
has an InUniverse example in the episode ''Mr. Monk Goes to a Wedding''. After Monk had to take Natalie with him to a mud spa due to it becoming a crime scene from a body being discovered in one of the stalls, he also took a male stripper with him, having mistook him for an actual cop. When telling the cop "cop" of the situation via police terms, the stripper responded with "That bad, huh?", implying that the stripper in question knew enough about police terms to understand the situation (presumably to allow him to play the role of a cop as realistically as possible).possible).
** In "Mr. Monk and the Big Game", Julie interviews Captain Stottlemeyer and Lieutenant Disher for a project on DNA evidence. All of the information given is practically straight on. One example: Stottlemeyer mentions that no two siblings will have the same DNA -- it's ''close'' to, but not exactly identical, with the exception for identical twins. Another example: one of Julie's questions is why DNA cannot be used to close every case, and Stottlemeyer replies that this is because 1) DNA is not found at every crime scene, and 2) even if there is usable DNA, there needs to be a match in the computer records to compare it to.
**The set designers for the season 5 episode "Mr. Monk Goes to a Rock Concert" [[http://www2.usanetwork.com/series/monk/webexclusives/blogs/ep_rockconcert.html put a lot of work into recreating the environment of an actual rock concert]]. They used actual port-a-potties, with one that they could remove the back end from so that they could shoot scenes inside the tight space. The stage set was constructed based on research for real rock concerts, including Woodstock. An acupuncture tent that Monk, Natalie, and Kendra Frank visit to interview a witness used real acupuncture benches, and the first aid tent where Monk and Natalie examine the body is stocked with actual supplies.
** In "Mr. Monk and the Big Game," many of the girls on the basketball teams were actual players, and the final goal was a shot that was accomplished in a single take.
** One reviewer who [[http://www.eviltwinltd.com/Monk/reviews/santa.htm reviewed]] "Mr. Monk and the Secret Santa" observed that the episode accurately portrays the effects of strychnine poisoning.
** If you look at the author's notes for each of the novels, you'll notice that Lee Goldberg did a lot of extra research to make the stories and settings as realistic as possible.
*** In ''Mr. Monk in Outer Space'', to create the parody show ''Beyond Earth'' and some background on the burger chain Burgerville, Goldberg did his homework by looking into ''Franchise/StarTrek'' and [=McDonald=]'s, respectively. Mr. Snork is like Mr. Spock, while a couple of real [=McDonald=]'s controversies are referenced, just with Burgerville in their place - namely, the ''Liebeck vs. [=McDonald=]'s Restaurants'' lawsuit (the Hot Coffee case), and the discovery in 2000 that [=McDonald=]'s was secretly using beef flavoring in their French fries which angered a lot of vegetarians. Additionally, the Burgerville financial scandal is compared by the forensics accountant as being identical to the Enron scandal.
*** In ''Mr. Monk is Miserable'', he did a lot of reading to create a very accurate impression of Paris. In ''Mr. Monk Goes to Germany'', its prequel, a lot of research was done on Lohr, Germany, the main setting, for information on the hotel that the psychiatric conference is held at, and also nods to "Literature/SnowWhite" (such as Natalie mentioning the town's old glass factories).
*** In ''Mr. Monk in Trouble'', Goldberg poured plenty of research on old mining towns in California around the time of the 1849 Gold Rush in order to recreate the atmosphere realistically to make Abigail Guthrie's journal entries about the tales of Artemis Monk seem realistic. Such information included stuff about train heists, various methods of salting mines, a disease known as Greeley's Cure, and a miner's lodgings.
*** In ''Mr. Monk On the Couch'', Goldberg created Natalie's subplot with a lot of background information about housing architectural styles and research about binoculars and optical lenses.
*** In ''Mr. Monk on the Road'', there was plenty of research done into the Mystery Spot in Santa Cruz, and painstakingly researched information on the physics of the Bixby Creek Bridge is shown. And many of the landmarks are ones you can encounter if you took a real road trip through the area.
** The USA Network blog entries written by Stottlemeyer provide a realistic insight into some of the minor types of incidents a police officer of his rank would encounter.
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