History Main / WritersCanNotDoMath

10th Dec '16 7:15:58 PM lucy24
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** The Tedrel Wars, for example. According to Exile's Honor (p. 68, in the Daw Books paperback) Jadus was a "older than Alberich, approaching middle age" when Alberich arrived in Valdemar. Alberich must then have been at least 25, maybe even 30, seeing as he had been selected at the age of 13, his training in the Karsite military Academy had lasted "long years", and after his training he had spent seven years in active duty in the mounted troops (p. 12-14, 73, 99 in the Daw Books paperback) before he arrived in Valdemar. Therefore, Jadus would have been at least 40, possibly 50, when he fought in the Tedrel Wars some 5-10 years later. In the Arrows Trilogy, he dies of old age. Considering that Healers are readily available, that can't have been before he was 60, making the Tedrel wars 10-20 years ago. Potential problem? Elspeth was born fairly exactly 2 years after the Tedrel Wars, because Selenay married close to the end of her year of mourning after Sendar's death, and conceived very soon after having married. Elspeth is a ''small child'' (based on her general behavior in Arrows of the Queen, maybe 5 or at most 8) when Jadus dies. So "approaching middle age" in Valdemar would be similar to what we mean with "middle age" in our world with modern medicine, and Elspeth should be a teenager or young adult in "Arrows of the Queeen", unless Jadus did go to war at the ripe age of approximately 55.

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** The Tedrel Wars, for example. According to Exile's Honor (p. 68, in the Daw Books paperback) Jadus was a "older than Alberich, approaching middle age" when Alberich arrived in Valdemar. Alberich must then have been at least 25, maybe even 30, seeing as he had been selected at the age of 13, his training in the Karsite military Academy had lasted "long years", and after his training he had spent seven years in active duty in the mounted troops (p. 12-14, 73, 99 in the Daw Books paperback) before he arrived in Valdemar. Therefore, Jadus would have been at least 40, possibly 50, when he fought in the Tedrel Wars some 5-10 years later. In the Arrows Trilogy, he dies of old age. Considering that Healers are readily available, that can't have been before he was 60, making the Tedrel wars 10-20 years ago. Potential problem? Elspeth was born fairly exactly 2 years after the Tedrel Wars, because Selenay married close to the end of her year of mourning after Sendar's death, and conceived very soon after having married. Elspeth is a ''small child'' (based on her general behavior in Arrows of the Queen, maybe 5 or at most 8) when Jadus dies. So "approaching middle age" in Valdemar would be similar to what we mean with "middle age" in our world with modern medicine, and Elspeth should be a teenager or young adult in "Arrows of the Queeen", Queen", unless Jadus did go to war at the ripe age of approximately 55.



** Spike has baby Emma at the end of the second season of ''Series/DegrassiJuniorHigh'', which is the end of year eight for Spike. So, when Spike graduates, Emma should be approximately four. At Spike's ten-year reunion in the first episode of ''Series/DegrassiTheNextGeneration'', Emma is only twelve.

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** Spike has baby Emma at the end of the second season of ''Series/DegrassiJuniorHigh'', which is the end of year grade eight for Spike. So, when Spike graduates, Emma should be approximately four. At Spike's ten-year reunion in the first episode of ''Series/DegrassiTheNextGeneration'', Emma is only twelve. In fact Emma should have been ''five'' when Spike graduates, because of the extra year (below).
10th Dec '16 7:03:18 PM lucy24
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** George R. R. Martin perpetually creates a one-year confusion because of how he confuses what numbers indicating place in order such as "seventh" mean in numerical value. For instance, Jaime Lannister is claimed to have been elected to the Kingsguard in his 15th year =- which would make him 14 at the time. However, whenever his age is referred to at the time, the book clearly says 15.

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** George R. R. Martin perpetually often creates a one-year confusion because of how he confuses what numbers indicating place by using the “in his Xth year” formulation.[[note]]Technically, a person’s 17th year is the year they are 16--the year ''leading up to'' their 17th birthday--but in order such as "seventh" mean in numerical value. current usage it rarely means anything other than that the person is ''now'' 17.[[/note]] For instance, Jaime Lannister is claimed to have been elected to the Kingsguard in his 15th year =- which would make him 14 at the time. year. However, whenever his age is referred to at the time, to, the book clearly says 15.
7th Dec '16 8:30:53 PM Kid
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* ''Series/{{Glee}}'' has an episode ("Acafellas") in the first season where Kurt drives himself, Mercedes, Tina, and Rachel to see Vocal Adrenaline perform. In Ohio, teenagers can get their permit at fifteen and their license at sixteen, and can't drive more than one other person until they're eighteen, which is pretty consistent with most states. Of course, it's possible that Kurt's breaking the law, but given [[SpringtimeForHitler his idea of chaos]]

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* ''Series/{{Glee}}'' has an episode ("Acafellas") in the first season where Kurt drives himself, Mercedes, Tina, and Rachel to see Vocal Adrenaline perform. In Ohio, teenagers can get their permit at fifteen and their license at sixteen, and can't drive more than one other person until they're eighteen, which is pretty consistent with most states. Of course, it's possible that Kurt's breaking the law, but given [[SpringtimeForHitler his idea of chaos]]chaos]]...
7th Dec '16 12:27:59 PM Kid
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** The matter of Ron's older brothers, Bill and Charlie: originally, Rowling stated that Charlie was two years older than Percy, and Bill was two years older than Charlie. However, Percy is in fifth year in "Philosopher's Stone", meaning that Charlie should have either been in seventh year, or just graduated. She later corrected this to Charlie being three years older than Percy -- which is still impossible, as the Gryffindor Quidditch team has allegedly not won the Cup since Charlie stopped playing for them, and the period of time since Gryffindor has won is given in "Prisoner of Azkaban" as having been seven years, coming up on eight (or four years before the start of the first book). Charlie would have had to have left the team in his third, or possibly fourth, year for his age at three years older than Percy to be plausible -- unlikely, since he was Quidditch Captain and "could have played for England". Bill was born in 1970 and would have finished in 1987 (four years before PS, not 8), Charlie was born in 1972 and would have finished in 1989 (2 years before PS not 8), Percy in 1976, Fred and George in 1978, Ron in March 1980 and Ginny in August 1981.

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** The matter of Ron's older brothers, Bill and Charlie: originally, Rowling stated that Charlie was two years older than Percy, and Bill was two years older than Charlie. However, Percy is in fifth year in "Philosopher's Stone", ''Philosopher's Stone'', meaning that Charlie should have either been in seventh year, or just graduated. She later corrected this to Charlie being three years older than Percy -- which is still impossible, as the Gryffindor Quidditch team has allegedly not won the Cup since Charlie stopped playing for them, and the period of time since Gryffindor has won is given in "Prisoner of Azkaban" as having been seven years, coming up on eight (or four years before the start of the first book). Charlie would have had to have left the team in his third, or possibly fourth, year for his age at three years older than Percy to be plausible -- unlikely, since he was Quidditch Captain and "could have played for England". Bill was born in 1970 and would have finished in 1987 (four years before PS, not 8), Charlie was born in 1972 and would have finished in 1989 (2 years before PS not 8), Percy in 1976, Fred and George in 1978, Ron in March 1980 and Ginny in August 1981.
4th Dec '16 8:46:31 AM TheSinful
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Added DiffLines:

** Supposedly a singly Ryo is worth roughly ten cents, however a single D-rank mission (which consists of chores like weeding, grocery shopping, and babysitting) costs a few thousand Ryo. So not only are people spending hundreds of dollars to have their fence painted, but there should be far less drive to reach higher ranks if a Genin can easily make a living wage just doing one or two D-ranks a day and never risk death on a mission.
2nd Dec '16 3:46:42 AM N8han11
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*** The opening narration doesn't say the spell must be broken by the Beast's 21st birthday. It says the spell must be broken by the beasts 21st year. The year someone is born is their 1st year, their 1st birthday starts off their 2nd year, ect. Therefore the beast was 10 when he was cursed.
30th Nov '16 9:40:07 PM Eievie
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Compare SoapOperaRapidAgingSyndrome, NotAllowedToGrowUp, and LongestPregnancyEver, where the writers ''can'' do math-- they're just intentionally fudging it. See also SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale and NotDrawnToScale. Possibly the root cause of EverybodyHatesMathematics. Might even involve EEqualsMCHammer. ArtisticLicenseStatistics is a subtrope.

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Compare SoapOperaRapidAgingSyndrome, NotAllowedToGrowUp, and LongestPregnancyEver, where the writers ''can'' do math-- math -- they're just intentionally fudging it. See also SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale and NotDrawnToScale. Possibly the root cause of EverybodyHatesMathematics. Might even involve EEqualsMCHammer. ArtisticLicenseStatistics is a subtrope.



Oh, for the examples below that reference the number Pi, it is an irrational number with no limit - an endless number - of digits, but the first 12 are 3.14159265359.[[note]]Note that they're rounded - the first 12 digits are 3.1415926535'''8''', and the next digit would be a 9, so the 8 is rounded up.[[/note]]

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Oh, for the examples below that reference the number Pi, it is an irrational number with no limit - -- an endless number - -- of digits, but the first 12 are 3.14159265359.[[note]]Note that they're rounded - -- the first 12 digits are 3.1415926535'''8''', and the next digit would be a 9, so the 8 is rounded up.[[/note]]



* In ''Manga/{{Mitsudomoe}}'' the class is playing anything goes chairs at the start of the manga and anime. The rules are simple - there are enough chairs in a circle to seat all but one member of the class. Whoever is left out has to call out a criterion, anyone who matches that criterion has to leave their chair and find a new one. After their initial rush for seats it appears that everyone in the class is seated. The teacher is confused at first thinking that there should be exactly one seat less than there are people - it turns out the eldest daughter Mitsuba is sitting on a classmate who is on all fours. Catch is, if she is sitting on a classmate ''instead'' of chair then there are two people not in chairs and thus an empty chair somewhere which would have been obvious.

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* In ''Manga/{{Mitsudomoe}}'' the class is playing anything goes chairs at the start of the manga and anime. The rules are simple - -- there are enough chairs in a circle to seat all but one member of the class. Whoever is left out has to call out a criterion, anyone who matches that criterion has to leave their chair and find a new one. After their initial rush for seats it appears that everyone in the class is seated. The teacher is confused at first thinking that there should be exactly one seat less than there are people - -- it turns out the eldest daughter Mitsuba is sitting on a classmate who is on all fours. Catch is, if she is sitting on a classmate ''instead'' of chair then there are two people not in chairs and thus an empty chair somewhere which would have been obvious.



* More a case of "Writers don't get units", but in an issue of the ''Second Coming'' crossover in ComicBook/XMen, the bad guys - a loose coalition of anti-mutant paramilitants - list off their armies, starting with "50 bases with a hundred men each" (so 5000 men, sizeable), "numbers in the thousands" (still large) and finally "40 armoured divisions." The latter would exceed 400,000 men, and thousands of tanks - a completely ridiculous number for the organization in question. For comparison, the United Kingdom's entire armed forces currently consists of six divisions, ONE of which is an armored division, 40 armoured divisions would be larger than the ''entire Indian army'' and only slightly smaller than the Chinese one. 40 divisions would also be about twice the strength of the current U.S. Army.

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* More a case of "Writers don't get units", but in an issue of the ''Second Coming'' crossover in ComicBook/XMen, the bad guys - -- a loose coalition of anti-mutant paramilitants - -- list off their armies, starting with "50 bases with a hundred men each" (so 5000 men, sizeable), "numbers in the thousands" (still large) and finally "40 armoured divisions." The latter would exceed 400,000 men, and thousands of tanks - -- a completely ridiculous number for the organization in question. For comparison, the United Kingdom's entire armed forces currently consists of six divisions, ONE of which is an armored division, 40 armoured divisions would be larger than the ''entire Indian army'' and only slightly smaller than the Chinese one. 40 divisions would also be about twice the strength of the current U.S. Army.



** Mathematician/genius Max Cohen tells the Kabbalists that he can't just tell them the 216 digit MacGuffin number because "You've already written down every 216 digit number and intoned them all and what has it gotten you?" To do so would, of course, take even a large group of researchers, such as the entire population of the Earth, significantly longer than the age of the Universe to do, and inconceivably more ink than there is mass in the universe - indeed, even if only one electron were needed to write down each number, 10^100 universes would be ''much'' too small. Any mathematician should be well aware of this. Of course, [[MindScrew Max and reality don't always see eye to eye, especially considering he's having a schizophrenic breakdown at that point]].

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** Mathematician/genius Max Cohen tells the Kabbalists that he can't just tell them the 216 digit MacGuffin number because "You've already written down every 216 digit number and intoned them all and what has it gotten you?" To do so would, of course, take even a large group of researchers, such as the entire population of the Earth, significantly longer than the age of the Universe to do, and inconceivably more ink than there is mass in the universe - -- indeed, even if only one electron were needed to write down each number, 10^100 universes would be ''much'' too small. Any mathematician should be well aware of this. Of course, [[MindScrew Max and reality don't always see eye to eye, especially considering he's having a schizophrenic breakdown at that point]].



* In using Howard Stark as Cap's ally in ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'', it creates a bit of an issue with either his or his son Tony's age. Dominic Cooper, Howard's actor, was 33 when ''Captain America'' came out. Robert Downey Jr, Tony Stark's actor, was born in 1965 (making him 47 when The Avengers came out the year after Cap). If we assume that Tony was born in the same year as Robert Downey Jr., and that Howard was Dominic's age during ''Captain America'', this would mean that Howard would have been 53 when Tony was born. It's certainly possible for a womaniser like Howard, although it stretches credibility a bit. The alternative is that Tony was born earlier than 1965, although this has the reverse problem (knocking off ten years, Howard would be 43 when Tony was born - still plausible - but Tony would be ''57'' in The Avengers). Really, it makes you wonder why they didn't make Cap's ally be Tony's grandfather and simply make Tony be slightly younger than his actor.

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* In using Howard Stark as Cap's ally in ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'', it creates a bit of an issue with either his or his son Tony's age. Dominic Cooper, Howard's actor, was 33 when ''Captain America'' came out. Robert Downey Jr, Tony Stark's actor, was born in 1965 (making him 47 when The Avengers came out the year after Cap). If we assume that Tony was born in the same year as Robert Downey Jr., and that Howard was Dominic's age during ''Captain America'', this would mean that Howard would have been 53 when Tony was born. It's certainly possible for a womaniser like Howard, although it stretches credibility a bit. The alternative is that Tony was born earlier than 1965, although this has the reverse problem (knocking off ten years, Howard would be 43 when Tony was born - -- still plausible - -- but Tony would be ''57'' in The Avengers). Really, it makes you wonder why they didn't make Cap's ally be Tony's grandfather and simply make Tony be slightly younger than his actor.



** The matter of Ron's older brothers, Bill and Charlie: originally, Rowling stated that Charlie was two years older than Percy, and Bill was two years older than Charlie. However, Percy is in fifth year in "Philosopher's Stone", meaning that Charlie should have either been in seventh year, or just graduated. She later corrected this to Charlie being three years older than Percy - which is still impossible, as the Gryffindor Quidditch team has allegedly not won the Cup since Charlie stopped playing for them, and the period of time since Gryffindor has won is given in "Prisoner of Azkaban" as having been seven years, coming up on eight (or four years before the start of the first book). Charlie would have had to have left the team in his third, or possibly fourth, year for his age at three years older than Percy to be plausible - unlikely, since he was Quidditch Captain and "could have played for England". Bill was born in 1970 and would have finished in 1987 (four years before PS, not 8), Charlie was born in 1972 and would have finished in 1989 (2 years before PS not 8), Percy in 1976, Fred and George in 1978, Ron in March 1980 and Ginny in August 1981.

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** The matter of Ron's older brothers, Bill and Charlie: originally, Rowling stated that Charlie was two years older than Percy, and Bill was two years older than Charlie. However, Percy is in fifth year in "Philosopher's Stone", meaning that Charlie should have either been in seventh year, or just graduated. She later corrected this to Charlie being three years older than Percy - -- which is still impossible, as the Gryffindor Quidditch team has allegedly not won the Cup since Charlie stopped playing for them, and the period of time since Gryffindor has won is given in "Prisoner of Azkaban" as having been seven years, coming up on eight (or four years before the start of the first book). Charlie would have had to have left the team in his third, or possibly fourth, year for his age at three years older than Percy to be plausible - -- unlikely, since he was Quidditch Captain and "could have played for England". Bill was born in 1970 and would have finished in 1987 (four years before PS, not 8), Charlie was born in 1972 and would have finished in 1989 (2 years before PS not 8), Percy in 1976, Fred and George in 1978, Ron in March 1980 and Ginny in August 1981.



** Another problem comes when you consider Skif. His mentor, Bazie, - who fought in the war - says that "Wuz back yon twenny yearn, easy, mebbe thutty" (page 104 in the Daw paperback of ''Take a Thief''). A few years later, Skif goes to the Collegium. At this point it's probably about 25 years after the wars, by what Bazie said. Problem? Skif gets to the Collegium before Talia arrives. When Talia arrives, Elspeth is a "small child". Again, she'd be a young adult by that point, and we know that Bazie could count, because he taught all his boys the three basic Rs. Considering Talia is 13 herself and Talia is supposed to bring discipline to Elspeth's life, Elspeth's age really does not add up at all.

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** Another problem comes when you consider Skif. His mentor, Bazie, - Bazie -- who fought in the war - -- says that "Wuz back yon twenny yearn, easy, mebbe thutty" (page 104 in the Daw paperback of ''Take a Thief''). A few years later, Skif goes to the Collegium. At this point it's probably about 25 years after the wars, by what Bazie said. Problem? Skif gets to the Collegium before Talia arrives. When Talia arrives, Elspeth is a "small child". Again, she'd be a young adult by that point, and we know that Bazie could count, because he taught all his boys the three basic Rs. Considering Talia is 13 herself and Talia is supposed to bring discipline to Elspeth's life, Elspeth's age really does not add up at all.



* "Lord of the Wolves" by Creator/AlexandreDumas is a horror story about a man who is granted unholy powers. However, the first time he uses them, one hair on his head turns fire red. The second time, it happens to two hairs, the third time, to four hairs, and so on. At one point in the novel, it is stated that more than half of his hairs are red. He proceeds to use his powers a few times more, and by the end of the book, only one single hair on his head remains normal. The problem is, if you add 1+2+4+8... together, the number of red hairs almost exactly doubles with every use of the power. So if it is stated that more than a half of his hairs have been turned "evil", he gets one more use of the power ''at most'', and no hairs on his head would remain unchanged. This is especially jarring as it would not impact the plot in any way if the amount of hairs changed into red mid-novel was realistic - not all uses of the character's powers are listed explicitly, all that matters for the purpose of the plot is the single remaining hair by the end.

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* "Lord of the Wolves" by Creator/AlexandreDumas is a horror story about a man who is granted unholy powers. However, the first time he uses them, one hair on his head turns fire red. The second time, it happens to two hairs, the third time, to four hairs, and so on. At one point in the novel, it is stated that more than half of his hairs are red. He proceeds to use his powers a few times more, and by the end of the book, only one single hair on his head remains normal. The problem is, if you add 1+2+4+8...1 + 2 + 4 + 8... together, the number of red hairs almost exactly doubles with every use of the power. So if it is stated that more than a half of his hairs have been turned "evil", he gets one more use of the power ''at most'', and no hairs on his head would remain unchanged. This is especially jarring as it would not impact the plot in any way if the amount of hairs changed into red mid-novel was realistic - -- not all uses of the character's powers are listed explicitly, all that matters for the purpose of the plot is the single remaining hair by the end.



* Although a scientist, Creator/IsaacAsimov clearly didn't do the math when it came to Trantor, the planet covered by one city in the Literature/{{Foundation}} trilogy (and the inspiration for Coruscant in ''Franchise/StarWars''). Trantor's population at its height is given as over 40 billion in a single city covering all 75 million square miles of the planet's land area: assuming 45 billion people, this works out to 600 people per square mile, or roughly equivalent to the United Kingdom instead of a city like Manhattan (which has more than 65,000 people per square mile). However, the city is also explained to go a mile down: the available area increases significantly. If there are only 100 levels underground, actual population density drops to 6 per square mile. The problem with Trantor isn't overcrowding, it's finding someone else to talk to. Maybe he used the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_scale long scale]]? Even with other planets being used to supply Trantor with food (and probably remove the garbage) there have to be some pretty sizable facilities for processing, transporting, and disposing of everything. Most major cities try to locate as many of the power plants and water treatment centers outside city limits, but they still take up room somewhere. Even if every inch of the planet is covered in buildings, its impossible for anywhere near 100% of them to be residential structures. The prequel books indicates that relatively large areas of the planet ''are'' taken up other things than residential structures - power plants, yeast-food production, infrastructure, etc. The Psychohistorians itself gives three examples of relatively large, sprawling non-residential complexes: the University, the Palace and the spaceports (those giant food-transports have to ''land'' somewhere, after all!). Still, there doesn't seem to be enough to bring Trantor up to city-level population density.

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* Although a scientist, Creator/IsaacAsimov clearly didn't do the math when it came to Trantor, the planet covered by one city in the Literature/{{Foundation}} trilogy (and the inspiration for Coruscant in ''Franchise/StarWars''). Trantor's population at its height is given as over 40 billion in a single city covering all 75 million square miles of the planet's land area: assuming 45 billion people, this works out to 600 people per square mile, or roughly equivalent to the United Kingdom instead of a city like Manhattan (which has more than 65,000 people per square mile). However, the city is also explained to go a mile down: the available area increases significantly. If there are only 100 levels underground, actual population density drops to 6 per square mile. The problem with Trantor isn't overcrowding, it's finding someone else to talk to. Maybe he used the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_scale long scale]]? Even with other planets being used to supply Trantor with food (and probably remove the garbage) there have to be some pretty sizable facilities for processing, transporting, and disposing of everything. Most major cities try to locate as many of the power plants and water treatment centers outside city limits, but they still take up room somewhere. Even if every inch of the planet is covered in buildings, its impossible for anywhere near 100% of them to be residential structures. The prequel books indicates that relatively large areas of the planet ''are'' taken up other things than residential structures - -- power plants, yeast-food production, infrastructure, etc. The Psychohistorians itself gives three examples of relatively large, sprawling non-residential complexes: the University, the Palace and the spaceports (those giant food-transports have to ''land'' somewhere, after all!). Still, there doesn't seem to be enough to bring Trantor up to city-level population density.



** In ''Echoes of Honor'', a velocity is given as "about four thousand KPH [kilometers per ''hour''] — make it sixty-seven KPS[kilometers per ''second'']" - oops!

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** In ''Echoes of Honor'', a velocity is given as "about four thousand KPH [kilometers per ''hour''] -- make it sixty-seven KPS[kilometers per ''second'']" - -- oops!



** In the same book, a more subtle error is in the missiles which "accelerated at four thousand gravities." That means they fly a distance of 20km in the first second. They are locked-on manually, and there are six of them in the air at the same time. Assuming launch intervals of only two two three seconds ("Target Two up!" - "Launch Two!" - "Two away!" is spoken), that's at least ten seconds between the first missile and the sixth. And a distance of 2000km assuming constant acceleration. Even more importantly, an impact velocity of 400km/s, which would make them effective kinetic weapons - although Weber writes that they are not. (Certainly not at peak efficiency, but equally certainly effective.)

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** In the same book, a more subtle error is in the missiles which "accelerated at four thousand gravities." That means they fly a distance of 20km in the first second. They are locked-on manually, and there are six of them in the air at the same time. Assuming launch intervals of only two two three seconds ("Target Two up!" - -- "Launch Two!" - -- "Two away!" is spoken), that's at least ten seconds between the first missile and the sixth. And a distance of 2000km assuming constant acceleration. Even more importantly, an impact velocity of 400km/s, which would make them effective kinetic weapons - -- although Weber writes that they are not. (Certainly not at peak efficiency, but equally certainly effective.)



** George R. R. Martin perpetually creates a one-year confusion because of how he confuses what numbers indicating place in order such as "seventh" mean in numerical value. For instance, Jaime Lannister is claimed to have been elected to the Kingsguard in his 15th year - which would make him 14 at the time. However, whenever his age is referred to at the time, the book clearly says 15.

to:

** George R. R. Martin perpetually creates a one-year confusion because of how he confuses what numbers indicating place in order such as "seventh" mean in numerical value. For instance, Jaime Lannister is claimed to have been elected to the Kingsguard in his 15th year - =- which would make him 14 at the time. However, whenever his age is referred to at the time, the book clearly says 15.



* In ''Literature/TheFaultInOurStars'', Hazel incorrectly believes that the infinite set between zero and two is larger than the infinite set between zero and one. However, WordOfGod states that it was intentional, as he didn’t want his characters to always be right. Also, Creator/JohnGreen is so inept at mathematics that he has a ‘resident mathematician’, Daniel Biss, whom he calls - sometimes in the middle of filming – to clarify an equation.

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* In ''Literature/TheFaultInOurStars'', Hazel incorrectly believes that the infinite set between zero and two is larger than the infinite set between zero and one. However, WordOfGod states that it was intentional, as he didn’t want his characters to always be right. Also, Creator/JohnGreen is so inept at mathematics that he has a ‘resident mathematician’, Daniel Biss, whom he calls - -- sometimes in the middle of filming -- to clarify an equation.



* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' has screwed up a couple of times. Tommy was seen graduating high school as part of the Class of 1997 at the start of ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo''. By ''Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder'', he's got a [=PhD=], and is a teacher at another high school - where his students have a prom at the end of the season - for the Class of 2004. It's impossible to get that qualification, have time to do the research which [[NiceJobBreakingItHero led to the creation of the bad guys]], then become a teacher, in only seven years. Then in ''Series/PowerRangersSamurai'', [[ThoseTwoGuys Bulk]] is shown bringing up teenager Spike, the son of his best friend [[Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers Skull]]. He's about 14 or 15, which would mean he was born during ''Series/PowerRangersZeo'' or ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo''. Wasn't mentioned at the time!

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* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' has screwed up a couple of times. Tommy was seen graduating high school as part of the Class of 1997 at the start of ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo''. By ''Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder'', he's got a [=PhD=], and is a teacher at another high school - -- where his students have a prom at the end of the season - -- for the Class of 2004. It's impossible to get that qualification, have time to do the research which [[NiceJobBreakingItHero led to the creation of the bad guys]], then become a teacher, in only seven years. Then in ''Series/PowerRangersSamurai'', [[ThoseTwoGuys Bulk]] is shown bringing up teenager Spike, the son of his best friend [[Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers Skull]]. He's about 14 or 15, which would mean he was born during ''Series/PowerRangersZeo'' or ''Series/PowerRangersTurbo''. Wasn't mentioned at the time!



* ''{{Series/Merlin}}'' reveals two illegitimate children from Gorlois's wife Vivienne. The first of whom is Morgause, who was smuggled out of Camelot and declared stillborn to be kept secret. The second is [[spoiler: Morgana herself]] and Uther is the father, which poses problems since she and Arthur are roughly the same age - and Uther either cheated on Igraine while she was pregnant with Arthur or else used magic to conceive Arthur almost immediately after his affair with Vivienne. Morgause was kept secret, which is considerably harder for the ''mother'' to do, and requires her husband to have been away from the kingdom for long enough for Vivienne to have her affair and carry the pregnancy to term. All the while Gorlois was away for long enough not to notice any of this - and [[spoiler: Morgana's]] conception has to have happened recently enough before his return that the child could be passed off as his.

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* ''{{Series/Merlin}}'' reveals two illegitimate children from Gorlois's wife Vivienne. The first of whom is Morgause, who was smuggled out of Camelot and declared stillborn to be kept secret. The second is [[spoiler: Morgana [[spoiler:Morgana herself]] and Uther is the father, which poses problems since she and Arthur are roughly the same age - -- and Uther either cheated on Igraine while she was pregnant with Arthur or else used magic to conceive Arthur almost immediately after his affair with Vivienne. Morgause was kept secret, which is considerably harder for the ''mother'' to do, and requires her husband to have been away from the kingdom for long enough for Vivienne to have her affair and carry the pregnancy to term. All the while Gorlois was away for long enough not to notice any of this - -- and [[spoiler: Morgana's]] conception has to have happened recently enough before his return that the child could be passed off as his.



** Space Marine chapters, famously, are composed of a thousand marines each (not counting casualties). Which makes sense - there's ten battle companies, each composed of ten squads of ten men each, for a thousand marines... plus the captains/chaplains/command squads (7 per company, or an additional 70 marines), the Chapter command (roughly 15 marines, counting the honour guard), the armoury, the apothecarion, the librarius (cumulatively another 70 marines), plus the vehicle crew, starship commanders, and pilots. In all, "a thousand" marines, is actually at least 1350 and could potentially be upwards of 1600.

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** Space Marine chapters, famously, are composed of a thousand marines each (not counting casualties). Which makes sense - -- there's ten battle companies, each composed of ten squads of ten men each, for a thousand marines... plus the captains/chaplains/command squads (7 per company, or an additional 70 marines), the Chapter command (roughly 15 marines, counting the honour guard), the armoury, the apothecarion, the librarius (cumulatively another 70 marines), plus the vehicle crew, starship commanders, and pilots. In all, "a thousand" marines, is actually at least 1350 and could potentially be upwards of 1600.



** A case where it was applied to the mechanics underpinning an entire class: the difficulty a truenamer must beat to use their powers goes up ''at least'' twice as quickly as their actual rank in the Truename skill does - it goes up by 2 per hit die of the target opponent, hit dice are usually equivalent to levels when calculating encounter difficulty but can be higher, and the truenamer can only add one rank of the Truename skill per level. Meaning that by level 20, a truenamer needs to make up a deficit of twenty skill ranks with magic items and stat increases (in other words, +5 to the key stat for levelling up, +5 to that stat from a really expensive magic item, and then another magic item granting Truename +15) to have the ''same chance'' of their power working on a level 20 monster as a level 1 truenamer would when targeting a 1 HD monster. And then, when they do use a power successfully, the difficulty goes up. There's a reason optimisers tend to dismiss the truenamer as utterly useless.

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** A case where it was applied to the mechanics underpinning an entire class: the difficulty a truenamer must beat to use their powers goes up ''at least'' twice as quickly as their actual rank in the Truename skill does - -- it goes up by 2 per hit die of the target opponent, hit dice are usually equivalent to levels when calculating encounter difficulty but can be higher, and the truenamer can only add one rank of the Truename skill per level. Meaning that by level 20, a truenamer needs to make up a deficit of twenty skill ranks with magic items and stat increases (in other words, +5 to the key stat for levelling up, +5 to that stat from a really expensive magic item, and then another magic item granting Truename +15) to have the ''same chance'' of their power working on a level 20 monster as a level 1 truenamer would when targeting a 1 HD monster. And then, when they do use a power successfully, the difficulty goes up. There's a reason optimisers tend to dismiss the truenamer as utterly useless.



* Trying to determine the age of Big Boss from ''Franchise/MetalGear'' is a bit of a nightmare thanks to [[SeriesContinuityError inconsistent dates and ages]]. ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'' in particular has one character, as he's threatening to kill Big Boss, claim he will be "dead at 39, just like [[UsefulNotes/CheGuevara El Che]]". This would place him as being born in 1935, which is a problem because Big Boss was previously established as being a Korean War veteran ''and'' in the Green Berets before The Boss took him under her wing (even if he lied about his age to enlist, that wouldn't work for a special forces unit). Before that came commentary and promotional material for ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'', which established him as being in his 30s in 1964, which would be a bit more believable - except it was ''also'' stated early in ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 2|SonsOfLiberty}}'' that he was in his late fifties when [[CloningBlues the Les Enfantes Terribles project]] was underway, which was in 1972, just eight years after ''[=MGS3=]''.

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* Trying to determine the age of Big Boss from ''Franchise/MetalGear'' is a bit of a nightmare thanks to [[SeriesContinuityError inconsistent dates and ages]]. ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'' in particular has one character, as he's threatening to kill Big Boss, claim he will be "dead at 39, just like [[UsefulNotes/CheGuevara El Che]]". This would place him as being born in 1935, which is a problem because Big Boss was previously established as being a Korean War veteran ''and'' in the Green Berets before The Boss took him under her wing (even if he lied about his age to enlist, that wouldn't work for a special forces unit). Before that came commentary and promotional material for ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'', which established him as being in his 30s in 1964, which would be a bit more believable - -- except it was ''also'' stated early in ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 2|SonsOfLiberty}}'' that he was in his late fifties when [[CloningBlues the Les Enfantes Terribles project]] was underway, which was in 1972, just eight years after ''[=MGS3=]''.



** The various direct-to-video films and other follow-ups don't help with this issue. Enough time passes in the castle that they celebrate Christmas, for instance. The PerspectiveFlip novel ''[[Literature/ATaleOf The Beast Within]]'' scraps the movie's implication that the Beast was cursed when he was only eleven years old, but keeps the condition of the curse becoming permanent when he turns 21. But it's not clear at all how much time passes over the course of the story — he is old enough to be engaged when he's cursed, several months pass as the curse begins to take effect, and years pass after that. Thus the Beast's age remains in doubt.

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** The various direct-to-video films and other follow-ups don't help with this issue. Enough time passes in the castle that they celebrate Christmas, for instance. The PerspectiveFlip novel ''[[Literature/ATaleOf The Beast Within]]'' scraps the movie's implication that the Beast was cursed when he was only eleven years old, but keeps the condition of the curse becoming permanent when he turns 21. But it's not clear at all how much time passes over the course of the story -- he is old enough to be engaged when he's cursed, several months pass as the curse begins to take effect, and years pass after that. Thus the Beast's age remains in doubt.



** For a lesser example, Batman Beyond 2.0 issue #16 has Barbara expressing her belief to Dick that he's held Sam against her for twenty years [[note]]both are in their mid-late sixties at this point[[/note]], but the flashback to the day of Barbara's wedding depicts both characters looking as they did in the 90's cartoon, when they were (presumably) in their early-mid 20's. Could be a case of them [[OlderThanTheyLook still looking young for their age]] in the flashback, but still worth noting - especially since Commissioner Gordon is shown as alive.

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** For a lesser example, Batman Beyond 2.0 issue #16 has Barbara expressing her belief to Dick that he's held Sam against her for twenty years [[note]]both are in their mid-late sixties at this point[[/note]], but the flashback to the day of Barbara's wedding depicts both characters looking as they did in the 90's cartoon, when they were (presumably) in their early-mid 20's. Could be a case of them [[OlderThanTheyLook still looking young for their age]] in the flashback, but still worth noting - -- especially since Commissioner Gordon is shown as alive.
30th Nov '16 1:24:54 PM Ccook1956
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* A case of Techs Cannot Do Math: A 1963 telecast of ''ThePriceIsRight'' had a contestant, Richard Darling, returning as champ with $10,118 won the week before. At the end of his next show he has won an additional $6,670 in prizes, which would have brought his two-week total to $10,788. The tote screen showed it as $10,778.
30th Nov '16 12:22:33 PM easytorememberhandle
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* In ''Film/RushHour'', the kidnappers demand fifty million dollars in ransom: 20 million in fifties, 20 million in twenties, and 10 million in tens. That adds up to ''two million, four hundred thousand'' separate bills, and yet all that money apparently fits in a single briefcase, which the villain attempts to escape with in the end. That briefcase would weigh over ''fifty thousand pounds''.

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* In ''Film/RushHour'', the kidnappers demand fifty million dollars in ransom: 20 million in fifties, 20 million in twenties, and 10 million in tens. That adds up to ''two million, four hundred thousand'' separate bills, and yet all that money apparently fits in a single briefcase, two ordinary briefcases, which the villain attempts to escape with in the end. That briefcase Those briefcases would weigh over ''fifty ''five thousand pounds''.
30th Nov '16 7:47:25 AM Ccook1956
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** He didn't have to. He was just making Elmer think he was a rabbit because he was "multiplying."
* Frank Tashlin's "Porky Pig's Feat" (1943) shows Porky and Daffy's hotel bill, which is totaled at $152.50. A second look at the bill and adding the items all up ($65 room, $20 bath, $32 bed, $15 air, $12.50 sunshine, $17.50 goodwill and $10.50 extra goodwill) shows an actual total of $175.50.
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