History Series / RestaurantImpossible

19th Jul '16 11:02:29 PM LadyNorbert
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Really, it pretty much is. There are a few differences... Robert has a much tighter time constraint, being about two days, versus the week Gordon Ramsay would typically spend at a restaurant. Robert also has a strict budget of $10,000 as opposed to Gordon spending either no money at all or as much money as the show's producers would allow him to. In the earlier seasons, Robert also didn't get ''quite'' as into helping the staff with their personal problems, apparently figuring if the restaurant started doing well the rest would sort itself out. Later seasons have changed this aspect, with Robert playing counsellor to the dysfunctional families/staff. And so, [[StrictlyFormula the formula is almost identical]]: the celebrity British chef shows up to a failing restaurant, remarking on the terrible decor when he does. He tries the food, and with near-certainty finds that absolutely everything is dreadful, and usually is either frozen or comes from cans. Upon checking the kitchen, he will almost invariably find it filthy and staffed by people who have either never cooked well, been strangled by incompetent managing, or simply lost their passion and drive. Robert tackles the problems, freaking out along the way. (As opposed to Gordon's [[ClusterFBomb swearing a blue streak]], Robert generally prefers to freak out by throwing up his hands and [[{{Angrish}} letting out an exasperated yell]].) Now has its own imitator following it directly on the same network, ''Series/RestaurantStakeout''.

Like the UK version and later seasons of the U.S. ''Kitchen Nightmares'', each episode ends with a short epilogue of how the restaurant was doing after the episode. These are usually rather vague, though, often merely saying that business is "on the mend" or somesuch, or that the restaurant closed (but not why). The honesty of these is somewhat questionable. One example is the Sweet Tea Restaurant, which according to online reviews went back to having bad service and jacked up their prices ''the day after'' Robert left, soon went to a buffet, and eventually closed, none of which is mentioned in the original ending blurb or edited in reruns. Eventually, the epilogues were replaced by pointers to the website, which usually contains follow-up interviews with the owners along with a longer update. For what it's worth, Robert himself has said their success rate is around 75%.

to:

Really, it pretty much is. There are a few differences... Robert has a much tighter time constraint, being about two days, versus the week Gordon Ramsay would typically spend at a restaurant. Robert also has a strict budget of $10,000 as opposed to Gordon spending either no money at all or as much money as the show's producers would allow him to.allow. In the earlier seasons, Robert also didn't get ''quite'' as into helping the staff with their personal problems, apparently figuring if the restaurant started doing well the rest would sort itself out. Later seasons have changed this aspect, with Robert playing counsellor counselor to the dysfunctional families/staff. And so, [[StrictlyFormula the formula is almost identical]]: the celebrity British chef shows up to a failing restaurant, remarking on the terrible decor when he does. He tries the food, and with near-certainty finds that absolutely everything is dreadful, and usually is either frozen or comes from cans. Upon checking the kitchen, he will almost invariably find it filthy and staffed by people who have either never cooked well, been strangled by incompetent managing, or simply lost their passion and drive. Robert tackles the problems, freaking out along the way. (As opposed to Gordon's [[ClusterFBomb swearing a blue streak]], Robert generally prefers to freak out by throwing up his hands and [[{{Angrish}} letting out an exasperated yell]].) Now has its own imitator following it directly on the same network, ''Series/RestaurantStakeout''.

Like the UK version and later seasons of the U.S. ''Kitchen Nightmares'', each episode ends with a short epilogue of how the restaurant was doing after the episode. These are usually rather vague, though, often merely saying that business is "on the mend" or somesuch, some such, or that the restaurant closed (but not why). The honesty of these is somewhat questionable. One example is the Sweet Tea Restaurant, which according to online reviews went back to having bad service and jacked up their prices ''the day after'' Robert left, soon went to a buffet, and eventually closed, none of which is mentioned in the original ending blurb or edited in reruns. Eventually, the epilogues were replaced by pointers to the website, which usually contains follow-up interviews with the owners along with a longer update. For what it's worth, Robert himself has said their success rate is around 75%.



* ICallItVera: Robert refers to his sledgehammer as "Robert's Rabble-Rouser".



* ICallItVera: Robert refers to his sledgehammer as "Robert's Rabble-Rouser".



** The "chefs" at both Sweet Tea of Chapin, South Carolina; and Salt Works II of Wilmington, North Carolina made everything (and we mean ''everything'') from cans and mixes. Robert had to spend parts of both episodes showing them how to make basic stuff like chicken stock and white gravy, because they didn't know how. Of course, their reliance on cans and mixes had rendered the food both expensive and tasteless. Robert even had to tell a proprietor of Sweet Tea that a drinkable "Ginger Iced Tea" does ''not'' include whole pieces of raw ginger in the glass!

to:

** The "chefs" at both Sweet Tea of (of Chapin, South Carolina; Carolina) and Salt Works II of (of Wilmington, North Carolina Carolina) made everything (and - and we mean ''everything'') ''everything'' - from cans and mixes. Robert had to spend parts of both episodes showing them how to make basic stuff like chicken stock and white gravy, because they didn't know how. Of course, their reliance on cans and mixes had rendered the food both expensive and tasteless. Robert even had to tell a proprietor of Sweet Tea that a drinkable "Ginger Iced Tea" does ''not'' include whole pieces of raw ginger in the glass!



** Subverted at Mamma Lucrezia's. The customers enjoy the food, and Robert said that Maria's pizza was among the best he's ever had in his life. The service is reliable and fast. The restaurant's decor is not great, but at least clean and acceptable. The location is a busy main road. This puzzles Robert deeply as he initially fails to find a reason the restaurant is failing. [[spoiler:The reason is because the owner's brother, Mike, had driven a wedge between her and her sister and insulting their customers from across the street--in other words, they were sabotaged and demoralized.]]

to:

** Subverted at Mamma Lucrezia's. The customers enjoy the food, and Robert said that Maria's pizza was among the best he's ever had in his life. The service is reliable and fast. The restaurant's decor is not great, but at least clean and acceptable. The location is a busy main road. This puzzles Robert deeply as he initially fails to find a reason the restaurant is failing. [[spoiler:The reason is because the owner's brother, Mike, had driven a wedge between her and her their sister and ''and'' was insulting their customers from across the street--in street -- in other words, they were sabotaged and demoralized.]]



** While both physically and mentally intimidating, Robert is quite friendly with children (even if they're disruptive to the dining experience). Also, see the Christmas episode. It's this for the owners as well, as he really does want to help the restaurant succeed, and acting the way he does is the only way he can make enough of an impression in only two days to stand a chance of effecting lasting change.

to:

** While both physically and mentally intimidating, Robert is quite friendly with children (even if they're disruptive to the dining experience). Also, see the Christmas episode. It's He's this for the owners as well, as he really does want to help the restaurant succeed, and acting the way he does is the only way he can make enough of an impression in only two days to stand a chance of effecting lasting change.



** This has cropped up in a few episodes. Oddly grandchildren seem to be the more common recipients of this than children.
* NeverMyFault: Many restaurant owners refuse to accept the issues of the restaurant as their fault, instead blaming them on the staff or other circumstances. For example, the owner of Paliani's has a tantrum as she complains that the staff should just accept their jobs and stop complaining, and is outright offended that she has to take her two-year-old son elsewhere. The issue is that A) everyone agreed that she took ''no'' leadership, causing mayhem in the kitchen, and B) her son Nico was loud, disruptive, and an annoyance to the customers, mostly because she left him completely unattended.

to:

** This has cropped up in a few episodes. Oddly Oddly, grandchildren seem to be the more common recipients of this than children.
* NeverMyFault: Many restaurant owners refuse to accept the issues of the restaurant as their fault, instead blaming them on the staff or other circumstances. For example, the owner of Paliani's has a tantrum as she complains that the staff should just accept their jobs and stop complaining, and is outright offended that she has to take her two-year-old son elsewhere. The issue is that A) everyone agreed that she took had ''no'' leadership, leadership skills, causing mayhem in the kitchen, and B) her son Nico was loud, disruptive, and an annoyance to the customers, mostly because she left him completely unattended.



* OhCrap: The looks on the design team's faces when Robert grabbed a sledgehammer and put a large hole in a wall he wanted removed, and that they'd told him was full of plumbing and electrical equipment. One designer actually ''screamed''- understandably, though.

to:

* OhCrap: The looks on the design team's faces when Robert grabbed a sledgehammer and put a large hole in a wall he wanted removed, and that they'd told him was full of plumbing and electrical equipment. One designer actually ''screamed''- ''screamed'' - understandably, though.



* Retool: Starting in Season 12 the show changed format, with Robert & co. "ambushing" owners by showing up to the restaurant unannounced.

to:

* Retool: {{Retool}}: Starting in Season 12 the show changed format, with Robert & co. "ambushing" owners by showing up to the restaurant unannounced.



** This has happened more than once, especially for servers/staff very low on the totem pole, have already decided that they're not cut out for the industry long before Robert ever shows up or just doing the job for supplemental income and decide that Robert's berating or putting up with the restaurant's poor management just isn't worth sticking around for. Since these low-level people aren't the type of staff the show's going to feature or interview individually, it's mostly noticeable by paying attention to which faces disappear between Day 1 and when everybody gathers for the Big Reveal. Comparing the episode with the restaurant's "About" or "who's who" web page if available will often reveal this too.

to:

** This has happened more than once, especially for servers/staff very low on the totem pole, have already decided that they're not cut out for the industry long before Robert ever shows up or just doing the job for supplemental income and decide that Robert's berating or putting up with the restaurant's poor management just isn't worth sticking around for. Since these low-level people aren't the type of staff the show's going to feature or interview individually, it's mostly noticeable by paying attention to which faces disappear between Day 1 and when everybody gathers for the Big Reveal. Comparing the episode with the restaurant's "About" or "who's who" web page page, if available available, will often reveal this too.



* SiblingRivalry: Mamma Lucrezia's was getting torn apart by Maria and Stefania, two sisters and co-owners who had different ideas of how to run the place. On top of that, their brother Mike opened a restaurant across the street seemignly solely to spite them.

to:

* SiblingRivalry: Mamma Lucrezia's was getting torn apart by Maria and Stefania, two sisters and co-owners who had different ideas of how to run the place. On top of that, their brother Mike opened a restaurant across the street seemignly street, something he apparently did solely to spite them.



* SocialSemiCircle: If there are two or more people Robert wants to have a private chat with, they will collectively occupy three-quarters of a table's perimeter with the camera occupying the fourth.

to:

* SocialSemiCircle: If there are two or more people with whom Robert wants to have a private chat with, chat, they will collectively occupy three-quarters of a table's perimeter with the camera occupying the fourth.



** The owner of Rascal's in New Castle, Delaware, who had an obvious hoarding problem. Robert worked with him, dunged out his horrid back patio and spent thousands to get his disgusting kitchen properly cleaned. [[UngratefulBastard The owner responded by telling local media that Irvine had planted fake mouse droppings in the kitchen]] (while not bothering to deny the ''thirteen'' dead mice Robert's cleaning crew found). Several months later, the hoarding problem returned and the Health Department shut the place down.
** There are four owners of Scrimmage's, a restaurant in Wilmington, Delaware, only one of whom is at the restaurant more than once per week. Two of the others are simply investors and the last an accountant, under the impression that if they just throw enough money at the restaurant, everything should fix itself. The accountant was somehow not keeping track of how much money was going in and out of the restaurant and was given advice from Robert, of whom accounting is far from his best talents, on how to do so--prior, he was simply guesstimating. By the end of the episode, the lesson learned from the investors? Visit the restaurant once per week and [[ObstructiveBureaucrat have more meetings]]. The owner who was at the restaurant every day (and had been before Robert showed up) was the only one who learned any cooking or serving techniques.

to:

** The owner of Rascal's in New Castle, Delaware, who had an obvious hoarding problem. Robert worked with him, dunged out his horrid back patio and spent thousands to get his disgusting kitchen properly cleaned. [[UngratefulBastard The owner responded by telling local media that Irvine had planted fake mouse droppings in the kitchen]] (while not bothering to deny the ''thirteen'' dead mice Robert's cleaning crew found). Several months later, the hoarding problem returned and the Health Department shut the place down.
** There are four owners of Scrimmage's, a restaurant in Wilmington, Delaware, only one of whom is at the restaurant more than once per week. Two of the others are simply investors and the last an accountant, under the impression that if they just throw enough money at the restaurant, everything should fix itself. The accountant was somehow not keeping track of how much money was going in and out of the restaurant and was given advice from Robert, of for whom accounting is far from his best talents, on how to do so--prior, so; prior, he was simply guesstimating. By the end of the episode, the lesson learned from by the investors? Visit the restaurant once per week and [[ObstructiveBureaucrat have more meetings]]. The owner who was at the restaurant every day (and had been before Robert showed up) was the only one who learned any cooking or serving techniques.



** ''Wedding Impossible'' also qualifies for this designation - Robert took charge of the arrangements for his own wedding, to professional wrestler Wrestling/GailKim.

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** ''Wedding Impossible'' also qualifies for this designation - Robert took charge of the arrangements for his own wedding, to professional wrestler Wrestling/GailKim. It was both beautiful and entertaining; plus, fans got to see Robert visit with his two daughters, who flew to America to be their new stepmother's bridal attendants.



* WellDoneSonGuy: From Country Cow, Kerry's negative faults turn out to center almost entirely around him attempting to erase the guilt from his now-deceased father's upbringing. Growing up, his father was always MovingTheGoalposts with working around the farm--any amount of effort Kerry made, his father rejected it and made him work harder. This turned him into a workaholic and an introvert, spending his days at his restaurant trying to do as much of it as he could by himself and furious that other people don't step in to help him without him having to tell them. He ''really'' started feeling bad when he was unable to attend his father's funeral and had since decorated the interior with various keepsakes of his father's.

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* WellDoneSonGuy: From Country Cow, Kerry's negative faults turn out to center almost entirely around him attempting to erase the guilt from the way his now-deceased father's upbringing. father raised him. Growing up, his father was always MovingTheGoalposts with working around the farm--any farm; any amount of effort Kerry made, his father rejected would reject it and made make him work harder. This turned him into a workaholic and an introvert, spending his days at his restaurant trying to do as much of it as he could by himself and furious that other people don't step in to help him without him having to tell them. He ''really'' started feeling bad when he was unable to attend his father's funeral and had since decorated the interior with various keepsakes of his father's.
29th May '16 9:00:00 AM RaiderDuck
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Added DiffLines:

** A liquor-infused variation of this with the proprietress of Cray Eatery: She had enjoyed infused liquors while visiting bars in southeast Asia and had done the same thing in her bar, except her "infusions" consisted of putting food items like garlic and rosemary into a big container of liquor and letting them sit there for YEARS at a time. Even her employees thought they tasted disgusting. When Robert emptied out the containers, most of the added ingredients had long since rotted and/or grown moldy (consumer-strength liquor retards mold growth but does not prevent it). Part of Robert's upgrades consisted of showing her how to properly infuse flavors into liquor and store the resulting concoctions.
5th Mar '16 10:19:52 AM KevinKlawitter
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Added DiffLines:

* Retool: Starting in Season 12 the show changed format, with Robert & co. "ambushing" owners by showing up to the restaurant unannounced.
15th Feb '16 4:35:54 PM Gimere
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Really, it pretty much is. There are a few differences... Robert has a much tighter time constraint, being about two days, versus the week Gordon Ramsay would typically spend at a restaurant. Robert also has a strict budget of $10,000 as opposed to Gordon spending either no money at all or as much money as the show's producers would allow him to. In the earlier seasons, Robert also didn't get ''quite'' as into helping the staff with their personal problems, apparently figuring if the restaurant started doing well the rest would sort itself out. Later seasons have changed this aspect, with Robert playing counsellor to the dysfunctional families/staff. And so, [[StrictlyFormula the formula is almost identical]]: the celebrity British chef shows up to a failing restaurant, remarking on the terrible decor when he does. He tries the food, and with near-certainty finds that absolutely everything is dreadful, and usually is either frozen or comes from cans. Upon checking the kitchen, he will almost invariably find it filthy and staffed by people who have either never cooked well, been strangled by incompetent managing, or simply lost their passion and drive. Robert tackles the problems, freaking out along the way. (As opposed to Gordon's [[ClusterFBomb swearing a blue streak]], Robert generally prefers to freak out by throwing up his hands and letting out an exasperated yell.) Now has its own imitator following it directly on the same network, ''Series/RestaurantStakeout''.

to:

Really, it pretty much is. There are a few differences... Robert has a much tighter time constraint, being about two days, versus the week Gordon Ramsay would typically spend at a restaurant. Robert also has a strict budget of $10,000 as opposed to Gordon spending either no money at all or as much money as the show's producers would allow him to. In the earlier seasons, Robert also didn't get ''quite'' as into helping the staff with their personal problems, apparently figuring if the restaurant started doing well the rest would sort itself out. Later seasons have changed this aspect, with Robert playing counsellor to the dysfunctional families/staff. And so, [[StrictlyFormula the formula is almost identical]]: the celebrity British chef shows up to a failing restaurant, remarking on the terrible decor when he does. He tries the food, and with near-certainty finds that absolutely everything is dreadful, and usually is either frozen or comes from cans. Upon checking the kitchen, he will almost invariably find it filthy and staffed by people who have either never cooked well, been strangled by incompetent managing, or simply lost their passion and drive. Robert tackles the problems, freaking out along the way. (As opposed to Gordon's [[ClusterFBomb swearing a blue streak]], Robert generally prefers to freak out by throwing up his hands and [[{{Angrish}} letting out an exasperated yell.yell]].) Now has its own imitator following it directly on the same network, ''Series/RestaurantStakeout''.






* AsianRudeness: Robert ran headfirst into this at Spicy Bar & Grill, where the Jenny and Natalie made snarky, defiant remarks at Robert--at least until Robert forced the owners to fire Jenny, which got Natalie in line.

to:

* AsianRudeness: Robert ran headfirst into this at Spicy Bar & Grill, where the employees Jenny and Natalie made snarky, defiant remarks at Robert--at least until Robert forced the owners to fire Jenny, which got Natalie in line.



** Filthy kitchens. [[CatchPhrase "YOU'RE GONNA KILL SOMEONE!"]] In the El Bistro episode, he was so outraged at the sheer filth of the entire restaurant - which was just about as bad as Rascals or [=McShane's=] - that he was literally on the verge of walking out and refusing to do the mission.

to:

** Filthy kitchens. [[CatchPhrase "YOU'RE GONNA KILL SOMEONE!"]] In the El Bistro episode, he was so outraged at the sheer filth of the entire restaurant - which was just about as bad as Rascals or [=McShane's=] - that he was literally on the verge of [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere walking out and refusing to do the mission.mission]].



* BoredomMontage: Robert in one episode where he had the owner read the restaurant's [[LongList 180+ item menu]] aloud in order to hammer home the point of why an outsized menu is bad for customers. Reading it took the owner over ''20 minutes''.

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* BoredomMontage: Robert in one episode where he had the owner read the restaurant's [[LongList 180+ item menu]] aloud in order to hammer home the point of why an outsized menu is bad for customers. Reading it It took the owner over ''20 minutes''.minutes'' to finish reading it.



* {{Catchphrase}}: Robert has a few:

to:

* {{Catchphrase}}: Robert has a few:{{Catchphrase}}:



* ChefOfIron: Robert is a Royal Navy veteran. On top of it all, he's [[HeroicBuild buffed and cut enough to look like he could kick your ass with ease]].

to:

* ChefOfIron: Robert is a Royal Navy veteran. On top of it all, he's [[HeroicBuild buffed and cut enough enough]] to look like he could kick your ass with ease]].ease.



* {{Deconstruction}}: Mama Della's New York Pizzeria seems to be what would happen if there was a ''real'' [[Series/{{Seinfeld}} Soup Nazi]][[note]]The Soup Nazi in ''Seinfeld'' is, in fact, based on a real eatery, but it was exaggerated for the show; Mama Della's embodies those exaggerations[[/note]]--the owner's drop-of-a-hat temper, his inflexibility (bad for pizza when you cannot customize, ignoring even health or religious reasons), and his ControlFreak personality scares away most of his potential customers and caused his son to resent him so much that the two split apart as mutual enemies. His restaurant wound up struggling because he was unable to compete with pizzerias that have popped up more recently offering better service and because he has been repeatedly slammed online for his attitude problems. His staff has also dwindled as they could not put up with him as their boss, leaving him doing most of the work by himself (and, being one person, the dining area is left dusty and dingy). His food also used to be good, but they've taken a nosedive due to a combination of pride and lack of drive.

to:

* {{Deconstruction}}: Mama Della's New York Pizzeria seems to be what would happen if there was a ''real'' [[Series/{{Seinfeld}} Soup Nazi]][[note]]The Nazi]][[note]]While the Soup Nazi in ''Seinfeld'' is, in fact, ''is'' based on a real eatery, but it was exaggerated for the show; Mama Della's embodies those exaggerations[[/note]]--the owner's drop-of-a-hat temper, his inflexibility (bad for pizza when you cannot customize, ignoring even health or religious reasons), and his ControlFreak personality scares away most of his potential customers and caused his son to resent him so much that the two split apart as mutual enemies. His restaurant wound up struggling because he was unable to compete with pizzerias that have popped up more recently offering better service and because he has been repeatedly slammed online for his attitude problems. His staff has also dwindled as they could not put up with him as their boss, leaving him doing most of the work by himself (and, being one person, the dining area is left dusty and dingy). His food also used to be good, but they've taken a nosedive due to a combination of pride and lack of drive.



* DysfunctionalFamily: The La Susas at Mike La Susa's--Mike is supposed to be the owner and head chef but has his hands tied by his mother Mary, who runs the place from behind the scenes with an iron fist while Mike's father Pat is Mary's YesMan. Mary hates having any changes to the menu and resists everything Robert tries to propose. Both of them threaten Mike on a daily basis of shutting the restaurant down if he goes against their ways. Due to years of this psychological abuse, Mary and Pat had pulverized out of Mike his confidence and his passion for cooking (he had previously gone to culinary school and was an executive chef before this restaurant). Robert's only way of solving this restaurant's problems was to separate Mike from Mary and Pat, as there was no way Robert could rekindle Mike with his parents present.

to:

* DysfunctionalFamily: DysfunctionalFamily:
**
The La Susas at Mike La Susa's--Mike is supposed to be the owner and head chef but has his hands tied by his mother Mary, who runs the place from behind the scenes with an iron fist while Mike's father Pat is Mary's YesMan. Mary hates having any changes to the menu and resists everything Robert tries to propose. Both of them threaten Mike on a daily basis of shutting the restaurant down if he goes against their ways. Due to years of this psychological abuse, Mary and Pat had pulverized out of Mike his confidence and his passion for cooking (he had previously gone to culinary school and was an executive chef before this restaurant). Robert's only way of solving this restaurant's problems was to separate Mike from Mary and Pat, as there was no way Robert could rekindle Mike with his parents present.



* IncompetenceInc: Good Lord, how do they even stay in business?

to:

* IncompetenceInc: Good Lord, how do they even some of these places stay in business?



* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: While both physically and mentally intimidating, Robert is quite friendly with children (even if they're disruptive to the dining experience). Also, see the Christmas episode. It's this for the owners as well, as he really does want to help the restaurant succeed, and acting the way he does is the only way he can make enough of an impression in only two days to stand a chance of effecting lasting change.
** Robert ran into two cases at the Green Berets Cafe: Mikki, the owner of the restaurant; and the colonel, who oversaw the premises the restaurant was on. Both of them were rather frosty to Robert for the same reason: They were afraid the ''Restaurant Impossible'' crew would not pay the Green Berets proper respect. Robert earned the colonel's respect by attending the following morning's physical training exercises as a demonstration of his dedication, and Mikki was overjoyed that Lynn, the interior designer, put up a monument in the corner dedicated to the Green Berets who have trained in the area, past and present. For the case of Mikki, it was not entirely clear why she disliked Robert so much until she saw the monument.

to:

* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: JerkWithAHeartOfGold:
**
While both physically and mentally intimidating, Robert is quite friendly with children (even if they're disruptive to the dining experience). Also, see the Christmas episode. It's this for the owners as well, as he really does want to help the restaurant succeed, and acting the way he does is the only way he can make enough of an impression in only two days to stand a chance of effecting lasting change.
** Robert ran into two cases of these at the Green Berets Cafe: Mikki, the owner of the restaurant; and the colonel, who oversaw the premises the restaurant was on. Both of them were rather frosty to Robert for the same reason: They were afraid the ''Restaurant Impossible'' crew would not pay the Green Berets proper respect. Robert earned the colonel's respect by attending the following morning's physical training exercises as a demonstration of his dedication, and Mikki was overjoyed that Lynn, the interior designer, put up a monument in the corner dedicated to the Green Berets who have trained in the area, past and present. For the case of Mikki, it was not entirely clear why she disliked Robert so much until she saw the monument.



* SpiritualSuccessor: Of ''Series/DinnerImpossible''
* TooDumbToLive: This, and IncompetenceInc.

to:

* SpiritualSuccessor: Of ''Series/DinnerImpossible''
''Series/DinnerImpossible''.
* TooDumbToLive: This, and IncompetenceInc.TooDumbToLive:



* VerySpecialEpisode: One year, at Christmastime, Robert's team renovated not a commercial restaurant but the struggling kitchen of a homeless shelter, more than doubling the number of meals they would be able to provide to the local needy.

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* VerySpecialEpisode: VerySpecialEpisode:
**
One year, at Christmastime, Robert's team renovated not a commercial restaurant but the struggling kitchen of a homeless shelter, more than doubling the number of meals they would be able to provide to the local needy.
8th Jan '16 6:23:21 PM nombretomado
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* FollowTheLeader: Just as ''Series/RestaurantImpossible'' was inspired by ''Series/KitchenNightmares'', several other shows have adopted the same format of "celebrity X saves failing Y", including SpikeTV's ''Series/BarRescue'', the Travel Channel's ''Hotel Impossible'', and the Creator/FoodNetwork's own ''Series/RestaurantTakeover'', ''Series/RestaurantStakeout'', ''Series/MysteryDiners'', ''Series/RestaurantRedemption'' (focusing on Asian restaurants), and most recently, ''Series/SaveMyBakery''.

to:

* FollowTheLeader: Just as ''Series/RestaurantImpossible'' was inspired by ''Series/KitchenNightmares'', several other shows have adopted the same format of "celebrity X saves failing Y", including SpikeTV's Creator/SpikeTV's ''Series/BarRescue'', the Travel Channel's ''Hotel Impossible'', and the Creator/FoodNetwork's own ''Series/RestaurantTakeover'', ''Series/RestaurantStakeout'', ''Series/MysteryDiners'', ''Series/RestaurantRedemption'' (focusing on Asian restaurants), and most recently, ''Series/SaveMyBakery''.
3rd Dec '15 4:24:01 AM jormis29
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* FollowTheLeader: Just as ''Series/RestaurantImpossible'' was inspired by ''Series/KitchenNightmares'', several other shows have adopted the same format of "celebrity X saves failing Y", including SpikeTV's ''Series/BarRescue'', the Travel Channel's ''Hotel Impossible'', and the FoodNetwork's own ''Restaurant Takeover'', ''Restaurant Stakeout'', ''Mystery Diners'', ''Restaurant Redemption'' (focusing on Asian restaurants), and most recently, ''Save My Bakery''.

to:

* FollowTheLeader: Just as ''Series/RestaurantImpossible'' was inspired by ''Series/KitchenNightmares'', several other shows have adopted the same format of "celebrity X saves failing Y", including SpikeTV's ''Series/BarRescue'', the Travel Channel's ''Hotel Impossible'', and the FoodNetwork's Creator/FoodNetwork's own ''Restaurant Takeover'', ''Restaurant Stakeout'', ''Mystery Diners'', ''Restaurant Redemption'' ''Series/RestaurantTakeover'', ''Series/RestaurantStakeout'', ''Series/MysteryDiners'', ''Series/RestaurantRedemption'' (focusing on Asian restaurants), and most recently, ''Save My Bakery''.''Series/SaveMyBakery''.
29th Sep '15 2:10:23 AM Gimere
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* AntiClimax: A common event during each episode is that Robert will usually break down a wall with his trusty golden sledgehammer, much to the annoyance of his builder Tom Bury. At Michele's, Robert and Tom found a wall that they both wanted to knock down, and for the first time they both grabbed a sledgehammer and prepared to demolish it cooperatively. [[AntiClimax It fell down after only a couple of swings]]. Afterwards, the two stood in silent disappointment at how effortless it was.

to:

* AntiClimax: A common event during each episode is that Robert will usually break down a wall with his trusty golden sledgehammer, much to the annoyance of his builder Tom Bury. At Michele's, Robert and Tom found a wall that they both wanted to knock down, and for the first time they both grabbed a sledgehammer and prepared to demolish it cooperatively. [[AntiClimax It fell down after only a couple of swings]].swings. Afterwards, the two stood in silent disappointment at how effortless it was.



** Filthy kitchens. "YOU'RE GONNA KILL SOMEONE!" In the El Bistro episode, he was so outraged at the sheer filth of the entire restaurant - which was just about as bad as Rascals or [=McShane's=] - that he was literally on the verge of walking out and refusing to do the mission.

to:

** Filthy kitchens. [[CatchPhrase "YOU'RE GONNA KILL SOMEONE!" SOMEONE!"]] In the El Bistro episode, he was so outraged at the sheer filth of the entire restaurant - which was just about as bad as Rascals or [=McShane's=] - that he was literally on the verge of walking out and refusing to do the mission.



** Mama E's was previously featured on ''DinersDriveInsAndDives'' during its glory days. Robert points this out numerous times (and even mentions that Guy would rip down the poster of him that hangs in the restaurant if he could see the current state of the place.)

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** Mama E's was previously featured on ''DinersDriveInsAndDives'' ''Series/DinersDriveInsAndDives'' during its glory days. Robert points this out numerous times (and even mentions that Guy would rip down the poster of him that hangs in the restaurant if he could see the current state of the place.)
29th Jun '15 1:36:49 PM Morgenthaler
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** A weird version of a crossover with his other show ''DinnerImpossible''. Granted, Robert is no longer producing ''Dinner: Impossible'', but certain episodes bring this into the show itself. Two examples: Thanksgiving 2011 (in Newark) and the Christmas Special 2012 (in Joplin, Missouri).

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** A weird version of a crossover with his other show ''DinnerImpossible''.''Series/DinnerImpossible''. Granted, Robert is no longer producing ''Dinner: Impossible'', but certain episodes bring this into the show itself. Two examples: Thanksgiving 2011 (in Newark) and the Christmas Special 2012 (in Joplin, Missouri).



* OnceAnEpisode: In the earlier episodes, Robert would gather the restaurant staff around his paper board and outline the bullet points of everything he needs to do. Actually, it's a callback to ''DinnerImpossible''.

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* OnceAnEpisode: In the earlier episodes, Robert would gather the restaurant staff around his paper board and outline the bullet points of everything he needs to do. Actually, it's a callback to ''DinnerImpossible''.''Series/DinnerImpossible''.



* SadistShow: Yep, just like its big sister ''DinnerImpossible''. Except that you now get to see the restaurant owners getting chewed out, as well as Robert's own frustration.

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* SadistShow: Yep, just like its big sister ''DinnerImpossible''.''Series/DinnerImpossible''. Except that you now get to see the restaurant owners getting chewed out, as well as Robert's own frustration.
29th Jun '15 1:32:57 PM Morgenthaler
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** Even better. In that same episode, Robert deliberately invokes that "garbage can turkey" trick from the ''[[DinnerImpossible Dinner: Impossible]]'' days.

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** Even better. In that same episode, Robert deliberately invokes that "garbage can turkey" trick from the ''[[DinnerImpossible Dinner: Impossible]]'' ''Series/DinnerImpossible'' days.
27th Jun '15 4:34:32 PM KevinKlawitter
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Added DiffLines:

* AsYouKnow: When Robert speaks to his builder and designer about the mission, he'll inevitably repeat the fact that they only have "2 days and $10,000" to finish the job.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Series.RestaurantImpossible