History Main / VillainyFreeVillain

10th Jul '16 8:15:45 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Unless they KickTheDog all the time, many of the heels in Wrestling/{{WWE}} (and to a lesser extent {{TNA}}) aren't all that villainous. Many times, all it takes for them to get booed is to be a little whiny or contrary, or to [[TheComplainerIsAlwaysWrong say something that nobody wants to hear]]. The worst instances are when a wrestler is a heel simply because he or she is a ForeignWrestlingHeel from a country that Americans don't really like, and has the balls to [[CaptainPatriotic praise his or her own country instead of automatically bowing down to worship the United States of America]].

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* Unless they KickTheDog all the time, many of the heels in Wrestling/{{WWE}} (and to a lesser extent {{TNA}}) Wrestling/{{TNA}}) aren't all that villainous. Many times, all it takes for them to get booed is to be a little whiny or contrary, or to [[TheComplainerIsAlwaysWrong say something that nobody wants to hear]]. The worst instances are when a wrestler is a heel simply because he or she is a ForeignWrestlingHeel from a country that Americans don't really like, and has the balls to [[CaptainPatriotic praise his or her own country instead of automatically bowing down to worship the United States of America]].
8th Jul '16 9:42:08 PM erforce
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* The concierge in ''[[Film/HomeAlone Home Alone 2]]'' has every right to be wary and suspicious of a ten-year-old checking into a four-star hotel by himself, so the film has him act as though his very life is consumed by a desire to nail Kevin for "credit card fraud."

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* The concierge in ''[[Film/HomeAlone Home Alone 2]]'' ''Film/HomeAlone2LostInNewYork'' has every right to be wary and suspicious of a ten-year-old checking into a four-star hotel by himself, so the film has him act as though his very life is consumed by a desire to nail Kevin for "credit card fraud."
8th Jul '16 9:22:36 PM merotoker
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In any work of fiction in which the protagonist is a LoveableRogue or JustifiedCriminal or [[ClearMyName an innocent person who has been framed for a heinous crime]], the law enforcers chasing after him are inevitably going to appear unsympathetic to the audience, even if their motives are beyond reproach. The hero may even end up fighting them as much as the villain. Authority figures who have to control children (teachers, especially) also make fine default antagonists even without being a SadistTeacher. So do any authority figures [[PunchClockVillain whose job requires them]] [[GoodIsNotNice to be harsh]]: police officers, judges, and [[DrillSergeantNasty drill sergeants]] are all especially prone to this.

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In any work of fiction in which the protagonist is a LoveableRogue LovableRogue or JustifiedCriminal or [[ClearMyName an innocent person who has been framed for a heinous crime]], the law enforcers chasing after him are inevitably going to appear unsympathetic to the audience, even if their motives are beyond reproach. The hero may even end up fighting them as much as the villain. Authority figures who have to control children (teachers, especially) also make fine default antagonists even without being a SadistTeacher. So do any authority figures [[PunchClockVillain whose job requires them]] [[GoodIsNotNice to be harsh]]: police officers, judges, and [[DrillSergeantNasty drill sergeants]] are all especially prone to this.



* WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse once opened a pizza parlor and its success led Petey to open a rival pizza parlor in front of Mickey's. While the readers were expected to cheer for Mickey, Petey couldn't realistically be called a villain until near the end, when he sicced some animals to eat a giant pizza made by Mickey (and even then, it's made clear he ''didn't'' like doing this and considered it as a LastResort). Fortunately, some of the animals [[HoistByHisOwnPetard ate the rival's own giant pizza as well]]. After that, Mickey ran out of flour and his rival ran out of cheese and the two of them decided to share to avoid bankruptcy.

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* WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse ComicBook/{{Mickey Mouse|ComicUniverse}} once opened a pizza parlor and its success led Petey to open a rival pizza parlor in front of Mickey's. While the readers were expected to cheer for Mickey, Petey couldn't realistically be called a villain until near the end, when he sicced some animals to eat a giant pizza made by Mickey (and even then, it's made clear he ''didn't'' like doing this and considered it as a LastResort).last resort). Fortunately, some of the animals [[HoistByHisOwnPetard ate the rival's own giant pizza as well]]. After that, Mickey ran out of flour and his rival ran out of cheese and the two of them decided to share to avoid bankruptcy.



* Dr. Jonas Miller, the protagonists' tornado-chasing rival in ''Film/{{Twister}}''. His sins? Taking corporate funding, creating a competitor to the protagonists' experimental prototype, being a SmugSnake, and riding around in a [[ColorCodedForYourConvenience caravan of black SUVs]]. Jonas even has plenty of valid points that he and Bill are NotSoDifferent. Both Bill and Jonas left their old crew for better-paying jobs (Jonas for his corporate sponsors, Bill as a TV weatherman.) Bill also abandoned his idea for the "Dorothy" system, and Jonas built a working prototype without him.

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* Dr. Jonas Miller, the protagonists' tornado-chasing rival in ''Film/{{Twister}}''. His sins? Taking corporate funding, creating a competitor to the protagonists' experimental prototype, being a SmugSnake, and riding around in a [[ColorCodedForYourConvenience [[ColourCodedForYourConvenience caravan of black SUVs]]. Jonas even has plenty of valid points that he and Bill are NotSoDifferent. Both Bill and Jonas left their old crew for better-paying jobs (Jonas for his corporate sponsors, Bill as a TV weatherman.) Bill also abandoned his idea for the "Dorothy" system, and Jonas built a working prototype without him.



** In the episode "Mr. Plow", Homer starts his snow removal business and gets a lot of money for it, but Barney comes with a bigger plow and takes all of Homer's clients, he is presented as the episode villain, but the only wrong thing he ever did was shoot one of the tires of Homer's plow and make a commercial defaming Homer, aside from that, he is just being a competitor, even at the end when Homer saves him (From the danger that Homer put him in the first place), he decides that from now on they will be partners as his HeelFaceTurn, however, one flashback scene shows that Homer is the one that presented alcohol to Barney, ruining his life.
** When Homer returns to college to complete a nuclear science class, he immediately assumes that the Dean is automatically a student-hating villain while in fact the Dean is laid back, friendly and the most understanding man you could ever meet.

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** In the episode "Mr. Plow", Homer starts his snow removal business and gets a lot of money for it, but Barney comes with a bigger plow and takes all of Homer's clients, he is presented as the episode villain, but the only wrong thing he ever did was shoot one of the tires of Homer's plow and make a commercial defaming Homer, aside Homer. Aside from that, he is just being a competitor, even at the end when Homer saves him (From the danger that Homer put him in the first place), and he decides that from now on they will be partners as his HeelFaceTurn, however, one HeelFaceTurn. One flashback scene shows that Homer is the one that presented alcohol to Barney, ruining his life.
** When Homer returns to college to complete a nuclear science class, he immediately assumes that the Dean is [[DeanBitterman automatically a student-hating villain villain]] while in fact the Dean is laid back, friendly and the most understanding man you could ever meet.



** The Dinkleburgs too, who are, for the most part, completely harmless, but enjoy rubbing their accomplishments in Timmy's dad's face. That being said, the show does portray Timmy's dad in a less-than-flattering light for him hating them so much. However, one episode did feature Mr. Dinkleburg act like an evil villain just to make Timmy's dad appear ProperlyParanoid (though we discover Dinkleburg did it to try and cheer Mr. Turner up).

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** [[SitcomArchnemesis The Dinkleburgs Dinkleburgs]] too, who are, for the most part, completely harmless, but enjoy rubbing their accomplishments in Timmy's dad's face. That being said, the show does portray Timmy's dad in a less-than-flattering light for him hating them so much. However, one episode did feature Mr. Dinkleburg act like an evil villain just to make Timmy's dad appear ProperlyParanoid (though we discover Dinkleburg did it to try and cheer Mr. Turner up).



** The later episode "Magic Duel" subverts this at first, when Trixie returns to Ponyville armed with immensely powerful magic, boots Twilight Sparkle out of the town and reigns as a tyrant over the city. However, her newfound evil is revealed to be the doing of the ArtifactOfDoom she used to obtain power. It is not hard to surmise that Trixie got the Amulet in an attempt to simply show up Twilight, but TheCorruption took it from there. By the end of the episode, [[spoiler:Trixie is remorseful for the horrible things she has done under the Amulet's influence, and makes amends to Twilight.]]

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** The later episode "Magic Duel" subverts this at first, when Trixie returns to Ponyville armed with immensely powerful magic, boots Twilight Sparkle out of the town and reigns as a tyrant over the city. However, her newfound evil is revealed to be the doing of the ArtifactOfDoom she used to obtain power. It is not hard to surmise that Trixie got the Amulet in an attempt to simply show up Twilight, but TheCorruption took it from there. By the end of the episode, [[spoiler:Trixie is remorseful for the horrible things she has done under the Amulet's influence, and makes amends to Twilight.]]Twilight]].



* ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants''. While capable of being an outright villain [[DependingonTheWriter Depending on the Episode]] Plankton at times can be a legitimate competitor towards Mr. Krabs with no real malicious intention, once even offering to give up attempting to steal the formula for one single customer. Worse case scenario in these situations, Plankton just wants to drive Krabs nuts.

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* ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants''.''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants''. While capable of being an outright villain [[DependingonTheWriter Depending on the Episode]] Plankton at times can be a legitimate competitor towards Mr. Krabs with no real malicious intention, once even offering to give up attempting to steal the formula for one single customer. Worse case scenario in these situations, Plankton just wants to drive Krabs nuts.
1st Jul '16 9:56:56 AM KingLyger
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[[BlatantLies No work of fiction is complete]] [[NoAntagonist without a villain of some sort]]. After all, if there's no villain, who will create the conflict? Who will the heroes confront in the climax? [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking Who will sing the best]] [[VillainSong songs?]]

But sometimes, writers encounter a problem. See, sometimes... what the antagonist is doing? It's not illegal, or even immoral. At all. In a sports story, the antagonist would just be the leader of the OpposingSportsTeam. If, say, you're writing an inspiring story about an underdog who aspires to be a great chef, the antagonist would be a tough-to-please food critic, or the owner of a rival restaurant. Sure, these people's success would make the hero's life worse, but in real life, nobody would hold it against these people. That's just the way the world works. Surely, these stories are forever bound to having both a hero protagonist ''and'' a HeroAntagonist, right? ...right?

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[[BlatantLies No work of fiction is complete]] can exist without a {{conflict}}. [[NoAntagonist without Almost all works]] help accomplish this by having a villain of some sort]]. sort. After all, if there's no villain, who will create the conflict? Who will the heroes confront in the climax? [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking [[VillainSong Who will sing the best]] [[VillainSong best songs?]]

But sometimes, writers encounter a problem. See, sometimes... Sometimes, what the antagonist is doing? It's not doing isn't illegal, or even immoral. At all.immoral. In a sports story, the antagonist would just be the leader of the OpposingSportsTeam. If, say, you're writing an inspiring story about an underdog who aspires to be a great chef, the antagonist would be a tough-to-please food critic, or the owner of a rival restaurant. Sure, these people's their success would make the hero's life worse, but in real life, nobody would hold it against these people.them. That's just the way the world works. Surely, these stories are forever bound to having both a hero protagonist ''and'' a HeroAntagonist, right? ...right?



Meet the Villainy-Free Villain, the very personification of FelonyMisdemeanor. To make sure that viewer sympathy is still squarely on the protagonist, the Villainy-Free Villain is an antagonist who compensates for his completely socially acceptable aspirations by being as much of a {{Jerkass}} about them as humanly possible. He's not a villain, but he sure acts like one. It's as if he doesn't care about his own well-being, but sees his actions as a wonderful opportunity to crush the protagonist's hopes and dreams.

In any work of fiction in which the protagonist is a LoveableRogue or JustifiedCriminal or [[ClearMyName an innocent person who has been framed for a heinous crime]], the law enforcers chasing after him are inevitably going to appear unsympathetic to the audience, even if their motives are beyond reproach. The hero may even end up fighting them as much as the villain. Authority figures who have to control children (teachers, especially) also make fine default antagonists even without being a SadistTeacher. So do any authority figures [[PunchClockVillain whose job requires them]] [[GoodIsNotNice to be harsh]]: police officers, judges, [[DrillSergeantNasty Drill Sergeant Nasties]].

This is a clear case of TruthInTelevision. A person doesn't have to kill or steal to be unlikeable. If you're a complete jerk to people and rub your own victories in the faces of the people you step over, you'll still be seen in a bad light.

Note that a character cannot qualify to be a Villainy-Free Villain if he participates in unethical activities. As the name suggests, this antagonist has all the aspects of the villain except the actual villainy.

'''Also, for a character to qualify, he has to actually BE as unpleasant as a normal villain, enough so for the viewer to not sympathize with him. Otherwise, he's just a DesignatedVillain.'''

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Meet the Villainy-Free Villain, the very personification of a FelonyMisdemeanor. To make sure that viewer sympathy is still squarely on the protagonist, the Villainy-Free Villain is an antagonist who compensates for his their completely socially acceptable aspirations by being as much of a {{Jerkass}} about them as humanly possible. He's S/He's not a villain, but he s/he sure acts like one. It's as if he doesn't they don't care about his their own well-being, but sees his their actions as a wonderful opportunity to crush the protagonist's hopes and dreams.

In any work of fiction in which the protagonist is a LoveableRogue or JustifiedCriminal or [[ClearMyName an innocent person who has been framed for a heinous crime]], the law enforcers chasing after him are inevitably going to appear unsympathetic to the audience, even if their motives are beyond reproach. The hero may even end up fighting them as much as the villain. Authority figures who have to control children (teachers, especially) also make fine default antagonists even without being a SadistTeacher. So do any authority figures [[PunchClockVillain whose job requires them]] [[GoodIsNotNice to be harsh]]: police officers, judges, and [[DrillSergeantNasty Drill Sergeant Nasties]].

drill sergeants]] are all especially prone to this.

This is a clear case of TruthInTelevision. A person doesn't have to kill or steal to be unlikeable. unlikable. If you're a complete jerk to people and rub your own victories in the faces of the people you step over, you'll still be seen in a bad light.

Note '''Note that a character cannot qualify to be a Villainy-Free Villain if he participates in unethical activities. As the name suggests, this antagonist has all the aspects of the villain except the actual villainy.

'''Also,
villainy. Also, for a character to qualify, he has to actually BE be as unpleasant as a normal villain, enough so for the viewer to not sympathize with him. Otherwise, he's just a DesignatedVillain.'''
1st Jul '16 5:23:24 AM KingLyger
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* The Shadowbolts of Crystal Prep High School from ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirlsFriendshipGames'' aren't really all that antagonistic towards the heroes of Canterlot High School, save for some competitive smack-talking and bragging. Most of Crystal Prep's students are just good enough to beat the Wondercolts fairly, without any [[DickDastardlyStopsToCheat unnecessary cheating]]. If anything, they're the most antagonistic towards one of their own, the {{Anti Villain}}ous Human Twilight, than the Wondercolts. All of them are still obnoxious in their own ways to prevent any sympathy from being given to them. [[spoiler:And while they do convince Human Twilight to [[VillainSong unleash the magic]], that was more due to the toxic influence of the movie's BigBad, Principal Cinch.]]
30th Jun '16 12:23:20 PM Morgenthaler
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* In ''Film/MyCousinVinny'', the judge is ''arguably'' this. He clearly doesn't like Vinny, but his antagonism is a direct result of Vinny constantly flouting legal protocols, and his (accurate) suspicion that Vinny has been lying about his qualifications. Despite this friction, he clearly takes his job serious, and (with only one exception), he never appears to let his dislike impact how he presides over the trial.
1st Jun '16 5:57:38 AM Shadowgazer
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In any work of fiction in which the protagonist is a LoveableRogue or JustifiedCriminal or [[ClearMyName an innocent person who has been framed for a heinous crime]], the law enforcers chasing after him are inevitably going to appear unsympathetic to the audience, even if their motives are beyond reproach. The hero may even end up fighting them as much as the villain. Authority figures who have to control children (teachers, especially) also make [[SadistTeacher fine default villains]]. So do any authority figures [[PunchClockVillain whose job requires them]] [[GoodIsNotNice to be harsh]]: police officers, judges, [[DrillSergeantNasty Drill Sergeant Nasties]].

to:

In any work of fiction in which the protagonist is a LoveableRogue or JustifiedCriminal or [[ClearMyName an innocent person who has been framed for a heinous crime]], the law enforcers chasing after him are inevitably going to appear unsympathetic to the audience, even if their motives are beyond reproach. The hero may even end up fighting them as much as the villain. Authority figures who have to control children (teachers, especially) also make [[SadistTeacher fine default villains]].antagonists even without being a SadistTeacher. So do any authority figures [[PunchClockVillain whose job requires them]] [[GoodIsNotNice to be harsh]]: police officers, judges, [[DrillSergeantNasty Drill Sergeant Nasties]].
26th May '16 11:02:43 AM AllenbysEyes88
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* Ocatvio on ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill''. Being voiced [[InkSuitActor and modeled after]] Creator/DannyTrejo, he looks and acts like a hardened criminal, complete with tattoos and an arsenal of guns and knives. But Octavio's actually a harmless guy who occasionally helps Dale with his zany schemes, at worst committing acts of petty fraud like denting Dale's car with a crowbar or selling black market prescription drugs (which, while illegal, is justified in context).



* Ocatvio on ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill''. Being voiced [[InkSuitActor and modeled after]] Creator/DannyTrejo, he looks and acts like a hardened criminal, complete with tattoos and an arsenal of guns and knives. But Octavio's actually a harmless guy who occasionally helps Dale with his zany schemes, at worst committing acts of petty fraud like denting Dale's car with a crowbar or selling black market prescription drugs.
26th May '16 11:01:55 AM AllenbysEyes88
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to:

* Ocatvio on ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill''. Being voiced [[InkSuitActor and modeled after]] Creator/DannyTrejo, he looks and acts like a hardened criminal, complete with tattoos and an arsenal of guns and knives. But Octavio's actually a harmless guy who occasionally helps Dale with his zany schemes, at worst committing acts of petty fraud like denting Dale's car with a crowbar or selling black market prescription drugs.
8th Apr '16 2:58:03 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Film/OverTheTop'': Mike Hawk's grandfather never delivered his wayward father's letters to him, sends him to a boarding military academy and tries to take custody of him away from his father. He comes across like an overbearing jerk, but he seems to be acting in an honest attempt to do what he feels is best for his grandson.
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