History Music / TheWho

11th Jan '18 1:55:23 AM Q4
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* RhymingWithItself:
-->[[CharacterTitle Happy Jack]] wasn't old, but he was a man\\
He lived in the sand at the Isle of Man
3rd Jan '18 1:13:37 AM bt8257
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Their first breakthrough was the 1967 ConceptAlbum ''Music/TheWhoSellOut'', which included their first Top 10 hit in the US, "I Can See for Miles". That plus their appearance at the Monterey Pop Festival marked their breakthrough in the US. In 1968, Townshend became a convert to the teachings of Meher Baba, an Indian guru who preached a gospel of love, pantheism, and music as the key to understanding the universe. Inspired by his new religion, and the rejection of psychedelic drugs that it called for, Townshend wrote what many consider the Who's best -- the famous RockOpera ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' in 1969, about a deaf, dumb and blind kid who sure plays a mean pinball. The tour in support of this album, which took the band to Film/{{Woodstock}} and often featured them performing ''Tommy'' in its entirety, established them as one of the most dynamic and exciting live acts of their day. Around this time Townshend conceived an epic project called ''Lifehouse'', a story set in a CrapsackWorld led by an authoritarian government in which hundreds of people gather at a concert and ascend to a higher plane of existence through ThePowerOfRock. However he over-exerted himself this time, and the absence of manager / co-producer Kit Lambert (who convinced the band about the ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' concept) to explain just what the fuck Pete wanted killed the project until it resurfaced as a Townshend solo album in 2000. Instead, The Who regrouped in 1971 with producer Glyn Johns and [[RecycledSoundtrack reworked the songs written for Lifehouse]] to produce ''Music/WhosNext''. ''Who's Next'' reached #1 on the UK charts, #4 in the USA, was critically acclaimed and contains some of their best-known songs: "Won't Get Fooled Again", "Baba O'Riley" and "Behind Blue Eyes".

to:

Their first breakthrough was the 1967 ConceptAlbum ''Music/TheWhoSellOut'', which included their first Top 10 hit in the US, "I Can See for Miles". That That, plus their appearance at the Monterey Pop Festival Festival, marked their breakthrough in the US. In 1968, Townshend became a convert to the teachings of Meher Baba, an Indian guru who preached a gospel of love, pantheism, and music as the key to understanding the universe. Inspired by his new religion, and the rejection of psychedelic drugs that it called for, Townshend wrote what many consider the Who's best -- the famous RockOpera ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' in 1969, about a deaf, dumb and blind kid who sure plays a mean pinball. The tour in support of this album, which took the band to Film/{{Woodstock}} and often featured them performing ''Tommy'' in its entirety, established them as one of the most dynamic and exciting live acts of their day. Around this time Townshend conceived an epic project called ''Lifehouse'', a story set in a CrapsackWorld led by an authoritarian government in which hundreds of people gather at a concert and ascend to a higher plane of existence through ThePowerOfRock. However he over-exerted himself this time, and the absence of manager / co-producer Kit Lambert (who convinced the band about the ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' concept) to explain just what the fuck Pete wanted killed the project until it resurfaced as a Townshend solo album in 2000. Instead, The Who regrouped in 1971 with producer Glyn Johns and [[RecycledSoundtrack reworked the songs written for Lifehouse]] to produce ''Music/WhosNext''. ''Who's Next'' reached #1 on the UK charts, #4 in the USA, was critically acclaimed and contains some of their best-known songs: "Won't Get Fooled Again", "Baba O'Riley" and "Behind Blue Eyes".
23rd Dec '17 9:21:18 AM Piotrusp98
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''YEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHH''

to:

''YEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHH''''YEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHH!''
26th Nov '17 7:43:22 PM NWolfman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Since developing asthma, Roger has been known to put his foot down about smoking during concerts, as one sniff too many could send him to the hospital and [[SkewedPriorities end the show early]].

to:

** Since developing asthma, Roger has been known to put his foot down about smoking during concerts, as one sniff too many could send him to the hospital and [[SkewedPriorities end the show early]].early.
* BiTheWay: Townshend has flip-flopped on the matter of his attraction to men since the 80s, claiming that his song "Rough Boys" was specifically about gay sex and coming to terms with his interest thereof. He later revoked this and said that it was about his ''friends'' who were gay. In his autobiography, he writes that he's "probably bi," saying that he was certainly attracted to Music/MickJagger at one point.
11th Nov '17 6:32:54 AM Q4
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Possibly lamp-shaded by Pete in the ''Live at Leeds'' album. When introducing "Substitute", "Happy Jack", and "I'm a Boy", he mentions that the first "was our first #4", the second "was our first #1... ''In Germany''", and the third, "according to Melody Maker, was our first #1 in England... For about half an hour."[[note]]Which is true, if understated - ''Melody Maker'' published its own charts in the 1960s, and it '''did''' list "I'm A Boy" at number one, for two weeks - their only #1 on ''any'' of the major competing charts of the era. However, the ''Melody Maker'' chart wasn't the one that ended up being accepted as canon, so "I'm a Boy" is now recognised as only a #2 in the UK.[[/note]]

to:

** Possibly lamp-shaded by Pete in the ''Live at Leeds'' album. When introducing "Substitute", "Happy Jack", and "I'm a Boy", he mentions that the first "was our first #4", the second "was our first #1... ''In Germany''", and the third, "according to Melody Maker, was our first #1 in England... For about half an hour."[[note]]Which is true, if understated true - ''Melody Maker'' published its own charts in the 1960s, and it '''did''' list "I'm A Boy" at number one, for two weeks - their only #1 on ''any'' of the major competing charts of the era. However, the ''Melody Maker'' chart wasn't the one that ended up being accepted as canon, so "I'm a Boy" is now recognised as only a #2 in the UK. What beat it to the top? Of all things, "Distant Drums" by the late (having died two years earlier) country crooner Jim Reeves.[[/note]]
10th Nov '17 2:29:37 AM Q4
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ToTheTuneOf: The two sides of their first single as The High Numbers, "Zoot Suit" and "I'm The Face", were new lyrics written by then-manager Pete Meaden to the tunes of "Misery" by The Dynamics and "Got Love If You Want it" by Slim Harpo, respectively.



* VocalTagTeam: Even though Roger Daltrey has the official position of lead vocalist, There are a handful of songs on every album that feature Pete Townshend on lead vocal or on co-lead vocal. John Entwistle has a few songs on lead vocal too and even Keith Moon (who was not known for his singing abilities) gets to sing lead a couple of times. Whole songs featuring harmonizing between Roger, Pete and John are not uncommon either

to:

* VocalTagTeam: Even though Roger Daltrey has the official position of lead vocalist, There are a handful of songs on every album that feature Pete Townshend on lead vocal or on co-lead vocal. John Entwistle has a few songs on lead vocal too and even Keith Moon (who was not known for his singing abilities) gets to sing lead a couple of times. Whole songs featuring harmonizing between Roger, Pete and John are not uncommon eithereither.
26th Oct '17 11:55:24 AM Q4
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Possibly lamp-shaded by Pete in the ''Live at Leeds'' album. When introducing "Substitute", "Happy Jack", and "I'm a Boy", he mentions that the first "was our first #4", the second "was our first #1... ''In Germany''", and the third, "according to Melody Maker, was our first #1 in England... For about half an hour."[[note]]Which is true, if understated - ''Melody Maker'' published its own charts in the 1960s, and it '''did''' list "I'm A Boy" at number one, for two weeks. However, the ''Melody Maker'' chart wasn't the one that ended up being accepted as canon, so "I'm a Boy" is now recognised as only a #2 in the UK.

to:

** Possibly lamp-shaded by Pete in the ''Live at Leeds'' album. When introducing "Substitute", "Happy Jack", and "I'm a Boy", he mentions that the first "was our first #4", the second "was our first #1... ''In Germany''", and the third, "according to Melody Maker, was our first #1 in England... For about half an hour."[[note]]Which is true, if understated - ''Melody Maker'' published its own charts in the 1960s, and it '''did''' list "I'm A Boy" at number one, for two weeks.weeks - their only #1 on ''any'' of the major competing charts of the era. However, the ''Melody Maker'' chart wasn't the one that ended up being accepted as canon, so "I'm a Boy" is now recognised as only a #2 in the UK.[[/note]]
26th Oct '17 11:50:45 AM Q4
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Possibly lamp-shaded by Pete in the ''Live at Leeds'' album. When introducing "Substitute", "Happy Jack", and "I'm a Boy", he mentions that the first "was our first #4", the second "was our first #1... ''In Germany''", and the third, "according to Melody Maker, was our first #1 in England... For about half an hour."[[note]]Which is true, if understated - ''Melody Maker'' published its own charts in the 1960s, and it '''did''' list "I'm A Boy" at number one, for two weeks. However, the ''Melody Maker'' chart wasn't the one that ended up being accepted as canon, so "I'm a Boy" is now recognised as only a #2 in the UK.]]

to:

** Possibly lamp-shaded by Pete in the ''Live at Leeds'' album. When introducing "Substitute", "Happy Jack", and "I'm a Boy", he mentions that the first "was our first #4", the second "was our first #1... ''In Germany''", and the third, "according to Melody Maker, was our first #1 in England... For about half an hour."[[note]]Which is true, if understated - ''Melody Maker'' published its own charts in the 1960s, and it '''did''' list "I'm A Boy" at number one, for two weeks. However, the ''Melody Maker'' chart wasn't the one that ended up being accepted as canon, so "I'm a Boy" is now recognised as only a #2 in the UK.]]
25th Oct '17 7:50:32 AM Q4
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Possibly lamp-shaded by Pete in the ''Live at Leeds'' album. When introducing "Substitute", "Happy Jack", and "I'm a Boy", he mentions that the first "was our first #4", the second "was our first #1... ''In Germany''", and the third, "according to Melody Maker, was our first #1 in England... For about half an hour." ([[DontExplainTheJoke "I'm a Boy" ended up peaking at #2 in the UK]]).

to:

** Possibly lamp-shaded by Pete in the ''Live at Leeds'' album. When introducing "Substitute", "Happy Jack", and "I'm a Boy", he mentions that the first "was our first #4", the second "was our first #1... ''In Germany''", and the third, "according to Melody Maker, was our first #1 in England... For about half an hour." ([[DontExplainTheJoke "[[note]]Which is true, if understated - ''Melody Maker'' published its own charts in the 1960s, and it '''did''' list "I'm A Boy" at number one, for two weeks. However, the ''Melody Maker'' chart wasn't the one that ended up being accepted as canon, so "I'm a Boy" ended up peaking at is now recognised as only a #2 in the UK]]).UK.]]
15th Oct '17 3:05:13 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A famous, groundbreaking British rock band from Shepherd's Bush, London, known both for their many influential songs and for their pioneering of the art of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instrument_destruction instrument destruction]]. They are so influential that when people talk of the great rock bands of TheBritishInvasion, it's often Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheRollingStones, The Who, and Music/TheKinks in the same breath. But of the four, only The Who actually spawned a whole musical [[PunkRock genre]]. Don't take our word for it: [[Music/SexPistols Johnny Rotten]], [[Music/TheRamones Johnny Ramone]], and [[Music/TheClash Joe Strummer]] (to name only three) are on record as saying something like, "If not for The Who..."

to:

A famous, groundbreaking British rock band from Shepherd's Bush, London, known both for their many influential songs and for their pioneering of the art of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instrument_destruction instrument destruction]]. They are so influential that when people talk of the great rock bands of TheBritishInvasion, UsefulNotes/TheBritishInvasion, it's often Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheRollingStones, The Who, and Music/TheKinks in the same breath. But of the four, only The Who actually spawned a whole musical [[PunkRock genre]]. Don't take our word for it: [[Music/SexPistols Johnny Rotten]], [[Music/TheRamones Johnny Ramone]], and [[Music/TheClash Joe Strummer]] (to name only three) are on record as saying something like, "If not for The Who..."
This list shows the last 10 events of 333. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Music.TheWho