History Main / WeHaveReserves

20th Jun '17 3:44:48 AM Piterpicher
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* ''{{Section 8}}: Prejudice'': When Thorne calls in a bomber to try and kill you, it might frag some of his own troops. One of your allies points out his nonchalance about this.

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* ''{{Section ''VideoGame/{{Section 8}}: Prejudice'': When Thorne calls in a bomber to try and kill you, it might frag some of his own troops. One of your allies points out his nonchalance about this.
13th Jun '17 8:56:05 PM harostar
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* Both Commander Erwin and Commander Pixis in ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'', despite being [[AFatherToHisMen fathers to their men,]] often have to employ this mentality with their own soldiers and even civilians as any and all sacrifices are acceptable if it means saving humanity as a whole. They know their efforts has caused the deaths of countless of people and believe [[ImGoingToHellForThis there is a spot in Hell waiting for them]].

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* ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'':
**
Both Commander Erwin and Commander Pixis in ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'', Pixis, despite being [[AFatherToHisMen fathers to their men,]] often have to employ this mentality with their own soldiers and even civilians as any and all sacrifices are acceptable if it means saving humanity as a whole. They know their efforts has caused the deaths of countless of people and believe [[ImGoingToHellForThis there is a spot in Hell waiting for them]].them]].
** This is standard for [[spoiler: the nation of Marley]], which is more than happy to use this to keep their Warriors in line. Should they ask too many questions, disobey orders, or fail their missions, their superiors will simply [[EatenAlive replace]] them with one of the many reserve candidates.
11th Jun '17 2:40:59 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/XCOM'' plays with this concept. Both the original and the 2012 remake, [[XCOMEnemyUnknown Enemy Unknown]] reward the player for keeping their troops alive by making them more effective in combat. In the original, as they level up, their skills improve. In the remake, as they level up they get new classes and combat abilities, so highly trained and well-equipped soldiers will absolutely devastate late-game missions. The problem is that the road getting there is paved with the corpses of the soldiers who didn't make it that far. Rookies start out with piss-poor aim and equipment, plus you're always outnumbered by aliens, making it necessary to have reserves and RedShirts given how death is a fairly common occurrence. To drive the point home, losing one out of four squadmates still gives a "Good" mission rating.

to:

* ''VideoGame/XCOM'' ''VideoGame/XCom'' plays with this concept. Both the original and the 2012 remake, [[XCOMEnemyUnknown ''[[VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown Enemy Unknown]] Unknown]]'' reward the player for keeping their troops alive by making them more effective in combat. In the original, as they level up, their skills improve. In the remake, as they level up they get new classes and combat abilities, so highly trained and well-equipped soldiers will absolutely devastate late-game missions. The problem is that the road getting there is paved with the corpses of the soldiers who didn't make it that far. Rookies start out with piss-poor aim and equipment, plus you're always outnumbered by aliens, making it necessary to have reserves and RedShirts given how death is a fairly common occurrence. To drive the point home, losing one out of four squadmates still gives a "Good" mission rating.
14th May '17 3:24:17 PM nombretomado
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* ''Franchise/{{Starcraft}}'': ZergRush! The Zerg have done enough to apply this trope as a military tactic to the point that [[ZergRush they got their own subtrope]]. Ironically enough, the actual Zerg don't count as this as their troops are mindless drones under a HiveMind.

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Starcraft}}'': ''VideoGame/StarCraft'': ZergRush! The Zerg have done enough to apply this trope as a military tactic to the point that [[ZergRush they got their own subtrope]]. Ironically enough, the actual Zerg don't count as this as their troops are mindless drones under a HiveMind.
8th May '17 1:10:38 AM AgentKyles
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* A rather cold-hearted take on this is sometimes cited by [[WarHawk more bellicose]] [[BloodKnight Indian generals]] in response to the logic of MutualAssuredDestruction in the event of a nuclear war with Pakistan, arguing that it doesn't apply, since if an Indian strike takes out 200 million Pakistanis, it has exterminated the country, whereas if a Pakistani strike takes out 200 million Indians, they still have over a billion left.

to:

* A rather cold-hearted take on this is sometimes cited by [[WarHawk more bellicose]] [[BloodKnight Indian generals]] in response to the logic of MutualAssuredDestruction MutuallyAssuredDestruction in the event of a nuclear war with Pakistan, arguing that it doesn't apply, since if an Indian strike takes out 200 million Pakistanis, it has exterminated the country, whereas if a Pakistani strike takes out 200 million Indians, they still have over a billion left.



** Also by extension, most of fights against colonialist forces also this trope. When the [[RagtagBunchOfMisfits rebel/local force]] lacks 1) training, 2) [[FiveRoundsRapid hardware]], 3) not-obsolete military understanding and organization, the number is usually on their side and they utilize that advantage.

to:

** Also by extension, most of [[OccupiersOutOfOurCountry fights against colonialist forces forces]] also this trope. When the rebel/local force lacks 1) [[RagtagBunchOfMisfits rebel/local force]] lacks 1) training, training]], 2) [[FiveRoundsRapid hardware]], 3) not-obsolete military understanding and organization, the number is usually on their side and they utilize that advantage.
8th May '17 1:07:04 AM AgentKyles
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* ''Used'' by both sides in UsefulNotes/WorldWar2.
** The US did a kind of this in UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 where they sent out stupid amounts of ''ships'', as quoted "the US built more ships than Japan could sink" which was meant [[NotHyperbole literally]]. The sailors would be pulled out of the water and sent to crew new ships. This variant of the trope was less reprehensible than others, though many sailors of course did die. Of course, the the US and its allies certainly did not neglect defending those ships as best as they could from enemy attack while they were at this, which included also building fighting ships as fast as they could to do so.
*** Interestingly enough, the threat of endless American reserves in UsefulNotes/WW1 contributed to Germany's surrender.
** The cargo carrying Liberty ships were the best example of this. Designed to be built fast and in huge numbers, it was said if one carried a single load of war material across the Atlantic it had paid for itself. So much emphasis was put on building them ''quickly'', that it wasn't unheard of for welds in the hulls (welding was used in place of riveting because it was faster) to split open in bad weather even without the aid of the enemy. It was calculated the lifespan of a Liberty ship would be 20 Atlantic crossings, so once having made one she had paid herself and the rest 19 would be net profits. Amazingly, many Liberty ships still served in revenue transportation in the 1970s. Two of them are still functional as museum/training ships.
** Similarly to the Liberty Ships were the Escort Carriers, small, cheap aircraft carriers that could be built in mass quantities. The US built over 120 of these ships, which were used for various duties (anti-sub patrol, convoy escort, air support for amphibious forces, etc.) to free up the less numerous and far more capable Fleet carriers such as the Essex class (of which the US fielded "only" 24) to focus on other things (such as hunting down the dwindling numbers of Japanese carriers). For the Escort Carriers, ruggedness was not a high priority, earning them the nickname "Combustible, Vulnerable, Expendable" [[FunWithAcronyms in reference to]] their "CVE" hull classification.
** When the bombings of Berlin escalated, the allied forces did all they could to provoke the Luftwaffe into attacking them. This caused large losses for both sides, but while the allies could replace the lost planes and crews fairly easily the Germans could not. It was one of the factors that eventually allowed the allies to gain air superiority first and air supremacy later.
** The American daylight bombing campaign proved to be staggeringly expensive in terms of human life lost. The Eighth Air Force, which gets most of the spotlight for the air war over Europe, suffered 46,000 casualties, including more than 26,000 airmen killed in action (more lives lost than the entire [[SemperFi US Marine Corps in that war]], although in contrast to the Airmen, the Marines didn't charge en masse into enemy artillery fire as a matter of course). In addition to the 8th AF, the less-famous Fifteenth Air Force, operating out of Italy, also suffered severe casualties pressing their daylight bombing campaign in southern and eastern Europe throughout the war.
** The T-34 was also used in this fashion, and the USSR is very liberal in sending them in swarms. The difference is that the T-34 was incredibly blind-sighted and could rarely even see far enough to fight[[note]]The story of T-34s ramming Tiger wasn't because they were suicidal enough, but because they literally didn't see the giant, steel-gray, angular brick in their face until it was too late to not run into it[[/note]], beat it's own crew half to death, not to mention crippling communications problems (Read: A complete lack of any radio whatsoever). This was rectified in the later models, though, and later T-34-85s incorporated "Common sense" adaptations as other tanks of the time, such as a full 360 cupola for the commander, a turret basket, and an expanded turret so that the Commander didn't also have to pull double duty as the loader.
** Soviet [[BoxedCrook penal battalions]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shtrafbat "Shtrafbats"]], were former Gulag prisoners or transferred Red Army troops for being suspected of having a reluctance to fight for whatever reason. Though told their crimes could be redeemed by receiving a combat injury or performing especially heroically in battle, in reality shtrafbats were largely just treated as existing for this trope's purposes - such as, attempting to break especially stubborn defenses, being [[HighlyConspicuousUniform dressed blatantly]] to be decoys for regular units, suicidal rearguard actions to cover retreats, or worst of all, "trampler" duty where in they cleared minefields...by running through them prior to regular troops' advances.
** Royal Air Force Bomber Command in WWII. Air Marshall Arthur Harris had nickname "Butcher" amongst the RAF bomber crews.
** In general during this period, while the notion of mass producing tanks and planes of inferior quality was an effective strategy for a few years, it simply could not be sustained with manpower losses, because while producing hardware like tanks and planes is simple and quick, recruiting and training men with the sort of skill required to handle even simple equipment was a significantly more lengthy process. As was shown in the case of Germany and Japan, while they were in fact capable of continuing to put out more then enough military hardware to meet their needs, they were chronically short of the experienced crews required to man them. Germany had lost a great many of its best pilots in the Battle of Britain while Japan lost all of its finest Carrier aircraft pilots either at Midway or during the Solomon Islands campaign; while both nations were able to make good their losses of aircraft, they simply could never train pilots with the sort of skill to match their predecessors in a short time. So the lesson that could be learned from this is that while machines are expendable, the men who know how to use those machines are not. America, Russia, and Britain were quick to learn this lesson upon taking stock of their losses after WWII and realized that while quantity over quality had managed to win them the war, it had left them severely weakened with significantly lowered reserves of trained crews at the end of WWII, with countless American crewmen who had spent months in training left as charred corpses inside gutted Sherman tanks scattered across the French countryside. This may have been a key contributing factor in why the Cold War didn't kick off into full blown war after WWII, as both sides had to train an entire new generation of crews to replace those lost in the war, which took time.
** One German general actually stated that Allies would have never gained air superiority had Germany not spent too much resources on strategic bombers. But Allies also spent large amount of resources on strategic bombers, which means that both sides basically sent crews of strategic bombers to die for little military value, while actually harming their own ability to fight the war. In fact, USSBS has shown that German military production reached its peak at actual peak of US strategic bombardment campaign, and only started to slow down after the US re-focused on destroying Oil production and storage facilities over industrial production. It didn't help that the British Night Bombing campaign was instead focused on [[RevengeBeforeReason using the cover of night for petty terror bombing in retaliation for earlier luftwaffe bombing of Britain]].
*** This gave rise to the abandonment of GoingDownWithTheShip for officers that lose a battle. We Have Reserves of equipment, but a trained officer can't be replaced so easily. The [[HonorBeforeReason Death Before Dishonor]] mentality instilled by Japanese officer training meant the Japanese officer corps kept getting worse, while the American and British officer corps kept getting better.
** The entire concept of Kamikaze attacks were based on these, where Japan hoped that it would have more pilots and hardware to outlast their opponents. One Japanese General noted that they were "like bees" in that they swarm to sting the opponent, but died as they done so. Japan would seriously underestimate their reserves, however, and with adapted tactics by the Allies, Kamikazes became less and less effective[[note]]The first few attacks were wildly successful because Allied interceptors ignored planes that headed into a dive, as they expected the pilot of those planes to pull up at the last second. At the time the only suicide attacks had been made by crippled planes, where the pilots were certain to die. They never expected that the Japanese units would ''intentionally'' try to ram a ship with a functional plane[[/note]].
** By the end of the war, Germany itself would resort to similar tactics. Because spare parts were in such short supply, it wasn't uncommon for entire tanks to be shipped to units for cannibalizing into parts. Panzer Brigades were organized with large numbers of the newly-produced tanks and Panzergrenadiers, but severely lacking in anti-aircraft guns, armored recovery vehicles and the general logistics that made German armor effective. Poorly-trained crews were often lost to seasoned American tank veterans. Sabotage from slave labor, less available resources and the constant bombing sharply drove down quality - post-war tests conducted by the Soviets determined armor plate on Panthers would frequently fall apart when struck with rounds theoretically rated to protect against. Ball-bearings for turret traverse mechanisms and hard, durable metals needed for transmissions were in extremely short supply.
** Hitler gave orders amounting to no retreat and no surrender to Army Group North, Center, A, B, and North Africa - ordering them all to fight to the last man. A common interpretation is that the apparent success of 'no retreat' in the winter of '41-42 - in the face of an over-ambitious Soviet counter-offensive that failed to encircle and annihilate Army Group Center due to command-inexperience and weak logistics - convinced him that German troops were superior (man-for-man) to their Soviet counterparts and needed only the moral courage to keep fighting for them to prevail. At no point did he ever seem to appreciate the importance of mobile reserves and operational/campaign-level withdrawals to a successful strategic defense-in-depth - the Wehrmacht basically had nothing of the former left after the Ukrainian autumn-winter campaigns of '43-44, which annihilated the country's stock of experienced Panzer-crews, and he increasingly forbade the latter and began routinely firing Generals who [[ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight refused to follow those orders]] - even the most talented and indispensable of them, such as Manstein and Runstedt.
** In fact, this mentality was one of many reasons why the Germans lost the Battle of Stalingrad and, later, the entire Eastern Front of the European Theater.
** Also applies to the German U-boat service. By the end of the war, they had suffered a permanent casualty rate of over 70%. Yet, they kept being sent out on what were effectively suicide missions.

to:

* ''Used'' by both sides in UsefulNotes/WorldWar2.
** The US did a kind of this in UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 where they sent out stupid amounts of ''ships'', as quoted "the US built more ships than Japan could sink" which was meant [[NotHyperbole literally]]. The sailors would be pulled out of the water and sent to crew new ships. This variant of the trope was less reprehensible than others, though many sailors of course did die. Of course, the the US and its allies certainly did not neglect defending those ships as best as they could from enemy attack while they were at this, which included also building fighting ships as fast as they could to do so.
*** Interestingly enough, the threat of endless American reserves in UsefulNotes/WW1 contributed to Germany's surrender.
** The cargo carrying Liberty ships were the best example of this. Designed to be built fast and in huge numbers, it was said if one carried a single load of war material across the Atlantic it had paid for itself. So much emphasis was put on building them ''quickly'', that it wasn't unheard of for welds in the hulls (welding was used in place of riveting because it was faster) to split open in bad weather even without the aid of the enemy. It was calculated the lifespan of a Liberty ship would be 20 Atlantic crossings, so once having made one she had paid herself and the rest 19 would be net profits. Amazingly, many Liberty ships still served in revenue transportation in the 1970s. Two of them are still functional as museum/training ships.
** Similarly to the Liberty Ships were the Escort Carriers, small, cheap aircraft carriers that could be built in mass quantities. The US built over 120 of these ships, which were used for various duties (anti-sub patrol, convoy escort, air support for amphibious forces, etc.) to free up the less numerous and far more capable Fleet carriers such as the Essex class (of which the US fielded "only" 24) to focus on other things (such as hunting down the dwindling numbers of Japanese carriers). For the Escort Carriers, ruggedness was not a high priority, earning them the nickname "Combustible, Vulnerable, Expendable" [[FunWithAcronyms in reference to]] their "CVE" hull classification.
** When the bombings of Berlin escalated, the allied forces did all they could to provoke the Luftwaffe into attacking them. This caused large losses for both sides, but while the allies could replace the lost planes and crews fairly easily the Germans could not. It was one of the factors that eventually allowed the allies to gain air superiority first and air supremacy later.
** The American daylight bombing campaign proved to be staggeringly expensive in terms of human life lost. The Eighth Air Force, which gets most of the spotlight for the air war over Europe, suffered 46,000 casualties, including more than 26,000 airmen killed in action (more lives lost than the entire [[SemperFi US Marine Corps in that war]], although in contrast to the Airmen, the Marines didn't charge en masse into enemy artillery fire as a matter of course). In addition to the 8th AF, the less-famous Fifteenth Air Force, operating out of Italy, also suffered severe casualties pressing their daylight bombing campaign in southern and eastern Europe throughout the war.
** The T-34 was also used in this fashion, and the USSR is very liberal in sending them in swarms. The difference is that the T-34 was incredibly blind-sighted and could rarely even see far enough to fight[[note]]The story of T-34s ramming Tiger wasn't because they were suicidal enough, but because they literally didn't see the giant, steel-gray, angular brick in their face until it was too late to not run into it[[/note]], beat it's own crew half to death, not to mention crippling communications problems (Read: A complete lack of any radio whatsoever). This was rectified in the later models, though, and later T-34-85s incorporated "Common sense" adaptations as other tanks of the time, such as a full 360 cupola for the commander, a turret basket, and an expanded turret so that the Commander didn't also have to pull double duty as the loader.
** Soviet [[BoxedCrook penal battalions]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shtrafbat "Shtrafbats"]], were former Gulag prisoners or transferred Red Army troops for being suspected of having a reluctance to fight for whatever reason. Though told their crimes could be redeemed by receiving a combat injury or performing especially heroically in battle, in reality shtrafbats were largely just treated as existing for this trope's purposes - such as, attempting to break especially stubborn defenses, being [[HighlyConspicuousUniform dressed blatantly]] to be decoys for regular units, suicidal rearguard actions to cover retreats, or worst of all, "trampler" duty where in they cleared minefields...by running through them prior to regular troops' advances.
** Royal Air Force Bomber Command in WWII. Air Marshall Arthur Harris had nickname "Butcher" amongst the RAF bomber crews.
** In general during this period, while the notion of mass producing tanks and planes of inferior quality was an effective strategy for a few years, it simply could not be sustained with manpower losses, because while producing hardware like tanks and planes is simple and quick, recruiting and training men with the sort of skill required to handle even simple equipment was a significantly more lengthy process. As was shown in the case of Germany and Japan, while they were in fact capable of continuing to put out more then enough military hardware to meet their needs, they were chronically short of the experienced crews required to man them. Germany had lost a great many of its best pilots in the Battle of Britain while Japan lost all of its finest Carrier aircraft pilots either at Midway or during the Solomon Islands campaign; while both nations were able to make good their losses of aircraft, they simply could never train pilots with the sort of skill to match their predecessors in a short time. So the lesson that could be learned from this is that while machines are expendable, the men who know how to use those machines are not. America, Russia, and Britain were quick to learn this lesson upon taking stock of their losses after WWII and realized that while quantity over quality had managed to win them the war, it had left them severely weakened with significantly lowered reserves of trained crews at the end of WWII, with countless American crewmen who had spent months in training left as charred corpses inside gutted Sherman tanks scattered across the French countryside. This may have been a key contributing factor in why the Cold War didn't kick off into full blown war after WWII, as both sides had to train an entire new generation of crews to replace those lost in the war, which took time.
** One German general actually stated that Allies would have never gained air superiority had Germany not spent too much resources on strategic bombers. But Allies also spent large amount of resources on strategic bombers, which means that both sides basically sent crews of strategic bombers to die for little military value, while actually harming their own ability to fight the war. In fact, USSBS has shown that German military production reached its peak at actual peak of US strategic bombardment campaign, and only started to slow down after the US re-focused on destroying Oil production and storage facilities over industrial production. It didn't help that the British Night Bombing campaign was instead focused on [[RevengeBeforeReason using the cover of night for petty terror bombing in retaliation for earlier luftwaffe bombing of Britain]].
*** This gave rise to the abandonment of GoingDownWithTheShip for officers that lose a battle. We Have Reserves of equipment, but a trained officer can't be replaced so easily. The [[HonorBeforeReason Death Before Dishonor]] mentality instilled by Japanese officer training meant the Japanese officer corps kept getting worse, while the American and British officer corps kept getting better.
** The entire concept of Kamikaze attacks were based on these, where Japan hoped that it would have more pilots and hardware to outlast their opponents. One Japanese General noted that they were "like bees" in that they swarm to sting the opponent, but died as they done so. Japan would seriously underestimate their reserves, however, and with adapted tactics by the Allies, Kamikazes became less and less effective[[note]]The first few attacks were wildly successful because Allied interceptors ignored planes that headed into a dive, as they expected the pilot of those planes to pull up at the last second. At the time the only suicide attacks had been made by crippled planes, where the pilots were certain to die. They never expected that the Japanese units would ''intentionally'' try to ram a ship with a functional plane[[/note]].
** By the end of the war, Germany itself would resort to similar tactics. Because spare parts were in such short supply, it wasn't uncommon for entire tanks to be shipped to units for cannibalizing into parts. Panzer Brigades were organized with large numbers of the newly-produced tanks and Panzergrenadiers, but severely lacking in anti-aircraft guns, armored recovery vehicles and the general logistics that made German armor effective. Poorly-trained crews were often lost to seasoned American tank veterans. Sabotage from slave labor, less available resources and the constant bombing sharply drove down quality - post-war tests conducted by the Soviets determined armor plate on Panthers would frequently fall apart when struck with rounds theoretically rated to protect against. Ball-bearings for turret traverse mechanisms and hard, durable metals needed for transmissions were in extremely short supply.
** Hitler gave orders amounting to no retreat and no surrender to Army Group North, Center, A, B, and North Africa - ordering them all to fight to the last man. A common interpretation is that the apparent success of 'no retreat' in the winter of '41-42 - in the face of an over-ambitious Soviet counter-offensive that failed to encircle and annihilate Army Group Center due to command-inexperience and weak logistics - convinced him that German troops were superior (man-for-man) to their Soviet counterparts and needed only the moral courage to keep fighting for them to prevail. At no point did he ever seem to appreciate the importance of mobile reserves and operational/campaign-level withdrawals to a successful strategic defense-in-depth - the Wehrmacht basically had nothing of the former left after the Ukrainian autumn-winter campaigns of '43-44, which annihilated the country's stock of experienced Panzer-crews, and he increasingly forbade the latter and began routinely firing Generals who [[ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight refused to follow those orders]] - even the most talented and indispensable of them, such as Manstein and Runstedt.
** In fact, this mentality was one of many reasons why the Germans lost the Battle of Stalingrad and, later, the entire Eastern Front of the European Theater.
** Also applies to the German U-boat service. By the end of the war, they had suffered a permanent casualty rate of over 70%. Yet, they kept being sent out on what were effectively suicide missions.
!!Military -- Pre-20th Century



* King Goujian of Yue, a pre-Imperial Chinese ruler, would terrorise his opponents by having his front line march out to the middle of the field and decapitate themselves (or, in some accounts, slit their own throats, which makes more sense).
* Seriously averted by, of all people, Genghis Khan. When your forces are usually a fraction of what your opposition can muster in you need to preserve those forces. They never engaged in hand-to-hand when they didn't have to, and leaving wounded men on the field was grounds for a commander's execution. Overly aggressive types tended not to get promoted because of the casualties they would take. Also, Genghis was known for a FatherToHisMen approach--at least to his own people.



* During the battle of Guilford Courthouse during the UsefulNotes/AmericanRevolution, Lord Cornwallis's forces were on the verge of a devastating defeat. Out of desperation, he ordered his remaining artillery to fire grapeshot into the mass of men on the plain, regular and rebel alike. The rebels were forced back, [[WasItReallyWorthIt but at a staggering cost to Cornwallis's troops]].



* During the battle of Guilford Courthouse during the UsefulNotes/AmericanRevolution, Lord Cornwallis's forces were on the verge of a devastating defeat. Out of desperation, he ordered his remaining artillery to fire grapeshot into the mass of men on the plain, regular and rebel alike. The rebels were forced back, [[WasItReallyWorthIt but at a staggering cost to Cornwallis's troops]].




!!Military -- World War I
* The point of the WWI strategy of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attrition_warfare attrition warfare]] was "we have '''more''' reserves than them!"



** The point of the WWI strategy of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attrition_warfare attrition warfare]] was "we have '''more''' reserves than them!"
** Luigi Cadorna's strategy for the Italian army was based on this: knowing that his army was underequipped but most of the Austro-Hungarian forces were tied up fighting the Russians, he launched assault after pointless assault on the Isonzo to drain the enemy reserves while Italy's industry produced enough guns to properly equip his troops. Eventually he succeeded in draining the Austro-Hungarian reserves, but before he could break through the Russians collapsed and the newly freed enemy forces were redeployed to Italy with some German reinforcements, resulting in the catastrophic defeat at the Battle of Caporetto. In the end he was sacked but still somewhat succeeded, as the Austro-Hungarians ''still'' had no reserves left while Italy could use their last reserves to ''fill the losses of the battle and then some'', now led well by Cadorna's replacement Armando Diaz properly equipped, with Italy's shortage of machine guns filled in large part by American and French supplies.
** Then there's Aylmer Hunter-Weston, a British divisional commander during the Gallipoli Campaign. When a staff officer remarked on the heavy casualties his men incurred at the Battle of Krithia, Hunter-Weston asked "Casualties? What do I care for casualties?"

to:

** The point of the WWI strategy of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attrition_warfare attrition warfare]] was "we have '''more''' reserves than them!"
**
* Luigi Cadorna's strategy for the Italian army was based on this: knowing that his army was underequipped but most of the Austro-Hungarian forces were tied up fighting the Russians, he launched assault after pointless assault on the Isonzo to drain the enemy reserves while Italy's industry produced enough guns to properly equip his troops. Eventually he succeeded in draining the Austro-Hungarian reserves, but before he could break through the Russians collapsed and the newly freed enemy forces were redeployed to Italy with some German reinforcements, resulting in the catastrophic defeat at the Battle of Caporetto. In the end he was sacked but still somewhat succeeded, as the Austro-Hungarians ''still'' had no reserves left while Italy could use their last reserves to ''fill the losses of the battle and then some'', now led well by Cadorna's replacement Armando Diaz properly equipped, with Italy's shortage of machine guns filled in large part by American and French supplies.
** * Then there's Aylmer Hunter-Weston, a British divisional commander during the Gallipoli Campaign. When a staff officer remarked on the heavy casualties his men incurred at the Battle of Krithia, Hunter-Weston asked "Casualties? What do I care for casualties?"casualties?"

!!Military -- World War II
''Used'' by both sides in UsefulNotes/WorldWar2.

!!!The USSR and the Allies
* The US did a kind of this in WWII where they sent out stupid amounts of ''ships'', as quoted "the US built more ships than Japan could sink" which was meant [[NotHyperbole literally]]. The sailors would be pulled out of the water and sent to crew new ships. This variant of the trope was less reprehensible than others, though many sailors of course did die. Of course, the the US and its allies certainly did not neglect defending those ships as best as they could from enemy attack while they were at this, which included also building fighting ships as fast as they could to do so.
** Interestingly enough, the threat of endless American reserves in UsefulNotes/WW1 contributed to Germany's surrender.
* The cargo carrying Liberty ships were the best example of this. Designed to be built fast and in huge numbers, it was said if one carried a single load of war material across the Atlantic it had paid for itself. So much emphasis was put on building them ''quickly'', that it wasn't unheard of for welds in the hulls (welding was used in place of riveting because it was faster) to split open in bad weather even without the aid of the enemy. It was calculated the lifespan of a Liberty ship would be 20 Atlantic crossings, so once having made one she had paid herself and the rest 19 would be net profits. Amazingly, many Liberty ships still served in revenue transportation in the 1970s. Two of them are still functional as museum/training ships.
* Similarly to the Liberty Ships were the Escort Carriers, small, cheap aircraft carriers that could be built in mass quantities. The US built over 120 of these ships, which were used for various duties (anti-sub patrol, convoy escort, air support for amphibious forces, etc.) to free up the less numerous and far more capable Fleet carriers such as the Essex class (of which the US fielded "only" 24) to focus on other things (such as hunting down the dwindling numbers of Japanese carriers). For the Escort Carriers, ruggedness was not a high priority, earning them the nickname "Combustible, Vulnerable, Expendable" [[FunWithAcronyms in reference to]] their "CVE" hull classification.
* When the bombings of Berlin escalated, the allied forces did all they could to provoke the Luftwaffe into attacking them. This caused large losses for both sides, but while the allies could replace the lost planes and crews fairly easily the Germans could not. It was one of the factors that eventually allowed the allies to gain air superiority first and air supremacy later.
* The American daylight bombing campaign proved to be staggeringly expensive in terms of human life lost. The Eighth Air Force, which gets most of the spotlight for the air war over Europe, suffered 46,000 casualties, including more than 26,000 airmen killed in action (more lives lost than the entire [[SemperFi US Marine Corps in that war]], although in contrast to the Airmen, the Marines didn't charge en masse into enemy artillery fire as a matter of course). In addition to the 8th AF, the less-famous Fifteenth Air Force, operating out of Italy, also suffered severe casualties pressing their daylight bombing campaign in southern and eastern Europe throughout the war.
* Royal Air Force Bomber Command in WWII. Air Marshall Arthur Harris had nickname "Butcher" amongst the RAF bomber crews.
* The T-34 was also used in this fashion, and the USSR was very liberal in sending them in swarms. The difference is that the T-34 was incredibly blind-sighted and could rarely even see far enough to fight[[note]]The story of T-34s ramming Tiger wasn't because they were suicidal enough, but because they literally didn't see the giant, steel-gray, angular brick in their face until it was too late to not run into it[[/note]], beat it's own crew half to death, not to mention crippling communications problems (Read: A complete lack of any radio whatsoever). This was rectified in the later models, though, and later T-34-85s incorporated "Common sense" adaptations as other tanks of the time, such as a full 360 cupola for the commander, a turret basket, and an expanded turret so that the Commander didn't also have to pull double duty as the loader.
* Soviet [[BoxedCrook penal battalions]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shtrafbat "Shtrafbats"]], were former Gulag prisoners or transferred Red Army troops for being suspected of having a reluctance to fight for whatever reason. Though told their crimes could be redeemed by receiving a combat injury or performing especially heroically in battle, in reality shtrafbats were largely just treated as existing for this trope's purposes - such as, attempting to break especially stubborn defenses, being [[HighlyConspicuousUniform dressed blatantly]] to be decoys for regular units, suicidal rearguard actions to cover retreats, or worst of all, "trampler" duty where in they cleared minefields...by running through them prior to regular troops' advances.
* In general during this period, while the notion of mass producing tanks and planes of inferior quality was an effective strategy for a few years, it simply could not be sustained with manpower losses, because while producing hardware like tanks and planes is simple and quick, recruiting and training men with the sort of skill required to handle even simple equipment was a significantly more lengthy process. As was shown in the case of Germany and Japan, while they were in fact capable of continuing to put out more then enough military hardware to meet their needs, they were chronically short of the experienced crews required to man them. Germany had lost a great many of its best pilots in the Battle of Britain while Japan lost all of its finest Carrier aircraft pilots either at Midway or during the Solomon Islands campaign; while both nations were able to make good their losses of aircraft, they simply could never train pilots with the sort of skill to match their predecessors in a short time. So the lesson that could be learned from this is that while machines are expendable, the men who know how to use those machines are not. America, Russia, and Britain were quick to learn this lesson upon taking stock of their losses after WWII and realized that while quantity over quality had managed to win them the war, it had left them severely weakened with significantly lowered reserves of trained crews at the end of WWII, with countless American crewmen who had spent months in training left as charred corpses inside gutted Sherman tanks scattered across the French countryside. This may have been a key contributing factor in why the Cold War didn't kick off into full blown war after WWII, as both sides had to train an entire new generation of crews to replace those lost in the war, which took time.
* One German general actually stated that Allies would have never gained air superiority had Germany not spent too much resources on strategic bombers. But Allies also spent large amount of resources on strategic bombers, which means that both sides basically sent crews of strategic bombers to die for little military value, while actually harming their own ability to fight the war. In fact, USSBS has shown that German military production reached its peak at actual peak of US strategic bombardment campaign, and only started to slow down after the US re-focused on destroying Oil production and storage facilities over industrial production. It didn't help that the British Night Bombing campaign was instead focused on [[RevengeBeforeReason using the cover of night for petty terror bombing in retaliation for earlier luftwaffe bombing of Britain]].
** This gave rise to the abandonment of GoingDownWithTheShip for officers that lose a battle. We Have Reserves of equipment, but a trained officer can't be replaced so easily. The [[HonorBeforeReason Death Before Dishonor]] mentality instilled by Japanese officer training meant the Japanese officer corps kept getting worse, while the American and British officer corps kept getting better.

!!!The Axis
* By the end of the war, Germany itself would resort to similar tactics. Because spare parts were in such short supply, it wasn't uncommon for entire tanks to be shipped to units for cannibalizing into parts. Panzer Brigades were organized with large numbers of the newly-produced tanks and Panzergrenadiers, but severely lacking in anti-aircraft guns, armored recovery vehicles and the general logistics that made German armor effective. Poorly-trained crews were often lost to seasoned American tank veterans. Sabotage from slave labor, less available resources and the constant bombing sharply drove down quality - post-war tests conducted by the Soviets determined armor plate on Panthers would frequently fall apart when struck with rounds theoretically rated to protect against. Ball-bearings for turret traverse mechanisms and hard, durable metals needed for transmissions were in extremely short supply.
* Hitler gave orders amounting to no retreat and no surrender to Army Group North, Center, A, B, and North Africa - ordering them all to fight to the last man. A common interpretation is that the apparent success of 'no retreat' in the winter of '41-42 - in the face of an over-ambitious Soviet counter-offensive that failed to encircle and annihilate Army Group Center due to command-inexperience and weak logistics - convinced him that German troops were superior (man-for-man) to their Soviet counterparts and needed only the moral courage to keep fighting for them to prevail. At no point did he ever seem to appreciate the importance of mobile reserves and operational/campaign-level withdrawals to a successful strategic defense-in-depth - the Wehrmacht basically had nothing of the former left after the Ukrainian autumn-winter campaigns of '43-44, which annihilated the country's stock of experienced Panzer-crews, and he increasingly forbade the latter and began routinely firing Generals who [[ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight refused to follow those orders]] - even the most talented and indispensable of them, such as Manstein and Runstedt.
** In fact, this mentality was one of many reasons why the Germans lost the Battle of Stalingrad and, later, the entire Eastern Front of the European Theater.
* Also applies to the German U-boat service. By the end of the war, they had suffered a permanent casualty rate of over 70%. Yet, they kept being sent out on what were effectively suicide missions.
* The entire concept of Kamikaze attacks were based on these, where Japan hoped that it would have more pilots and hardware to outlast their opponents. One Japanese General noted that they were "like bees" in that they swarm to sting the opponent, but died as they done so. Japan would seriously underestimate their reserves, however, and with adapted tactics by the Allies, Kamikazes became less and less effective[[note]]The first few attacks were wildly successful because Allied interceptors ignored planes that headed into a dive, as they expected the pilot of those planes to pull up at the last second. At the time the only suicide attacks had been made by crippled planes, where the pilots were certain to die. They never expected that the Japanese units would ''intentionally'' try to ram a ship with a functional plane[[/note]].

!!Military -- Cold War to present day



* King Goujian of Yue, a pre-Imperial Chinese ruler, would terrorise his opponents by having his front line march out to the middle of the field and decapitate themselves (or, in some accounts, slit their own throats, which makes more sense).
* A rather cold-hearted take on this is sometimes cited by more bellicose Indian generals in response to the logic of Mutual Assured Destruction in the event of a nuclear war with Pakistan, arguing that it doesn't apply, since if an Indian strike takes out 200 million Pakistanis, it has exterminated the country, whereas if a Pakistani strike takes out 200 million Indians, they still have over a billion left.

to:

* King Goujian of Yue, a pre-Imperial Chinese ruler, would terrorise his opponents A rather cold-hearted take on this is sometimes cited by having his front line march out [[WarHawk more bellicose]] [[BloodKnight Indian generals]] in response to the middle logic of MutualAssuredDestruction in the field and decapitate themselves (or, in some accounts, slit their own throats, which makes more sense).event of a nuclear war with Pakistan, arguing that it doesn't apply, since if an Indian strike takes out 200 million Pakistanis, it has exterminated the country, whereas if a Pakistani strike takes out 200 million Indians, they still have over a billion left.
* A rather cold-hearted take on Like China in Korean War example above, Vietnam Wars prove to be this is sometimes cited by for North Vietnamese against US military. They want to win more bellicose Indian generals in response to (they have fewer choices; USA can get out, they can't), and, by percentage of nation's GDP, put more effort into their fight. So no matter how North lost battles and personnel, they will keep fighting until the logic USA just give up.
** Also by extension, most
of Mutual Assured Destruction in fights against colonialist forces also this trope. When the event of a nuclear war with Pakistan, arguing [[RagtagBunchOfMisfits rebel/local force]] lacks 1) training, 2) [[FiveRoundsRapid hardware]], 3) not-obsolete military understanding and organization, the number is usually on their side and they utilize that it doesn't apply, since if an Indian strike takes out 200 million Pakistanis, it has exterminated the country, whereas if a Pakistani strike takes out 200 million Indians, they still have over a billion left. advantage.

!!Non-military



** Similarly the GDR had a WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer approach to Lignite. It was (and still is) the only natural resource found in any appreciable quantities in the area and while most of its uses are horribly inefficient and/or polluting,[[note]] You can make almost everything that you can make from oil from coal as well. Including gasoline. It's just much more inefficient. Oh and lignite is also 50% water by weight, so every second car in a train carrying lignite is carrying high priced steam[[/note]] it was still cheaper than buying other resources or technology to increase efficiency. In subsidized housing in the GDR people would regulate the temperature by opening the window as the heating could not be shut off and was paid for anyway. It's almost hard to believe the GDR eventually ran out of money.
* Seriously averted by, of all people, Genghis Khan. When your forces are usually a fraction of what your opposition can muster in you need to preserve those forces. They never engaged in hand-to-hand when they didn't have to, and leaving wounded men on the field was grounds for a commander's execution. Overly aggressive types tended not to get promoted because of the casualties they would take. Also, Genghis was known for a FatherToHisMen approach--at least to his own people.
* Like China in Korean War example above, Vietnam Wars prove to be this for North Vietnamese against US military. They want to win more (they have fewer choices; USA can get out, they can't), and, by percentage of nation's GDP, put more effort into their fight. So no matter how North lost battles and personnel, they will keep fighting until the USA just give up.
** Also by extension, most of fights against colonialist forces also this trope. When the rebel or local lacks 1) training, 2) hardware, 3) not-obsolete military understanding and organization, the number is usually on their side and they utilize that advantage.

to:

** * Similarly [[UsefulNotes/EastGermany the GDR GDR]] had a WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer approach to Lignite. It was (and still is) the only natural resource found in any appreciable quantities in the area and while most of its uses are horribly inefficient and/or polluting,[[note]] You can make almost everything that you can make from oil from coal as well. Including gasoline. It's just much more inefficient. Oh and lignite is also 50% water by weight, so every second car in a train carrying lignite is carrying high priced steam[[/note]] it was still cheaper than buying other resources or technology to increase efficiency. In subsidized housing in the GDR people would regulate the temperature by opening the window as the heating could not be shut off and was paid for anyway. It's almost hard to believe the GDR eventually ran out of money.
* Seriously averted by, of all people, Genghis Khan. When your forces are usually a fraction of what your opposition can muster in you need to preserve those forces. They never engaged in hand-to-hand when they didn't have to, and leaving wounded men on the field was grounds for a commander's execution. Overly aggressive types tended not to get promoted because of the casualties they would take. Also, Genghis was known for a FatherToHisMen approach--at least to his own people.
* Like China in Korean War example above, Vietnam Wars prove to be this for North Vietnamese against US military. They want to win more (they have fewer choices; USA can get out, they can't), and, by percentage of nation's GDP, put more effort into their fight. So no matter how North lost battles and personnel, they will keep fighting until the USA just give up.
** Also by extension, most of fights against colonialist forces also this trope. When the rebel or local lacks 1) training, 2) hardware, 3) not-obsolete military understanding and organization, the number is usually on their side and they utilize that advantage.
money.
8th May '17 12:33:57 AM AgentKyles
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** In the second game, Baron Tarko has a

to:

** In the second game, Baron Tarko has aa similar attitude.
* ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'': This appears to be standard policy for Imperial officers, Darths, and Empire officials in general. The officers shrug it off; they're just "common soldiers." The Sith don't give a bantha's rear about much else other than themselves and their power games (the [[HumanoidAbomination Emperor]] is an OmnicidalManiac who wants ''everything in the galaxy except himself'' dead), and Empire officials follow the lead of the military and Sith. Couple this with KlingonPromotion being the ''preferred'' method of advancement (it's just gauche for a non-Sith to not be sneaky about it), and the Empire does more damage to itself than it does its enemies. Manditory conscription and [[WeWillUseManualLaborInTheFuture extensive use of slave labor]] is likely the only reason they managed to get off Dromund Kaas. The fact they caught the Republic by surprise [[WhatAnIdiot (thanks to Revan and Exile having ''no backup plans'' and walking into an obvious trap)]] is the only reason they had any success at all.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Overlord}}'', this is ''your'' attitude towards your own {{Mook}}s. Fun ensues.
* Many RealTimeStrategy games will end up either encouraging this in their players, or doing so as their AI. Most noticable in the first ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'' game, when using ground troops against the laser towers. Laser tower = one guaranteed dead enemy soldier, or one very heavily damaged enemy vehicle, every few seconds. Infantry = lots of 'em, I can crank them out so fast I can't deploy them fast enough, and eventually.
** While various factions in various games incur bonuses for sacrificing troops. Examples: ''C&C Red Alert Yuri's Revenge'' where Yuri can feed troops (own or mind-controlled enemies) to the Meat Grinder for cash. Starcraft and Warcraft III where Zerg and Undead can 'eat' their own troops for energy/mana.
* Strongly averted in ''VideoGame/CompanyOfHeroes''. The costs of getting a unit or vehicle to the frontlines is much, much more than the cost of reinforcing or repairing it (compare 270 manpower units for a basic rifle company, compared to 30 units each for each member of the squad, up to five). In addition, the American units gain veteran bonuses as they survive in combat, and veterancy only survives if the unit does: if your elite unit of riflemen are all killed, they take their elite status to the grave with them.
** [=COH=] does have an example of this trope however. The American armor commander has the "Allied War Machine" ability which, when activated, gives you free tanks to replace any that are destroyed during the duration of the ability (although there is a rather hefty munition cost to use this). Be prepared for more of this trope though when ''Company of Heroes 2'' comes out, which takes place on the Eastern Front.
* Real Time Tactics games generally avert this trope by giving you fixed units in the game, though this gives another problem of destroyed units being [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost for good]] (except in ''VideoGame/WorldInConflict'' which allowed reinforcements to replace lost units). Some modern RTS also avoid the "We Have Reserves" type gameplay by taking psychological issues of individual units into account, which makes sending troops into suicide missions tactically prohibitive.
* ''Franchise/MassEffect'':
** A rare example of this trope in play with a military that ''does'' value its personnel's lives. According to the [[EncyclopediaExposita Codex]], fighter groups that launch torpedo bombing runs on larger ships will ''always'' suffer casualties due to virtual intelligence-controlled GARDIAN laser point defense; the only way to defeat these defenses is to overwhelm them with sheer numbers until they overheat. As a result, fighter wings always take heavy casualties when attacking an enemy fleet. Though while the first fighter waves are always ''hit'', it's not as if everybody in the first wave dies. Indeed, because the strength of the lasers drops off the greater the distance to the target due to beam diffusion, it's rare for the GARDIAN systems to score more than a few actual ''kills.'' What generally happens instead is that the first waves of fighters take a bit of damage and are forced to return to base.
** This is implied to be the krogan military strategy in a nutshell. There are always more krogan, forever--the only way that the Council was able to defeat them was by reducing the rate of viable pregnancies to one in one thousand, and it was still enough to sustain their population. Warlord Okeer gives us this wonderful quote, which summarizes krogan battle tactics:
--->'''Okeer:''' I say let us carry the [[DepopulationBomb genophage]] with us. Let a thousand children die for every one that lives. We will climb to victory atop a mountain of our dead -- for that is the krogan way.
** Geth don't place much value on individual mobile platforms; if one is destroyed, the geth in that platform transmit their memories and experiences to the nearest carrier, and that data is uploaded to the total gestalt geth MindHive, effectively making the geth immortal. However, they aren't stupid - they will still try to preserve mobile platforms if possible in order to to maximize combat effectiveness and resources. Plus what happens to the programs within mobile platforms not connected to the geth collective.
---> [[spoiler:'''Legion''': No carrier, no carrier, no carrier, no...(*thunk*)]]
** If Commander Shepard has the 'Ruthless' background, his/her military claim-to-fame is being the Butcher of Torfan, where s/he ordered his/her men forward, knowing many would be gunned down, also knowing it would ensure victory. Torfan was a base used by batarian slavers responsible for hitting human colonies, and the attack is a response meant to curb this trend: Ruthless Renegade Shepard makes no apologies, as part of the "get the job done at any cost" mentality. Ruthless ''Paragon'' Shepard is somewhat haunted by the experience, but s/he believed sending a message to discourage repeats of Mindoir and Elysium was more important. Even then, Ruthless Shepard crosses (or came very close to crossing) the MoralEventHorizon anyway - s/he also killed the batarians that had surrendered.
** Harbinger's thoughts on losing his own troops:
---> Leave the dead where they fall.\\
The dead are useless.\\
Ignore the fallen.\\
Kill one, and one hundred will replace it.\\
This form is irrelevant (to his current host)
** Interestingly, ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' gives us an example from a scientific perspective. A Cerberus scientist is trying to decipher the secrets behind huskification and indoctrination, some of the most advanced and dangerous examples of Reaper tech. Even though the technology is thousands if not ''millions'' of years beyond them, the fact that they have tens of millions of test subjects and a complete disregard for the lives of said test subjects allows them to make steady progress regardless.
** The Reapers rely heavily on this for their ground troops, who are typically indoctrinated, cyborged victims of Reaper attacks; you will encounter a lot of examples where the main strategy they use to try and take a location or kill Shepard, assuming they can't have an indoctrinated agent open the doors for them, is "throw more husks/Cannibals/Marauders/Brutes at the problem until it goes away". They don't use it as often with Ravagers or Banshees, however, since after Attican Traverse: Krogan Team they have a limited supply of Ravagers, and Banshees can only be created from asari with a very rare genetic defect.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Prototype}}'', the [[ArmiesAreEvil Blackwatch]] explicitly state that they are using the United States Marines as the "shock troops" for the occupation of Manhattan and the war against the infected. Their purpose is to take casualties and take the blame for the destruction of the city to cover up Blackwatch's operations. At one point, one of the Web of Intrigue nodes indicates that Blackwatch anticipates Marine casualties per week to be between one thousand to two and a half thousand. Putting that in a perspective of modern military terms, total Coalition casualties during Operation Iraqi Freedom - a full-scale war against a ''country'' - were less than a thousand over a ''month-long'' period.
** The US casualties list from March 2003 to September 2009 was 4,334. That's ''over 6 years.'' Blackwatch figure the Marines will lose that many ''in about three weeks''.
** The Marines [[ThrowTheDogABone are thrown a bone]] in the end when they get ''all'' of the credit for saving what's left of Manhattan from the Infection [[spoiler:and a nuke]].
* SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker is like this in ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamAsylum'', leaving his cohorts in multiple lurches without batting an eyelash, making YouHaveFailedMe comments as they get taken out one-by-one by Franchise/{{Batman}}, and insulting anybody who fails him, including Harley Quinn. MadLove, indeed.
* In ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'', this is one of the things that makes the SpacePirates a serious threat. Absolutely everyone is expendable, from mooks to commanders, as long as the goal is accomplished. They will blow up ''entire planets'' just to kill one person, and the troops down there are even ordered to stay so they can ''stall.''
* Notably averted in ''VideoGame/OriginalWar'' from Altar Interactive, a RTS with RPG elements. In the single player game (and multiplayer with the right settings), every person who dies is actually KilledOffForReal. Each of them has a name, skills and a face. You know them. When any of them dies, it's a loss not just for the war cause (the reinforcements are very limited) but for you as the commander personally. Over the whole storyline - if you let four guys die in the first mission, you are going to have to do without them for the rest of the game. The Russian/Soviet faction in the game employ this trope quite a bit though and the Arabians even more so - even then though, the losses are permanent and the soldiers are not very happy about it.
* The military tactics of Thomas "Stonewall" Flathead in ''VideoGame/ZorkZero'' seem to match this. He routinely took 90+% casualties in military operations (Mainly suppressing tax riots against his brother the King's 90+% income tax), and held unit strength up with unlimited conscription powers.
* Mouri Motonari from ''VideoGame/SengokuBasara'' refers to his soldiers as "pawns" and will sacrifice as many of them as needed to fulfil his plans without batting an eyelid. He even has the ability to attack his own troops in-game.
* In the ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' mythos, this is how the New California Republic eventually beat the Brotherhood of Steel after a long war. The Brotherhood possessed advanced technology (as the entire point to their order was to preserve technology over human life) but their elitist and isolationist nature meant that replacing their troops was difficult while the NCR was a republic free to conscript thousands of soldiers.
** The Legion is a more straightforward example; whereas the NCR values even the most lowly recruit's livest, the Legion regards themselves as expendable and that anyone who tries to capture them will not get them alive.
** During the NCR/Brotherhood war, Father Elijah employed this tactic against the NCR when trying to secure the HELIOS One power plant, mainly because [[BadBoss he could care less about the lives of his subordinates]] when it comes to the possibility of obtaining valuable tech (plus just not having the military training and experience of your average Brotherhood Elder -- as implied above, he tried to use reserve tactics [[GeneralFailure when it was the other side that had reserves]]). Later on, he attempted to use this very tactic to crack the Sierra Madre, only for many to succumb to GoldFever and start killing each other out of greed.
* ''VideoGame/FearEffect''. [[spoiler:The Shop, the organization Glas used to work for, sent Glas and his entire squad on a mission. Said mission caused the squad to end up in an ambush that left them all dead or captured, except for Glas. Glas tried to order the squad to abort, but it was too late. Glas unexpectedly encounters his brother Drew and Drew shoots him in the back. Drew claims that the Shop knew that the squad would be ambushed on this mission, but it sent the squad on it anyway. Glas and his squad were not informed of this. Does anyone realize how much the idea of knowing that an ambush is going to occur and not warning anyone about it makes no sense at all?]]
** In the 2nd game, Baron Tarko has a similar attitude.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'' has this happen a lot. Spells (positive or negative) target everything within a range, either centered on a tile or a character. Since spells have a timer before they are cast, it's possible to do a lot more damage to your own forced than to the enemy.
** On some maps and party builds, using a "muddle" (bottling up enemy troops in a tight area using your own troops to block tiles moving out) to bomb enemies is considered a valid tactic.
* Necromancers in ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' can raise undead minions from the corpses of fallen enemies that constantly lose health. You can heal them, but the longer they live, the faster they lose health. The proper way to use them is to let them soak up most of the enemy melee attacks or using spells to make them explode when they're close to the enemy.
* ''Franchise/DragonAge'': This is, essentially, how the Darkspawn fight. They're a mindless [[TheHorde horde]] born by the thousands, driven by a single will. The Battle at Ostagar was doomed from the start, as their tactics relied on an enemy comprised of trained soldiers, not mindless brutes who don't care whether they live or die. ''That'''s why the Blights are so dangerous. The only way to stop them is to eliminate that will by killing the Archdemon.
** The goal of Ostagar (as far as the Grey Wardens were concerned) wasn't to break the Darkspawn but to stall them for long enough for the Archdemon to show up, so that a Warden could kill him.
* ''{{Section 8}}: Prejudice'': When Thorne calls in a bomber to try and kill you, it might frag some of his own troops. One of your allies points out his nonchalance about this.
* Can be invoked by the player in ''VideoGame/SinsOfASolarEmpire'', especially early on. If an enemy player or CPU invades one of your planets, and you don't have a sufficiently sized fleet yet to meet them, you can start cranking out ships and send them into battle one at a time in an attempt to delay the enemy forces until your main fleet arrives, or you can build enough defenses to whittle them down. Can get expensive over time, which can be painful early on as you don't have a lot of resources coming in yet to keep making the units.
** Alternatively, players can split their forces, and send the bulk of their forces to invade an enemy planet, while keeping a small portion behind to deal with enemy invasions, or in case their main fleet needs assistance. Which can prove to be useful should you end up fighting a multiple-front war.
** Also, story-wise, the TEC's main strength is its ability to outproduce the Advent and the Vasari, since they are lagging far behind technologically. There is a fanfic where a TEC admiral is gleeful to discover that newer flagship models are predicted to have a loss rate of ''only'' 2-to-1 (i.e. 2 TEC ships for every 1 equivalent Vasari ship), as opposed to the previous loss rate of 4-to-1. The admiral muses that, with the TEC having a huge industrial and population base, the Vasari will soon be ground down by attrition.
* The Punic Wars, a little-known game by the creators of Tropico, has this as the best strategy (may have been rebalanced in the sequel). Play as Carthage, train tons of the cheapest unit in the game, research an upgrade that pays you if they get killed. Your first army will be traded evenly with that of the enemy. You will come back with two armies instead, then four... you see where this is going. On large maps with many enemies, it's common to have columns of unmanaged, starved soldiers connecting your own city and several enemy towns, it's easier to recruit more than to feed them or pay for a commander to get them in formation.
* The ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic'' series have always had somewhat of this mentality underlying it - after all, your troops are highly disposable, and another few hundred will pop up in your cities next week anyway. Of interest, however, is the sixth game, which simultaneously discourages this (by giving you a score bonus for minimizing or entirely eliminating losses), and allows you to re-enact the classic scenario practically detail-by-detail if you're a Might-based Haven hero. The 'Reinforcement' skill adds a number of temporary members to a chosen squad - these won't stick around after the end of the battle anyway, and thus are eminently expendable, perfect for canon-fodder. As long as the squad doesn't drop below its original numbers, you effectively suffered zero losses. And it just so happens that your upgraded ranged unit, the Sharpshooter, has a powerful attack that hits all units in a line, including your own. If firing into a melee, some of your own units are liable to be in the line of fire too. But hey - we've got Reinforcements, so it doesn't matter, does it?
** And the best part is, the 'Reinforcements' ability is considered a 'Tears' type ability... thus, using this strategy will push your hero [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop closer to ''good'' end of the alignment spectrum]]...
* In any MultiplayerOnlineBattleArena game, you have a line of constantly respawning "creeps" who are there almost solely to take damage for the heroes (such as damage from towers). Some game actively encourage you to kill ''your own'' creeps to limit the amount of gold and experience your enemies get.
* The "Quantity" Idea in ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis'' IV is all about this trope, making you able to have more troops and at the same time reinforcing any losses much faster. Going towards the Quantity side of the Quality-Quantity slider was the same idea in ''II'' and ''III'' -- you get more manpower, quicker reinforcement and faster army construction, but the morale and organisation penalties means that your armies will take more and deal less damage (and likely break earlier), meaning you will ''need'' your larger armies and quicker ability to push more bodies into the fray to overcome otherwise equal foes leaning towards the Quality side.
* At the end of ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'''s Gravidus Dilemma event, the Corpus board of directors pulled Alad V's funding not out of concern for the lives he wasted but the money he was throwing away.
** The Grineer are very prone to this, due to being an entire faction of [[ExpendableClone Expendable Clones]].
* ''VideoGame/XCOM'' plays with this concept. Both the original and the 2012 remake, [[XCOMEnemyUnknown Enemy Unknown]] reward the player for keeping their troops alive by making them more effective in combat. In the original, as they level up, their skills improve. In the remake, as they level up they get new classes and combat abilities, so highly trained and well-equipped soldiers will absolutely devastate late-game missions. The problem is that the road getting there is paved with the corpses of the soldiers who didn't make it that far. Rookies start out with piss-poor aim and equipment, plus you're always outnumbered by aliens, making it necessary to have reserves and RedShirts given how death is a fairly common occurrence. To drive the point home, losing one out of four squadmates still gives a "Good" mission rating.
** Ditto for the fan-made remake ''VideoGame/{{Xenonauts}}''. No matter how hard you try or [[SaveScumming Save Scum]], losses are unavoidable.
* In ''VideoGame/BravelyDefault'', [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Dr. Qada]] has no problems with releasing a chemical weapon that can kill hundreds of thousands of people, both friend and foe, in order to win a war.
* Near the end of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'', the almost-last-boss summons dozens - even hundreds - of minions, with the sole purpose of stalling the player until the boss can [[spoiler:revive Demise, the actual last boss, using Zelda's life force]]. Technically, he doesn't actually have reinforcements, as he throws all his might against the player at once, but he still treats his troops as expendable.
* The indie title ''Life Goes On'' has this as its central gameplay mechanic. You play as a knight going through a dungeon trying to get the treasure at the end. However, it's impossible to make it through any of the levels without dying at least once. So instead you have to die in such a way that it helps later knights to progress.
* ''VideoGame/FurFighters'' has a bit of fun with this. In the intro to the last level of the game, [[BigBad General Viggo]] finds out to his horror that as a result of the Fur Fighters going through all the previous areas of the game, only ''five'' of presumably thousands of his bear minions are left alive. Naturally, [[GameplayAndStorySegregation come the level proper, there's far more than five bears for you to deal with]].
* Averted in both installments of the ''VideoGame/{{WarWind}}'' series. Since the player cannot just produce or breed units, it is necessary to hire basic worker units in an inn, or find a neutral settlement with possible recruits, and then train them as specialists (soldiers, scouts, etc.). Advanced units require talented recruits, which are rather hard to find. Due to this, the player quickly learns to value every single unit, even the weakest one.
* ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed:'' Standard operating procedure for the Templars, and their modern-day incarnation Abstergo Industires. It even applies to their higher ups, who they have on occasion been totally willing to leave at the mercies of an Assassin, all for the sake of their plan. Slightly justified in that they ''really do'' have reserves.
** This even applies to their best agents. In one of the in-game files of ''Rogue'', Agent Dacosta, one of their EliteMooks, comments upon one historical Templar being a SacrificialLamb. Her immediate superior, who previously criticised his boss for this attitude, responds with "Agent Dacosta, you are ''all'' expendable".
* In ''VideoGame/LordsOfTheRealm2'', peasants essentially amount to this in battle. They are extremely weak and die really easily, so are often best utilized to soak up damage for your other troops. The AI tends to make extensive use of this trope as well, particularly the Bishop.
* In ''VideoGame/EiyuuSenkiTheWorldConquest'' a unit's health is represented by the number of soldiers she has. After a battle, the player can just spend money to replenish all of the lost health/soldiers.
* This is basically how you deal with the Combine in the Nova Prospekt level of ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'': Keep sending wave after wave of antlions after them. You don't really even have to do this on purpose for the most part; the antlions will just naturally keep spawning, follow close behind you, and attack any humanoid that's not you. However, if you're [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential feeling particularly lackadaisical]], you can also use them to clear out tripmines. (LetsPlay/SpoilerWarning had some fun with this; see below.)
* In ''VideoGame/TheLordOfTheRingsOnline'', this is actually done by the good guys. If a player wants their character to run skirmishes, they have to undergo the Skirmish Tutorial. When explaining the use of your accompanying Skirmish Soldier, Chief Watcher Heathstraw cheerfully advises you "If he falls, simply call another one.".
* A variation in ''VideoGame/SwordOfTheStars''. During battles, each side has a command point limit that determines how many ships and of which size it can bring to bear at the same time. The number of command points depends on a number of factors, but it's generally a must to have a command ship with you to increase it by a large factor. Furthermore, the game provides a command point bonus to the side with a vastly higher number of ships in the fleet, encouraging armada fights. This doesn't necessarily mean the ships you bring with you have to be combat ships, since you still need support ships (e.g. fuel tankers, repair), which count towards this number. So your fleet of 30 cruisers might only have 12 actual warships with the rest being support ships (they can fight, but not as effectively). But the game will still treat your fleet as having 30 cruisers. For a different effect, the [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Morrigi]] have a unique form of FTL travel that increases the fleet's interstellar speed based on how many ships are in that fleet, even if some of those ships are significantly slower on their own (i.e. they're the only race where slow ships help ''speed up'' the rest of the fleet instead of bogging it down). According to the fluff, only one ship in the fleet is actually using its void drive, with the rest pumping their power into the lead ship to boost the void drive's performance and everyone else "riding the wave". So, you can bring those obsolete ships you have from the start of the game and use them to provided that little boost of speed your new, more powerful ships need.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comics]]
* [[http://rocr.net/index.php?p=20070604 This webcomic strip]], part of the ''CrossoverWars''.
* Prince Ansom used this against Parson in the first book of ''Webcomic/{{Erfworld}}''; and nearly succeeded, although Parson was very good at exploiting the weaknesses of that strategy:
-->'''Parson''': Ansom's thinking he can overwhelm us with numbers, but that's ''additive''. [[RPGMechanicsVerse I've been playing with this combat system for a week now. And it's all about force multipliers.]]
** In the end though, Parson could only defeat the Ansom's forces completely by [[spoiler: having his Dirtamancer and Croackamancer (meaning his earth elementalist and necromancer) work together to reanimate the dead volcano they're in. This ends up destroying both armies.]] It leads to a long WhatHaveIDone period for Parson.
* Subverted in ''Webcomic/GirlGenius'':
-->'''Tarvek:''' If we sacrificed every minion we had, we might take out ''one'' of them.\\
'''Gil:''' That's a terrible plan!\\
'''Minion:''' Thank you, sir!\\
'''Gil:''' There are another ''twenty'' of them! We don't have enough minions!\\
'''Minion:''' Er...
* As EvilOverlord CardCarryingVillain Xykon of ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' is a very BadBoss, he and his [[TheDragon Dragons]] and allies do it repeatedly. A few examples:
** Responding to a group of his ogres demanding to be paid by killing them and turning them into zombies.
** [[TheDragon Dragon]] Redcloak (a goblin) orders a group of hobgoblin ([[FantasticRacism whom he despises]]) {{mooks}} up a dangerous trail so they would cause an avalanche and ensure the safety of the others. Later he sends in unarmed troops against a guard monster, so it will fall asleep after eating them, and orders a human-wave style attack against a fortified city. After one of them dies saving his life, he realizes what he's doing and [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone reacts with horror at what he is becoming]] and promptly stops the wasteful spending of lives.
*** They weren't unarmed. [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0192.html They were given garnish clubs and cracker shields]]!
** [[LampshadeHanging "Sacrificing minions - is there any problem it]] ''[[LampshadeHanging can't]]'' [[LampshadeHanging solve?"]]
** In the Azure City siege, the death knight has hobgoblins throw themselves at the wall and die by the hundreds so that their bodies will create a ramp he can ride up.
** In a bonus strip from ''No Cure For the Paladin Blues'', Xykon kills a mook who has succeeded in slaying a dragon, because the XP he gained from this elevates him beyond a simple mook now--and also makes it possible for him, as a high-level caster, to get a bit of XP that he wouldn't get for killing an unleveled mook.
* In ''Webcomic/TheRedStar'', [[http://www.beyondrealitymedia.com/the-red-star/issue-2/page-13/ Maya comments on how Command had always succeeded by sending more men to die, and they thought it would work this time, too.]]
* In ''Webcomic/{{Terra}}'' UEC General Cole Winters orders the Jolly Roger Squadron to launch an airstrike against a major [[LaResistance Resistance]] base with no backup and no hope of rescue if they survive being shot down. Since they're ''that'' good, they pull it off with only minor losses (two fighters destroyed, with one crew of two {{Red Shirt}}s killed and the other crew ejecting safely and being rescued by the Resistance to become part of the main cast).
* ''WebComic/DragonBallMultiverse'': Bojack's gang was composed of twenty-seven members when it was formed, according to Bujin; according to the novelization, this is the reason why there were only five members left when they met the Z-Warriors.
* ''WebComic/BrawlInTheFamily'' provides the current page image, in a comic that shows the contrast between the ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' tactician and the ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars'' one. The former focuses on his troops' continued survival (being in a video game where [[CastOfSnowflakes any one of the unique units]] [[AnyoneCanDie can die]]), while the latter encourages aggressive tactics without caring about his troops' casualties, because he "can always buy more troops." [[http://brawlinthefamily.keenspot.com/comic/title-559/ The full comic can be seen here.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Originals]]
* ''Wiki/SCPFoundation'' willfully sacrifice hundreds of its D-Class personnel when observing [=SCP=]s. Many of which die in cruel and painful manners, and even if they do survive over a month they get executed anyway.
** Don't feel too sorry for the D-Class personnel though, they're recruited from death row convicts, ie murderers and rapists, to ensure expendable, unsympathetic Red Shirts for SCP experiments
* Humourously spoofed in ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'''s ShowWithinAShow ''Cheat Commandos'', where Gunhaver shows absolutely no concern for the safety of the "[[RedShirt Green Helmets]]":
-->'''Silent Rip''': Uh, shouldn't we go help him?\\
'''Gunhaver''': Naw, he's just one of those Green Helmets. We've got like fifty of them.
* This is Freeza's MO in WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged. While he does show concern for his higher level men (even planning to send gifts to the Ginyu Force's family), his lower level men... not so much. In his first on-screen attack, he shows indifference when the Namekians are slaughtering his troops, but panics when they start targeting his equipment. Once he reaches Earth, he even kills his last henchman for no real reason. This infuriates his father not because of the loss of life or the senselessness of it, but because now they have no one to fly them home (flying is for the help).
* The evil [[FishPeople Kua-Toa]] of ''WebVideo/TalesFromMyDDCampaign'' rely heavily on vast legions of expendable aquatic SlaveMooks to keep their EnemyCivilWar going.
** Also Inverted in the case of the Verandi invasion. The chief reason why the startling amount of resistance the humans put up was so aggravating to the Kua leadership was that the Kua are the only race that can breathe both air and water, meaning that they couldn't use their armies of expendable slaves, and were instead getting large numbers of actual Kua killed trying to hold on to their foothold.
* As mentioned above, LetsPlay/SpoilerWarning found it amusing that this is a common way to deal with Combine tripmines in ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', and started quoting the examples from ''Shrek'', ''Cheat Commandos'', and ''Futurama''.
* ''Podcast/PlumbingTheDeathStar'''s Zammit hopes to put the suicide back in ''Film/SuicideSquad'' in "How Would You Use The Suicide Squad" by sending the squad into areas humans haven't explored because of how dangerous they are. The logic is that eventually one of the squad members will survive and be able to further the sciences with their discoveries; even if the entire Suicide Squad is killed on their adventures into the unknown, odds are Batman will have used that time to capture even ''more'' supervillains to put on the squad.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/GeneratorRex'', White Knight is a particularly [[JerkAss Jerky]] example because not only does he sacrifice the Redshirts and tell them to their face that he was doing so, he says that they themselves should be aware of that by now, and should therefore not be offended.
* Also played for humor in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' with Zapp Brannigan, who once sent, in his own words, [[ZergRush "wave after wave"]] of his own men to fight the Killbots, knowing that the enemies had an exact (though horrifically high) limit of how many humans they were programmed to kill before they shut down. The humor comes from the fact that this was actually seen as a perfectly viable strategy. ("Kif, show them the medal I won.") In a deleted scene from ''Love's Labours Lost In Space,'' a ''single'' Killbot, Corpse-A-Tron, is shown to have a kill limit of 999,999.
** Another time, he actually used this tactic with SHIPS.
-->'''Brannigan:''' [[GeneralFailure On my signal, all ships will file directly into the enemy death cannons, clogging them with wreckage]]!
** Some other examples:
-->'''Brannigan:''' How many men did we lose, Kif?\\
'''Kif:''' All of them, sir.\\
'''Brannigan:''' Well, at least they won't have to mourn each other.
** His men are well aware of this.
-->'''Brannigan:''' Don't worry Leela, I will send in wave after wave of my own men to complete your mission! Are you with me, men?\\
''[complete silence from the entire mess hall]''\\
'''Voice in the back:''' You suck!
** It doesn't help that Brannigan is WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer for this.
-->'''Bender:''' Sir, I volunteer for a suicide mission! ...lousy patriotism circuit!\\
'''Brannigan:''' That's commendable, son, but when I'm in command, ''every'' mission is a suicide mission!
* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'': After speaking out against a general's plan to throw freshly-recruited troops at the front line to serve as meat-shields, not only does Prince Zuko get half his face burned off, but he gets banished and sent on a SnipeHunt, too.
* At the end of ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' Megatron succumbs to this, killing more of his soldiers than the Maximals ever did. Presumably he assumed that when you have a giant warship and superpowers (even by Transformer standards of being big immortal war machines) you don't need a lot of help.
** By the time of the less popular sequel series, Megatron took this to the logical extreme with his [[MechaMooks Vehicon hordes]]. He had so many that the Maximals tore dozens into scrap metal every battle without making a dent in his overall forces.
* In ''ThePenguinsOfMadagascar'' special "Dr. Blowhole's Revenge", the titular villain threatens the penguins with his nearly endless supply of minions:
--> '''Dr. Blowhole:''' So what if they cut down ten, twenty lobsters? We've got MORE LOBSTERS!
** His lobster minions pause in their cheering at that statement and look a little worried. King Julien however has a similar approach to tactics and doesn't look concerned at all.
* ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'': In the episode where ComicBook/{{Aquaman}} appeared, when ComicBook/LexLuthor was told his move would result in the deaths of several employees, he replied their families would receive compensation.
* In the ''Literature/RainbowMagic'' movie, Jack Frost says this in the movie, saying his snowman army is comprised of expendable weaklings that can be replaced infinitely in battle. Said army disagrees.
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries''. Tony Zucco, (an extortionist who set up the "accident" that killed Dick Grayson's parents), shoots at Batman with a Tommy gun, even though multiple {{mooks}} are likely to be hit as well and beg him not to.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Birdman}}'' episode "Meets Birdgirl". While Birdman is fighting Birdgirl, her boss Doctor Mentaur orders his minion to fire hydrogen "shells" (bombs) at them, even after being warned that the bombs will hit Birdgirl too.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life]]
* ''Used'' by both sides in UsefulNotes/WorldWar2.
** The US did a kind of this in UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 where they sent out stupid amounts of ''ships'', as quoted "the US built more ships than Japan could sink" which was meant [[NotHyperbole literally]]. The sailors would be pulled out of the water and sent to crew new ships. This variant of the trope was less reprehensible than others, though many sailors of course did die. Of course, the the US and its allies certainly did not neglect defending those ships as best as they could from enemy attack while they were at this, which included also building fighting ships as fast as they could to do so.
*** Interestingly enough, the threat of endless American reserves in UsefulNotes/WW1 contributed to Germany's surrender.
** The cargo carrying Liberty ships were the best example of this. Designed to be built fast and in huge numbers, it was said if one carried a single load of war material across the Atlantic it had paid for itself. So much emphasis was put on building them ''quickly'', that it wasn't unheard of for welds in the hulls (welding was used in place of riveting because it was faster) to split open in bad weather even without the aid of the enemy. It was calculated the lifespan of a Liberty ship would be 20 Atlantic crossings, so once having made one she had paid herself and the rest 19 would be net profits. Amazingly, many Liberty ships still served in revenue transportation in the 1970s. Two of them are still functional as museum/training ships.
** Similarly to the Liberty Ships were the Escort Carriers, small, cheap aircraft carriers that could be built in mass quantities. The US built over 120 of these ships, which were used for various duties (anti-sub patrol, convoy escort, air support for amphibious forces, etc.) to free up the less numerous and far more capable Fleet carriers such as the Essex class (of which the US fielded "only" 24) to focus on other things (such as hunting down the dwindling numbers of Japanese carriers). For the Escort Carriers, ruggedness was not a high priority, earning them the nickname "Combustible, Vulnerable, Expendable" [[FunWithAcronyms in reference to]] their "CVE" hull classification.
** When the bombings of Berlin escalated, the allied forces did all they could to provoke the Luftwaffe into attacking them. This caused large losses for both sides, but while the allies could replace the lost planes and crews fairly easily the Germans could not. It was one of the factors that eventually allowed the allies to gain air superiority first and air supremacy later.
** The American daylight bombing campaign proved to be staggeringly expensive in terms of human life lost. The Eighth Air Force, which gets most of the spotlight for the air war over Europe, suffered 46,000 casualties, including more than 26,000 airmen killed in action (more lives lost than the entire [[SemperFi US Marine Corps in that war]], although in contrast to the Airmen, the Marines didn't charge en masse into enemy artillery fire as a matter of course). In addition to the 8th AF, the less-famous Fifteenth Air Force, operating out of Italy, also suffered severe casualties pressing their daylight bombing campaign in southern and eastern Europe throughout the war.
** The T-34 was also used in this fashion, and the USSR is very liberal in sending them in swarms. The difference is that the T-34 was incredibly blind-sighted and could rarely even see far enough to fight[[note]]The story of T-34s ramming Tiger wasn't because they were suicidal enough, but because they literally didn't see the giant, steel-gray, angular brick in their face until it was too late to not run into it[[/note]], beat it's own crew half to death, not to mention crippling communications problems (Read: A complete lack of any radio whatsoever). This was rectified in the later models, though, and later T-34-85s incorporated "Common sense" adaptations as other tanks of the time, such as a full 360 cupola for the commander, a turret basket, and an expanded turret so that the Commander didn't also have to pull double duty as the loader.
** Soviet [[BoxedCrook penal battalions]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shtrafbat "Shtrafbats"]], were former Gulag prisoners or transferred Red Army troops for being suspected of having a reluctance to fight for whatever reason. Though told their crimes could be redeemed by receiving a combat injury or performing especially heroically in battle, in reality shtrafbats were largely just treated as existing for this trope's purposes - such as, attempting to break especially stubborn defenses, being [[HighlyConspicuousUniform dressed blatantly]] to be decoys for regular units, suicidal rearguard actions to cover retreats, or worst of all, "trampler" duty where in they cleared minefields...by running through them prior to regular troops' advances.
** Royal Air Force Bomber Command in WWII. Air Marshall Arthur Harris had nickname "Butcher" amongst the RAF bomber crews.
** In general during this period, while the notion of mass producing tanks and planes of inferior quality was an effective strategy for a few years, it simply could not be sustained with manpower losses, because while producing hardware like tanks and planes is simple and quick, recruiting and training men with the sort of skill required to handle even simple equipment was a significantly more lengthy process. As was shown in the case of Germany and Japan, while they were in fact capable of continuing to put out more then enough military hardware to meet their needs, they were chronically short of the experienced crews required to man them. Germany had lost a great many of its best pilots in the Battle of Britain while Japan lost all of its finest Carrier aircraft pilots either at Midway or during the Solomon Islands campaign; while both nations were able to make good their losses of aircraft, they simply could never train pilots with the sort of skill to match their predecessors in a short time. So the lesson that could be learned from this is that while machines are expendable, the men who know how to use those machines are not. America, Russia, and Britain were quick to learn this lesson upon taking stock of their losses after WWII and realized that while quantity over quality had managed to win them the war, it had left them severely weakened with significantly lowered reserves of trained crews at the end of WWII, with countless American crewmen who had spent months in training left as charred corpses inside gutted Sherman tanks scattered across the French countryside. This may have been a key contributing factor in why the Cold War didn't kick off into full blown war after WWII, as both sides had to train an entire new generation of crews to replace those lost in the war, which took time.
** One German general actually stated that Allies would have never gained air superiority had Germany not spent too much resources on strategic bombers. But Allies also spent large amount of resources on strategic bombers, which means that both sides basically sent crews of strategic bombers to die for little military value, while actually harming their own ability to fight the war. In fact, USSBS has shown that German military production reached its peak at actual peak of US strategic bombardment campaign, and only started to slow down after the US re-focused on destroying Oil production and storage facilities over industrial production. It didn't help that the British Night Bombing campaign was instead focused on [[RevengeBeforeReason using the cover of night for petty terror bombing in retaliation for earlier luftwaffe bombing of Britain]].
*** This gave rise to the abandonment of GoingDownWithTheShip for officers that lose a battle. We Have Reserves of equipment, but a trained officer can't be replaced so easily. The [[HonorBeforeReason Death Before Dishonor]] mentality instilled by Japanese officer training meant the Japanese officer corps kept getting worse, while the American and British officer corps kept getting better.
** The entire concept of Kamikaze attacks were based on these, where Japan hoped that it would have more pilots and hardware to outlast their opponents. One Japanese General noted that they were "like bees" in that they swarm to sting the opponent, but died as they done so. Japan would seriously underestimate their reserves, however, and with adapted tactics by the Allies, Kamikazes became less and less effective[[note]]The first few attacks were wildly successful because Allied interceptors ignored planes that headed into a dive, as they expected the pilot of those planes to pull up at the last second. At the time the only suicide attacks had been made by crippled planes, where the pilots were certain to die. They never expected that the Japanese units would ''intentionally'' try to ram a ship with a functional plane[[/note]].
** By the end of the war, Germany itself would resort to similar tactics. Because spare parts were in such short supply, it wasn't uncommon for entire tanks to be shipped to units for cannibalizing into parts. Panzer Brigades were organized with large numbers of the newly-produced tanks and Panzergrenadiers, but severely lacking in anti-aircraft guns, armored recovery vehicles and the general logistics that made German armor effective. Poorly-trained crews were often lost to seasoned American tank veterans. Sabotage from slave labor, less available resources and the constant bombing sharply drove down quality - post-war tests conducted by the Soviets determined armor plate on Panthers would frequently fall apart when struck with rounds theoretically rated to protect against. Ball-bearings for turret traverse mechanisms and hard, durable metals needed for transmissions were in extremely short supply.
** Hitler gave orders amounting to no retreat and no surrender to Army Group North, Center, A, B, and North Africa - ordering them all to fight to the last man. A common interpretation is that the apparent success of 'no retreat' in the winter of '41-42 - in the face of an over-ambitious Soviet counter-offensive that failed to encircle and annihilate Army Group Center due to command-inexperience and weak logistics - convinced him that German troops were superior (man-for-man) to their Soviet counterparts and needed only the moral courage to keep fighting for them to prevail. At no point did he ever seem to appreciate the importance of mobile reserves and operational/campaign-level withdrawals to a successful strategic defense-in-depth - the Wehrmacht basically had nothing of the former left after the Ukrainian autumn-winter campaigns of '43-44, which annihilated the country's stock of experienced Panzer-crews, and he increasingly forbade the latter and began routinely firing Generals who [[ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight refused to follow those orders]] - even the most talented and indispensable of them, such as Manstein and Runstedt.
** In fact, this mentality was one of many reasons why the Germans lost the Battle of Stalingrad and, later, the entire Eastern Front of the European Theater.
** Also applies to the German U-boat service. By the end of the war, they had suffered a permanent casualty rate of over 70%. Yet, they kept being sent out on what were effectively suicide missions.
* Demetrios [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast the Besieger]] would throw his men at the walls of enemy cities, not out of necessity, but out of anger or [[GloryHound thirst for glory]]. When his own son pointed out how his men were dying for nothing, Demetrios lashed out at him, saying "Why so distraught? Are rations due from you to the dead?"
* An attitude similar to this served the Romans well during their expansion. While they were perhaps not as callous about it as many other examples of this trope, they were willing and able to sustain casualties that would cripple any rival state. It didn't work so well against the Germanic tribes, though.
** [[TropeNamer King Pyrrhus]] won several battles over the Romans but [[PyrrhicVictory found his army getting weaker whereas the Romans were able to use their manpower to bring their armies back up to full strength]].
** The Roman reaction to the disastrous battle of Cannae, the bloodiest day in Roman history to that point, with the virtually the entire Roman army annihilated? Raise another army and outlaw even speaking the word ''pax'' (''peace''). Interestingly, Hannibal, the winner of Cannae, '' knew'' it, and his entire strategy in the [[UsefulNotes/PunicWars Second Punic War]] was a [[ExploitedTrope well-thought attempt at working around this]]: knowing that the Romans' numerical superiority mostly came from the troops provided by their allies in Italy, he invaded Italy with a small but well-trained and ''magnificently'' led army and started inflicting crushing defeats after crushing defeats in the attempt to scare and impress the Italian population in defecting to his side, thus ''stealing away Rome's numerical superiority''. While partially effective, this strategy didn't cause enough defections, to the point that, right after Cannae, the Romans could effectively keep ''six'' armies in the field: one facing Hannibal and [[DeathOfAThousandCuts launching raids to slowly destroy his army]], one in Northern Italy facing his Gaulish allies, one in Southern Italy facing the Samnites and the other populations who had defected from the alliance with Rome (this one would also occasionally fight Hannibal because most of the time he was in the area), one in ''Spain'' to attack Hannibal's base of operation, one in ''the Balkans'' to face the Macedons (who had entered the war because, after Cannae, they had figured the Romans were too weak to defend their allies in Greece), and ''the survivors of Cannae'' [[TheDogBitesBack destroying the Sicilian cities that had defected to Hannibal]]. His situation only grew worse from that: the Carthaginians managed to destroy the army deployed in Spain, but by that point Hannibal's allies in Sicily had been destroyed or cowed into defecting back to Rome, the Gauls were broken as an effective fighting force and the Macedons [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere had realized what was happening and sued for peace]], meaning the survivors of Cannae could go to Spain and finish the job, the army of Northern Italy could pick off the Carthaginian troops that had escaped Spain and were trying to join Hannibal, and the forces of the army of the Balkans had been divided between the Northern and the Southern Italy armies to allow them to finish their job faster. ''Then'' the survivors of Cannae [[UpToEleven raised reinforcements in Spain and Sicily]] and invaded Africa, where they [[{{Irony}} successfully stole Carthage's main ally]].
** Even before Hannibal, the Romans were so well-versed in manouver they could pull this ''on armies that outnumbered them'': their frontline and rear-guard troops would switch position mid-battle, allowing their soldiers to stay relatively fresh while the enemy grew tired and felt like the Romans were outnumbering them until they either broke and were massacred during the escape (because the Romans were still fresher and would catch up to them) or were all chopped down in battle.
*** During their civil wars, this bit them back in the ass: as both sides would pull this, unless one of the commanders was significantly better or got lucky the armies would suffer grevious losses, resulting in a greater weakening of the Roman military than it would be for other armies.
* At the Battle of Crecy in 1346, the French king Philip VI opened the battle by deploying Genoese mercenary crossbowmen and ordered them to begin firing on the English encamped at the top of the hill. The Genoese commander informed Philip that his troops were very fatigued from marching through rain and mud, did not have their pavises (anti-arrow shields) and that their bowstrings were wet from rain, which reduced their range. Philip insisted that they attack anyway which predictably ended with a catastrophe against the fast-firing English archers. Annoyed that his mercenaries had the audacity to die because of his idiotic order, Philip compounded his stupidity and brutality by ordereding his cavalry to charge through them to get to the English. The French knights deliberately ''[[LeeroyJenkins chopped their way through their own crossbowmen]]'' to try and attack the English.
** [[KarmicDeath And the result was that the longbowmen promptly shot all of the knights too]].
* [[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution Revolutionary]] UsefulNotes/{{France}}, according to historian Eugen Weber, was the first Western power to recruit conscripts in large numbers. The traditional file of well-trained soldiers went out in favor of massive columns of ill-trained soldiers, and French generals did not hesitate to throw them at the enemy under heavy fire, beginning what Weber called "The Gun Fodder Era." When you have a whole country of potential conscripts as your reserves, you can afford to lose many more soldiers than those that have to pay a professional army.
** From the same era, one way {{UsefulNotes/Napoleon Bonaparte}} earned the ire of his fellow commanders prior to his declaring himself Emperor was because he was known to brag about the number of men he could lose in a single battle and still win it.
* During the battle of Guilford Courthouse during the UsefulNotes/AmericanRevolution, Lord Cornwallis's forces were on the verge of a devastating defeat. Out of desperation, he ordered his remaining artillery to fire grapeshot into the mass of men on the plain, regular and rebel alike. The rebels were forced back, [[WasItReallyWorthIt but at a staggering cost to Cornwallis's troops]].
* In the US Civil War, Union General Grant was accused of this, being given the appellation "Butcher" Grant by some on the Union side after his high-casualty battles in Virginia. But he didn't spend his men needlessly (and deeply mourned the battle of Cold Harbour, the one high-casualty battle that was genuinely pointless), and was distinguished from previous Union generals by ''advancing'' after high-casualty battles rather than retreating, something which made the men happy because they could see they were actually making progress.
** A lot of that was because he was lined up against Lee. In the West he could fairly often outmanoever his opponents, such his Siege of Vicksburg where he finessed a spectacular and relatively low-cost victory that happened at around the same time, and was arguably more important than, the battle of Gettysburg. In addition, he was fighting in the Eastern Theater, where there simply wasn't space to maneuver or to bring the Union's superior numbers to bear. In the West, there was such space.
* Some WWI commanders would shoot those attempting to retreat without orders, or who refused to go over the trenches. It was a sort of preemptive punishment for treason. Although the number of men so shot is grossly overexaggerated, there were men who were under ''two'' suspended sentences of death for desertion or sleeping at their posts.
** The point of the WWI strategy of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attrition_warfare attrition warfare]] was "we have '''more''' reserves than them!"
** Luigi Cadorna's strategy for the Italian army was based on this: knowing that his army was underequipped but most of the Austro-Hungarian forces were tied up fighting the Russians, he launched assault after pointless assault on the Isonzo to drain the enemy reserves while Italy's industry produced enough guns to properly equip his troops. Eventually he succeeded in draining the Austro-Hungarian reserves, but before he could break through the Russians collapsed and the newly freed enemy forces were redeployed to Italy with some German reinforcements, resulting in the catastrophic defeat at the Battle of Caporetto. In the end he was sacked but still somewhat succeeded, as the Austro-Hungarians ''still'' had no reserves left while Italy could use their last reserves to ''fill the losses of the battle and then some'', now led well by Cadorna's replacement Armando Diaz properly equipped, with Italy's shortage of machine guns filled in large part by American and French supplies.
** Then there's Aylmer Hunter-Weston, a British divisional commander during the Gallipoli Campaign. When a staff officer remarked on the heavy casualties his men incurred at the Battle of Krithia, Hunter-Weston asked "Casualties? What do I care for casualties?"
* The official policy of UsefulNotes/{{Egypt}} in the War of Attrition 1967-1970, after they lost the Six Day War. As said by President UsefulNotes/GamalAbdelNasser:
--> "If the enemy succeeds in inflicting fifty-thousand casualties in this campaign, we can go on fighting nevertheless, because we have manpower reserves. If we succeed in inflicting ten-thousand casualties, he will unavoidably find himself compelled to stop fighting, because he has no manpower reserves."
** The Israelis tried to counter since theu [[GenreSavvy could do the math just as well]] and [[TookAThirdOption decided to bomb Cairo from the air]], directly and indirectly threatening the Nasser regime itself. However, it turned out, they could not sustain a deep penetration bombing campaign either.[[note]] The Egyptians purchases scores of batteries of the latest Soviet Surface to Air Missiles and put them on the approaches to Cairo. It turns out that equipment not troops is the limiting factor in modern war[[/note]]
* During the First Gulf War, the USA's one-time (Cold-War) Ally Generalissimo Saddam Hussein believed that a lesson from the Vietnam War was that the USA (who formed the backbone of the U.N. taskforce to force him back from The Kingdom Of Kuwait) wouldn't support a war that would cost them 10,000 casualites. He, meanwhile had hundreds of thousands to spare and none of his subjects could protest the attrition. For one thing he thought that the U.N. would obey the letter of international law and seek to only engage him in Kuwait (they attacked Iraq itself, outflanking his forces and trapping them in Kuwait). For another, he seems to have forgotten the basics of force multipliers - i.e. his troops were catastrophically outmatched, so the enemy could be expected to take minimal losses (the greater the enemy's advantage, the fewer their losses). Thus, while the U.N. killed some 30k Iraqi troops they only lost 392 people.
* King Goujian of Yue, a pre-Imperial Chinese ruler, would terrorise his opponents by having his front line march out to the middle of the field and decapitate themselves (or, in some accounts, slit their own throats, which makes more sense).
* A rather cold-hearted take on this is sometimes cited by more bellicose Indian generals in response to the logic of Mutual Assured Destruction in the event of a nuclear war with Pakistan, arguing that it doesn't apply, since if an Indian strike takes out 200 million Pakistanis, it has exterminated the country, whereas if a Pakistani strike takes out 200 million Indians, they still have over a billion left.
* In nature, reproductive strategies are split between animals that have a small number of young and raise them carefully, and ones that have lots of young (or, typically, lay lots of eggs) and don't care for them at all, trusting that there are enough that ''some'' will survive. The latter strategy is a lot less energy-intensive and is generally used by more basic and short-lived species, while the former is particularly common among some birds and nearly all the larger mammals. Some kinds of rodents have and raise frequent large litters, leading to exponential population growth over a very short time if conditions are favorable.
* The human body is like this. It creates millions of white blood cells to fight infections and continues to create them until the infection is defeated. It works most of the time, except against diseases that attack the immune system itself or autoimmune disorders (when they go nuts and attack the tissues they're supposed to defend).
* In a non human killing way, situations or countries that have (more than) enough of a certain resource can act like that. Iceland for example has a lot of geothermal and hydropower resources; much more than a country of a bit over 300 000 people could ever use for domestic consumption and there is no way to export any sizable quantity of it directly, so while electricity is not quite "too cheap to meter", some of the energy uses tend to be rather wasteful. The famous "Blue Lagoon" for instance is basically wastewater of a geothermal power plant that is still warm enough to swim in in the Icelandic winter. Most other countries would probably use it to heat homes, but there is just ''so much'' of it that this is what is left over even after all needs are met. Being quite GenreSavvy, Iceland has started quite a big aluminum industry, because converting bauxite into aluminum requires a huge amount of electric energy and Iceland has a lot of it.
** Similarly the GDR had a WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer approach to Lignite. It was (and still is) the only natural resource found in any appreciable quantities in the area and while most of its uses are horribly inefficient and/or polluting,[[note]] You can make almost everything that you can make from oil from coal as well. Including gasoline. It's just much more inefficient. Oh and lignite is also 50% water by weight, so every second car in a train carrying lignite is carrying high priced steam[[/note]] it was still cheaper than buying other resources or technology to increase efficiency. In subsidized housing in the GDR people would regulate the temperature by opening the window as the heating could not be shut off and was paid for anyway. It's almost hard to believe the GDR eventually ran out of money.
* Seriously averted by, of all people, Genghis Khan. When your forces are usually a fraction of what your opposition can muster in you need to preserve those forces. They never engaged in hand-to-hand when they didn't have to, and leaving wounded men on the field was grounds for a commander's execution. Overly aggressive types tended not to get promoted because of the casualties they would take. Also, Genghis was known for a FatherToHisMen approach--at least to his own people.
* Like China in Korean War example above, Vietnam Wars prove to be this for North Vietnamese against US military. They want to win more (they have fewer choices; USA can get out, they can't), and, by percentage of nation's GDP, put more effort into their fight. So no matter how North lost battles and personnel, they will keep fighting until the USA just give up.
** Also by extension, most of fights against colonialist forces also this trope. When the rebel or local lacks 1) training, 2) hardware, 3) not-obsolete military understanding and organization, the number is usually on their side and they utilize that advantage.
[[/folder]]

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7th May '17 10:00:46 PM Gamermaster
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* Leonmichelle from ''Anime/DogDays'' is a big fan of wave attacks, and none too fussy about any damage to her own side that her attacks might cause. Of course, like most war tropes in ''Dog Days'', this is completely PlayedForLaughs, because in such a [[FriendlyWar war where]] [[NonLethalKO nobody gets]] [[NonLethalWarfare seriously hurt]], the only real casualty in a worst-case scenario would be [[ClothingDamage the clothes]].



** In the second game, Baron Tarko has a similar attitude.
* ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'': This appears to be standard policy for Imperial officers, Darths, and Empire officials in general. The officers shrug it off; they're just "common soldiers." The Sith don't give a bantha's rear about much else other than themselves and their power games (the [[HumanoidAbomination Emperor]] is an OmnicidalManiac who wants ''everything in the galaxy except himself'' dead), and Empire officials follow the lead of the military and Sith. Couple this with KlingonPromotion being the ''preferred'' method of advancement (it's just gauche for a non-Sith to not be sneaky about it), and the Empire does more damage to itself than it does its enemies. Manditory conscription and [[WeWillUseManualLaborInTheFuture extensive use of slave labor]] is likely the only reason they managed to get off Dromund Kaas. The fact they caught the Republic by surprise [[WhatAnIdiot (thanks to Revan and Exile having ''no backup plans'' and walking into an obvious trap)]] is the only reason they had any success at all.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Overlord}}'', this is ''your'' attitude towards your own {{Mook}}s. Fun ensues.
* Many RealTimeStrategy games will end up either encouraging this in their players, or doing so as their AI. Most noticable in the first ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'' game, when using ground troops against the laser towers. Laser tower = one guaranteed dead enemy soldier, or one very heavily damaged enemy vehicle, every few seconds. Infantry = lots of 'em, I can crank them out so fast I can't deploy them fast enough, and eventually.
** While various factions in various games incur bonuses for sacrificing troops. Examples: ''C&C Red Alert Yuri's Revenge'' where Yuri can feed troops (own or mind-controlled enemies) to the Meat Grinder for cash. Starcraft and Warcraft III where Zerg and Undead can 'eat' their own troops for energy/mana.
* Strongly averted in ''VideoGame/CompanyOfHeroes''. The costs of getting a unit or vehicle to the frontlines is much, much more than the cost of reinforcing or repairing it (compare 270 manpower units for a basic rifle company, compared to 30 units each for each member of the squad, up to five). In addition, the American units gain veteran bonuses as they survive in combat, and veterancy only survives if the unit does: if your elite unit of riflemen are all killed, they take their elite status to the grave with them.
** [=COH=] does have an example of this trope however. The American armor commander has the "Allied War Machine" ability which, when activated, gives you free tanks to replace any that are destroyed during the duration of the ability (although there is a rather hefty munition cost to use this). Be prepared for more of this trope though when ''Company of Heroes 2'' comes out, which takes place on the Eastern Front.
* Real Time Tactics games generally avert this trope by giving you fixed units in the game, though this gives another problem of destroyed units being [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost for good]] (except in ''VideoGame/WorldInConflict'' which allowed reinforcements to replace lost units). Some modern RTS also avoid the "We Have Reserves" type gameplay by taking psychological issues of individual units into account, which makes sending troops into suicide missions tactically prohibitive.
* ''Franchise/MassEffect'':
** A rare example of this trope in play with a military that ''does'' value its personnel's lives. According to the [[EncyclopediaExposita Codex]], fighter groups that launch torpedo bombing runs on larger ships will ''always'' suffer casualties due to virtual intelligence-controlled GARDIAN laser point defense; the only way to defeat these defenses is to overwhelm them with sheer numbers until they overheat. As a result, fighter wings always take heavy casualties when attacking an enemy fleet. Though while the first fighter waves are always ''hit'', it's not as if everybody in the first wave dies. Indeed, because the strength of the lasers drops off the greater the distance to the target due to beam diffusion, it's rare for the GARDIAN systems to score more than a few actual ''kills.'' What generally happens instead is that the first waves of fighters take a bit of damage and are forced to return to base.
** This is implied to be the krogan military strategy in a nutshell. There are always more krogan, forever--the only way that the Council was able to defeat them was by reducing the rate of viable pregnancies to one in one thousand, and it was still enough to sustain their population. Warlord Okeer gives us this wonderful quote, which summarizes krogan battle tactics:
--->'''Okeer:''' I say let us carry the [[DepopulationBomb genophage]] with us. Let a thousand children die for every one that lives. We will climb to victory atop a mountain of our dead -- for that is the krogan way.
** Geth don't place much value on individual mobile platforms; if one is destroyed, the geth in that platform transmit their memories and experiences to the nearest carrier, and that data is uploaded to the total gestalt geth MindHive, effectively making the geth immortal. However, they aren't stupid - they will still try to preserve mobile platforms if possible in order to to maximize combat effectiveness and resources. Plus what happens to the programs within mobile platforms not connected to the geth collective.
---> [[spoiler:'''Legion''': No carrier, no carrier, no carrier, no...(*thunk*)]]
** If Commander Shepard has the 'Ruthless' background, his/her military claim-to-fame is being the Butcher of Torfan, where s/he ordered his/her men forward, knowing many would be gunned down, also knowing it would ensure victory. Torfan was a base used by batarian slavers responsible for hitting human colonies, and the attack is a response meant to curb this trend: Ruthless Renegade Shepard makes no apologies, as part of the "get the job done at any cost" mentality. Ruthless ''Paragon'' Shepard is somewhat haunted by the experience, but s/he believed sending a message to discourage repeats of Mindoir and Elysium was more important. Even then, Ruthless Shepard crosses (or came very close to crossing) the MoralEventHorizon anyway - s/he also killed the batarians that had surrendered.
** Harbinger's thoughts on losing his own troops:
---> Leave the dead where they fall.\\
The dead are useless.\\
Ignore the fallen.\\
Kill one, and one hundred will replace it.\\
This form is irrelevant (to his current host)
** Interestingly, ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' gives us an example from a scientific perspective. A Cerberus scientist is trying to decipher the secrets behind huskification and indoctrination, some of the most advanced and dangerous examples of Reaper tech. Even though the technology is thousands if not ''millions'' of years beyond them, the fact that they have tens of millions of test subjects and a complete disregard for the lives of said test subjects allows them to make steady progress regardless.
** The Reapers rely heavily on this for their ground troops, who are typically indoctrinated, cyborged victims of Reaper attacks; you will encounter a lot of examples where the main strategy they use to try and take a location or kill Shepard, assuming they can't have an indoctrinated agent open the doors for them, is "throw more husks/Cannibals/Marauders/Brutes at the problem until it goes away". They don't use it as often with Ravagers or Banshees, however, since after Attican Traverse: Krogan Team they have a limited supply of Ravagers, and Banshees can only be created from asari with a very rare genetic defect.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Prototype}}'', the [[ArmiesAreEvil Blackwatch]] explicitly state that they are using the United States Marines as the "shock troops" for the occupation of Manhattan and the war against the infected. Their purpose is to take casualties and take the blame for the destruction of the city to cover up Blackwatch's operations. At one point, one of the Web of Intrigue nodes indicates that Blackwatch anticipates Marine casualties per week to be between one thousand to two and a half thousand. Putting that in a perspective of modern military terms, total Coalition casualties during Operation Iraqi Freedom - a full-scale war against a ''country'' - were less than a thousand over a ''month-long'' period.
** The US casualties list from March 2003 to September 2009 was 4,334. That's ''over 6 years.'' Blackwatch figure the Marines will lose that many ''in about three weeks''.
** The Marines [[ThrowTheDogABone are thrown a bone]] in the end when they get ''all'' of the credit for saving what's left of Manhattan from the Infection [[spoiler:and a nuke]].
* SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker is like this in ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamAsylum'', leaving his cohorts in multiple lurches without batting an eyelash, making YouHaveFailedMe comments as they get taken out one-by-one by Franchise/{{Batman}}, and insulting anybody who fails him, including Harley Quinn. MadLove, indeed.
* In ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'', this is one of the things that makes the SpacePirates a serious threat. Absolutely everyone is expendable, from mooks to commanders, as long as the goal is accomplished. They will blow up ''entire planets'' just to kill one person, and the troops down there are even ordered to stay so they can ''stall.''
* Notably averted in ''VideoGame/OriginalWar'' from Altar Interactive, a RTS with RPG elements. In the single player game (and multiplayer with the right settings), every person who dies is actually KilledOffForReal. Each of them has a name, skills and a face. You know them. When any of them dies, it's a loss not just for the war cause (the reinforcements are very limited) but for you as the commander personally. Over the whole storyline - if you let four guys die in the first mission, you are going to have to do without them for the rest of the game. The Russian/Soviet faction in the game employ this trope quite a bit though and the Arabians even more so - even then though, the losses are permanent and the soldiers are not very happy about it.
* The military tactics of Thomas "Stonewall" Flathead in ''VideoGame/ZorkZero'' seem to match this. He routinely took 90+% casualties in military operations (Mainly suppressing tax riots against his brother the King's 90+% income tax), and held unit strength up with unlimited conscription powers.
* Mouri Motonari from ''VideoGame/SengokuBasara'' refers to his soldiers as "pawns" and will sacrifice as many of them as needed to fulfil his plans without batting an eyelid. He even has the ability to attack his own troops in-game.
* In the ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' mythos, this is how the New California Republic eventually beat the Brotherhood of Steel after a long war. The Brotherhood possessed advanced technology (as the entire point to their order was to preserve technology over human life) but their elitist and isolationist nature meant that replacing their troops was difficult while the NCR was a republic free to conscript thousands of soldiers.
** The Legion is a more straightforward example; whereas the NCR values even the most lowly recruit's livest, the Legion regards themselves as expendable and that anyone who tries to capture them will not get them alive.
** During the NCR/Brotherhood war, Father Elijah employed this tactic against the NCR when trying to secure the HELIOS One power plant, mainly because [[BadBoss he could care less about the lives of his subordinates]] when it comes to the possibility of obtaining valuable tech (plus just not having the military training and experience of your average Brotherhood Elder -- as implied above, he tried to use reserve tactics [[GeneralFailure when it was the other side that had reserves]]). Later on, he attempted to use this very tactic to crack the Sierra Madre, only for many to succumb to GoldFever and start killing each other out of greed.
* ''VideoGame/FearEffect''. [[spoiler:The Shop, the organization Glas used to work for, sent Glas and his entire squad on a mission. Said mission caused the squad to end up in an ambush that left them all dead or captured, except for Glas. Glas tried to order the squad to abort, but it was too late. Glas unexpectedly encounters his brother Drew and Drew shoots him in the back. Drew claims that the Shop knew that the squad would be ambushed on this mission, but it sent the squad on it anyway. Glas and his squad were not informed of this. Does anyone realize how much the idea of knowing that an ambush is going to occur and not warning anyone about it makes no sense at all?]]
** In the 2nd game, Baron Tarko has a similar attitude.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'' has this happen a lot. Spells (positive or negative) target everything within a range, either centered on a tile or a character. Since spells have a timer before they are cast, it's possible to do a lot more damage to your own forced than to the enemy.
** On some maps and party builds, using a "muddle" (bottling up enemy troops in a tight area using your own troops to block tiles moving out) to bomb enemies is considered a valid tactic.
* Necromancers in ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' can raise undead minions from the corpses of fallen enemies that constantly lose health. You can heal them, but the longer they live, the faster they lose health. The proper way to use them is to let them soak up most of the enemy melee attacks or using spells to make them explode when they're close to the enemy.
* ''Franchise/DragonAge'': This is, essentially, how the Darkspawn fight. They're a mindless [[TheHorde horde]] born by the thousands, driven by a single will. The Battle at Ostagar was doomed from the start, as their tactics relied on an enemy comprised of trained soldiers, not mindless brutes who don't care whether they live or die. ''That'''s why the Blights are so dangerous. The only way to stop them is to eliminate that will by killing the Archdemon.
** The goal of Ostagar (as far as the Grey Wardens were concerned) wasn't to break the Darkspawn but to stall them for long enough for the Archdemon to show up, so that a Warden could kill him.
* ''{{Section 8}}: Prejudice'': When Thorne calls in a bomber to try and kill you, it might frag some of his own troops. One of your allies points out his nonchalance about this.
* Can be invoked by the player in ''VideoGame/SinsOfASolarEmpire'', especially early on. If an enemy player or CPU invades one of your planets, and you don't have a sufficiently sized fleet yet to meet them, you can start cranking out ships and send them into battle one at a time in an attempt to delay the enemy forces until your main fleet arrives, or you can build enough defenses to whittle them down. Can get expensive over time, which can be painful early on as you don't have a lot of resources coming in yet to keep making the units.
** Alternatively, players can split their forces, and send the bulk of their forces to invade an enemy planet, while keeping a small portion behind to deal with enemy invasions, or in case their main fleet needs assistance. Which can prove to be useful should you end up fighting a multiple-front war.
** Also, story-wise, the TEC's main strength is its ability to outproduce the Advent and the Vasari, since they are lagging far behind technologically. There is a fanfic where a TEC admiral is gleeful to discover that newer flagship models are predicted to have a loss rate of ''only'' 2-to-1 (i.e. 2 TEC ships for every 1 equivalent Vasari ship), as opposed to the previous loss rate of 4-to-1. The admiral muses that, with the TEC having a huge industrial and population base, the Vasari will soon be ground down by attrition.
* The Punic Wars, a little-known game by the creators of Tropico, has this as the best strategy (may have been rebalanced in the sequel). Play as Carthage, train tons of the cheapest unit in the game, research an upgrade that pays you if they get killed. Your first army will be traded evenly with that of the enemy. You will come back with two armies instead, then four... you see where this is going. On large maps with many enemies, it's common to have columns of unmanaged, starved soldiers connecting your own city and several enemy towns, it's easier to recruit more than to feed them or pay for a commander to get them in formation.
* The ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic'' series have always had somewhat of this mentality underlying it - after all, your troops are highly disposable, and another few hundred will pop up in your cities next week anyway. Of interest, however, is the sixth game, which simultaneously discourages this (by giving you a score bonus for minimizing or entirely eliminating losses), and allows you to re-enact the classic scenario practically detail-by-detail if you're a Might-based Haven hero. The 'Reinforcement' skill adds a number of temporary members to a chosen squad - these won't stick around after the end of the battle anyway, and thus are eminently expendable, perfect for canon-fodder. As long as the squad doesn't drop below its original numbers, you effectively suffered zero losses. And it just so happens that your upgraded ranged unit, the Sharpshooter, has a powerful attack that hits all units in a line, including your own. If firing into a melee, some of your own units are liable to be in the line of fire too. But hey - we've got Reinforcements, so it doesn't matter, does it?
** And the best part is, the 'Reinforcements' ability is considered a 'Tears' type ability... thus, using this strategy will push your hero [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop closer to ''good'' end of the alignment spectrum]]...
* In any MultiplayerOnlineBattleArena game, you have a line of constantly respawning "creeps" who are there almost solely to take damage for the heroes (such as damage from towers). Some game actively encourage you to kill ''your own'' creeps to limit the amount of gold and experience your enemies get.
* The "Quantity" Idea in ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis'' IV is all about this trope, making you able to have more troops and at the same time reinforcing any losses much faster. Going towards the Quantity side of the Quality-Quantity slider was the same idea in ''II'' and ''III'' -- you get more manpower, quicker reinforcement and faster army construction, but the morale and organisation penalties means that your armies will take more and deal less damage (and likely break earlier), meaning you will ''need'' your larger armies and quicker ability to push more bodies into the fray to overcome otherwise equal foes leaning towards the Quality side.
* At the end of ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'''s Gravidus Dilemma event, the Corpus board of directors pulled Alad V's funding not out of concern for the lives he wasted but the money he was throwing away.
** The Grineer are very prone to this, due to being an entire faction of [[ExpendableClone Expendable Clones]].
* ''VideoGame/XCOM'' plays with this concept. Both the original and the 2012 remake, [[XCOMEnemyUnknown Enemy Unknown]] reward the player for keeping their troops alive by making them more effective in combat. In the original, as they level up, their skills improve. In the remake, as they level up they get new classes and combat abilities, so highly trained and well-equipped soldiers will absolutely devastate late-game missions. The problem is that the road getting there is paved with the corpses of the soldiers who didn't make it that far. Rookies start out with piss-poor aim and equipment, plus you're always outnumbered by aliens, making it necessary to have reserves and RedShirts given how death is a fairly common occurrence. To drive the point home, losing one out of four squadmates still gives a "Good" mission rating.
** Ditto for the fan-made remake ''VideoGame/{{Xenonauts}}''. No matter how hard you try or [[SaveScumming Save Scum]], losses are unavoidable.
* In ''VideoGame/BravelyDefault'', [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Dr. Qada]] has no problems with releasing a chemical weapon that can kill hundreds of thousands of people, both friend and foe, in order to win a war.
* Near the end of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'', the almost-last-boss summons dozens - even hundreds - of minions, with the sole purpose of stalling the player until the boss can [[spoiler:revive Demise, the actual last boss, using Zelda's life force]]. Technically, he doesn't actually have reinforcements, as he throws all his might against the player at once, but he still treats his troops as expendable.
* The indie title ''Life Goes On'' has this as its central gameplay mechanic. You play as a knight going through a dungeon trying to get the treasure at the end. However, it's impossible to make it through any of the levels without dying at least once. So instead you have to die in such a way that it helps later knights to progress.
* ''VideoGame/FurFighters'' has a bit of fun with this. In the intro to the last level of the game, [[BigBad General Viggo]] finds out to his horror that as a result of the Fur Fighters going through all the previous areas of the game, only ''five'' of presumably thousands of his bear minions are left alive. Naturally, [[GameplayAndStorySegregation come the level proper, there's far more than five bears for you to deal with]].
* Averted in both installments of the ''VideoGame/{{WarWind}}'' series. Since the player cannot just produce or breed units, it is necessary to hire basic worker units in an inn, or find a neutral settlement with possible recruits, and then train them as specialists (soldiers, scouts, etc.). Advanced units require talented recruits, which are rather hard to find. Due to this, the player quickly learns to value every single unit, even the weakest one.
* ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed:'' Standard operating procedure for the Templars, and their modern-day incarnation Abstergo Industires. It even applies to their higher ups, who they have on occasion been totally willing to leave at the mercies of an Assassin, all for the sake of their plan. Slightly justified in that they ''really do'' have reserves.
** This even applies to their best agents. In one of the in-game files of ''Rogue'', Agent Dacosta, one of their EliteMooks, comments upon one historical Templar being a SacrificialLamb. Her immediate superior, who previously criticised his boss for this attitude, responds with "Agent Dacosta, you are ''all'' expendable".
* In ''VideoGame/LordsOfTheRealm2'', peasants essentially amount to this in battle. They are extremely weak and die really easily, so are often best utilized to soak up damage for your other troops. The AI tends to make extensive use of this trope as well, particularly the Bishop.
* In ''VideoGame/EiyuuSenkiTheWorldConquest'' a unit's health is represented by the number of soldiers she has. After a battle, the player can just spend money to replenish all of the lost health/soldiers.
* This is basically how you deal with the Combine in the Nova Prospekt level of ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'': Keep sending wave after wave of antlions after them. You don't really even have to do this on purpose for the most part; the antlions will just naturally keep spawning, follow close behind you, and attack any humanoid that's not you. However, if you're [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential feeling particularly lackadaisical]], you can also use them to clear out tripmines. (LetsPlay/SpoilerWarning had some fun with this; see below.)
* In ''VideoGame/TheLordOfTheRingsOnline'', this is actually done by the good guys. If a player wants their character to run skirmishes, they have to undergo the Skirmish Tutorial. When explaining the use of your accompanying Skirmish Soldier, Chief Watcher Heathstraw cheerfully advises you "If he falls, simply call another one.".
* A variation in ''VideoGame/SwordOfTheStars''. During battles, each side has a command point limit that determines how many ships and of which size it can bring to bear at the same time. The number of command points depends on a number of factors, but it's generally a must to have a command ship with you to increase it by a large factor. Furthermore, the game provides a command point bonus to the side with a vastly higher number of ships in the fleet, encouraging armada fights. This doesn't necessarily mean the ships you bring with you have to be combat ships, since you still need support ships (e.g. fuel tankers, repair), which count towards this number. So your fleet of 30 cruisers might only have 12 actual warships with the rest being support ships (they can fight, but not as effectively). But the game will still treat your fleet as having 30 cruisers. For a different effect, the [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Morrigi]] have a unique form of FTL travel that increases the fleet's interstellar speed based on how many ships are in that fleet, even if some of those ships are significantly slower on their own (i.e. they're the only race where slow ships help ''speed up'' the rest of the fleet instead of bogging it down). According to the fluff, only one ship in the fleet is actually using its void drive, with the rest pumping their power into the lead ship to boost the void drive's performance and everyone else "riding the wave". So, you can bring those obsolete ships you have from the start of the game and use them to provided that little boost of speed your new, more powerful ships need.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comics]]
* [[http://rocr.net/index.php?p=20070604 This webcomic strip]], part of the ''CrossoverWars''.
* Prince Ansom used this against Parson in the first book of ''Webcomic/{{Erfworld}}''; and nearly succeeded, although Parson was very good at exploiting the weaknesses of that strategy:
-->'''Parson''': Ansom's thinking he can overwhelm us with numbers, but that's ''additive''. [[RPGMechanicsVerse I've been playing with this combat system for a week now. And it's all about force multipliers.]]
** In the end though, Parson could only defeat the Ansom's forces completely by [[spoiler: having his Dirtamancer and Croackamancer (meaning his earth elementalist and necromancer) work together to reanimate the dead volcano they're in. This ends up destroying both armies.]] It leads to a long WhatHaveIDone period for Parson.
* Subverted in ''Webcomic/GirlGenius'':
-->'''Tarvek:''' If we sacrificed every minion we had, we might take out ''one'' of them.\\
'''Gil:''' That's a terrible plan!\\
'''Minion:''' Thank you, sir!\\
'''Gil:''' There are another ''twenty'' of them! We don't have enough minions!\\
'''Minion:''' Er...
* As EvilOverlord CardCarryingVillain Xykon of ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' is a very BadBoss, he and his [[TheDragon Dragons]] and allies do it repeatedly. A few examples:
** Responding to a group of his ogres demanding to be paid by killing them and turning them into zombies.
** [[TheDragon Dragon]] Redcloak (a goblin) orders a group of hobgoblin ([[FantasticRacism whom he despises]]) {{mooks}} up a dangerous trail so they would cause an avalanche and ensure the safety of the others. Later he sends in unarmed troops against a guard monster, so it will fall asleep after eating them, and orders a human-wave style attack against a fortified city. After one of them dies saving his life, he realizes what he's doing and [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone reacts with horror at what he is becoming]] and promptly stops the wasteful spending of lives.
*** They weren't unarmed. [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0192.html They were given garnish clubs and cracker shields]]!
** [[LampshadeHanging "Sacrificing minions - is there any problem it]] ''[[LampshadeHanging can't]]'' [[LampshadeHanging solve?"]]
** In the Azure City siege, the death knight has hobgoblins throw themselves at the wall and die by the hundreds so that their bodies will create a ramp he can ride up.
** In a bonus strip from ''No Cure For the Paladin Blues'', Xykon kills a mook who has succeeded in slaying a dragon, because the XP he gained from this elevates him beyond a simple mook now--and also makes it possible for him, as a high-level caster, to get a bit of XP that he wouldn't get for killing an unleveled mook.
* In ''Webcomic/TheRedStar'', [[http://www.beyondrealitymedia.com/the-red-star/issue-2/page-13/ Maya comments on how Command had always succeeded by sending more men to die, and they thought it would work this time, too.]]
* In ''Webcomic/{{Terra}}'' UEC General Cole Winters orders the Jolly Roger Squadron to launch an airstrike against a major [[LaResistance Resistance]] base with no backup and no hope of rescue if they survive being shot down. Since they're ''that'' good, they pull it off with only minor losses (two fighters destroyed, with one crew of two {{Red Shirt}}s killed and the other crew ejecting safely and being rescued by the Resistance to become part of the main cast).
* ''WebComic/DragonBallMultiverse'': Bojack's gang was composed of twenty-seven members when it was formed, according to Bujin; according to the novelization, this is the reason why there were only five members left when they met the Z-Warriors.
* ''WebComic/BrawlInTheFamily'' provides the current page image, in a comic that shows the contrast between the ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' tactician and the ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars'' one. The former focuses on his troops' continued survival (being in a video game where [[CastOfSnowflakes any one of the unique units]] [[AnyoneCanDie can die]]), while the latter encourages aggressive tactics without caring about his troops' casualties, because he "can always buy more troops." [[http://brawlinthefamily.keenspot.com/comic/title-559/ The full comic can be seen here.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Originals]]
* ''Wiki/SCPFoundation'' willfully sacrifice hundreds of its D-Class personnel when observing [=SCP=]s. Many of which die in cruel and painful manners, and even if they do survive over a month they get executed anyway.
** Don't feel too sorry for the D-Class personnel though, they're recruited from death row convicts, ie murderers and rapists, to ensure expendable, unsympathetic Red Shirts for SCP experiments
* Humourously spoofed in ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'''s ShowWithinAShow ''Cheat Commandos'', where Gunhaver shows absolutely no concern for the safety of the "[[RedShirt Green Helmets]]":
-->'''Silent Rip''': Uh, shouldn't we go help him?\\
'''Gunhaver''': Naw, he's just one of those Green Helmets. We've got like fifty of them.
* This is Freeza's MO in WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged. While he does show concern for his higher level men (even planning to send gifts to the Ginyu Force's family), his lower level men... not so much. In his first on-screen attack, he shows indifference when the Namekians are slaughtering his troops, but panics when they start targeting his equipment. Once he reaches Earth, he even kills his last henchman for no real reason. This infuriates his father not because of the loss of life or the senselessness of it, but because now they have no one to fly them home (flying is for the help).
* The evil [[FishPeople Kua-Toa]] of ''WebVideo/TalesFromMyDDCampaign'' rely heavily on vast legions of expendable aquatic SlaveMooks to keep their EnemyCivilWar going.
** Also Inverted in the case of the Verandi invasion. The chief reason why the startling amount of resistance the humans put up was so aggravating to the Kua leadership was that the Kua are the only race that can breathe both air and water, meaning that they couldn't use their armies of expendable slaves, and were instead getting large numbers of actual Kua killed trying to hold on to their foothold.
* As mentioned above, LetsPlay/SpoilerWarning found it amusing that this is a common way to deal with Combine tripmines in ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', and started quoting the examples from ''Shrek'', ''Cheat Commandos'', and ''Futurama''.
* ''Podcast/PlumbingTheDeathStar'''s Zammit hopes to put the suicide back in ''Film/SuicideSquad'' in "How Would You Use The Suicide Squad" by sending the squad into areas humans haven't explored because of how dangerous they are. The logic is that eventually one of the squad members will survive and be able to further the sciences with their discoveries; even if the entire Suicide Squad is killed on their adventures into the unknown, odds are Batman will have used that time to capture even ''more'' supervillains to put on the squad.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/GeneratorRex'', White Knight is a particularly [[JerkAss Jerky]] example because not only does he sacrifice the Redshirts and tell them to their face that he was doing so, he says that they themselves should be aware of that by now, and should therefore not be offended.
* Also played for humor in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' with Zapp Brannigan, who once sent, in his own words, [[ZergRush "wave after wave"]] of his own men to fight the Killbots, knowing that the enemies had an exact (though horrifically high) limit of how many humans they were programmed to kill before they shut down. The humor comes from the fact that this was actually seen as a perfectly viable strategy. ("Kif, show them the medal I won.") In a deleted scene from ''Love's Labours Lost In Space,'' a ''single'' Killbot, Corpse-A-Tron, is shown to have a kill limit of 999,999.
** Another time, he actually used this tactic with SHIPS.
-->'''Brannigan:''' [[GeneralFailure On my signal, all ships will file directly into the enemy death cannons, clogging them with wreckage]]!
** Some other examples:
-->'''Brannigan:''' How many men did we lose, Kif?\\
'''Kif:''' All of them, sir.\\
'''Brannigan:''' Well, at least they won't have to mourn each other.
** His men are well aware of this.
-->'''Brannigan:''' Don't worry Leela, I will send in wave after wave of my own men to complete your mission! Are you with me, men?\\
''[complete silence from the entire mess hall]''\\
'''Voice in the back:''' You suck!
** It doesn't help that Brannigan is WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer for this.
-->'''Bender:''' Sir, I volunteer for a suicide mission! ...lousy patriotism circuit!\\
'''Brannigan:''' That's commendable, son, but when I'm in command, ''every'' mission is a suicide mission!
* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'': After speaking out against a general's plan to throw freshly-recruited troops at the front line to serve as meat-shields, not only does Prince Zuko get half his face burned off, but he gets banished and sent on a SnipeHunt, too.
* At the end of ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' Megatron succumbs to this, killing more of his soldiers than the Maximals ever did. Presumably he assumed that when you have a giant warship and superpowers (even by Transformer standards of being big immortal war machines) you don't need a lot of help.
** By the time of the less popular sequel series, Megatron took this to the logical extreme with his [[MechaMooks Vehicon hordes]]. He had so many that the Maximals tore dozens into scrap metal every battle without making a dent in his overall forces.
* In ''ThePenguinsOfMadagascar'' special "Dr. Blowhole's Revenge", the titular villain threatens the penguins with his nearly endless supply of minions:
--> '''Dr. Blowhole:''' So what if they cut down ten, twenty lobsters? We've got MORE LOBSTERS!
** His lobster minions pause in their cheering at that statement and look a little worried. King Julien however has a similar approach to tactics and doesn't look concerned at all.
* ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'': In the episode where ComicBook/{{Aquaman}} appeared, when ComicBook/LexLuthor was told his move would result in the deaths of several employees, he replied their families would receive compensation.
* In the ''Literature/RainbowMagic'' movie, Jack Frost says this in the movie, saying his snowman army is comprised of expendable weaklings that can be replaced infinitely in battle. Said army disagrees.
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries''. Tony Zucco, (an extortionist who set up the "accident" that killed Dick Grayson's parents), shoots at Batman with a Tommy gun, even though multiple {{mooks}} are likely to be hit as well and beg him not to.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Birdman}}'' episode "Meets Birdgirl". While Birdman is fighting Birdgirl, her boss Doctor Mentaur orders his minion to fire hydrogen "shells" (bombs) at them, even after being warned that the bombs will hit Birdgirl too.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life]]
* ''Used'' by both sides in UsefulNotes/WorldWar2.
** The US did a kind of this in UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 where they sent out stupid amounts of ''ships'', as quoted "the US built more ships than Japan could sink" which was meant [[NotHyperbole literally]]. The sailors would be pulled out of the water and sent to crew new ships. This variant of the trope was less reprehensible than others, though many sailors of course did die. Of course, the the US and its allies certainly did not neglect defending those ships as best as they could from enemy attack while they were at this, which included also building fighting ships as fast as they could to do so.
*** Interestingly enough, the threat of endless American reserves in UsefulNotes/WW1 contributed to Germany's surrender.
** The cargo carrying Liberty ships were the best example of this. Designed to be built fast and in huge numbers, it was said if one carried a single load of war material across the Atlantic it had paid for itself. So much emphasis was put on building them ''quickly'', that it wasn't unheard of for welds in the hulls (welding was used in place of riveting because it was faster) to split open in bad weather even without the aid of the enemy. It was calculated the lifespan of a Liberty ship would be 20 Atlantic crossings, so once having made one she had paid herself and the rest 19 would be net profits. Amazingly, many Liberty ships still served in revenue transportation in the 1970s. Two of them are still functional as museum/training ships.
** Similarly to the Liberty Ships were the Escort Carriers, small, cheap aircraft carriers that could be built in mass quantities. The US built over 120 of these ships, which were used for various duties (anti-sub patrol, convoy escort, air support for amphibious forces, etc.) to free up the less numerous and far more capable Fleet carriers such as the Essex class (of which the US fielded "only" 24) to focus on other things (such as hunting down the dwindling numbers of Japanese carriers). For the Escort Carriers, ruggedness was not a high priority, earning them the nickname "Combustible, Vulnerable, Expendable" [[FunWithAcronyms in reference to]] their "CVE" hull classification.
** When the bombings of Berlin escalated, the allied forces did all they could to provoke the Luftwaffe into attacking them. This caused large losses for both sides, but while the allies could replace the lost planes and crews fairly easily the Germans could not. It was one of the factors that eventually allowed the allies to gain air superiority first and air supremacy later.
** The American daylight bombing campaign proved to be staggeringly expensive in terms of human life lost. The Eighth Air Force, which gets most of the spotlight for the air war over Europe, suffered 46,000 casualties, including more than 26,000 airmen killed in action (more lives lost than the entire [[SemperFi US Marine Corps in that war]], although in contrast to the Airmen, the Marines didn't charge en masse into enemy artillery fire as a matter of course). In addition to the 8th AF, the less-famous Fifteenth Air Force, operating out of Italy, also suffered severe casualties pressing their daylight bombing campaign in southern and eastern Europe throughout the war.
** The T-34 was also used in this fashion, and the USSR is very liberal in sending them in swarms. The difference is that the T-34 was incredibly blind-sighted and could rarely even see far enough to fight[[note]]The story of T-34s ramming Tiger wasn't because they were suicidal enough, but because they literally didn't see the giant, steel-gray, angular brick in their face until it was too late to not run into it[[/note]], beat it's own crew half to death, not to mention crippling communications problems (Read: A complete lack of any radio whatsoever). This was rectified in the later models, though, and later T-34-85s incorporated "Common sense" adaptations as other tanks of the time, such as a full 360 cupola for the commander, a turret basket, and an expanded turret so that the Commander didn't also have to pull double duty as the loader.
** Soviet [[BoxedCrook penal battalions]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shtrafbat "Shtrafbats"]], were former Gulag prisoners or transferred Red Army troops for being suspected of having a reluctance to fight for whatever reason. Though told their crimes could be redeemed by receiving a combat injury or performing especially heroically in battle, in reality shtrafbats were largely just treated as existing for this trope's purposes - such as, attempting to break especially stubborn defenses, being [[HighlyConspicuousUniform dressed blatantly]] to be decoys for regular units, suicidal rearguard actions to cover retreats, or worst of all, "trampler" duty where in they cleared minefields...by running through them prior to regular troops' advances.
** Royal Air Force Bomber Command in WWII. Air Marshall Arthur Harris had nickname "Butcher" amongst the RAF bomber crews.
** In general during this period, while the notion of mass producing tanks and planes of inferior quality was an effective strategy for a few years, it simply could not be sustained with manpower losses, because while producing hardware like tanks and planes is simple and quick, recruiting and training men with the sort of skill required to handle even simple equipment was a significantly more lengthy process. As was shown in the case of Germany and Japan, while they were in fact capable of continuing to put out more then enough military hardware to meet their needs, they were chronically short of the experienced crews required to man them. Germany had lost a great many of its best pilots in the Battle of Britain while Japan lost all of its finest Carrier aircraft pilots either at Midway or during the Solomon Islands campaign; while both nations were able to make good their losses of aircraft, they simply could never train pilots with the sort of skill to match their predecessors in a short time. So the lesson that could be learned from this is that while machines are expendable, the men who know how to use those machines are not. America, Russia, and Britain were quick to learn this lesson upon taking stock of their losses after WWII and realized that while quantity over quality had managed to win them the war, it had left them severely weakened with significantly lowered reserves of trained crews at the end of WWII, with countless American crewmen who had spent months in training left as charred corpses inside gutted Sherman tanks scattered across the French countryside. This may have been a key contributing factor in why the Cold War didn't kick off into full blown war after WWII, as both sides had to train an entire new generation of crews to replace those lost in the war, which took time.
** One German general actually stated that Allies would have never gained air superiority had Germany not spent too much resources on strategic bombers. But Allies also spent large amount of resources on strategic bombers, which means that both sides basically sent crews of strategic bombers to die for little military value, while actually harming their own ability to fight the war. In fact, USSBS has shown that German military production reached its peak at actual peak of US strategic bombardment campaign, and only started to slow down after the US re-focused on destroying Oil production and storage facilities over industrial production. It didn't help that the British Night Bombing campaign was instead focused on [[RevengeBeforeReason using the cover of night for petty terror bombing in retaliation for earlier luftwaffe bombing of Britain]].
*** This gave rise to the abandonment of GoingDownWithTheShip for officers that lose a battle. We Have Reserves of equipment, but a trained officer can't be replaced so easily. The [[HonorBeforeReason Death Before Dishonor]] mentality instilled by Japanese officer training meant the Japanese officer corps kept getting worse, while the American and British officer corps kept getting better.
** The entire concept of Kamikaze attacks were based on these, where Japan hoped that it would have more pilots and hardware to outlast their opponents. One Japanese General noted that they were "like bees" in that they swarm to sting the opponent, but died as they done so. Japan would seriously underestimate their reserves, however, and with adapted tactics by the Allies, Kamikazes became less and less effective[[note]]The first few attacks were wildly successful because Allied interceptors ignored planes that headed into a dive, as they expected the pilot of those planes to pull up at the last second. At the time the only suicide attacks had been made by crippled planes, where the pilots were certain to die. They never expected that the Japanese units would ''intentionally'' try to ram a ship with a functional plane[[/note]].
** By the end of the war, Germany itself would resort to similar tactics. Because spare parts were in such short supply, it wasn't uncommon for entire tanks to be shipped to units for cannibalizing into parts. Panzer Brigades were organized with large numbers of the newly-produced tanks and Panzergrenadiers, but severely lacking in anti-aircraft guns, armored recovery vehicles and the general logistics that made German armor effective. Poorly-trained crews were often lost to seasoned American tank veterans. Sabotage from slave labor, less available resources and the constant bombing sharply drove down quality - post-war tests conducted by the Soviets determined armor plate on Panthers would frequently fall apart when struck with rounds theoretically rated to protect against. Ball-bearings for turret traverse mechanisms and hard, durable metals needed for transmissions were in extremely short supply.
** Hitler gave orders amounting to no retreat and no surrender to Army Group North, Center, A, B, and North Africa - ordering them all to fight to the last man. A common interpretation is that the apparent success of 'no retreat' in the winter of '41-42 - in the face of an over-ambitious Soviet counter-offensive that failed to encircle and annihilate Army Group Center due to command-inexperience and weak logistics - convinced him that German troops were superior (man-for-man) to their Soviet counterparts and needed only the moral courage to keep fighting for them to prevail. At no point did he ever seem to appreciate the importance of mobile reserves and operational/campaign-level withdrawals to a successful strategic defense-in-depth - the Wehrmacht basically had nothing of the former left after the Ukrainian autumn-winter campaigns of '43-44, which annihilated the country's stock of experienced Panzer-crews, and he increasingly forbade the latter and began routinely firing Generals who [[ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight refused to follow those orders]] - even the most talented and indispensable of them, such as Manstein and Runstedt.
** In fact, this mentality was one of many reasons why the Germans lost the Battle of Stalingrad and, later, the entire Eastern Front of the European Theater.
** Also applies to the German U-boat service. By the end of the war, they had suffered a permanent casualty rate of over 70%. Yet, they kept being sent out on what were effectively suicide missions.
* Demetrios [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast the Besieger]] would throw his men at the walls of enemy cities, not out of necessity, but out of anger or [[GloryHound thirst for glory]]. When his own son pointed out how his men were dying for nothing, Demetrios lashed out at him, saying "Why so distraught? Are rations due from you to the dead?"
* An attitude similar to this served the Romans well during their expansion. While they were perhaps not as callous about it as many other examples of this trope, they were willing and able to sustain casualties that would cripple any rival state. It didn't work so well against the Germanic tribes, though.
** [[TropeNamer King Pyrrhus]] won several battles over the Romans but [[PyrrhicVictory found his army getting weaker whereas the Romans were able to use their manpower to bring their armies back up to full strength]].
** The Roman reaction to the disastrous battle of Cannae, the bloodiest day in Roman history to that point, with the virtually the entire Roman army annihilated? Raise another army and outlaw even speaking the word ''pax'' (''peace''). Interestingly, Hannibal, the winner of Cannae, '' knew'' it, and his entire strategy in the [[UsefulNotes/PunicWars Second Punic War]] was a [[ExploitedTrope well-thought attempt at working around this]]: knowing that the Romans' numerical superiority mostly came from the troops provided by their allies in Italy, he invaded Italy with a small but well-trained and ''magnificently'' led army and started inflicting crushing defeats after crushing defeats in the attempt to scare and impress the Italian population in defecting to his side, thus ''stealing away Rome's numerical superiority''. While partially effective, this strategy didn't cause enough defections, to the point that, right after Cannae, the Romans could effectively keep ''six'' armies in the field: one facing Hannibal and [[DeathOfAThousandCuts launching raids to slowly destroy his army]], one in Northern Italy facing his Gaulish allies, one in Southern Italy facing the Samnites and the other populations who had defected from the alliance with Rome (this one would also occasionally fight Hannibal because most of the time he was in the area), one in ''Spain'' to attack Hannibal's base of operation, one in ''the Balkans'' to face the Macedons (who had entered the war because, after Cannae, they had figured the Romans were too weak to defend their allies in Greece), and ''the survivors of Cannae'' [[TheDogBitesBack destroying the Sicilian cities that had defected to Hannibal]]. His situation only grew worse from that: the Carthaginians managed to destroy the army deployed in Spain, but by that point Hannibal's allies in Sicily had been destroyed or cowed into defecting back to Rome, the Gauls were broken as an effective fighting force and the Macedons [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere had realized what was happening and sued for peace]], meaning the survivors of Cannae could go to Spain and finish the job, the army of Northern Italy could pick off the Carthaginian troops that had escaped Spain and were trying to join Hannibal, and the forces of the army of the Balkans had been divided between the Northern and the Southern Italy armies to allow them to finish their job faster. ''Then'' the survivors of Cannae [[UpToEleven raised reinforcements in Spain and Sicily]] and invaded Africa, where they [[{{Irony}} successfully stole Carthage's main ally]].
** Even before Hannibal, the Romans were so well-versed in manouver they could pull this ''on armies that outnumbered them'': their frontline and rear-guard troops would switch position mid-battle, allowing their soldiers to stay relatively fresh while the enemy grew tired and felt like the Romans were outnumbering them until they either broke and were massacred during the escape (because the Romans were still fresher and would catch up to them) or were all chopped down in battle.
*** During their civil wars, this bit them back in the ass: as both sides would pull this, unless one of the commanders was significantly better or got lucky the armies would suffer grevious losses, resulting in a greater weakening of the Roman military than it would be for other armies.
* At the Battle of Crecy in 1346, the French king Philip VI opened the battle by deploying Genoese mercenary crossbowmen and ordered them to begin firing on the English encamped at the top of the hill. The Genoese commander informed Philip that his troops were very fatigued from marching through rain and mud, did not have their pavises (anti-arrow shields) and that their bowstrings were wet from rain, which reduced their range. Philip insisted that they attack anyway which predictably ended with a catastrophe against the fast-firing English archers. Annoyed that his mercenaries had the audacity to die because of his idiotic order, Philip compounded his stupidity and brutality by ordereding his cavalry to charge through them to get to the English. The French knights deliberately ''[[LeeroyJenkins chopped their way through their own crossbowmen]]'' to try and attack the English.
** [[KarmicDeath And the result was that the longbowmen promptly shot all of the knights too]].
* [[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution Revolutionary]] UsefulNotes/{{France}}, according to historian Eugen Weber, was the first Western power to recruit conscripts in large numbers. The traditional file of well-trained soldiers went out in favor of massive columns of ill-trained soldiers, and French generals did not hesitate to throw them at the enemy under heavy fire, beginning what Weber called "The Gun Fodder Era." When you have a whole country of potential conscripts as your reserves, you can afford to lose many more soldiers than those that have to pay a professional army.
** From the same era, one way {{UsefulNotes/Napoleon Bonaparte}} earned the ire of his fellow commanders prior to his declaring himself Emperor was because he was known to brag about the number of men he could lose in a single battle and still win it.
* During the battle of Guilford Courthouse during the UsefulNotes/AmericanRevolution, Lord Cornwallis's forces were on the verge of a devastating defeat. Out of desperation, he ordered his remaining artillery to fire grapeshot into the mass of men on the plain, regular and rebel alike. The rebels were forced back, [[WasItReallyWorthIt but at a staggering cost to Cornwallis's troops]].
* In the US Civil War, Union General Grant was accused of this, being given the appellation "Butcher" Grant by some on the Union side after his high-casualty battles in Virginia. But he didn't spend his men needlessly (and deeply mourned the battle of Cold Harbour, the one high-casualty battle that was genuinely pointless), and was distinguished from previous Union generals by ''advancing'' after high-casualty battles rather than retreating, something which made the men happy because they could see they were actually making progress.
** A lot of that was because he was lined up against Lee. In the West he could fairly often outmanoever his opponents, such his Siege of Vicksburg where he finessed a spectacular and relatively low-cost victory that happened at around the same time, and was arguably more important than, the battle of Gettysburg. In addition, he was fighting in the Eastern Theater, where there simply wasn't space to maneuver or to bring the Union's superior numbers to bear. In the West, there was such space.
* Some WWI commanders would shoot those attempting to retreat without orders, or who refused to go over the trenches. It was a sort of preemptive punishment for treason. Although the number of men so shot is grossly overexaggerated, there were men who were under ''two'' suspended sentences of death for desertion or sleeping at their posts.
** The point of the WWI strategy of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attrition_warfare attrition warfare]] was "we have '''more''' reserves than them!"
** Luigi Cadorna's strategy for the Italian army was based on this: knowing that his army was underequipped but most of the Austro-Hungarian forces were tied up fighting the Russians, he launched assault after pointless assault on the Isonzo to drain the enemy reserves while Italy's industry produced enough guns to properly equip his troops. Eventually he succeeded in draining the Austro-Hungarian reserves, but before he could break through the Russians collapsed and the newly freed enemy forces were redeployed to Italy with some German reinforcements, resulting in the catastrophic defeat at the Battle of Caporetto. In the end he was sacked but still somewhat succeeded, as the Austro-Hungarians ''still'' had no reserves left while Italy could use their last reserves to ''fill the losses of the battle and then some'', now led well by Cadorna's replacement Armando Diaz properly equipped, with Italy's shortage of machine guns filled in large part by American and French supplies.
** Then there's Aylmer Hunter-Weston, a British divisional commander during the Gallipoli Campaign. When a staff officer remarked on the heavy casualties his men incurred at the Battle of Krithia, Hunter-Weston asked "Casualties? What do I care for casualties?"
* The official policy of UsefulNotes/{{Egypt}} in the War of Attrition 1967-1970, after they lost the Six Day War. As said by President UsefulNotes/GamalAbdelNasser:
--> "If the enemy succeeds in inflicting fifty-thousand casualties in this campaign, we can go on fighting nevertheless, because we have manpower reserves. If we succeed in inflicting ten-thousand casualties, he will unavoidably find himself compelled to stop fighting, because he has no manpower reserves."
** The Israelis tried to counter since theu [[GenreSavvy could do the math just as well]] and [[TookAThirdOption decided to bomb Cairo from the air]], directly and indirectly threatening the Nasser regime itself. However, it turned out, they could not sustain a deep penetration bombing campaign either.[[note]] The Egyptians purchases scores of batteries of the latest Soviet Surface to Air Missiles and put them on the approaches to Cairo. It turns out that equipment not troops is the limiting factor in modern war[[/note]]
* During the First Gulf War, the USA's one-time (Cold-War) Ally Generalissimo Saddam Hussein believed that a lesson from the Vietnam War was that the USA (who formed the backbone of the U.N. taskforce to force him back from The Kingdom Of Kuwait) wouldn't support a war that would cost them 10,000 casualites. He, meanwhile had hundreds of thousands to spare and none of his subjects could protest the attrition. For one thing he thought that the U.N. would obey the letter of international law and seek to only engage him in Kuwait (they attacked Iraq itself, outflanking his forces and trapping them in Kuwait). For another, he seems to have forgotten the basics of force multipliers - i.e. his troops were catastrophically outmatched, so the enemy could be expected to take minimal losses (the greater the enemy's advantage, the fewer their losses). Thus, while the U.N. killed some 30k Iraqi troops they only lost 392 people.
* King Goujian of Yue, a pre-Imperial Chinese ruler, would terrorise his opponents by having his front line march out to the middle of the field and decapitate themselves (or, in some accounts, slit their own throats, which makes more sense).
* A rather cold-hearted take on this is sometimes cited by more bellicose Indian generals in response to the logic of Mutual Assured Destruction in the event of a nuclear war with Pakistan, arguing that it doesn't apply, since if an Indian strike takes out 200 million Pakistanis, it has exterminated the country, whereas if a Pakistani strike takes out 200 million Indians, they still have over a billion left.
* In nature, reproductive strategies are split between animals that have a small number of young and raise them carefully, and ones that have lots of young (or, typically, lay lots of eggs) and don't care for them at all, trusting that there are enough that ''some'' will survive. The latter strategy is a lot less energy-intensive and is generally used by more basic and short-lived species, while the former is particularly common among some birds and nearly all the larger mammals. Some kinds of rodents have and raise frequent large litters, leading to exponential population growth over a very short time if conditions are favorable.
* The human body is like this. It creates millions of white blood cells to fight infections and continues to create them until the infection is defeated. It works most of the time, except against diseases that attack the immune system itself or autoimmune disorders (when they go nuts and attack the tissues they're supposed to defend).
* In a non human killing way, situations or countries that have (more than) enough of a certain resource can act like that. Iceland for example has a lot of geothermal and hydropower resources; much more than a country of a bit over 300 000 people could ever use for domestic consumption and there is no way to export any sizable quantity of it directly, so while electricity is not quite "too cheap to meter", some of the energy uses tend to be rather wasteful. The famous "Blue Lagoon" for instance is basically wastewater of a geothermal power plant that is still warm enough to swim in in the Icelandic winter. Most other countries would probably use it to heat homes, but there is just ''so much'' of it that this is what is left over even after all needs are met. Being quite GenreSavvy, Iceland has started quite a big aluminum industry, because converting bauxite into aluminum requires a huge amount of electric energy and Iceland has a lot of it.
** Similarly the GDR had a WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer approach to Lignite. It was (and still is) the only natural resource found in any appreciable quantities in the area and while most of its uses are horribly inefficient and/or polluting,[[note]] You can make almost everything that you can make from oil from coal as well. Including gasoline. It's just much more inefficient. Oh and lignite is also 50% water by weight, so every second car in a train carrying lignite is carrying high priced steam[[/note]] it was still cheaper than buying other resources or technology to increase efficiency. In subsidized housing in the GDR people would regulate the temperature by opening the window as the heating could not be shut off and was paid for anyway. It's almost hard to believe the GDR eventually ran out of money.
* Seriously averted by, of all people, Genghis Khan. When your forces are usually a fraction of what your opposition can muster in you need to preserve those forces. They never engaged in hand-to-hand when they didn't have to, and leaving wounded men on the field was grounds for a commander's execution. Overly aggressive types tended not to get promoted because of the casualties they would take. Also, Genghis was known for a FatherToHisMen approach--at least to his own people.
* Like China in Korean War example above, Vietnam Wars prove to be this for North Vietnamese against US military. They want to win more (they have fewer choices; USA can get out, they can't), and, by percentage of nation's GDP, put more effort into their fight. So no matter how North lost battles and personnel, they will keep fighting until the USA just give up.
** Also by extension, most of fights against colonialist forces also this trope. When the rebel or local lacks 1) training, 2) hardware, 3) not-obsolete military understanding and organization, the number is usually on their side and they utilize that advantage.
[[/folder]]

----

to:

** In the second game, Baron Tarko has a similar attitude.
* ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'': This appears to be standard policy for Imperial officers, Darths, and Empire officials in general. The officers shrug it off; they're just "common soldiers." The Sith don't give a bantha's rear about much else other than themselves and their power games (the [[HumanoidAbomination Emperor]] is an OmnicidalManiac who wants ''everything in the galaxy except himself'' dead), and Empire officials follow the lead of the military and Sith. Couple this with KlingonPromotion being the ''preferred'' method of advancement (it's just gauche for a non-Sith to not be sneaky about it), and the Empire does more damage to itself than it does its enemies. Manditory conscription and [[WeWillUseManualLaborInTheFuture extensive use of slave labor]] is likely the only reason they managed to get off Dromund Kaas. The fact they caught the Republic by surprise [[WhatAnIdiot (thanks to Revan and Exile having ''no backup plans'' and walking into an obvious trap)]] is the only reason they had any success at all.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Overlord}}'', this is ''your'' attitude towards your own {{Mook}}s. Fun ensues.
* Many RealTimeStrategy games will end up either encouraging this in their players, or doing so as their AI. Most noticable in the first ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'' game, when using ground troops against the laser towers. Laser tower = one guaranteed dead enemy soldier, or one very heavily damaged enemy vehicle, every few seconds. Infantry = lots of 'em, I can crank them out so fast I can't deploy them fast enough, and eventually.
** While various factions in various games incur bonuses for sacrificing troops. Examples: ''C&C Red Alert Yuri's Revenge'' where Yuri can feed troops (own or mind-controlled enemies) to the Meat Grinder for cash. Starcraft and Warcraft III where Zerg and Undead can 'eat' their own troops for energy/mana.
* Strongly averted in ''VideoGame/CompanyOfHeroes''. The costs of getting a unit or vehicle to the frontlines is much, much more than the cost of reinforcing or repairing it (compare 270 manpower units for a basic rifle company, compared to 30 units each for each member of the squad, up to five). In addition, the American units gain veteran bonuses as they survive in combat, and veterancy only survives if the unit does: if your elite unit of riflemen are all killed, they take their elite status to the grave with them.
** [=COH=] does have an example of this trope however. The American armor commander has the "Allied War Machine" ability which, when activated, gives you free tanks to replace any that are destroyed during the duration of the ability (although there is a rather hefty munition cost to use this). Be prepared for more of this trope though when ''Company of Heroes 2'' comes out, which takes place on the Eastern Front.
* Real Time Tactics games generally avert this trope by giving you fixed units in the game, though this gives another problem of destroyed units being [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost for good]] (except in ''VideoGame/WorldInConflict'' which allowed reinforcements to replace lost units). Some modern RTS also avoid the "We Have Reserves" type gameplay by taking psychological issues of individual units into account, which makes sending troops into suicide missions tactically prohibitive.
* ''Franchise/MassEffect'':
** A rare example of this trope in play with a military that ''does'' value its personnel's lives. According to the [[EncyclopediaExposita Codex]], fighter groups that launch torpedo bombing runs on larger ships will ''always'' suffer casualties due to virtual intelligence-controlled GARDIAN laser point defense; the only way to defeat these defenses is to overwhelm them with sheer numbers until they overheat. As a result, fighter wings always take heavy casualties when attacking an enemy fleet. Though while the first fighter waves are always ''hit'', it's not as if everybody in the first wave dies. Indeed, because the strength of the lasers drops off the greater the distance to the target due to beam diffusion, it's rare for the GARDIAN systems to score more than a few actual ''kills.'' What generally happens instead is that the first waves of fighters take a bit of damage and are forced to return to base.
** This is implied to be the krogan military strategy in a nutshell. There are always more krogan, forever--the only way that the Council was able to defeat them was by reducing the rate of viable pregnancies to one in one thousand, and it was still enough to sustain their population. Warlord Okeer gives us this wonderful quote, which summarizes krogan battle tactics:
--->'''Okeer:''' I say let us carry the [[DepopulationBomb genophage]] with us. Let a thousand children die for every one that lives. We will climb to victory atop a mountain of our dead -- for that is the krogan way.
** Geth don't place much value on individual mobile platforms; if one is destroyed, the geth in that platform transmit their memories and experiences to the nearest carrier, and that data is uploaded to the total gestalt geth MindHive, effectively making the geth immortal. However, they aren't stupid - they will still try to preserve mobile platforms if possible in order to to maximize combat effectiveness and resources. Plus what happens to the programs within mobile platforms not connected to the geth collective.
---> [[spoiler:'''Legion''': No carrier, no carrier, no carrier, no...(*thunk*)]]
** If Commander Shepard has the 'Ruthless' background, his/her military claim-to-fame is being the Butcher of Torfan, where s/he ordered his/her men forward, knowing many would be gunned down, also knowing it would ensure victory. Torfan was a base used by batarian slavers responsible for hitting human colonies, and the attack is a response meant to curb this trend: Ruthless Renegade Shepard makes no apologies, as part of the "get the job done at any cost" mentality. Ruthless ''Paragon'' Shepard is somewhat haunted by the experience, but s/he believed sending a message to discourage repeats of Mindoir and Elysium was more important. Even then, Ruthless Shepard crosses (or came very close to crossing) the MoralEventHorizon anyway - s/he also killed the batarians that had surrendered.
** Harbinger's thoughts on losing his own troops:
---> Leave the dead where they fall.\\
The dead are useless.\\
Ignore the fallen.\\
Kill one, and one hundred will replace it.\\
This form is irrelevant (to his current host)
** Interestingly, ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' gives us an example from a scientific perspective. A Cerberus scientist is trying to decipher the secrets behind huskification and indoctrination, some of the most advanced and dangerous examples of Reaper tech. Even though the technology is thousands if not ''millions'' of years beyond them, the fact that they have tens of millions of test subjects and a complete disregard for the lives of said test subjects allows them to make steady progress regardless.
** The Reapers rely heavily on this for their ground troops, who are typically indoctrinated, cyborged victims of Reaper attacks; you will encounter a lot of examples where the main strategy they use to try and take a location or kill Shepard, assuming they can't have an indoctrinated agent open the doors for them, is "throw more husks/Cannibals/Marauders/Brutes at the problem until it goes away". They don't use it as often with Ravagers or Banshees, however, since after Attican Traverse: Krogan Team they have a limited supply of Ravagers, and Banshees can only be created from asari with a very rare genetic defect.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Prototype}}'', the [[ArmiesAreEvil Blackwatch]] explicitly state that they are using the United States Marines as the "shock troops" for the occupation of Manhattan and the war against the infected. Their purpose is to take casualties and take the blame for the destruction of the city to cover up Blackwatch's operations. At one point, one of the Web of Intrigue nodes indicates that Blackwatch anticipates Marine casualties per week to be between one thousand to two and a half thousand. Putting that in a perspective of modern military terms, total Coalition casualties during Operation Iraqi Freedom - a full-scale war against a ''country'' - were less than a thousand over a ''month-long'' period.
** The US casualties list from March 2003 to September 2009 was 4,334. That's ''over 6 years.'' Blackwatch figure the Marines will lose that many ''in about three weeks''.
** The Marines [[ThrowTheDogABone are thrown a bone]] in the end when they get ''all'' of the credit for saving what's left of Manhattan from the Infection [[spoiler:and a nuke]].
* SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker is like this in ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamAsylum'', leaving his cohorts in multiple lurches without batting an eyelash, making YouHaveFailedMe comments as they get taken out one-by-one by Franchise/{{Batman}}, and insulting anybody who fails him, including Harley Quinn. MadLove, indeed.
* In ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'', this is one of the things that makes the SpacePirates a serious threat. Absolutely everyone is expendable, from mooks to commanders, as long as the goal is accomplished. They will blow up ''entire planets'' just to kill one person, and the troops down there are even ordered to stay so they can ''stall.''
* Notably averted in ''VideoGame/OriginalWar'' from Altar Interactive, a RTS with RPG elements. In the single player game (and multiplayer with the right settings), every person who dies is actually KilledOffForReal. Each of them has a name, skills and a face. You know them. When any of them dies, it's a loss not just for the war cause (the reinforcements are very limited) but for you as the commander personally. Over the whole storyline - if you let four guys die in the first mission, you are going to have to do without them for the rest of the game. The Russian/Soviet faction in the game employ this trope quite a bit though and the Arabians even more so - even then though, the losses are permanent and the soldiers are not very happy about it.
* The military tactics of Thomas "Stonewall" Flathead in ''VideoGame/ZorkZero'' seem to match this. He routinely took 90+% casualties in military operations (Mainly suppressing tax riots against his brother the King's 90+% income tax), and held unit strength up with unlimited conscription powers.
* Mouri Motonari from ''VideoGame/SengokuBasara'' refers to his soldiers as "pawns" and will sacrifice as many of them as needed to fulfil his plans without batting an eyelid. He even has the ability to attack his own troops in-game.
* In the ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' mythos, this is how the New California Republic eventually beat the Brotherhood of Steel after a long war. The Brotherhood possessed advanced technology (as the entire point to their order was to preserve technology over human life) but their elitist and isolationist nature meant that replacing their troops was difficult while the NCR was a republic free to conscript thousands of soldiers.
** The Legion is a more straightforward example; whereas the NCR values even the most lowly recruit's livest, the Legion regards themselves as expendable and that anyone who tries to capture them will not get them alive.
** During the NCR/Brotherhood war, Father Elijah employed this tactic against the NCR when trying to secure the HELIOS One power plant, mainly because [[BadBoss he could care less about the lives of his subordinates]] when it comes to the possibility of obtaining valuable tech (plus just not having the military training and experience of your average Brotherhood Elder -- as implied above, he tried to use reserve tactics [[GeneralFailure when it was the other side that had reserves]]). Later on, he attempted to use this very tactic to crack the Sierra Madre, only for many to succumb to GoldFever and start killing each other out of greed.
* ''VideoGame/FearEffect''. [[spoiler:The Shop, the organization Glas used to work for, sent Glas and his entire squad on a mission. Said mission caused the squad to end up in an ambush that left them all dead or captured, except for Glas. Glas tried to order the squad to abort, but it was too late. Glas unexpectedly encounters his brother Drew and Drew shoots him in the back. Drew claims that the Shop knew that the squad would be ambushed on this mission, but it sent the squad on it anyway. Glas and his squad were not informed of this. Does anyone realize how much the idea of knowing that an ambush is going to occur and not warning anyone about it makes no sense at all?]]
** In the 2nd game, Baron Tarko has a similar attitude.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'' has this happen a lot. Spells (positive or negative) target everything within a range, either centered on a tile or a character. Since spells have a timer before they are cast, it's possible to do a lot more damage to your own forced than to the enemy.
** On some maps and party builds, using a "muddle" (bottling up enemy troops in a tight area using your own troops to block tiles moving out) to bomb enemies is considered a valid tactic.
* Necromancers in ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' can raise undead minions from the corpses of fallen enemies that constantly lose health. You can heal them, but the longer they live, the faster they lose health. The proper way to use them is to let them soak up most of the enemy melee attacks or using spells to make them explode when they're close to the enemy.
* ''Franchise/DragonAge'': This is, essentially, how the Darkspawn fight. They're a mindless [[TheHorde horde]] born by the thousands, driven by a single will. The Battle at Ostagar was doomed from the start, as their tactics relied on an enemy comprised of trained soldiers, not mindless brutes who don't care whether they live or die. ''That'''s why the Blights are so dangerous. The only way to stop them is to eliminate that will by killing the Archdemon.
** The goal of Ostagar (as far as the Grey Wardens were concerned) wasn't to break the Darkspawn but to stall them for long enough for the Archdemon to show up, so that a Warden could kill him.
* ''{{Section 8}}: Prejudice'': When Thorne calls in a bomber to try and kill you, it might frag some of his own troops. One of your allies points out his nonchalance about this.
* Can be invoked by the player in ''VideoGame/SinsOfASolarEmpire'', especially early on. If an enemy player or CPU invades one of your planets, and you don't have a sufficiently sized fleet yet to meet them, you can start cranking out ships and send them into battle one at a time in an attempt to delay the enemy forces until your main fleet arrives, or you can build enough defenses to whittle them down. Can get expensive over time, which can be painful early on as you don't have a lot of resources coming in yet to keep making the units.
** Alternatively, players can split their forces, and send the bulk of their forces to invade an enemy planet, while keeping a small portion behind to deal with enemy invasions, or in case their main fleet needs assistance. Which can prove to be useful should you end up fighting a multiple-front war.
** Also, story-wise, the TEC's main strength is its ability to outproduce the Advent and the Vasari, since they are lagging far behind technologically. There is a fanfic where a TEC admiral is gleeful to discover that newer flagship models are predicted to have a loss rate of ''only'' 2-to-1 (i.e. 2 TEC ships for every 1 equivalent Vasari ship), as opposed to the previous loss rate of 4-to-1. The admiral muses that, with the TEC having a huge industrial and population base, the Vasari will soon be ground down by attrition.
* The Punic Wars, a little-known game by the creators of Tropico, has this as the best strategy (may have been rebalanced in the sequel). Play as Carthage, train tons of the cheapest unit in the game, research an upgrade that pays you if they get killed. Your first army will be traded evenly with that of the enemy. You will come back with two armies instead, then four... you see where this is going. On large maps with many enemies, it's common to have columns of unmanaged, starved soldiers connecting your own city and several enemy towns, it's easier to recruit more than to feed them or pay for a commander to get them in formation.
* The ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic'' series have always had somewhat of this mentality underlying it - after all, your troops are highly disposable, and another few hundred will pop up in your cities next week anyway. Of interest, however, is the sixth game, which simultaneously discourages this (by giving you a score bonus for minimizing or entirely eliminating losses), and allows you to re-enact the classic scenario practically detail-by-detail if you're a Might-based Haven hero. The 'Reinforcement' skill adds a number of temporary members to a chosen squad - these won't stick around after the end of the battle anyway, and thus are eminently expendable, perfect for canon-fodder. As long as the squad doesn't drop below its original numbers, you effectively suffered zero losses. And it just so happens that your upgraded ranged unit, the Sharpshooter, has a powerful attack that hits all units in a line, including your own. If firing into a melee, some of your own units are liable to be in the line of fire too. But hey - we've got Reinforcements, so it doesn't matter, does it?
** And the best part is, the 'Reinforcements' ability is considered a 'Tears' type ability... thus, using this strategy will push your hero [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop closer to ''good'' end of the alignment spectrum]]...
* In any MultiplayerOnlineBattleArena game, you have a line of constantly respawning "creeps" who are there almost solely to take damage for the heroes (such as damage from towers). Some game actively encourage you to kill ''your own'' creeps to limit the amount of gold and experience your enemies get.
* The "Quantity" Idea in ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis'' IV is all about this trope, making you able to have more troops and at the same time reinforcing any losses much faster. Going towards the Quantity side of the Quality-Quantity slider was the same idea in ''II'' and ''III'' -- you get more manpower, quicker reinforcement and faster army construction, but the morale and organisation penalties means that your armies will take more and deal less damage (and likely break earlier), meaning you will ''need'' your larger armies and quicker ability to push more bodies into the fray to overcome otherwise equal foes leaning towards the Quality side.
* At the end of ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'''s Gravidus Dilemma event, the Corpus board of directors pulled Alad V's funding not out of concern for the lives he wasted but the money he was throwing away.
** The Grineer are very prone to this, due to being an entire faction of [[ExpendableClone Expendable Clones]].
* ''VideoGame/XCOM'' plays with this concept. Both the original and the 2012 remake, [[XCOMEnemyUnknown Enemy Unknown]] reward the player for keeping their troops alive by making them more effective in combat. In the original, as they level up, their skills improve. In the remake, as they level up they get new classes and combat abilities, so highly trained and well-equipped soldiers will absolutely devastate late-game missions. The problem is that the road getting there is paved with the corpses of the soldiers who didn't make it that far. Rookies start out with piss-poor aim and equipment, plus you're always outnumbered by aliens, making it necessary to have reserves and RedShirts given how death is a fairly common occurrence. To drive the point home, losing one out of four squadmates still gives a "Good" mission rating.
** Ditto for the fan-made remake ''VideoGame/{{Xenonauts}}''. No matter how hard you try or [[SaveScumming Save Scum]], losses are unavoidable.
* In ''VideoGame/BravelyDefault'', [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Dr. Qada]] has no problems with releasing a chemical weapon that can kill hundreds of thousands of people, both friend and foe, in order to win a war.
* Near the end of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'', the almost-last-boss summons dozens - even hundreds - of minions, with the sole purpose of stalling the player until the boss can [[spoiler:revive Demise, the actual last boss, using Zelda's life force]]. Technically, he doesn't actually have reinforcements, as he throws all his might against the player at once, but he still treats his troops as expendable.
* The indie title ''Life Goes On'' has this as its central gameplay mechanic. You play as a knight going through a dungeon trying to get the treasure at the end. However, it's impossible to make it through any of the levels without dying at least once. So instead you have to die in such a way that it helps later knights to progress.
* ''VideoGame/FurFighters'' has a bit of fun with this. In the intro to the last level of the game, [[BigBad General Viggo]] finds out to his horror that as a result of the Fur Fighters going through all the previous areas of the game, only ''five'' of presumably thousands of his bear minions are left alive. Naturally, [[GameplayAndStorySegregation come the level proper, there's far more than five bears for you to deal with]].
* Averted in both installments of the ''VideoGame/{{WarWind}}'' series. Since the player cannot just produce or breed units, it is necessary to hire basic worker units in an inn, or find a neutral settlement with possible recruits, and then train them as specialists (soldiers, scouts, etc.). Advanced units require talented recruits, which are rather hard to find. Due to this, the player quickly learns to value every single unit, even the weakest one.
* ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed:'' Standard operating procedure for the Templars, and their modern-day incarnation Abstergo Industires. It even applies to their higher ups, who they have on occasion been totally willing to leave at the mercies of an Assassin, all for the sake of their plan. Slightly justified in that they ''really do'' have reserves.
** This even applies to their best agents. In one of the in-game files of ''Rogue'', Agent Dacosta, one of their EliteMooks, comments upon one historical Templar being a SacrificialLamb. Her immediate superior, who previously criticised his boss for this attitude, responds with "Agent Dacosta, you are ''all'' expendable".
* In ''VideoGame/LordsOfTheRealm2'', peasants essentially amount to this in battle. They are extremely weak and die really easily, so are often best utilized to soak up damage for your other troops. The AI tends to make extensive use of this trope as well, particularly the Bishop.
* In ''VideoGame/EiyuuSenkiTheWorldConquest'' a unit's health is represented by the number of soldiers she has. After a battle, the player can just spend money to replenish all of the lost health/soldiers.
* This is basically how you deal with the Combine in the Nova Prospekt level of ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'': Keep sending wave after wave of antlions after them. You don't really even have to do this on purpose for the most part; the antlions will just naturally keep spawning, follow close behind you, and attack any humanoid that's not you. However, if you're [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential feeling particularly lackadaisical]], you can also use them to clear out tripmines. (LetsPlay/SpoilerWarning had some fun with this; see below.)
* In ''VideoGame/TheLordOfTheRingsOnline'', this is actually done by the good guys. If a player wants their character to run skirmishes, they have to undergo the Skirmish Tutorial. When explaining the use of your accompanying Skirmish Soldier, Chief Watcher Heathstraw cheerfully advises you "If he falls, simply call another one.".
* A variation in ''VideoGame/SwordOfTheStars''. During battles, each side has a command point limit that determines how many ships and of which size it can bring to bear at the same time. The number of command points depends on a number of factors, but it's generally a must to have a command ship with you to increase it by a large factor. Furthermore, the game provides a command point bonus to the side with a vastly higher number of ships in the fleet, encouraging armada fights. This doesn't necessarily mean the ships you bring with you have to be combat ships, since you still need support ships (e.g. fuel tankers, repair), which count towards this number. So your fleet of 30 cruisers might only have 12 actual warships with the rest being support ships (they can fight, but not as effectively). But the game will still treat your fleet as having 30 cruisers. For a different effect, the [[OurDragonsAreDifferent Morrigi]] have a unique form of FTL travel that increases the fleet's interstellar speed based on how many ships are in that fleet, even if some of those ships are significantly slower on their own (i.e. they're the only race where slow ships help ''speed up'' the rest of the fleet instead of bogging it down). According to the fluff, only one ship in the fleet is actually using its void drive, with the rest pumping their power into the lead ship to boost the void drive's performance and everyone else "riding the wave". So, you can bring those obsolete ships you have from the start of the game and use them to provided that little boost of speed your new, more powerful ships need.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comics]]
* [[http://rocr.net/index.php?p=20070604 This webcomic strip]], part of the ''CrossoverWars''.
* Prince Ansom used this against Parson in the first book of ''Webcomic/{{Erfworld}}''; and nearly succeeded, although Parson was very good at exploiting the weaknesses of that strategy:
-->'''Parson''': Ansom's thinking he can overwhelm us with numbers, but that's ''additive''. [[RPGMechanicsVerse I've been playing with this combat system for a week now. And it's all about force multipliers.]]
** In the end though, Parson could only defeat the Ansom's forces completely by [[spoiler: having his Dirtamancer and Croackamancer (meaning his earth elementalist and necromancer) work together to reanimate the dead volcano they're in. This ends up destroying both armies.]] It leads to a long WhatHaveIDone period for Parson.
* Subverted in ''Webcomic/GirlGenius'':
-->'''Tarvek:''' If we sacrificed every minion we had, we might take out ''one'' of them.\\
'''Gil:''' That's a terrible plan!\\
'''Minion:''' Thank you, sir!\\
'''Gil:''' There are another ''twenty'' of them! We don't have enough minions!\\
'''Minion:''' Er...
* As EvilOverlord CardCarryingVillain Xykon of ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' is a very BadBoss, he and his [[TheDragon Dragons]] and allies do it repeatedly. A few examples:
** Responding to a group of his ogres demanding to be paid by killing them and turning them into zombies.
** [[TheDragon Dragon]] Redcloak (a goblin) orders a group of hobgoblin ([[FantasticRacism whom he despises]]) {{mooks}} up a dangerous trail so they would cause an avalanche and ensure the safety of the others. Later he sends in unarmed troops against a guard monster, so it will fall asleep after eating them, and orders a human-wave style attack against a fortified city. After one of them dies saving his life, he realizes what he's doing and [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone reacts with horror at what he is becoming]] and promptly stops the wasteful spending of lives.
*** They weren't unarmed. [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0192.html They were given garnish clubs and cracker shields]]!
** [[LampshadeHanging "Sacrificing minions - is there any problem it]] ''[[LampshadeHanging can't]]'' [[LampshadeHanging solve?"]]
** In the Azure City siege, the death knight has hobgoblins throw themselves at the wall and die by the hundreds so that their bodies will create a ramp he can ride up.
** In a bonus strip from ''No Cure For the Paladin Blues'', Xykon kills a mook who has succeeded in slaying a dragon, because the XP he gained from this elevates him beyond a simple mook now--and also makes it possible for him, as a high-level caster, to get a bit of XP that he wouldn't get for killing an unleveled mook.
* In ''Webcomic/TheRedStar'', [[http://www.beyondrealitymedia.com/the-red-star/issue-2/page-13/ Maya comments on how Command had always succeeded by sending more men to die, and they thought it would work this time, too.]]
* In ''Webcomic/{{Terra}}'' UEC General Cole Winters orders the Jolly Roger Squadron to launch an airstrike against a major [[LaResistance Resistance]] base with no backup and no hope of rescue if they survive being shot down. Since they're ''that'' good, they pull it off with only minor losses (two fighters destroyed, with one crew of two {{Red Shirt}}s killed and the other crew ejecting safely and being rescued by the Resistance to become part of the main cast).
* ''WebComic/DragonBallMultiverse'': Bojack's gang was composed of twenty-seven members when it was formed, according to Bujin; according to the novelization, this is the reason why there were only five members left when they met the Z-Warriors.
* ''WebComic/BrawlInTheFamily'' provides the current page image, in a comic that shows the contrast between the ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' tactician and the ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars'' one. The former focuses on his troops' continued survival (being in a video game where [[CastOfSnowflakes any one of the unique units]] [[AnyoneCanDie can die]]), while the latter encourages aggressive tactics without caring about his troops' casualties, because he "can always buy more troops." [[http://brawlinthefamily.keenspot.com/comic/title-559/ The full comic can be seen here.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Originals]]
* ''Wiki/SCPFoundation'' willfully sacrifice hundreds of its D-Class personnel when observing [=SCP=]s. Many of which die in cruel and painful manners, and even if they do survive over a month they get executed anyway.
** Don't feel too sorry for the D-Class personnel though, they're recruited from death row convicts, ie murderers and rapists, to ensure expendable, unsympathetic Red Shirts for SCP experiments
* Humourously spoofed in ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'''s ShowWithinAShow ''Cheat Commandos'', where Gunhaver shows absolutely no concern for the safety of the "[[RedShirt Green Helmets]]":
-->'''Silent Rip''': Uh, shouldn't we go help him?\\
'''Gunhaver''': Naw, he's just one of those Green Helmets. We've got like fifty of them.
* This is Freeza's MO in WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged. While he does show concern for his higher level men (even planning to send gifts to the Ginyu Force's family), his lower level men... not so much. In his first on-screen attack, he shows indifference when the Namekians are slaughtering his troops, but panics when they start targeting his equipment. Once he reaches Earth, he even kills his last henchman for no real reason. This infuriates his father not because of the loss of life or the senselessness of it, but because now they have no one to fly them home (flying is for the help).
* The evil [[FishPeople Kua-Toa]] of ''WebVideo/TalesFromMyDDCampaign'' rely heavily on vast legions of expendable aquatic SlaveMooks to keep their EnemyCivilWar going.
** Also Inverted in the case of the Verandi invasion. The chief reason why the startling amount of resistance the humans put up was so aggravating to the Kua leadership was that the Kua are the only race that can breathe both air and water, meaning that they couldn't use their armies of expendable slaves, and were instead getting large numbers of actual Kua killed trying to hold on to their foothold.
* As mentioned above, LetsPlay/SpoilerWarning found it amusing that this is a common way to deal with Combine tripmines in ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', and started quoting the examples from ''Shrek'', ''Cheat Commandos'', and ''Futurama''.
* ''Podcast/PlumbingTheDeathStar'''s Zammit hopes to put the suicide back in ''Film/SuicideSquad'' in "How Would You Use The Suicide Squad" by sending the squad into areas humans haven't explored because of how dangerous they are. The logic is that eventually one of the squad members will survive and be able to further the sciences with their discoveries; even if the entire Suicide Squad is killed on their adventures into the unknown, odds are Batman will have used that time to capture even ''more'' supervillains to put on the squad.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/GeneratorRex'', White Knight is a particularly [[JerkAss Jerky]] example because not only does he sacrifice the Redshirts and tell them to their face that he was doing so, he says that they themselves should be aware of that by now, and should therefore not be offended.
* Also played for humor in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' with Zapp Brannigan, who once sent, in his own words, [[ZergRush "wave after wave"]] of his own men to fight the Killbots, knowing that the enemies had an exact (though horrifically high) limit of how many humans they were programmed to kill before they shut down. The humor comes from the fact that this was actually seen as a perfectly viable strategy. ("Kif, show them the medal I won.") In a deleted scene from ''Love's Labours Lost In Space,'' a ''single'' Killbot, Corpse-A-Tron, is shown to have a kill limit of 999,999.
** Another time, he actually used this tactic with SHIPS.
-->'''Brannigan:''' [[GeneralFailure On my signal, all ships will file directly into the enemy death cannons, clogging them with wreckage]]!
** Some other examples:
-->'''Brannigan:''' How many men did we lose, Kif?\\
'''Kif:''' All of them, sir.\\
'''Brannigan:''' Well, at least they won't have to mourn each other.
** His men are well aware of this.
-->'''Brannigan:''' Don't worry Leela, I will send in wave after wave of my own men to complete your mission! Are you with me, men?\\
''[complete silence from the entire mess hall]''\\
'''Voice in the back:''' You suck!
** It doesn't help that Brannigan is WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer for this.
-->'''Bender:''' Sir, I volunteer for a suicide mission! ...lousy patriotism circuit!\\
'''Brannigan:''' That's commendable, son, but when I'm in command, ''every'' mission is a suicide mission!
* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'': After speaking out against a general's plan to throw freshly-recruited troops at the front line to serve as meat-shields, not only does Prince Zuko get half his face burned off, but he gets banished and sent on a SnipeHunt, too.
* At the end of ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' Megatron succumbs to this, killing more of his soldiers than the Maximals ever did. Presumably he assumed that when you have a giant warship and superpowers (even by Transformer standards of being big immortal war machines) you don't need a lot of help.
** By the time of the less popular sequel series, Megatron took this to the logical extreme with his [[MechaMooks Vehicon hordes]]. He had so many that the Maximals tore dozens into scrap metal every battle without making a dent in his overall forces.
* In ''ThePenguinsOfMadagascar'' special "Dr. Blowhole's Revenge", the titular villain threatens the penguins with his nearly endless supply of minions:
--> '''Dr. Blowhole:''' So what if they cut down ten, twenty lobsters? We've got MORE LOBSTERS!
** His lobster minions pause in their cheering at that statement and look a little worried. King Julien however has a similar approach to tactics and doesn't look concerned at all.
* ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'': In the episode where ComicBook/{{Aquaman}} appeared, when ComicBook/LexLuthor was told his move would result in the deaths of several employees, he replied their families would receive compensation.
* In the ''Literature/RainbowMagic'' movie, Jack Frost says this in the movie, saying his snowman army is comprised of expendable weaklings that can be replaced infinitely in battle. Said army disagrees.
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries''. Tony Zucco, (an extortionist who set up the "accident" that killed Dick Grayson's parents), shoots at Batman with a Tommy gun, even though multiple {{mooks}} are likely to be hit as well and beg him not to.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Birdman}}'' episode "Meets Birdgirl". While Birdman is fighting Birdgirl, her boss Doctor Mentaur orders his minion to fire hydrogen "shells" (bombs) at them, even after being warned that the bombs will hit Birdgirl too.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life]]
* ''Used'' by both sides in UsefulNotes/WorldWar2.
** The US did a kind of this in UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 where they sent out stupid amounts of ''ships'', as quoted "the US built more ships than Japan could sink" which was meant [[NotHyperbole literally]]. The sailors would be pulled out of the water and sent to crew new ships. This variant of the trope was less reprehensible than others, though many sailors of course did die. Of course, the the US and its allies certainly did not neglect defending those ships as best as they could from enemy attack while they were at this, which included also building fighting ships as fast as they could to do so.
*** Interestingly enough, the threat of endless American reserves in UsefulNotes/WW1 contributed to Germany's surrender.
** The cargo carrying Liberty ships were the best example of this. Designed to be built fast and in huge numbers, it was said if one carried a single load of war material across the Atlantic it had paid for itself. So much emphasis was put on building them ''quickly'', that it wasn't unheard of for welds in the hulls (welding was used in place of riveting because it was faster) to split open in bad weather even without the aid of the enemy. It was calculated the lifespan of a Liberty ship would be 20 Atlantic crossings, so once having made one she had paid herself and the rest 19 would be net profits. Amazingly, many Liberty ships still served in revenue transportation in the 1970s. Two of them are still functional as museum/training ships.
** Similarly to the Liberty Ships were the Escort Carriers, small, cheap aircraft carriers that could be built in mass quantities. The US built over 120 of these ships, which were used for various duties (anti-sub patrol, convoy escort, air support for amphibious forces, etc.) to free up the less numerous and far more capable Fleet carriers such as the Essex class (of which the US fielded "only" 24) to focus on other things (such as hunting down the dwindling numbers of Japanese carriers). For the Escort Carriers, ruggedness was not a high priority, earning them the nickname "Combustible, Vulnerable, Expendable" [[FunWithAcronyms in reference to]] their "CVE" hull classification.
** When the bombings of Berlin escalated, the allied forces did all they could to provoke the Luftwaffe into attacking them. This caused large losses for both sides, but while the allies could replace the lost planes and crews fairly easily the Germans could not. It was one of the factors that eventually allowed the allies to gain air superiority first and air supremacy later.
** The American daylight bombing campaign proved to be staggeringly expensive in terms of human life lost. The Eighth Air Force, which gets most of the spotlight for the air war over Europe, suffered 46,000 casualties, including more than 26,000 airmen killed in action (more lives lost than the entire [[SemperFi US Marine Corps in that war]], although in contrast to the Airmen, the Marines didn't charge en masse into enemy artillery fire as a matter of course). In addition to the 8th AF, the less-famous Fifteenth Air Force, operating out of Italy, also suffered severe casualties pressing their daylight bombing campaign in southern and eastern Europe throughout the war.
** The T-34 was also used in this fashion, and the USSR is very liberal in sending them in swarms. The difference is that the T-34 was incredibly blind-sighted and could rarely even see far enough to fight[[note]]The story of T-34s ramming Tiger wasn't because they were suicidal enough, but because they literally didn't see the giant, steel-gray, angular brick in their face until it was too late to not run into it[[/note]], beat it's own crew half to death, not to mention crippling communications problems (Read: A complete lack of any radio whatsoever). This was rectified in the later models, though, and later T-34-85s incorporated "Common sense" adaptations as other tanks of the time, such as a full 360 cupola for the commander, a turret basket, and an expanded turret so that the Commander didn't also have to pull double duty as the loader.
** Soviet [[BoxedCrook penal battalions]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shtrafbat "Shtrafbats"]], were former Gulag prisoners or transferred Red Army troops for being suspected of having a reluctance to fight for whatever reason. Though told their crimes could be redeemed by receiving a combat injury or performing especially heroically in battle, in reality shtrafbats were largely just treated as existing for this trope's purposes - such as, attempting to break especially stubborn defenses, being [[HighlyConspicuousUniform dressed blatantly]] to be decoys for regular units, suicidal rearguard actions to cover retreats, or worst of all, "trampler" duty where in they cleared minefields...by running through them prior to regular troops' advances.
** Royal Air Force Bomber Command in WWII. Air Marshall Arthur Harris had nickname "Butcher" amongst the RAF bomber crews.
** In general during this period, while the notion of mass producing tanks and planes of inferior quality was an effective strategy for a few years, it simply could not be sustained with manpower losses, because while producing hardware like tanks and planes is simple and quick, recruiting and training men with the sort of skill required to handle even simple equipment was a significantly more lengthy process. As was shown in the case of Germany and Japan, while they were in fact capable of continuing to put out more then enough military hardware to meet their needs, they were chronically short of the experienced crews required to man them. Germany had lost a great many of its best pilots in the Battle of Britain while Japan lost all of its finest Carrier aircraft pilots either at Midway or during the Solomon Islands campaign; while both nations were able to make good their losses of aircraft, they simply could never train pilots with the sort of skill to match their predecessors in a short time. So the lesson that could be learned from this is that while machines are expendable, the men who know how to use those machines are not. America, Russia, and Britain were quick to learn this lesson upon taking stock of their losses after WWII and realized that while quantity over quality had managed to win them the war, it had left them severely weakened with significantly lowered reserves of trained crews at the end of WWII, with countless American crewmen who had spent months in training left as charred corpses inside gutted Sherman tanks scattered across the French countryside. This may have been a key contributing factor in why the Cold War didn't kick off into full blown war after WWII, as both sides had to train an entire new generation of crews to replace those lost in the war, which took time.
** One German general actually stated that Allies would have never gained air superiority had Germany not spent too much resources on strategic bombers. But Allies also spent large amount of resources on strategic bombers, which means that both sides basically sent crews of strategic bombers to die for little military value, while actually harming their own ability to fight the war. In fact, USSBS has shown that German military production reached its peak at actual peak of US strategic bombardment campaign, and only started to slow down after the US re-focused on destroying Oil production and storage facilities over industrial production. It didn't help that the British Night Bombing campaign was instead focused on [[RevengeBeforeReason using the cover of night for petty terror bombing in retaliation for earlier luftwaffe bombing of Britain]].
*** This gave rise to the abandonment of GoingDownWithTheShip for officers that lose a battle. We Have Reserves of equipment, but a trained officer can't be replaced so easily. The [[HonorBeforeReason Death Before Dishonor]] mentality instilled by Japanese officer training meant the Japanese officer corps kept getting worse, while the American and British officer corps kept getting better.
** The entire concept of Kamikaze attacks were based on these, where Japan hoped that it would have more pilots and hardware to outlast their opponents. One Japanese General noted that they were "like bees" in that they swarm to sting the opponent, but died as they done so. Japan would seriously underestimate their reserves, however, and with adapted tactics by the Allies, Kamikazes became less and less effective[[note]]The first few attacks were wildly successful because Allied interceptors ignored planes that headed into a dive, as they expected the pilot of those planes to pull up at the last second. At the time the only suicide attacks had been made by crippled planes, where the pilots were certain to die. They never expected that the Japanese units would ''intentionally'' try to ram a ship with a functional plane[[/note]].
** By the end of the war, Germany itself would resort to similar tactics. Because spare parts were in such short supply, it wasn't uncommon for entire tanks to be shipped to units for cannibalizing into parts. Panzer Brigades were organized with large numbers of the newly-produced tanks and Panzergrenadiers, but severely lacking in anti-aircraft guns, armored recovery vehicles and the general logistics that made German armor effective. Poorly-trained crews were often lost to seasoned American tank veterans. Sabotage from slave labor, less available resources and the constant bombing sharply drove down quality - post-war tests conducted by the Soviets determined armor plate on Panthers would frequently fall apart when struck with rounds theoretically rated to protect against. Ball-bearings for turret traverse mechanisms and hard, durable metals needed for transmissions were in extremely short supply.
** Hitler gave orders amounting to no retreat and no surrender to Army Group North, Center, A, B, and North Africa - ordering them all to fight to the last man. A common interpretation is that the apparent success of 'no retreat' in the winter of '41-42 - in the face of an over-ambitious Soviet counter-offensive that failed to encircle and annihilate Army Group Center due to command-inexperience and weak logistics - convinced him that German troops were superior (man-for-man) to their Soviet counterparts and needed only the moral courage to keep fighting for them to prevail. At no point did he ever seem to appreciate the importance of mobile reserves and operational/campaign-level withdrawals to a successful strategic defense-in-depth - the Wehrmacht basically had nothing of the former left after the Ukrainian autumn-winter campaigns of '43-44, which annihilated the country's stock of experienced Panzer-crews, and he increasingly forbade the latter and began routinely firing Generals who [[ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight refused to follow those orders]] - even the most talented and indispensable of them, such as Manstein and Runstedt.
** In fact, this mentality was one of many reasons why the Germans lost the Battle of Stalingrad and, later, the entire Eastern Front of the European Theater.
** Also applies to the German U-boat service. By the end of the war, they had suffered a permanent casualty rate of over 70%. Yet, they kept being sent out on what were effectively suicide missions.
* Demetrios [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast the Besieger]] would throw his men at the walls of enemy cities, not out of necessity, but out of anger or [[GloryHound thirst for glory]]. When his own son pointed out how his men were dying for nothing, Demetrios lashed out at him, saying "Why so distraught? Are rations due from you to the dead?"
* An attitude similar to this served the Romans well during their expansion. While they were perhaps not as callous about it as many other examples of this trope, they were willing and able to sustain casualties that would cripple any rival state. It didn't work so well against the Germanic tribes, though.
** [[TropeNamer King Pyrrhus]] won several battles over the Romans but [[PyrrhicVictory found his army getting weaker whereas the Romans were able to use their manpower to bring their armies back up to full strength]].
** The Roman reaction to the disastrous battle of Cannae, the bloodiest day in Roman history to that point, with the virtually the entire Roman army annihilated? Raise another army and outlaw even speaking the word ''pax'' (''peace''). Interestingly, Hannibal, the winner of Cannae, '' knew'' it, and his entire strategy in the [[UsefulNotes/PunicWars Second Punic War]] was a [[ExploitedTrope well-thought attempt at working around this]]: knowing that the Romans' numerical superiority mostly came from the troops provided by their allies in Italy, he invaded Italy with a small but well-trained and ''magnificently'' led army and started inflicting crushing defeats after crushing defeats in the attempt to scare and impress the Italian population in defecting to his side, thus ''stealing away Rome's numerical superiority''. While partially effective, this strategy didn't cause enough defections, to the point that, right after Cannae, the Romans could effectively keep ''six'' armies in the field: one facing Hannibal and [[DeathOfAThousandCuts launching raids to slowly destroy his army]], one in Northern Italy facing his Gaulish allies, one in Southern Italy facing the Samnites and the other populations who had defected from the alliance with Rome (this one would also occasionally fight Hannibal because most of the time he was in the area), one in ''Spain'' to attack Hannibal's base of operation, one in ''the Balkans'' to face the Macedons (who had entered the war because, after Cannae, they had figured the Romans were too weak to defend their allies in Greece), and ''the survivors of Cannae'' [[TheDogBitesBack destroying the Sicilian cities that had defected to Hannibal]]. His situation only grew worse from that: the Carthaginians managed to destroy the army deployed in Spain, but by that point Hannibal's allies in Sicily had been destroyed or cowed into defecting back to Rome, the Gauls were broken as an effective fighting force and the Macedons [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere had realized what was happening and sued for peace]], meaning the survivors of Cannae could go to Spain and finish the job, the army of Northern Italy could pick off the Carthaginian troops that had escaped Spain and were trying to join Hannibal, and the forces of the army of the Balkans had been divided between the Northern and the Southern Italy armies to allow them to finish their job faster. ''Then'' the survivors of Cannae [[UpToEleven raised reinforcements in Spain and Sicily]] and invaded Africa, where they [[{{Irony}} successfully stole Carthage's main ally]].
** Even before Hannibal, the Romans were so well-versed in manouver they could pull this ''on armies that outnumbered them'': their frontline and rear-guard troops would switch position mid-battle, allowing their soldiers to stay relatively fresh while the enemy grew tired and felt like the Romans were outnumbering them until they either broke and were massacred during the escape (because the Romans were still fresher and would catch up to them) or were all chopped down in battle.
*** During their civil wars, this bit them back in the ass: as both sides would pull this, unless one of the commanders was significantly better or got lucky the armies would suffer grevious losses, resulting in a greater weakening of the Roman military than it would be for other armies.
* At the Battle of Crecy in 1346, the French king Philip VI opened the battle by deploying Genoese mercenary crossbowmen and ordered them to begin firing on the English encamped at the top of the hill. The Genoese commander informed Philip that his troops were very fatigued from marching through rain and mud, did not have their pavises (anti-arrow shields) and that their bowstrings were wet from rain, which reduced their range. Philip insisted that they attack anyway which predictably ended with a catastrophe against the fast-firing English archers. Annoyed that his mercenaries had the audacity to die because of his idiotic order, Philip compounded his stupidity and brutality by ordereding his cavalry to charge through them to get to the English. The French knights deliberately ''[[LeeroyJenkins chopped their way through their own crossbowmen]]'' to try and attack the English.
** [[KarmicDeath And the result was that the longbowmen promptly shot all of the knights too]].
* [[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution Revolutionary]] UsefulNotes/{{France}}, according to historian Eugen Weber, was the first Western power to recruit conscripts in large numbers. The traditional file of well-trained soldiers went out in favor of massive columns of ill-trained soldiers, and French generals did not hesitate to throw them at the enemy under heavy fire, beginning what Weber called "The Gun Fodder Era." When you have a whole country of potential conscripts as your reserves, you can afford to lose many more soldiers than those that have to pay a professional army.
** From the same era, one way {{UsefulNotes/Napoleon Bonaparte}} earned the ire of his fellow commanders prior to his declaring himself Emperor was because he was known to brag about the number of men he could lose in a single battle and still win it.
* During the battle of Guilford Courthouse during the UsefulNotes/AmericanRevolution, Lord Cornwallis's forces were on the verge of a devastating defeat. Out of desperation, he ordered his remaining artillery to fire grapeshot into the mass of men on the plain, regular and rebel alike. The rebels were forced back, [[WasItReallyWorthIt but at a staggering cost to Cornwallis's troops]].
* In the US Civil War, Union General Grant was accused of this, being given the appellation "Butcher" Grant by some on the Union side after his high-casualty battles in Virginia. But he didn't spend his men needlessly (and deeply mourned the battle of Cold Harbour, the one high-casualty battle that was genuinely pointless), and was distinguished from previous Union generals by ''advancing'' after high-casualty battles rather than retreating, something which made the men happy because they could see they were actually making progress.
** A lot of that was because he was lined up against Lee. In the West he could fairly often outmanoever his opponents, such his Siege of Vicksburg where he finessed a spectacular and relatively low-cost victory that happened at around the same time, and was arguably more important than, the battle of Gettysburg. In addition, he was fighting in the Eastern Theater, where there simply wasn't space to maneuver or to bring the Union's superior numbers to bear. In the West, there was such space.
* Some WWI commanders would shoot those attempting to retreat without orders, or who refused to go over the trenches. It was a sort of preemptive punishment for treason. Although the number of men so shot is grossly overexaggerated, there were men who were under ''two'' suspended sentences of death for desertion or sleeping at their posts.
** The point of the WWI strategy of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attrition_warfare attrition warfare]] was "we have '''more''' reserves than them!"
** Luigi Cadorna's strategy for the Italian army was based on this: knowing that his army was underequipped but most of the Austro-Hungarian forces were tied up fighting the Russians, he launched assault after pointless assault on the Isonzo to drain the enemy reserves while Italy's industry produced enough guns to properly equip his troops. Eventually he succeeded in draining the Austro-Hungarian reserves, but before he could break through the Russians collapsed and the newly freed enemy forces were redeployed to Italy with some German reinforcements, resulting in the catastrophic defeat at the Battle of Caporetto. In the end he was sacked but still somewhat succeeded, as the Austro-Hungarians ''still'' had no reserves left while Italy could use their last reserves to ''fill the losses of the battle and then some'', now led well by Cadorna's replacement Armando Diaz properly equipped, with Italy's shortage of machine guns filled in large part by American and French supplies.
** Then there's Aylmer Hunter-Weston, a British divisional commander during the Gallipoli Campaign. When a staff officer remarked on the heavy casualties his men incurred at the Battle of Krithia, Hunter-Weston asked "Casualties? What do I care for casualties?"
* The official policy of UsefulNotes/{{Egypt}} in the War of Attrition 1967-1970, after they lost the Six Day War. As said by President UsefulNotes/GamalAbdelNasser:
--> "If the enemy succeeds in inflicting fifty-thousand casualties in this campaign, we can go on fighting nevertheless, because we have manpower reserves. If we succeed in inflicting ten-thousand casualties, he will unavoidably find himself compelled to stop fighting, because he has no manpower reserves."
** The Israelis tried to counter since theu [[GenreSavvy could do the math just as well]] and [[TookAThirdOption decided to bomb Cairo from the air]], directly and indirectly threatening the Nasser regime itself. However, it turned out, they could not sustain a deep penetration bombing campaign either.[[note]] The Egyptians purchases scores of batteries of the latest Soviet Surface to Air Missiles and put them on the approaches to Cairo. It turns out that equipment not troops is the limiting factor in modern war[[/note]]
* During the First Gulf War, the USA's one-time (Cold-War) Ally Generalissimo Saddam Hussein believed that a lesson from the Vietnam War was that the USA (who formed the backbone of the U.N. taskforce to force him back from The Kingdom Of Kuwait) wouldn't support a war that would cost them 10,000 casualites. He, meanwhile had hundreds of thousands to spare and none of his subjects could protest the attrition. For one thing he thought that the U.N. would obey the letter of international law and seek to only engage him in Kuwait (they attacked Iraq itself, outflanking his forces and trapping them in Kuwait). For another, he seems to have forgotten the basics of force multipliers - i.e. his troops were catastrophically outmatched, so the enemy could be expected to take minimal losses (the greater the enemy's advantage, the fewer their losses). Thus, while the U.N. killed some 30k Iraqi troops they only lost 392 people.
* King Goujian of Yue, a pre-Imperial Chinese ruler, would terrorise his opponents by having his front line march out to the middle of the field and decapitate themselves (or, in some accounts, slit their own throats, which makes more sense).
* A rather cold-hearted take on this is sometimes cited by more bellicose Indian generals in response to the logic of Mutual Assured Destruction in the event of a nuclear war with Pakistan, arguing that it doesn't apply, since if an Indian strike takes out 200 million Pakistanis, it has exterminated the country, whereas if a Pakistani strike takes out 200 million Indians, they still have over a billion left.
* In nature, reproductive strategies are split between animals that have a small number of young and raise them carefully, and ones that have lots of young (or, typically, lay lots of eggs) and don't care for them at all, trusting that there are enough that ''some'' will survive. The latter strategy is a lot less energy-intensive and is generally used by more basic and short-lived species, while the former is particularly common among some birds and nearly all the larger mammals. Some kinds of rodents have and raise frequent large litters, leading to exponential population growth over a very short time if conditions are favorable.
* The human body is like this. It creates millions of white blood cells to fight infections and continues to create them until the infection is defeated. It works most of the time, except against diseases that attack the immune system itself or autoimmune disorders (when they go nuts and attack the tissues they're supposed to defend).
* In a non human killing way, situations or countries that have (more than) enough of a certain resource can act like that. Iceland for example has a lot of geothermal and hydropower resources; much more than a country of a bit over 300 000 people could ever use for domestic consumption and there is no way to export any sizable quantity of it directly, so while electricity is not quite "too cheap to meter", some of the energy uses tend to be rather wasteful. The famous "Blue Lagoon" for instance is basically wastewater of a geothermal power plant that is still warm enough to swim in in the Icelandic winter. Most other countries would probably use it to heat homes, but there is just ''so much'' of it that this is what is left over even after all needs are met. Being quite GenreSavvy, Iceland has started quite a big aluminum industry, because converting bauxite into aluminum requires a huge amount of electric energy and Iceland has a lot of it.
** Similarly the GDR had a WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer approach to Lignite. It was (and still is) the only natural resource found in any appreciable quantities in the area and while most of its uses are horribly inefficient and/or polluting,[[note]] You can make almost everything that you can make from oil from coal as well. Including gasoline. It's just much more inefficient. Oh and lignite is also 50% water by weight, so every second car in a train carrying lignite is carrying high priced steam[[/note]] it was still cheaper than buying other resources or technology to increase efficiency. In subsidized housing in the GDR people would regulate the temperature by opening the window as the heating could not be shut off and was paid for anyway. It's almost hard to believe the GDR eventually ran out of money.
* Seriously averted by, of all people, Genghis Khan. When your forces are usually a fraction of what your opposition can muster in you need to preserve those forces. They never engaged in hand-to-hand when they didn't have to, and leaving wounded men on the field was grounds for a commander's execution. Overly aggressive types tended not to get promoted because of the casualties they would take. Also, Genghis was known for a FatherToHisMen approach--at least to his own people.
* Like China in Korean War example above, Vietnam Wars prove to be this for North Vietnamese against US military. They want to win more (they have fewer choices; USA can get out, they can't), and, by percentage of nation's GDP, put more effort into their fight. So no matter how North lost battles and personnel, they will keep fighting until the USA just give up.
** Also by extension, most of fights against colonialist forces also this trope. When the rebel or local lacks 1) training, 2) hardware, 3) not-obsolete military understanding and organization, the number is usually on their side and they utilize that advantage.
[[/folder]]

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22nd Apr '17 4:58:42 PM nombretomado
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* ''SuikodenII'': Luca Blight kicks off the game by slaughtering his troops under a false flag.

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* ''SuikodenII'': ''VideoGame/SuikodenII'': Luca Blight kicks off the game by slaughtering his troops under a false flag.
16th Apr '17 7:11:13 PM nombretomado
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* In ''StarWarsBattlefront'', there's a game mode called Galactic Conquest where either 1 player faces off against the computer or 2 players face each other trying to conquer planets one by one across the galaxy. Each planet conquered will give a different bonus that a player can use in battle. One of these is called secondary reinforcements and it has some elements of We Have Reserves. The way it works is that at several points in the battle when your troop count falls to a certain number you will suddenly get new troops added to the count, imitating a new wave of troops coming into battle. These troops seem to be [[SurroundedByIdiots even dumber]] and, (believe it or not) [[ItsUpToYou have worse AI than usual]], but sheer numbers will often overwhelm an opponent or at least give the player a chance to kill off all the enemies or capture all the command posts by themself. (Nothing sucks more than being in a close battle, glancing up at the troop counts for both sides, seeing that both sides have about 40 troops left and thinking to yourself ''Hey, I can still win this'' only to see the other side suddenly get another 20 men added to their count. Cue the OhCrap).

to:

* In ''StarWarsBattlefront'', ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefront'', there's a game mode called Galactic Conquest where either 1 player faces off against the computer or 2 players face each other trying to conquer planets one by one across the galaxy. Each planet conquered will give a different bonus that a player can use in battle. One of these is called secondary reinforcements and it has some elements of We Have Reserves. The way it works is that at several points in the battle when your troop count falls to a certain number you will suddenly get new troops added to the count, imitating a new wave of troops coming into battle. These troops seem to be [[SurroundedByIdiots even dumber]] and, (believe it or not) [[ItsUpToYou have worse AI than usual]], but sheer numbers will often overwhelm an opponent or at least give the player a chance to kill off all the enemies or capture all the command posts by themself. (Nothing sucks more than being in a close battle, glancing up at the troop counts for both sides, seeing that both sides have about 40 troops left and thinking to yourself ''Hey, I can still win this'' only to see the other side suddenly get another 20 men added to their count. Cue the OhCrap).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.WeHaveReserves