History Manga / Akira

24th May '18 4:09:59 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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Being over 2000 pages in six hefty volumes, the story the original manga tells is much longer than the film. It is more violent and focuses more on politics. That the film was in development and saw its release while the manga was still running does show a bit, both resulting in some critical plot developments in the film often being {{Late Arrival Spoiler}}s in the manga, but it also leads to some characters and concepts that only saw a brief appearance in the film getting explored in greater depth by the manga. The series is notable for being the very first comic book series to utilize entirely computer coloring, when it was first released in the US by Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}}'s Epic Comics in the late 80s/early 90s. Later English editions from Dark Horse and Kodansha Comics USA restore the original black-and-white artwork, but the pages remain flipped from left-to-right.

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Being over 2000 pages in six hefty volumes, the story the original manga tells is much longer than the film. It is more violent and focuses more on politics. That the film was in development and saw its release while the manga was still running does show a bit, both resulting in some critical plot developments in the film often being {{Late Arrival Spoiler}}s in the manga, but it also leads to some characters and concepts that only saw a brief appearance in the film [[AdaptationExpansion getting explored in greater depth by the manga.manga]]. The series is notable for being the very first comic book series to utilize entirely computer coloring, when it was first released in the US by Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}}'s Epic Comics in the late 80s/early 90s. Later English editions from Dark Horse and Kodansha Comics USA restore the original black-and-white artwork, but the pages remain flipped from left-to-right.
24th May '18 4:09:29 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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''Akira'' (sometimes spelled ''AKIRA'' to differentiate between the work and the title character) is the name of a post apocalyptic [[ScienceFiction sci-fi]] {{Manga}} first released in 1982 and its movie adaptation released in 1988. It is the most recognizable of Creator/KatsuhiroOtomo's works.

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''Akira'' (sometimes spelled ''AKIRA'' to differentiate between the work and the title character) is the name of a post apocalyptic [[ScienceFiction sci-fi]] {{Manga}} first released in December 1982 and its movie adaptation released in 1988.1988. The manga meanwhile ended its run in June 1990. It is the most recognizable of Creator/KatsuhiroOtomo's works.



There was a highly-acclaimed {{Anime}} movie adaptation made in 1988. It's widely different outside the above mentioned premise. It is primarily known for its great animation, as well as the MindScrew plot, since it primarily focuses on events from the first third of the manga, while simultaneously removing or incorporating plot lines from later in the manga as well as rewriting a few plot points. The film was one of the things that helped disprove the AnimationAgeGhetto, at least for Anime in the West, and is still considered a landmark anime in the US. It has been dubbed twice into English, first in 1988 by Kondansha and distributed by Creator/StreamlinePictures (which lead to a misconception that Streamline produced it themselves) and then in 2001 by Animaze via Pioneer (later known as Creator/{{Geneon}}).

Being over 2000 pages in six hefty volumes, the story the original manga tells is much longer than the film. It is more violent and focuses more on politics. Critical plot developments in the film are often {{Late Arrival Spoiler}}s in the manga. The series is notable for being the very first comic book series to utilize entirely computer coloring, when it was first released in the US by Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}}'s Epic Comics in the late 80s/early 90s. Later English editions from Dark Horse and Kodansha Comics USA restore the original black-and-white artwork, but the pages remain flipped from left-to-right.

to:

There was a highly-acclaimed {{Anime}} movie adaptation made in 1988.1988, directed and co-written by Otomo himself. It's widely different outside the above mentioned premise. It is primarily known for its great animation, as well as the MindScrew plot, since it primarily focuses on events from the first third of the manga, while simultaneously removing or incorporating plot lines from later in the manga as well as rewriting a few plot points. The film was one of the things that helped disprove the AnimationAgeGhetto, at least for Anime in the West, and is still considered a landmark anime in the US. It has been dubbed twice into English, first in 1988 by Kondansha and distributed by Creator/StreamlinePictures (which lead to a misconception that Streamline produced it themselves) and then in 2001 by Animaze via Pioneer (later known as Creator/{{Geneon}}).

Being over 2000 pages in six hefty volumes, the story the original manga tells is much longer than the film. It is more violent and focuses more on politics. Critical That the film was in development and saw its release while the manga was still running does show a bit, both resulting in some critical plot developments in the film are often being {{Late Arrival Spoiler}}s in the manga, but it also leads to some characters and concepts that only saw a brief appearance in the film getting explored in greater depth by the manga. The series is notable for being the very first comic book series to utilize entirely computer coloring, when it was first released in the US by Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}}'s Epic Comics in the late 80s/early 90s. Later English editions from Dark Horse and Kodansha Comics USA restore the original black-and-white artwork, but the pages remain flipped from left-to-right.
23rd May '18 7:03:11 PM shinykittie
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11th May '18 10:15:39 PM HextarVigar
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Added DiffLines:

* CameBackWrong: In the manga, Tetsuo attempted to ressurect Kaori after she was shot dead. It technically ''does'' work, but she comes back blind, deaf and freezing cold. After seeing the agony she was in, he let her die again.
11th May '18 10:04:22 PM HextarVigar
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Oh, and it's [[NoPronunciationGuide pronounced]] "AH-kee-rah", not "uh-KAI-ruh" or "uh-KEE-ruh." Don't mess it up, [[FandomBerserkButton or else]].

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Oh, and it's [[NoPronunciationGuide pronounced]] "AH-kee-rah", "AH-kee-lrah", not "uh-KAI-ruh" or "uh-KEE-ruh." Don't mess it up, [[FandomBerserkButton or else]].
11th May '18 1:38:35 PM HextarVigar
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* SphereOfDestruction: The black dome that wipes out Tokyo and Neo-Tokyo. [[spoiler:Both times, it was caused by Akira.]]

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* SphereOfDestruction: The black dome that wipes out Tokyo and Neo-Tokyo. [[spoiler:Both times, it was caused by Akira. ''Teleporting''.]]
10th May '18 10:06:06 PM HextarVigar
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* ArtificialLimbs: Tetsuo's right arm, molded into a highly-sophisticated looking artificial limb of complex circuit boards, nerves, and gears, all made from random junk. Impressive.

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* ArtificialLimbs: Tetsuo's right arm, molded into a highly-sophisticated looking artificial limb of complex circuit boards, nerves, and gears, all made from random junk. Impressive. In the manga, his arm eventually grows back.
23rd Mar '18 8:04:47 AM SeptimusHeap
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* ComicBookTime: The Japanese edition of the manga had the destruction of Tokyo occurred on December 6th, 1982, which happened to be the date that ''Akira'' made its debut on ''Young Magazine''. The English editions, which began publication in 1989, moved it to 1992. The movie has it occur on July 16th, 1988, the day that the movie had its Japanese theatrical debut.

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* ComicBookTime: ComicBookTime:
**
The Japanese edition of the manga had the destruction of Tokyo occurred on December 6th, 1982, which happened to be the date that ''Akira'' made its debut on ''Young Magazine''. The English editions, which began publication in 1989, moved it to 1992. The movie has it occur on July 16th, 1988, the day that the movie had its Japanese theatrical debut.
6th Mar '18 8:46:46 PM nombretomado
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Not to be mistaken with Creator/AkiraIshida, Creator/AkiraKamiya, Creator/AkiraToriyama, Creator/AkiraKurosawa, Music/AkiraIfukube (the guy who composed the ''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}'' theme) or Music/AkiraYamaoka (who composed most of the ''Franchise/SilentHill'' games). Or [[TetrisTheGrandMaster Arika]], for that matter.

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Not to be mistaken with Creator/AkiraIshida, Creator/AkiraKamiya, Creator/AkiraToriyama, Creator/AkiraKurosawa, Music/AkiraIfukube (the guy who composed the ''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}'' theme) or Music/AkiraYamaoka (who composed most of the ''Franchise/SilentHill'' games). Or [[TetrisTheGrandMaster [[VideoGame/TetrisTheGrandMaster Arika]], for that matter.
18th Feb '18 9:09:31 PM Angeldeb82
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* CallForward: Neo-Tokyo is planning to host the [[RealLife 2020 Summer Olympics...]]

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* CallForward: Neo-Tokyo is planning to host the [[RealLife 2020 Summer Olympics...]]Olympics]]...



* CoolBike: Essentially every member of the biker gangs have cool bikes but special mention has to go to Kaneda's souped-up red bike that has glowing wheels. It's suggested he stole it. It's often displayed on merchandise, and the most iconic image [[spoiler:that ''isn't'' Tetsuo's mutation scene.]]

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* CoolBike: Essentially every member of the biker gangs have cool bikes but special mention has to go to Kaneda's souped-up red bike that has glowing wheels. It's suggested he stole it. It's often displayed on merchandise, and the most iconic image [[spoiler:that ''isn't'' Tetsuo's mutation scene.]]scene]].



* ThePowerOfFriendship: In the manga [[spoiler:the Espers use it decisively during the final battle against Tetsuo by appealing to their reawakened friend, Akira, to use his power once more to create a new universe to contain Tetsuo's expanding power. Later, the children tell Kaneda that one of the perks of being a psychic is gaining a new circle of friends who understand each other perfectly, without words. They even name their former antagonist Tetsuo as one of their friends, leading one to think that this new universe will be a place of harmony.]]

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* ThePowerOfFriendship: In the manga [[spoiler:the Espers use it decisively during the final battle against Tetsuo by appealing to their reawakened friend, Akira, to use his power once more to create a new universe to contain Tetsuo's expanding power. Later, the children tell Kaneda that one of the perks of being a psychic is gaining a new circle of friends who understand each other perfectly, without words. They even name their former antagonist Tetsuo as one of their friends, leading one to think that this new universe will be a place of harmony.]]harmony]].



* PsychicPowers: Akira, Tetsuo, and the Espers Kiyoko, Takashi, and Masaru. [[spoiler:Kei turns out to be [[WillingChanneler a medium capable of channeling the powers of other psychics through her (younger and healthier) body]]]].

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* PsychicPowers: Akira, Tetsuo, and the Espers Kiyoko, Takashi, and Masaru. [[spoiler:Kei turns out to be [[WillingChanneler a medium capable of channeling the powers of other psychics through her (younger and healthier) body]]]].body]].]]



* [[RealLifeWritesThePlot Real Life Mirrors The Plot]]: Katsuhiro Otomo chose 2019 as a sufficiently distant time in the future, even using that Neo-Tokyo was hosting the Olympics in the following year... completely failing to expect that Tokyo '''WOULD''' get the Olympics in 2020 '''''FOR REAL'''''.

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* [[RealLifeWritesThePlot Real Life Mirrors The the Plot]]: Katsuhiro Otomo chose 2019 as a sufficiently distant time in the future, even using that Neo-Tokyo was hosting the Olympics in the following year... completely failing to expect that Tokyo '''WOULD''' get the Olympics in 2020 '''''FOR REAL'''''.



* ConspicuousCGI: The brainwave pattern indicator that Doctor Ōnishi uses to measure Tetsuo's abilities. It especially sticks out since it's the only thing in the entire film to use CGI; the rest is regular cel animation.
* DeadAllAlong: [[spoiler:Tetsuo digs up Akira's cryogenic capsule only to find out that he's nothing but preserved organs. [[VillainousBreakdown He doesn't take it well]].]]

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* ConspicuousCGI: ConspicuousCG: The brainwave pattern indicator that Doctor Ōnishi uses to measure Tetsuo's abilities. It especially sticks out since it's the only thing in the entire film to use CGI; CG; the rest is regular cel animation.
* DeadAllAlong: [[spoiler:Tetsuo digs up Akira's cryogenic capsule only to find out that he's nothing but preserved organs. [[VillainousBreakdown He doesn't take it well]].]]well.]]]]



* DefaceOfTheMoon: To impress his empire, Tetsuo blows a hole in the moon. Unlike most examples of this trope, [[RealityEnsues this immediately begins screwing with the tides.]]

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* DefaceOfTheMoon: To impress his empire, Tetsuo blows a hole in the moon. Unlike most examples of this trope, [[RealityEnsues this immediately begins screwing with the tides.]]tides]].



* FuroScene: Kei takes a [[{{Fanservice}} ritual bath]] in Miyako's temple [[spoiler:to prepare herself to being used as a psychic medium by the Espers and Miyako.]]

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* FuroScene: Kei takes a [[{{Fanservice}} ritual bath]] in Miyako's temple [[spoiler:to prepare herself to being used as a psychic medium by the Espers and Miyako.]]Miyako]].



** Kaori tries to be one [[spoiler:after she becomes Akira's caretaker per Tetsuo's orders.]]

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** Kaori tries to be one [[spoiler:after she becomes Akira's caretaker per Tetsuo's orders.]]orders]].
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