History Music / TheWho

22nd Aug '16 2:38:58 PM Roemilus
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Added DiffLines:

*ImprobableWeaponUser: Pete Townshend has used his guitar to hit people over the head, such as during the Abbie Hoffman incident at Woodstock, or when he almost hit Roger Daltrey on the head with it during a particularly heated fight.
22nd Aug '16 2:14:55 PM Roemilus
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* TheNapoleon: Roger Daltrey is the shortest member of the group, and reports of his height vary between 5'5 (165 cm) and 5'7 (170 cm), which is short for British standards. In the band's early days, he was known for being a self-proclaimed fighter and for having a very dominant role within the band, often getting into fist fights with the others to solve disputes. He calmed down a lot between the release of "The Who Sell Out" and "Tommy", though, even earning the nickname Peaceful Perce [[note]] named after the street where he grew up [[/note]] from the other members.

to:

* TheNapoleon: Roger Daltrey is the shortest member of the group, and reports of his height vary between 5'5 (165 cm) and 5'7 (170 cm), which is quite short for British standards. In the band's early days, he was known for being a self-proclaimed fighter and for having a very dominant role within the band, often getting into fist fights with the others to solve disputes. He calmed down a lot between the release of "The Who Sell Out" and "Tommy", though, even earning the nickname Peaceful Perce [[note]] named after the street where he grew up [[/note]] from the other members.
22nd Aug '16 2:12:38 PM Roemilus
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* TheNapoleon: Roger Daltrey is the shortest member of the group, and reports of his height vary between 5'5 (165 cm) and 5'7 (170 cm). In the bands early days, he was known for being a self-proclaimed fighter and for having a very dominant role within the band, often getting into fist fights with the others to solve disputes. He calmed down a lot between the release of "The Who Sell Out" and "Tommy", though, even earning the nickname Peaceful Perce [[note]] named after the street where he grew up [[/note]] from the other members.

to:

* TheNapoleon: Roger Daltrey is the shortest member of the group, and reports of his height vary between 5'5 (165 cm) and 5'7 (170 cm). cm), which is short for British standards. In the bands band's early days, he was known for being a self-proclaimed fighter and for having a very dominant role within the band, often getting into fist fights with the others to solve disputes. He calmed down a lot between the release of "The Who Sell Out" and "Tommy", though, even earning the nickname Peaceful Perce [[note]] named after the street where he grew up [[/note]] from the other members.
22nd Aug '16 1:55:55 PM Roemilus
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Added DiffLines:

*TheNapoleon: Roger Daltrey is the shortest member of the group, and reports of his height vary between 5'5 (165 cm) and 5'7 (170 cm). In the bands early days, he was known for being a self-proclaimed fighter and for having a very dominant role within the band, often getting into fist fights with the others to solve disputes. He calmed down a lot between the release of "The Who Sell Out" and "Tommy", though, even earning the nickname Peaceful Perce [[note]] named after the street where he grew up [[/note]] from the other members.
22nd Aug '16 12:57:35 PM Roemilus
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* TheShowMustGoOn: In the middle of a concert in San Francisco in 1973, Keith passed out after taking tranquillizers (which were meant for animals, mixed with brandy), and wasn't able to continue playing. After doing one song without drums, Pete asked the audience: 'Can anyone play the drums? I mean someone good!'. 19-year old fan Scot Halpin was plucked out of the audience, despite that he hadn't played the drums in a year. He then played with the band for the final three songs so that they wouldn't have to cut the show short. Scot did a good job, and was awarded the Rolling Stone Magazine's 'Pick-Up Player of the Year Award' for his performance.

to:

* TheShowMustGoOn: In the middle of a concert in San Francisco in 1973, Keith passed out after taking tranquillizers (which were meant for animals, mixed with brandy), and wasn't able to continue playing. After doing one song without drums, Pete asked the audience: 'Can anyone play the drums? I mean someone good!'. 19-year old fan Scot Halpin was plucked out of the audience, despite that he hadn't played the drums in a year. He then and played with the band for the final three songs so that they wouldn't have to cut the show short. Scot did a good job, and was awarded the Rolling Stone Magazine's 'Pick-Up Player of the Year Award' for his performance.
22nd Aug '16 12:55:43 PM Roemilus
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* GagNose: Pete's characteristic big nose. He lampshades this during his first solo concert, changing the lyrics of "Magic Bus" to this:

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* GagNose: Pete's characteristic big nose. He lampshades this during his first solo concert, concert in 1974, changing the lyrics of "Magic Bus" to this:


Added DiffLines:

*TheShowMustGoOn: In the middle of a concert in San Francisco in 1973, Keith passed out after taking tranquillizers (which were meant for animals, mixed with brandy), and wasn't able to continue playing. After doing one song without drums, Pete asked the audience: 'Can anyone play the drums? I mean someone good!'. 19-year old fan Scot Halpin was plucked out of the audience, despite that he hadn't played the drums in a year. He then played with the band for the final three songs so that they wouldn't have to cut the show short. Scot did a good job, and was awarded the Rolling Stone Magazine's 'Pick-Up Player of the Year Award' for his performance.
**A tragic example happened when John died on the evening before a big American tour was supposed to kick off. Despite the emotional pain and technical difficulties this must've caused, the band managed to get session bassist Pino Palladino to fill in on short notice. With him, they did the tour anyway after a delay of only a few days.
19th Aug '16 11:44:54 AM gewunomox
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[[caption-width-right:350:The Who during their heyday. From left to right: John Entwistle, Roger Daltrey, Keith Moon and Pete Townshend.]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:The [[caption-width-right:350: The Who during their heyday. From left to right: John Entwistle, Roger Daltrey, Keith Moon and Pete Townshend.]]



->''"Inside Outside/Leave me alone''\\
''Inside Outside/Nowhere is home''\\
''Inside Outside/Where have I been?''\\

to:

->''"Inside Outside/Leave Outside / Leave me alone''\\
''Inside Outside/Nowhere Outside / Nowhere is home''\\
''Inside Outside/Where Outside / Where have I been?''\\



A famous, groundbreaking British rock band from Shepherd's Bush, London, known both for their many influential songs and for their pioneering of the art of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instrument_destruction instrument destruction]]. They are so influential that when people talk of the great rock bands of TheBritishInvasion, it's often Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheKinks, Music/TheRollingStones and The Who in the same breath. But of the four, only The Who actually spawned a whole musical [[PunkRock genre]]. Don't take our word for it: [[Music/TheSexPistols Johnny Rotten]], [[Music/TheRamones Johnny Ramone]], and [[Music/TheClash Joe Strummer]] (to name only three) are on record as saying something like, "If not for The Who ..."

The group started out as the Detours in 1962 when classmates Pete Townshend and John Entwistle met Roger Daltrey, then a high-school drop-out working in a sheet metal factory. They became The Who in 1964 after hearing of another band also known as The Detours. After firing founding drummer Doug Sandom, recruiting Keith Moon mid-gig, and beating around the bush for a while as a mod-rock act, changing their name to the High Numbers and then back again to the Who, they finally struck gold in 1965 with the singles "I Can't Explain", "Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere" and the classic "My Generation". The [[Music/MyGeneration album of the same name]] however was a rushed affair generally lacking in memorable work. Guitarist and primary songwriter Pete Townshend had more ambition though, and included the 9-minute "mini-opera" "A Quick One, While He's Away" on the album ''Music/AQuickOne'', which was released the next year (and also featured the single "Boris The Spider", written and sung by Entwistle), as a taste of things to come.

Their first breakthrough was the 1967 ConceptAlbum ''Music/TheWhoSellOut'', which included their first Top 40 hit in the US, "I Can See For Miles". That plus their appearance at the Monterey Pop Festival marked their breakthrough in the US. In 1968, Townshend became a convert to the teachings of Meher Baba, an Indian guru who preached a gospel of love, pantheism, and music as the key to understanding the universe. Inspired by his new religion, and the rejection of psychedelic drugs that it called for, Townshend wrote what many consider the Who's best- the famous RockOpera ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' in 1969, about a deaf, dumb and blind kid who sure plays a mean pinball. The tour in support of this album, which took the band to {{Woodstock}} and often featured them performing ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' in its entirety, established them as one of the most dynamic and exciting live acts of their day. Around this time Townshend conceived an epic project called ''Lifehouse'', a story set in a CrapsackWorld led by an authoritarian government in which hundreds of people gather at a concert and ascend to a higher plane of existence through ThePowerOfRock. However he over-exerted himself this time, and the absence of manager/co-producer Kit Lambert (who convinced the band about the ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' concept) to explain just what the fuck Pete wanted killed the project until it resurfaced as a Townshend solo album in 2000. Instead, The Who regrouped in 1971 with producer Glyn Johns and [[RecycledSoundtrack reworked the songs written for Lifehouse]] to produce ''Music/WhosNext''. ''Music/WhosNext'' reached #1 on the UK charts, #4 in the USA, was critically acclaimed and contains some of their best-known songs: "Won't Get Fooled Again", "Baba O'Riley" and "Behind Blue Eyes".

After a quick break, The Who recorded another ConceptAlbum / RockOpera, this time about a mentally ill teenager named Jimmy and his conflicts with his family and friends during the height of the mods-rockers conflict in the 1960s. Named ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'', it was released in 1973 to critical acclaim, and spawned another hit with the ballad "Love, Reign O'er Me". During the supporting tour, which proved less impressive than the ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' tour due to an increased reliance on then-primitive synthesizers and backing tapes, a famous incident occurred on 20 November 1973 in San Francisco, when Keith Moon passed out twice during the performance due to tranquillizers (the put-to-sleep-large-animals kind of tranquillizers), the first time returning after a half-hour delay, and the second time he was carried off. After playing "See Me, Feel Me" with Daltrey on tambourine, Townshend asked "Can anybody play the drums? I mean someone good!" An audience member, Scot Halpin, filled in for the three-song encore and did a pretty good job. When interviewed by ''Rolling Stone'', he noted: "I only played three numbers and I was dead".

The Who began faltering after this period, as a result of Keith Moon's addiction to drugs and alcohol and Townshend's depression, which resulted in 1975's bleak ''The Who By Numbers'', full of songs about self-loathing, alcoholism, middle-age, and fear of irrelevance, lightened by the Top 10 hit "Squeeze Box". The same year a [[TheMovie movie]] version of "Music/{{Tommy}}" was released with an all-star cast under Creator/{{Ken Russell}}'s direction. The move away from concept albums and epic rock operas continued with the stripped-down ''Who Are You'', released in 1978, which again climbed up the charts (higher in the US than the UK) and spawned a hit single, "Who Are You".

to:

A famous, groundbreaking British rock band from Shepherd's Bush, London, known both for their many influential songs and for their pioneering of the art of [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instrument_destruction instrument destruction]]. They are so influential that when people talk of the great rock bands of TheBritishInvasion, it's often Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheKinks, Music/TheRollingStones and The Who in the same breath. But of the four, only The Who actually spawned a whole musical [[PunkRock genre]]. Don't take our word for it: [[Music/TheSexPistols [[Music/SexPistols Johnny Rotten]], [[Music/TheRamones Johnny Ramone]], and [[Music/TheClash Joe Strummer]] (to name only three) are on record as saying something like, "If not for The Who ...Who..."

The group started out as the Detours in 1962 when classmates Pete Townshend and John Entwistle met Roger Daltrey, then a high-school drop-out working in a sheet metal factory. They became The Who in 1964 after hearing of another band also known as The Detours. After firing founding drummer Doug Sandom, recruiting Keith Moon mid-gig, and beating around the bush for a while as a mod-rock act, changing their name to the High Numbers and then back again to the Who, they finally struck gold in 1965 with the singles "I Can't Explain", "Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere" and the classic "My Generation". The [[Music/MyGeneration album of the same name]] however was a rushed affair generally lacking in memorable work. Guitarist and primary songwriter Pete Townshend had more ambition though, and included the 9-minute "mini-opera" "A Quick One, While He's Away" on the album ''Music/AQuickOne'', which was released the next year (and also featured the single "Boris The the Spider", written and sung by Entwistle), as a taste of things to come.

Their first breakthrough was the 1967 ConceptAlbum ''Music/TheWhoSellOut'', which included their first Top 40 hit in the US, "I Can See For for Miles". That plus their appearance at the Monterey Pop Festival marked their breakthrough in the US. In 1968, Townshend became a convert to the teachings of Meher Baba, an Indian guru who preached a gospel of love, pantheism, and music as the key to understanding the universe. Inspired by his new religion, and the rejection of psychedelic drugs that it called for, Townshend wrote what many consider the Who's best- best -- the famous RockOpera ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' in 1969, about a deaf, dumb and blind kid who sure plays a mean pinball. The tour in support of this album, which took the band to {{Woodstock}} Film/{{Woodstock}} and often featured them performing ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' ''Tommy'' in its entirety, established them as one of the most dynamic and exciting live acts of their day. Around this time Townshend conceived an epic project called ''Lifehouse'', a story set in a CrapsackWorld led by an authoritarian government in which hundreds of people gather at a concert and ascend to a higher plane of existence through ThePowerOfRock. However he over-exerted himself this time, and the absence of manager/co-producer manager / co-producer Kit Lambert (who convinced the band about the ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' concept) to explain just what the fuck Pete wanted killed the project until it resurfaced as a Townshend solo album in 2000. Instead, The Who regrouped in 1971 with producer Glyn Johns and [[RecycledSoundtrack reworked the songs written for Lifehouse]] to produce ''Music/WhosNext''. ''Music/WhosNext'' ''Who's Next'' reached #1 on the UK charts, #4 in the USA, was critically acclaimed and contains some of their best-known songs: "Won't Get Fooled Again", "Baba O'Riley" and "Behind Blue Eyes".

After a quick break, The Who recorded another ConceptAlbum / RockOpera, this time about a mentally ill teenager named Jimmy and his conflicts with his family and friends during the height of the mods-rockers conflict in the 1960s.1960's. Named ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'', it was released in 1973 to critical acclaim, and spawned another hit with the ballad "Love, Reign O'er Me". During the supporting tour, which proved less impressive than the ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' ''Tommy'' tour due to an increased reliance on then-primitive synthesizers and backing tapes, a famous incident occurred on 20 November 1973 in San Francisco, when Keith Moon passed out twice during the performance due to tranquillizers tranquilizers (the put-to-sleep-large-animals put to sleep large animals kind of tranquillizers), tranquilizers), the first time returning after a half-hour delay, and the second time he was carried off. After playing "See Me, Feel Me" with Daltrey on tambourine, Townshend asked "Can anybody play the drums? I mean someone good!" An audience member, Scot Halpin, filled in for the three-song encore and did a pretty good job. When interviewed by ''Rolling Stone'', he noted: "I only played three numbers and I was dead".

The Who began faltering after this period, as a result of Keith Moon's addiction to drugs and alcohol and Townshend's depression, which resulted in 1975's bleak ''The Who By by Numbers'', full of songs about self-loathing, alcoholism, middle-age, and fear of irrelevance, lightened by the Top 10 hit "Squeeze Box". The same year a [[TheMovie movie]] version of "Music/{{Tommy}}" "Tommy" was released with an all-star cast under Creator/{{Ken Russell}}'s Creator/KenRussell's direction. The move away from concept albums and epic rock operas continued with the stripped-down ''Who Are You'', released in 1978, which again climbed up the charts (higher in the US than the UK) and spawned a hit single, "Who Are You".



The Who first reunited for a one-off performance at Live Aid in 1985, and they again briefly in 1988. That was to be the last time Kenney Jones appeared with The Who, they went their separate ways shortly after. A 1989 anniversary tour followed, where, citing an inability to play electric guitar due to hearing problems, Townshend recruited a large backing band (similar to the one he'd played with in The Deep End), including a lead guitarist (Steve "Boltz" Bolton), a drummer (Simon Phillips, who previously played on Townshend's ''Empty Glass'') and a percussionist (Jody Linscott), three backing singers and a five-piece horn section, and [[DemotedToExtra mainly played acoustic guitar instead]]. During this tour, the band regularly performed ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' in its entirety for the first time since 1971. The tour ended up damaging the band's reputation quite badly due to the over-expanded backing band and the slick and overstuffed arrangements that resulted, earning it the derisive nickname "The Who On Ice". In 1991, the band recorded its last single with John Entwistle, a cover of Music/EltonJohn's "Saturday Night's Alright (For Fighting)" released on the Elton tribute album ''Two Rooms''.

1996 saw the band's next tour - a similarly large-scale production of ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'', featuring guest vocals by Billy Idol, Gary Glitter, and others, and the first appearance of Zak Starkey, son of Music/RingoStarr and childhood protégé of Keith Moon, as the group's regular drummer. Beginning in 2000, the Who returned to touring as a five-piece group, which they did on a biannual basis throughout the 2000s. The night before the scheduled kickoff of the 2002 tour in Las Vegas, John Entwistle died of heart failure after spending the night with long time rock groupie/stripper Alycen Rowse, and was replaced on short notice by session bassist Pino Palladino, who has played for the group since.

The band's current incarnation, which Townshend jokingly refers to as "Who-2", consists of Daltrey, Townshend, Palladino, Starkey, and Townshend's little brother Simon on backing guitar and vocals, among other touring members. In 2006, the group released ''Endless Wire'', their first studio album since ''It's Hard''. While not particularly a hitmaker, the album featured some rather good songs, including the ''Man In A Purple Dress'', a Dylanish ProtestSong inspired by ''Film/ThePassionOfTheChrist''; ''It's Not Enough'', the band's first charting single since 1982; ''Mike Post Theme'', a salute to the writer of theme songs for many of the TV shows catalogued on this very Wiki; and ''Wire And Glass'', a "mini-opera" adapted from Townshend's novella ''The Boy Who Heard Music''.

The band has performed only sporadically since 2008, including a handful of charity shows and a performance during the SuperBowl half-time show in 2010, though Roger Daltrey has toured internationally with a solo band in recent years, including the first touring production of ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' since 1989. The band performed as the final act of the closing ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics, and toured internationally in 2014 and 2015 to celebrate their 50th anniversary. A new song, "Be Lucky," was recorded for the occasion.

to:

The Who first reunited for a one-off performance at Live Aid in 1985, and they again briefly in 1988. That was to be the last time Kenney Jones appeared with The Who, they went their separate ways shortly after. A 1989 anniversary tour followed, where, citing an inability to play electric guitar due to hearing problems, Townshend recruited a large backing band (similar to the one he'd played with in The Deep End), including a lead guitarist (Steve "Boltz" Bolton), a drummer (Simon Phillips, who previously played on Townshend's ''Empty Glass'') and a percussionist (Jody Linscott), three backing singers and a five-piece horn section, and [[DemotedToExtra mainly played acoustic guitar instead]]. During this tour, the band regularly performed ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' ''Tommy'' in its entirety for the first time since 1971. The tour ended up damaging the band's reputation quite badly due to the over-expanded backing band and the slick and overstuffed arrangements that resulted, earning it the derisive nickname "The Who On on Ice". In 1991, the band recorded its last single with John Entwistle, a cover of Music/EltonJohn's "Saturday Night's Alright (For Fighting)" released on the Elton tribute album ''Two Rooms''.

1996 saw the band's next tour - -- a similarly large-scale production of ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'', featuring guest vocals by Billy Idol, Music/BillyIdol, Gary Glitter, and others, and the first appearance of Zak Starkey, son of Music/RingoStarr and childhood protégé of Keith Moon, as the group's regular drummer. Beginning in 2000, the Who returned to touring as a five-piece group, which they did on a biannual basis throughout the 2000s. 2000's. The night before the scheduled kickoff of the 2002 tour in Las Vegas, John Entwistle died of heart failure after spending the night with long time rock groupie/stripper groupie / stripper Alycen Rowse, and was replaced on short notice by session bassist Pino Palladino, who has played for the group since.

The band's current incarnation, which Townshend jokingly refers to as "Who-2", consists of Daltrey, Townshend, Palladino, Starkey, and Townshend's little brother Simon on backing guitar and vocals, among other touring members. In 2006, the group released ''Endless Wire'', their first studio album since ''It's Hard''. While not particularly a hitmaker, the album featured some rather good songs, including the ''Man In A in a Purple Dress'', a Dylanish ProtestSong inspired by ''Film/ThePassionOfTheChrist''; ''It's Not Enough'', the band's first charting single since 1982; ''Mike Post Theme'', a salute to the writer of theme songs for many of the TV shows catalogued on this very Wiki; and ''Wire And and Glass'', a "mini-opera" adapted from Townshend's novella ''The Boy Who Heard Music''.

The band has performed only sporadically since 2008, including a handful of charity shows and a performance during the SuperBowl half-time show in 2010, though Roger Daltrey has toured internationally with a solo band in recent years, including the first touring production of ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' ''Tommy'' since 1989. The band performed as the final act of the closing ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics, and toured internationally in 2014 and 2015 to celebrate their 50th anniversary. A new song, "Be Lucky," was recorded for the occasion.



The Who has also made an appearance in ''RockBand'': "Won't Get Fooled Again" in the first game, "Pinball Wizard" in the second, "I Can See For Miles" in the third, plus 20 [[DownloadableContent downloadable songs]]. For the announcement of Rock Band 2 at E3 they even held a concert in promotion for it. Not to mention their entire performance at the 2010 Super Bowl is available for download.

[[JustForFun Not to be mistaken]] for the cult TV series Series/DoctorWho, the only thing the two has in common are that they're both British icons that started in the 60s.

to:

The Who has also made an appearance in ''RockBand'': ''VideoGame/RockBand'': "Won't Get Fooled Again" in the first game, "Pinball Wizard" in the second, "I Can See For for Miles" in the third, plus 20 [[DownloadableContent downloadable songs]]. For the announcement of Rock Band 2 at E3 they even held a concert in promotion for it. Not to mention their entire performance at the 2010 Super Bowl is available for download.

[[JustForFun Not to be mistaken]] for the cult TV series Series/DoctorWho, the only thing the two has in common are that they're both British icons that started in the 60s.
'60s.



!!Principal members (Founding members in '''bold''', current members in ''italic''):

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!!Principal
!! Principal
members (Founding members in '''bold''', current members in ''italic''):






!!Studio Discography:

to:

!!Studio
!! Studio
Discography:



* 1966 - ''Ready! Steady! Who!'' [[note]][=EP=], now included on the [=CD=] reissue of ''A Quick One''[[/note]]

to:

* 1966 - ''Ready! Steady! Who!'' [[note]][=EP=], [[note]] EP, now included on the [=CD=] CD reissue of ''A Quick One''[[/note]]One'' [[/note]]



* 1967 - ''Music/HappyJack'' [[note]]Released in the US only as a substitute to ''A Quick One'', because of MoralGuardians. The title was changed, the track-listing was changed and it omitted "Heat Wave" and added "Happy Jack"[[/note]]

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* 1967 - ''Music/HappyJack'' [[note]]Released [[note]] Released in the US only as a substitute to ''A Quick One'', because of MoralGuardians. The title was changed, the track-listing was changed and it omitted "Heat Wave" and added "Happy Jack"[[/note]]Jack" [[/note]]






!!Live Discography:

to:

!!Live
!! Live
Discography:



* 2000 - ''BBC Sessions'' [[note]]Recorded between 1965 and 1973[[/note]]
* 2000 - ''Blues to the Bush''
* 2003 - ''Live at the Royal Albert Hall'' [[note]]Recorded in 2000[[/note]]
* 2006 - ''Live from Toronto'' [[note]]Recorded in 1982[[/note]]
* 2007 - ''View from a Backstage Pass'' [[note]]Recorded between 1969 and 1976[[/note]]
* 2010 - ''Greatest Hits Live'' [[note]]Recorded between 1965 and 2009[[/note]]
* 2012 - ''Live at Hull'' [[note]]Recorded in 1970[[/note]]
* 2014 - ''Quadrophenia Live in London''

to:

* 2000 - ''BBC Sessions'' [[note]]Recorded [[note]] Recorded between 1965 and 1973[[/note]]
1973 [[/note]]
* 2000 - ''Blues to the Bush''
Bush''
* 2003 - ''Live at the Royal Albert Hall'' [[note]]Recorded [[note]] Recorded in 2000[[/note]]
2000 [[/note]]
* 2006 - ''Live from Toronto'' [[note]]Recorded [[note]] Recorded in 1982[[/note]]
1982 [[/note]]
* 2007 - ''View from a Backstage Pass'' [[note]]Recorded [[note]] Recorded between 1969 and 1976[[/note]]
1976 [[/note]]
* 2010 - ''Greatest Hits Live'' [[note]]Recorded [[note]] Recorded between 1965 and 2009[[/note]]
2009 [[/note]]
* 2012 - ''Live at Hull'' [[note]]Recorded [[note]] Recorded in 1970[[/note]]
1970 [[/note]]
* 2014 - ''Quadrophenia Live in London''
London''



!!Non-album singles:

* 1964 - "I'm The Face" [[note]]Released when the Who was called The High Numbers[[/note]]
** "Zoot Suit" as the B-side [[note]]Released before The High Numbers became The Who[[/note]]

to:

!!Non-album singles:


!! Non-album Singles:

* 1964 - "I'm The the Face" [[note]]Released [[note]] Released when the Who was called The High Numbers[[/note]]
Numbers [[/note]]
** "Zoot Suit" as the B-side [[note]]Released [[note]] Released before The High Numbers became The Who[[/note]]Who [[/note]]



** "Bald Headed Woman" as the B-side

to:

** "Bald Headed Woman" as the B-sideB-side.



** "Daddy Rolling Stone" as the UK B-side
*** "Anytime You Want Me" as the US B-side
* 1965 - "My Generation" [[note]]Otherwise available on their 1965 album ''My Generation''[[/note]]
** "Shout And Shimmy" as the UK B-side
*** "Out In The Street" as the US B-side [[note]]Otherwise available on ''My Generation''[[/note]]

to:

** "Daddy Rolling Stone" as the UK B-side
B-side.
*** "Anytime You Want Me" as the US B-side
B-side.
* 1965 - "My Generation" [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on their 1965 album ''My Generation''[[/note]]
Generation'' [[/note]]
** "Shout And and Shimmy" as the UK B-side
B-side.
*** "Out In The in the Street" as the US B-side [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on ''My Generation''[[/note]]Generation'' [[/note]]



** "Instant Party (Circles)" as the first UK B-side [[note]]Otherwise available on ''The Who Sings My Generation'', but not on a UK album[[/note]]
*** "Waltz for a Pig'' as the US and second UK B-side [[note]]Not a song by The Who, it's a song by The Graham Bond Organization[[/note]]
* 1966 - "I'm A Boy"
** "In the City" as the B-side
* 1966 - "Happy Jack" [[note]]Otherwise available on ''Happy Jack'', but not on a UK album[[/note]]
** "I've Been Away" as the UK B-side
*** "Whiskey Man" as the US B-side [[note]]Otherwise available on their 1966 album ''A Quick One''[[/note]]
* 1967 - "Pictures Of Lily"
** "Doctor Doctor" as the B-side

to:

** "Instant Party (Circles)" as the first UK B-side [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on ''The Who Sings My Generation'', but not on a UK album[[/note]]
album [[/note]]
*** "Waltz for a Pig'' as the US and second UK B-side [[note]]Not [[note]] Not a song by The Who, it's a song by The Graham Bond Organization[[/note]]
Organization [[/note]]
* 1966 - "I'm A a Boy"
** "In the City" as the B-side
B-side.
* 1966 - "Happy Jack" [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on ''Happy Jack'', but not on a UK album[[/note]]
album [[/note]]
** "I've Been Away" as the UK B-side
B-side.
*** "Whiskey Man" as the US B-side [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on their 1966 album ''A Quick One''[[/note]]
One'' [[/note]]
* 1967 - "Pictures Of of Lily"
** "Doctor Doctor" as the B-sideB-side.



** "Under My Thumb" as the B-side
* 1967 - "I Can See For Miles" [[note]]Otherwise available on their 1967 album ''The Who Sell Out''[[/note]]
** "Someone's Coming" as the UK B-side
*** "Mary Anne With The Shaky Hand" as the US B-side [[note]]Otherwise available on ''The Who Sell Out"[[/note]]

to:

** "Under My Thumb" as the B-side
B-side.
* 1967 - "I Can See For for Miles" [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on their 1967 album ''The Who Sell Out''[[/note]]
Out'' [[/note]]
** "Someone's Coming" as the UK B-side
B-side.
*** "Mary Anne With The with the Shaky Hand" as the US B-side [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on ''The Who Sell Out"[[/note]]Out" [[/note]]



** "Call Me Lightning" as the B-side
* 1968 - "Call Me Lightning" [[note]]Previously released as the B-side to ''Dogs''[[/note]]
** "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" as the B-side

to:

** "Call Me Lightning" as the B-side
B-side.
* 1968 - "Call Me Lightning" [[note]]Previously [[note]] Previously released as the B-side to ''Dogs''[[/note]]
''Dogs'' [[/note]]
** "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" as the B-sideB-side.



** "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" as the UK B-side [[note]]Previously released as the B-side to ''Call Me Lightning''[[/note]]
*** "Bucket T" and "Someone's Coming" as the first and second US B-sides [[note]]"Bucket T" was previously released on the EP ''Ready! Steady! Who!'', and "Someone's Coming" was previously released as the British B-side to "I Can See For Miles"[[/note]]
* 1969 - "Pinball Wizard" [[note]]Otherwise available on their 1969 album ''Tommy''[[/note]]
** "Dogs (Part Two)" as the B-side

to:

** "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" as the UK B-side [[note]]Previously [[note]] Previously released as the B-side to ''Call Me Lightning''[[/note]]
Lightning'' [[/note]]
*** "Bucket T" and "Someone's Coming" as the first and second US B-sides [[note]]"Bucket [[note]] "Bucket T" was previously released on the EP ''Ready! Steady! Who!'', and "Someone's Coming" was previously released as the British B-side to "I Can See For Miles"[[/note]]
for Miles" [[/note]]
* 1969 - "Pinball Wizard" [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on their 1969 album ''Tommy''[[/note]]
''Tommy'' [[/note]]
** "Dogs (Part Two)" as the B-sideB-side.



** "Here For More" as the B-side
* 1970 - "Summertime Blues" [[note]]Otherwise available on their 1970 live album ''Live At Leeds''[[/note]]
** "Heaven And Hell" as the B-side
* 1971 - "Won't Get Fooled Again" [[note]]Otherwise available on their 1971 album ''Who's Next''[[/note]]
** "I Don't Even Know Myself" as the B-side

to:

** "Here For for More" as the B-side
B-side.
* 1970 - "Summertime Blues" [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on their 1970 live album ''Live At Leeds''[[/note]]
at Leeds'' [[/note]]
** "Heaven And and Hell" as the B-side
B-side.
* 1971 - "Won't Get Fooled Again" [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on their 1971 album ''Who's Next''[[/note]]
Next'' [[/note]]
** "I Don't Even Know Myself" as the B-sideB-side.



** "When I Was A Boy" as the B-side

to:

** "When I Was A a Boy" as the B-sideB-side.



** "Baby Don't You Do It" as the B-side

to:

** "Baby Don't You Do It" as the B-side B-side.



** "Waspman" as the B-side
* 1973 - "5.15" [[note]]Otherwise available on their 1973 album ''Quadrophenia''[[/note]]
** "Water"as the B-side
* 1973 - "Love, Reign o'er Me" [[note]]Otherwise available on ''Quadrophenia''[[/note]]
** "Water" as the B-side [[note]]Previously released as the B-side to "5.15"[[/note]]

to:

** "Waspman" as the B-side
B-side.
* 1973 - "5.15" [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on their 1973 album ''Quadrophenia''[[/note]]
''Quadrophenia'' [[/note]]
** "Water"as "Water" as the B-side
B-side.
* 1973 - "Love, Reign o'er O'er Me" [[note]]Otherwise [[note]] Otherwise available on ''Quadrophenia''[[/note]]
''Quadrophenia'' [[/note]]
** "Water" as the B-side [[note]]Previously [[note]] Previously released as the B-side to "5.15"[[/note]]15" [[/note]]



** "Put The Money Down" as the B-side

to:

** "Put The the Money Down" as the B-sideB-side.



** "Pure And Easy" as the B-side

to:

** "Pure And and Easy" as the B-sideB-side.



** "Old Red Wine" as the B-side

to:

** "Old Red Wine" as the B-sideB-side.






!!TropeNamer for:

to:

!!TropeNamer
!! TropeNamers
for:






!!Associated Tropes:

* AllDrummersAreAnimals: Keith Moon was the TropeCodifier. Besides his highly energetic drumming, he was legendary for wrecking hotel rooms - including part of a Holiday Inn in Michigan on his 21st birthday while The Who was touring the [=US=]. Popular legend claims that the chain banned the Who from all its hotels afterwards, though Moon's biographer claims this was an exaggeration.

to:

!!Associated
!! Associated
Tropes:

* AllDrummersAreAnimals: Keith Moon was the TropeCodifier. Besides his highly energetic drumming, he was legendary for wrecking hotel rooms - -- including part of a Holiday Inn in Michigan on his 21st birthday while The Who was touring the [=US=].US. Popular legend claims that the chain banned the Who from all its hotels afterwards, though Moon's biographer claims this was an exaggeration.



* AlwaysSecondBest: The Who never had a #1 single in the [=UK=] or [=US=] throughout their career, being constantly denied the top slot by Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheSmallFaces, Music/BobDylan, and others.

to:

* AlwaysSecondBest: The Who never had a #1 single in the [=UK=] UK or [=US=] US throughout their career, being constantly denied the top slot by Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheSmallFaces, Music/BobDylan, and others.



** Possibly lamp-shaded by Pete in the ''Live At Leeds'' album. When introducing "Substitute", "Happy Jack", and "I'm A Boy", he mentions that the first "was our first #4", the second "was our first #1... ''in Germany''", and the third, "according to Melody Maker, was our first #1 in England... for about half an hour." ([[DontExplainTheJoke "I'm A Boy" ended up peaking at #2 in the UK]])

to:

** Possibly lamp-shaded by Pete in the ''Live At at Leeds'' album. When introducing "Substitute", "Happy Jack", and "I'm A a Boy", he mentions that the first "was our first #4", the second "was our first #1... ''in ''In Germany''", and the third, "according to Melody Maker, was our first #1 in England... for For about half an hour." ([[DontExplainTheJoke "I'm A a Boy" ended up peaking at #2 in the UK]])UK]]).



** And at the call and answer part of "Pinball Wizard" (''how do you think he does it?'' / ''I don't know!''), the second part is often done by the audience.

to:

** And at the call and answer part of "Pinball Wizard" (''how (''How do you think he does it?'' / ''I don't know!''), the second part is often done by the audience.



** Even Abbie Hoffmann, who was told to "get the fuck off my fucking stage" at {{Woodstock}}. Hoffmann was trying to protest about the imprisonment of the poet and activist John Sinclair; Townshend later said that he ''agreed'' with Hoffmann on the issue, but was furious that he had intruded on stage. An audio recording of the incident exists on Website/YouTube for sceptics such as Hoffman to listen to. Here's the full transcript:

to:

** Even Abbie Hoffmann, who was told to "get the fuck off my fucking stage" at {{Woodstock}}.Film/{{Woodstock}}. Hoffmann was trying to protest about the imprisonment of the poet and activist John Sinclair; Townshend later said that he ''agreed'' with Hoffmann on the issue, but was furious that he had intruded on stage. An audio recording of the incident exists on Website/YouTube for sceptics skeptics such as Hoffman to listen to. Here's the full transcript:



** One of the concerts on the ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' tour turned into a disaster when the tape playing the backing music [[note]]featuring all the additional instrumentation that was on the album but that they couldn't afford to hire extra musicians to play in concert [[/note]] was played out of sync. Townshend reportedly went backstage and bodily dragged the sound engineer across the audio console.

to:

** One of the concerts on the ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' tour turned into a disaster when the tape playing the backing music [[note]]featuring [[note]] featuring all the additional instrumentation that was on the album but that they couldn't afford to hire extra musicians to play in concert [[/note]] was played out of sync. Townshend reportedly went backstage and bodily dragged the sound engineer across the audio console.



* {{Bowdlerise}}: For its [=US=] single release, "Substitute" had a line changed from "I look all white but my dad was black" to "I try walking forward but my feet walk back". {{Lampshaded}} in an early interview, where Pete Townshend said that, in America, their records only sold in cities that tended to have race riots.
* BunnyEarsLawyer: Keith Moon. Let's face it, when you're a touring band and your drummer's antics have gotten you banned from several notable hotel chains, [[CrazyAwesome he's gotta be a pretty amazing drummer]].

to:

* {{Bowdlerise}}: For its [=US=] US single release, "Substitute" had a line changed from "I look all white but my dad was black" to "I try walking forward but my feet walk back". {{Lampshaded}} in an early interview, where Pete Townshend said that, in America, their records only sold in cities that tended to have race riots.
* BunnyEarsLawyer: Keith Moon. Let's face it, when you're a touring band and your drummer's antics have gotten you banned from several notable hotel chains, [[CrazyAwesome he's gotta be a pretty amazing drummer]].



** From "You Better You Bet," released on the 1981 album ''Face Dances'' (and as the band's last top 20 single): "I drunk myself blind to the sound of old T.Rex / And ''Music/WhosNext''."

to:

** From "You Better You Bet," released on the 1981 album ''Face Dances'' (and as the band's last top 20 single): "I drunk myself blind to the sound of old T.Rex / And and ''Music/WhosNext''."



* CanonDisContinuity: As Gary Glitter has been just a wee bit ''publicly disgraced and exposed as a paedophile'', his contributions to the 1996 ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' tour have been excised from the CD and DVD releases. As Townshend had a run-in with the law himself on charges of possessing child porn not that long ago, his desire to avoid GuiltByAssociation is understandable.
* CloudCuckoolander: Keith Moon.

to:

* CanonDisContinuity: CanonDiscontinuity: As Gary Glitter has been just a wee bit ''publicly disgraced and exposed as a paedophile'', his contributions to the 1996 ''Music/{{Quadrophenia}}'' tour have been excised from the CD and DVD releases. As Townshend had a run-in with the law himself on charges of possessing child porn not that long ago, his desire to avoid GuiltByAssociation is understandable.
* CloudCuckoolander: {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: Keith Moon.



* TheCoverChangesTheMeaning: The cover of Sonny Boy Williamson II's "Eyesight To The Blind", as featured on ''Music/{{Tommy}}'', was reworked to fit it into the story of the album.

to:

* TheCoverChangesTheMeaning: The cover of Sonny Boy Williamson II's "Eyesight To The to the Blind", as featured on ''Music/{{Tommy}}'', was reworked to fit it into the story of the album.



* CrapsackWorld: The unreleased ''Lifehouse'' project took place in one, and several songs that were originally intended for inclusion on that album eventually found their way onto other albums. Also, John Entwistle's "905" takes place in a CrapsaccharineWorld similar to (if not actually inspired by) Aldous Huxley's ''Literature/BraveNewWorld''

to:

* CrapsackWorld: The unreleased ''Lifehouse'' project took place in one, and several songs that were originally intended for inclusion on that album eventually found their way onto other albums. Also, John Entwistle's "905" takes place in a CrapsaccharineWorld similar to (if not actually inspired by) Aldous Huxley's ''Literature/BraveNewWorld''''Literature/BraveNewWorld''.



* DarkerAndEdgier: A lot of their early material bordered on comedy: "I'm A Boy" was the lament of a child whose mother refused to acknowledge his gender, "Pictures Of Lily" and "Mary Anne With The Shaky Hand" both serving as a cheeky attempt at [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar fooling 1960s censors]], etc. Then there's ''Music/{{Tommy}}'', with its cynical take on adultery, child abuse, pop culture stardom, and social isolation only ''slightly'' obscured by the inclusion of a song about a blind kid playing pinball. And [[FromBadToWorse it gets much, much worse]] from there on out, with CreatorBreakdown leading to a string of bleaker and bleaker albums throughout the 1970s, culminating in 1975's ''The Who By Numbers'', sometimes referred to by fans as "Pete Townshend's suicide note." Joking and light-hearted songs didn't entirely disappear from the group's catalogue, but they were increasingly relegated to one or two tracks per album, if that.

to:

* DarkerAndEdgier: A lot of their early material bordered on comedy: "I'm A a Boy" was the lament of a child whose mother refused to acknowledge his gender, "Pictures Of of Lily" and "Mary Anne With The with the Shaky Hand" both serving as a cheeky attempt at [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar fooling 1960s 1960's censors]], etc. Then there's ''Music/{{Tommy}}'', with its cynical take on adultery, child abuse, pop culture stardom, and social isolation only ''slightly'' obscured by the inclusion of a song about a blind kid playing pinball. And [[FromBadToWorse it gets much, much worse]] from there on out, with CreatorBreakdown leading to a string of bleaker and bleaker albums throughout the 1970s, 1970's, culminating in 1975's ''The Who By by Numbers'', sometimes referred to by fans as "Pete Townshend's suicide note." Joking and light-hearted light hearted songs didn't entirely disappear from the group's catalogue, but they were increasingly relegated to one or two tracks per album, if that.



* ADateWithRosiePalms: Never outright stated but strongly implied in "Pictures Of Lily". The singer is a young man who has insomnia. When his father gives him the titular pictures of Lily, he feels better, and is able to sleep.

to:

* ADateWithRosiePalms: Never outright stated but strongly implied in "Pictures Of of Lily". The singer is a young man who has insomnia. When his father gives him the titular pictures of Lily, he feels better, and is able to sleep.



** Additionally, every live performance had at least one John Entwistle song, with him on lead vocals, usually "Heaven And Hell" (as an opening number), "Boris The Spider" and/or "My Wife". These numbers would usually be amongst of the rare moments of the concert where the spotlight was on the stoic bassist.
*** Keith Moon used to sometimes take the lead vocal on rare occasions, on studio recording and during live performances, which would often also qualify as CrowningMomentOfFunny.

to:

** Additionally, every live performance had at least one John Entwistle song, with him on lead vocals, usually "Heaven And and Hell" (as an opening number), "Boris The the Spider" and/or and / or "My Wife". These numbers would usually be amongst of the rare moments of the concert where the spotlight was on the stoic bassist.
*** Keith Moon used to sometimes take the lead vocal on rare occasions, on studio recording and during live performances, which would often also qualify as CrowningMomentOfFunny.SugarWiki/FunnyMoments.



* DeliciousDistraction: The promo film for "Happy Jack" has the band as a gang of [[BlatantBurglar Blatant Burglars]] who sneak into an apartment and start trying to break into the safe... only to be quickly distracted by a lovely cake.

to:

* DeliciousDistraction: The promo film for "Happy Jack" has the band as a gang of [[BlatantBurglar Blatant Burglars]] {{Blatant Burglar}}s who sneak into an apartment and start trying to break into the safe... only Only to be quickly distracted by a lovely cake. cake.



* DrugsAreBad: Roger Daltrey was straight-edge, and heavily objected to the other members' drug abuse. Once, he lost it on Keith Moon and flushed his pills down the toilet. Townshend also developed this stance after a bad acid trip aboard a plane. [[note]]That didn't stop him from being an alcoholic and junkie though[[/note]]

to:

* DrugsAreBad: Roger Daltrey was straight-edge, and heavily objected to the other members' drug abuse. Once, he lost it on Keith Moon and flushed his pills down the toilet. Townshend also developed this stance after a bad acid trip aboard a plane. [[note]]That [[note]] That didn't stop him from being an alcoholic and junkie though[[/note]]though [[/note]]



* EasilyForgiven: The girl who is the subject of "A Quick One, While He's Away" is forgiven by her long-absent boyfriend immediately after admitting her infidelity with Ivor the engine driver. A rare justified example - said boyfriend mentions he wasn't entirely faithful himself.
* EmbarrassingTattoo: "Tattoo" - played with in that the owner of the tattoo doesn't find it embarrassing.

to:

* EasilyForgiven: The girl who is the subject of "A Quick One, While He's Away" is forgiven by her long-absent boyfriend immediately after admitting her infidelity with Ivor the engine driver. A rare justified example - -- said boyfriend mentions he wasn't entirely faithful himself.
* EmbarrassingTattoo: "Tattoo" - -- played with in that the owner of the tattoo doesn't find it embarrassing.



* EpicRocking: "A Quick One, While He's Away", "Won't Get Fooled Again", "Love Reign O'er Me", "Baba O' Riley", "We're Not Gonna Take It"... among others.
* EmotionalTorque: A major component of Pete Townshend's musicianship, as he considered audience reaction to be just as much a part of a concert as the music itself (a concept he attempted to take to the next level in ''Lifehouse)''. In fact, he smashed his first guitar in a spur-of-the-moment attempt to induce this: he had accidentally broken it on the low roof of a venue and, when the audience failed to react, he proceeded to "make a big thing" out of destroying it so that the event would not go unnoticed.
* FadingIntoTheNextSong: All of ''Music/TheWhoSellOut'', most of ''Music/Tommy'' and ''Music/Quadrophenia'', "Love Ain't for Keeping" --> "My Wife" from ''Music/WhosNext'', "They're All In Love" --> "Blue, Red and Grey" from ''The Who by Numbers''.

to:

* EpicRocking: "A Quick One, While He's Away", "Won't Get Fooled Again", "Love Reign O'er Me", "Baba O' Riley", O'Riley", "We're Not Gonna Take It"... among Among others.
* EmotionalTorque: A major component of Pete Townshend's musicianship, as he considered audience reaction to be just as much a part of a concert as the music itself (a concept he attempted to take to the next level in ''Lifehouse)''. In fact, he smashed his first guitar in a spur-of-the-moment spur of the-moment attempt to induce this: he He had accidentally broken it on the low roof of a venue and, when the audience failed to react, he proceeded to "make a big thing" out of destroying it so that the event would not go unnoticed.
* FadingIntoTheNextSong: All of ''Music/TheWhoSellOut'', most of ''Music/Tommy'' and ''Music/Quadrophenia'', "Love Ain't for Keeping" --> "My Wife" from ''Music/WhosNext'', "They're All In in Love" --> "Blue, Red and Grey" from ''The Who by Numbers''.



** Roger '''(Melancholic)''' - hard-working, uptight, temperamental and domineering
** Pete '''(Supine)''' - self-righteous, insecure, stubborn and temperamental
** John '''(Supine)''' - moody, charming, witty and mischievous
** Keith '''(Choleric)''' - hyper-active, arrogant, temperamental and insecure
* FullCircleRevolution: "Won't Get Fooled Again", which is also TropeNamer for MeetTheNewBoss.

to:

** Roger '''(Melancholic)''' - hard-working, uptight, temperamental and domineering
domineering.
** Pete '''(Supine)''' - self-righteous, insecure, stubborn and temperamental
temperamental.
** John '''(Supine)''' - moody, charming, witty and mischievous
mischievous.
** Keith '''(Choleric)''' - hyper-active, arrogant, temperamental and insecure
insecure.
* FullCircleRevolution: "Won't Get Fooled Again", which is also TropeNamer TropeNamers for MeetTheNewBoss.



* GenreSavvy: The band's on-stage personalities tended to reflect the stereotypes of their instrument/role in the group: the flashy lead singer (Roger), the [[TheStoic stoic]] bassist (John), my CloudCuckooLander[=/=][[AllDrummersAreAnimals animalistic]] drummer (Keith), and the lead guitarist as the songwriter and the lynch-pin holding it all together (Pete).

to:

* GenreSavvy: The band's on-stage personalities tended to reflect the stereotypes of their instrument/role in the group: the The flashy lead singer (Roger), the [[TheStoic stoic]] bassist (John), my CloudCuckooLander[=/=][[AllDrummersAreAnimals {{Cloudcuckoolander}} / [[AllDrummersAreAnimals animalistic]] drummer (Keith), and the lead guitarist as the songwriter and the lynch-pin holding it all together (Pete).



* HarshVocals: John Entwistle's growled refrain in "Boris The Spider" has been cited as one of the earliest examples of a [[DeathMetal death-growl]].

to:

* HarshVocals: John Entwistle's growled refrain in "Boris The the Spider" has been cited as one of the earliest examples of a [[DeathMetal death-growl]].



** As of the 2000s, Pete was almost ''completely deaf''; when playing acoustic guitar on-stage, he has to wear headphones just to be able to hear his own playing. At the end of his life, John was also profoundly deaf and had to wear powerful hearing aids in both ears during his final sessions with the group before his death in 2002.

to:

** As of the 2000s, 2000's, Pete was almost ''completely deaf''; when playing acoustic guitar on-stage, he has to wear headphones just to be able to hear his own playing. At the end of his life, John was also profoundly deaf and had to wear powerful hearing aids in both ears during his final sessions with the group before his death in 2002.



* {{Hypochondria}}: The song "Doctor, Doctor" has this in the lyrics, with someone claiming to have palpitations, chillblains, blindness, whooping cough, the mumps, chickenpox, flu, and smallpox in quick succession.
* IAmTheBand: Pete Townshend.

to:

* {{Hypochondria}}: The song "Doctor, Doctor" has this in the lyrics, with someone claiming to have palpitations, chillblains, chilblains, blindness, whooping cough, the mumps, chickenpox, flu, and smallpox in quick succession.
* IAmTheBand: Pete Townshend.



* IntercourseWithYou: "Squeeze Box", "Pictures Of Lily", "Mary Ann With The Shaky Hand".
* IncrediblyLamePun: And plenty. Foremost being the band name itself.

to:

* IntercourseWithYou: "Squeeze Box", "Pictures Of of Lily", "Mary Ann With The with the Shaky Hand".
* IncrediblyLamePun: And plenty. Foremost being the band name itself.
Hand".



** "Tommy's Holiday Camp" from the same album ends with a really creepy growl from Townshend after a minute of bouncy fairground barrel organ music
** "Love Reigh O'Er Me" has two: the first being Roger's explosive "'''LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOVE!!!!'''", the second being the mournful horn sting after Keith's solo, accompanied, appropriately enough, by the sound of broken glass.
* LastSecondWordSwap: In "My Generation"

to:

** "Tommy's Holiday Camp" from the same album ends with a really creepy growl from Townshend after a minute of bouncy fairground barrel organ music
music.
** "Love Reigh "Love, Reign O'Er Me" has two: the first being Roger's explosive "'''LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOVE!!!!'''", the second being the mournful horn sting after Keith's solo, accompanied, appropriately enough, by the sound of broken glass.
* LastSecondWordSwap: In "My Generation"Generation":



* LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition: The original [=LP=] release of ''Live At Leeds'' consisted solely of six tracks on a single record. The first reissue in 1995 added the entire concert except for the live performance of ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' and some of Pete's stage banter. The 2001 reissue added that as well, and the 2010 version ''also'' included the sister concert performed a few days later at Hull (which had been shelved due to audio issues that couldn't have been fixed with pre-2010 technology).

to:

* LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition: The original [=LP=] LP release of ''Live At at Leeds'' consisted solely of six tracks on a single record. The first reissue in 1995 added the entire concert except for the live performance of ''Music/{{Tommy}}'' and some of Pete's stage banter. The 2001 reissue added that as well, and the 2010 version ''also'' included the sister concert performed a few days later at Hull (which had been shelved due to audio issues that couldn't have been fixed with pre-2010 technology).



* LostForever: Several of the songs the group recorded for ''Lifehouse'', such as "Mary", were lost due to the master tapes being inadequately preserved, and decayed to uselessness by the time the group sought to remaster them in the '90s. Some, like "Put The Money Down" and "Time Is Passing", were partially restored with new vocals and overdubs added to what could be retrieved from the originals.

to:

* LostForever: Several of the songs the group recorded for ''Lifehouse'', such as "Mary", were lost due to the master tapes being inadequately preserved, and decayed to uselessness by the time the group sought to remaster them in the '90s. Some, like "Put The the Money Down" and "Time Is is Passing", were partially restored with new vocals and overdubs added to what could be retrieved from the originals.



* LoudnessWar: Some of their recent remasters, especially ''Meaty''. You could argue the Who were the rock-throwing cavemen from whom a direct line can be drawn to the high-tech, range-compressing warriors of today. The Who just used plain old wattage (see "Heroic RROD" above). Dougal Butler, who wrote ''Full Moon'', a hilarious memoir of his days with the band, said: "The Who have been clocked at 120 decibels near the stage. This is a condition which can be exactly duplicated by sticking your head in a jet engine." This was only in live performances though, as thankfully technology back then couldn't stand as much abuse as [=CDs=] nowadays.

to:

* LoudnessWar: Some of their recent remasters, especially ''Meaty''. You could argue the Who were the rock-throwing rock throwing cavemen from whom a direct line can be drawn to the high-tech, range-compressing range compressing warriors of today. The Who just used plain old wattage (see "Heroic RROD" above). Dougal Butler, who wrote ''Full Moon'', a hilarious memoir of his days with the band, said: "The Who have been clocked at 120 decibels near the stage. This is a condition which can be exactly duplicated by sticking your head in a jet engine." This was only in live performances though, as thankfully technology back then couldn't stand as much abuse as [=CDs=] CD's nowadays.



** The Who were also in a Loudness War ''with themselves''. Everyone wanted to be heard over the other guy, so Pete Townshend and John Entwistle went to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Amplification Jim Marshall]] and wound up creating the now-classic "Marshall Stack".

to:

** The Who were also in a Loudness War ''with themselves''. Everyone wanted to be heard over the other guy, so Pete Townshend and John Entwistle went to [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Amplification Jim Marshall]] and wound up creating the now-classic "Marshall Stack".



* {{Pun}}: And plenty. Foremost being the band name itself.



* SellOut: ''Music/TheWhoSellOut'' is a massive [[LampshadeHanging lampshade]] of the group's numerous commercial endeavours during the late 60's, including recording radio promos for Coca-Cola, Heinz Baked Beans, a car dealer, a maker of guitar strings, the United States Air Force, and anyone else they felt would reimburse them for their trouble. [[http://www.thewho.net/linernotes/WhoSellOut.htm The original plan]] was to entice the companies mentioned on the album to pay for the references. No one was interested, but the band was blatant enough about it that many listeners [[IMeantToDoThat took the album as intentional satire]].

to:

* SellOut: ''Music/TheWhoSellOut'' is a massive [[LampshadeHanging lampshade]] of the group's numerous commercial endeavours during the late 60's, including recording radio promos for Coca-Cola, Heinz Baked Beans, a car dealer, a maker of guitar strings, the United States Air Force, and anyone else they felt would reimburse them for their trouble. [[http://www.thewho.net/linernotes/WhoSellOut.htm The original plan]] plan was to entice the companies mentioned on the album to pay for the references. No one was interested, but the band was blatant enough about it that many listeners [[IMeantToDoThat took the album as intentional satire]].
15th Aug '16 12:59:15 AM Roemilus
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* YMMV/TheWoobie: The main character of the song ''Behind Blue Eyes,'' without a doubt.
15th Aug '16 12:56:22 AM Roemilus
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---> I'm so nervous I guess it shows/

to:

---> I'm so nervous I guess it shows/shows
15th Aug '16 12:52:19 AM Roemilus
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Added DiffLines:

* GagNose: Pete's characteristic big nose. He lampshades this during his first solo concert, changing the lyrics of "Magic Bus" to this:
---> I'm so nervous I guess it shows/
--->Don't say a thing about my great big nose
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