History Main / WritersCannotDoMath

18th Jul '17 7:41:18 PM Zaiaku666
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** Matpat of [[WebShows/GameTheory Film Theory]] actually proved that the in universe formula was not only incorrect, but inconsistent due to the constant changing of units of measurements, and using molecules when anything measured chemically uses pure atoms.
* In the H-managa ''Dulce Report II'', a principle character is said to age at a rate of five times faster than a normal person due to LegoGenetics. However, she appears to be a SecondYearProtagonist and her conception happened five years ago not three. As there is no mention of her gestation taking longer or shorter the math doesn't agree with what is stated having her age at rate of around 3 times, give or take a few weeks, faster.
18th Jul '17 2:47:39 PM Divra
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* ''Literature/TheLaundryFiles'' is a complete aversion. Computational theory and related fields are the key component of magic in the setting, and the main character is one of the most talented computational demonologists of his generation. Expect a crash course on Riemannian and Lorentzian manifolds, the difference between P- and NP-complete problems and the mathematical foundations of the Everett-Wheeler cosmology and it's relation to the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. Also, the author insinuates that the reason volume four of ''The Art of Computer Programming'' took nearly 30 years to complete is that someone read and edited out all the bits that might bring the Elder Gods back from beyond the stars, but that some of it is still left in chapter 7.9. The math scans beautifully for those who understand it, and for those to whom the math reads as "blurble blurble jargon blurble" the novels are still completely comprehensible.
17th Jul '17 12:35:20 AM Ymirsdaughter
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** Then, of course, there is the number of wizards and witches in Great Britain, which Rowling puts at around 3,000. That's all fine and good until you start wondering how they support ''multiple'' professional, regional Quidditch teams, among other things, with a population that small. And that about a third of the population is apparently at Hogwarts for most of any given year. There also seems to be a rather oversized governing and law enforcement body for such a small community. Towns with many more than 3,000 inhabitants generally merit a small town council and a single police station (and often not even that these days), not a large government with an expansive bureaucracy and extensive law enforcement with special forces and intelligence sections. It seems the entire wizard population must either be government, Quidditch players, or in school.

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** Then, of course, there is the number of wizards and witches in Great Britain, which Rowling puts at around 3,000. That's all fine and good until you start wondering how they support ''multiple'' professional, regional Quidditch teams, among other things, with a population that small. And that about a third quarter of the population is apparently at Hogwarts for most of any given year. There also seems to be a rather oversized governing and law enforcement body for such a small community. Towns with many more than 3,000 inhabitants generally merit a small town council and a single police station (and often not even that these days), not a large government with an expansive bureaucracy and extensive law enforcement with special forces and intelligence sections. It seems the entire wizard population must either be government, Quidditch players, or in school.
16th Jul '17 4:17:58 PM NightShade96
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*** This is averted, however, with GreenArrow prior to New52, who was established to be in his early 40s and being inspired by Batman in his youth.

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*** This is averted, however, with GreenArrow ComicBook/GreenArrow prior to New52, the ComicBook/New52, who was established to be in his early 40s and being inspired by Batman in his youth.
15th Jul '17 8:04:07 PM maxwellsilver
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** Then, of course, there is the number of wizards and witches in Great Britain, which Rowling puts at around 3,000. That's all fine and good until you start wondering how they support ''multiple'' professional, regional Quidditch teams, among other things, with a population that small. And that about a third of the population is apparently at Hogwarts for most of any given year. There also seems to be a rather oversized governing and law enforcement body for such a small community. Towns with many more than 3000 inhabitants generally merit a small town council and a single police station (and often not even that these days), not a large government with an expansive bureaucracy and extensive law enforcement with special forces and intelligence sections. It seems the entire wizard population must either be government, Quidditch players, or in school.
** In the ''Philosopher's Stone'', we are told the Nicholas Flamel is 665 years old. The book is actually set in 1991-92, making Flamel's birth 1326/1327. However, Flamel was a real historical figure born in 1330.

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** Then, of course, there is the number of wizards and witches in Great Britain, which Rowling puts at around 3,000. That's all fine and good until you start wondering how they support ''multiple'' professional, regional Quidditch teams, among other things, with a population that small. And that about a third of the population is apparently at Hogwarts for most of any given year. There also seems to be a rather oversized governing and law enforcement body for such a small community. Towns with many more than 3000 3,000 inhabitants generally merit a small town council and a single police station (and often not even that these days), not a large government with an expansive bureaucracy and extensive law enforcement with special forces and intelligence sections. It seems the entire wizard population must either be government, Quidditch players, or in school.
** In the ''Philosopher's Stone'', we are told the Nicholas Flamel is 665 years old. The book is actually set in 1991-92, making Flamel's birth 1326/1327. However, Flamel was a real historical figure born in 1330.



** Actually, James Potter's parents have been stated to have been old 'even for wizards' when they had their only child, meaning that they both died of old age before James and Lily's death. This assumes that witches either don't have menopause like muggle women, or go into menopause much later (James's mother being around eighty when she gave birth) and with a much shorter period between infertility and end of life expectancy BUT there's nothing to suggest it isn't true or possible. This was probably one of Rowlings many afterthoughts, but at least it explains how Harry has no living wizarding family (any of James's uncles and aunts could also be dead of old age before his death) and how he's absolutely loaded.

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** Actually, *** James Potter's parents have been stated to have been old 'even for wizards' when they had their only child, meaning that they both died of old age before James and Lily's death. This assumes that witches either don't have menopause like muggle women, or go into menopause much later (James's mother being around eighty when she gave birth) and with a much shorter period between infertility and end of life expectancy BUT there's nothing to suggest it isn't true or possible. This was probably one of Rowlings Rowling's many afterthoughts, but at least it explains how Harry has no living wizarding family (any of James's uncles and aunts could also be dead of old age before his death) and how he's absolutely loaded.



* ''Threshold'' by Caitlín R. Kiernan contains a rare attempt of an author to include mathematics higher than arithmetic, but unfortunately falls headlong into this trope. The book lists a regular heptagon (a seven-sided polygon with all sides and angles the same) as an {{Alien Geometr|ies}}y based on the fact that a regular heptagon is not constructible. However, in geometry, "not constructable" means "cannot be drawn with only a straight edge and compass." It does not mean "cannot be made with any tool known to man" (you can draw a regular heptagon just fine if you have an accurate protractor and ruler) and most definitely doesn't mean "cannot exist in nature" or "seeing one will cause you to GoMadFromTheRevelation."

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* ''Threshold'' by Caitlín R. Kiernan contains a rare attempt of an author to include mathematics higher than arithmetic, but unfortunately falls headlong into this trope. The book lists a regular heptagon (a seven-sided polygon with all sides and angles the same) as an {{Alien Geometr|ies}}y based on the fact that a regular heptagon is not constructible. However, in geometry, "not constructable" constructible" means "cannot be drawn with only a straight edge straightedge and compass." It does not mean "cannot be made with any tool known to man" (you can draw a regular heptagon just fine if you have an accurate protractor and ruler) and most definitely doesn't mean "cannot exist in nature" or "seeing one will cause you to GoMadFromTheRevelation."


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* ''Literature/HoratioHornblower'': In ''Hornblower in the West Indies'', Hornblower is stated to run into a colleague he last saw during the defense of Riga in 1812, "twenty years ago",[[note]]Chronicled in ''Commodore Hornblower''[[/note]] which would be fine if Hornblower was made Commander of the West Indies in 1832... except it is explicitly set in 1821-23 -- crucially, the first chapter, "St. Elizabeth of Hungary", involves Napoleon Bonaparte's death in 1821 -- just a decade after Napoleon's invasion of Russia.
8th Jul '17 9:12:15 AM 64SuperNintendo
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[[folder: Anime & Manga]]

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[[folder: Anime & and Manga]]



* In ''Franchise/TheSims 2'' & ''3'', there are a lot of these. For example:
** ''The Sims 2'' & ''3'' made Michael Bachelor into Bella Goth's older brother, but in the first game she already had a child, while he was just out of college. And the Sims 3 was supposed to be about 25 years before the first game, yet Michael is a 20-year-old man.

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* In ''Franchise/TheSims 2'' & and ''3'', there are a lot of these. For example:
** ''The Sims 2'' & and ''3'' made Michael Bachelor into Bella Goth's older brother, but in the first game she already had a child, while he was just out of college. And the Sims 3 was supposed to be about 25 years before the first game, yet Michael is a 20-year-old man.
20th Jun '17 11:28:25 PM Nulono
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** A potion has no appreciable weigh, neither does acid, holy water or [[GreekFire alchemist's fire]]. But a potion vial (the sort of thing that they are in) does. Therefore liquids in [=D&D=] have negative weight.

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** A potion has no appreciable weigh, weight, and neither does acid, holy water or [[GreekFire alchemist's fire]]. But a potion vial (the sort of thing that they are in) does. Therefore liquids in [=D&D=] have negative weight.
16th Jun '17 3:00:50 PM LentilSandEater
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* ''Film/TheWizardOfOz'': The infamous "Sum of the square roots of any two sides of an isosceles triangle is equal to the square root of the remaining side." mangling of the Pythagorean theorem, as said by the scarecrow after he got his brain. It should be, "The square of the hypotenuse of a ''right'' triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides." (Of course, since the Scarecrow hasn't actually had any real increase in intelligence or learning, this could be intentional; he thinks he's now clever, so he says something that ''sounds'' clever). This is lampshaded in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', where Homer says the exact same line in an attempt to sound smart after putting on Henry Kissinger's lost glasses, and a person in the bathroom yells out, "That's a right triangle, you idiot!" Homer then responds to this with [[CatchPhrase "D'OH!"]]. The French dub of the film (titled Le Magicien d'Oz) averts the mistake, where the Scarecrow says "La somme de l'hypoténuse au carré doit être égale á la somme des deux cotés opposés au carré", or "The square of the hypotenuse must equal the squares of the two other sides" in English.

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* ''Film/TheWizardOfOz'': The infamous "Sum of the square roots of any two sides of an isosceles triangle is equal to the square root of the remaining side." mangling of the Pythagorean theorem, as said by the scarecrow after he got his brain. It should be, "The square of the hypotenuse of a ''right'' triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides." (Of course, since the Scarecrow hasn't actually had any real increase in intelligence or learning, this could be intentional; he thinks he's now clever, so he says something that ''sounds'' clever). This is lampshaded in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', where Homer says the exact same line in an attempt to sound smart after putting on Henry Kissinger's lost glasses, and a person in the bathroom yells out, "That's a right triangle, you idiot!" Homer then responds to this with [[CatchPhrase "D'OH!"]]. The French dub of the film (titled Le Magicien d'Oz) averts the mistake, where the Scarecrow says "La somme de l'hypoténuse au carré doit être égale á la somme des deux cotés opposés au carré", or "The square of the hypotenuse must equal the squares of the two other sides" in English.



** In ''Chamber of Secrets'', Ginny mentions wanting to attend Hogwarts ''since Bill came''. Bill went to Hogwarts a year after Ginny was born (and that's without the earlier dates from the paragraph above). So Ginny wanted to go to Hogwarts ''since she was one''? Or ''before she was born''? It was also unnecessary because she has 4 older brothers she would've been able to bond with before they went off to Hogwarts. (Of course, she wasn't exactly thinking clearly at the moment.)

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** In ''Chamber of Secrets'', Ginny mentions wanting to attend Hogwarts ''since Bill came''. Bill went to Hogwarts a year after Ginny was born (and that's without the earlier dates from the paragraph above). So Ginny wanted to go to Hogwarts ''since she was one''? Or ''before she was born''? It was also unnecessary because she has 4 older brothers she would've been able to bond with before they went off to Hogwarts. (Of course, she wasn't exactly thinking clearly at the moment.)
16th Jun '17 2:56:07 PM LentilSandEater
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** This may be intentional, Wailord is based on a blimp and as such has high HP and low defense so it would make sense that his weight is far smaller than his size, he's a balloon.
16th Jun '17 2:52:41 PM LentilSandEater
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You have just discovered the fundamental truth: that your favorite author failed irredeemably at high school math and never wants to see a number ever again except in the corner of a page. This is a particular kind of continuity error that would be avoided if professional writers kept calculators at their desks. In their defense, some of these mistakes can be obscure and noticed only by die-hard fans. It can also come from multiple writers not checking with each other, or screwups in the timeline.

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You have just discovered the fundamental truth: that your favorite author failed irredeemably at high school math and never wants to see a number ever again except in the corner of a page. This is a particular kind of continuity error that would be avoided if professional writers kept calculators at their desks. In their defense, some of these mistakes can be obscure and noticed only by die-hard fans. It can also come from multiple writers not checking with each other, or screwups in the timeline.
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