History Main / VillainyFreeVillain

23rd Jun '18 8:19:58 PM gophergiggles
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* Done ''amazingly'' in-universe with Mr. St. Peter in ''Film/TheBraveLittleToaster'' who's a good natured, fun-loving, and likeable chubby little man who runs a shop that dismantles old appliances to sell their parts as replacements. Really the only "villainous" thing he does is sell these parts under the pretenses of being new, so why's he such a feared and horrid villain? The film is from the viewpoint of the ''sentient appliances'' who have been locked in his shop and driven insane from watching him rip their friends apart one by one. Fittingly the scene of him dismantling a blender is framed like a scene from a horror movie, complete with a GoryDiscretionShot and a scene of the lifeless blender's corpse ''dripping "blood"''.
23rd Jun '18 9:51:16 AM gophergiggles
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** Chancellor Neighsay is one of the most maligned characters to ever appear in the show and often considered to stand alongside major villains like King Sombra and Queen Chrysalis, in spite of the fact he doesn't actually do anything definitively villainous outside of enforcing the policies of the EEA and closing Twilight's School of Friendship due to [[FantasticRacism racially-motivated]] but valid concerns (see his entry under StrawmanHasAPoint). He's just ''such'' an obnoxious, nasty, and unlikable individual about it that he's hard not to hate.
22nd Jun '18 2:11:15 PM gophergiggles
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* Team Zeus in ''Film/RealSteel''. Their evil acts consist of 1) building the absolutely strongest boxing robot they could via the means and methods available to them (which is pretty much what the protagonists do as well), 2) trying to buy the protagonist robot as they think it will make a good sparring partner for their champion robot (to remove any serious competition), and 3) [[spoiler: not handling a win that isn't a complete rout well, as their robot takes an immense pounding in the final match but does not get KO'd and ultimately gets the technical win on points]]. The film seems to recognize this, and includes a secondary antagonist figure who does more straightforward villain acts.

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* Team Zeus in ''Film/RealSteel''. Their evil acts consist of 1) building the absolutely strongest boxing robot they could via the means and methods available to them (which is pretty much what the protagonists do as well), 2) trying to buy the protagonist robot as they think it will make a good sparring partner for their champion robot (to remove any serious competition), competition, and to their credit they offered a fair price for it), and 3) [[spoiler: not handling a win that isn't a complete rout well, as their robot takes an immense pounding in the final match but does not get KO'd and ultimately gets the technical win on points]]. The film seems to recognize this, and includes a secondary antagonist figure who does more straightforward villain acts.
7th May '18 10:41:10 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* Dean Wormer from ''Film/AnimalHouse'' is an unpleasant JerkassHasAPoint antagonist type who is merely trying to enforce campus rules without committing immoral actions against hilarious but admittedly proto-delinquents frat boys. Part of his problem is that he's under pressure from the town's mayor, a genuinely evil amalgam of Mafia don and authoritarian plutocrat, who goes so far as to [[MoralEventHorizon threaten to have Wormer physically crippled]] if the Deltas do anything to embarrass him.
** Not ''immoral'', perhaps, but even in the early 1960s it was ethically questionable to enlist one group of students to spy on another; to run a kangaroo court in which the spied-upon have no reasonable chance to address the charges against them, some of which are absolutely false; and to justify all this with a "double-secret probation".

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* Dean Wormer from ''Film/AnimalHouse'' is an unpleasant JerkassHasAPoint antagonist type who is merely trying to enforce campus rules without committing immoral actions against hilarious but admittedly proto-delinquents frat boys. Part of his problem is that he's under pressure from the town's mayor, a genuinely evil amalgam of Mafia don and authoritarian plutocrat, who goes so far as to [[MoralEventHorizon threaten to have Wormer physically crippled]] if the Deltas do anything to embarrass him.
** Not ''immoral'', perhaps, but even in the early 1960s it was ethically questionable to enlist
him. While Wormer never does anything illegal, he certainly bends ethics by enlisting one group of students to spy on another; to run another, runs a kangaroo court in which the spied-upon have no reasonable chance to address the charges against them, some them (some of which are absolutely false; false), and to justify all this with a "double-secret probation". probation."



** As the primary advocate for a "guilty" verdict, Juror #3 is the closest thing the film has to a villain, even though he honestly does think the kid is guilty. The fact that he's an aggressive, irritable {{Jerkass}} who refuses to listen to the opposing side prevents him from being a HeroAntagonist.

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** As the primary advocate for a "guilty" verdict, Juror #3 is the closest thing the film has to a villain, even though he honestly does think the kid is guilty. The fact that he's an aggressive, irritable {{Jerkass}} who refuses to listen to the opposing side prevents him from being a HeroAntagonist.keeps our sympathy on the "not guilty" lobby through the duration of the story.



** "Pretty" Ricky Conlan in ''Film/{{Creed}}'' is extremely abrasive and deliberately antagonizes Adonis at a press conference, almost to the point of being a [[{{Heel}} wrestling heel]]. However, he is also a clean fighter and, after narrowly winning on points, tells Adonis that he is [[WorthyOpponent the future of the division]], and his abrasiveness is somewhat justified by the fact that he's being forced into retirement in his prime, and that Donnie is getting a title shot on his second professional bout off the strength of his name, while Conlan had to scratch and claw his way up from nothing.

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** * "Pretty" Ricky Conlan in ''Film/{{Creed}}'' is extremely abrasive and deliberately antagonizes Adonis at a press conference, almost to the point of being a [[{{Heel}} wrestling heel]]. However, he is also a clean fighter and, after narrowly winning on points, tells Adonis that he is [[WorthyOpponent the future of the division]], and his abrasiveness is somewhat justified by the fact that he's being forced into retirement in his prime, and that Donnie is getting a title shot on his second professional bout off the strength of his name, while Conlan had to scratch and claw his way up from nothing.



** A point is also made about how arrogant the Sovereign are about not ever putting any of their kind in danger since each member of the Sovereign is specially bred to be perfect. They may have hired the Guardians to do their dirty work for them because of their arrogance, but the Guardians are freelance mercenaries (meaning their bread and butter is getting paid to do dangerous work for people who don't want to do it themselves) and the Sovereign DID pay them and also handed Nebula over to them. Had Rocket not stolen their batteries they would have been nothing but some weird clients the Guardians did some work for.



* Skyler on ''Series/BreakingBad'' only wants to know what her sick husband was up to while she was at home struggling with a disabled son and another kid on the way. Her notable offences include returning an unattractive piece of jewelery she got from her sister, faking labor to avoid being arrested (for something she didn't do), and being luke warm to her husband's sexual advances. She later becomes a typical shrewish, visitation-denying, ex-wife [[spoiler: and an adulterous white collar criminal]], but her main function from early on is to put more pressure on Walt's already stressful double-life, making her somewhat unsympathetic by default. Vince Gilligan has stated that he's disturbed by the level of hatred some of the fans have for her, and if they're still keeping it up by season three it's probably just pure misogyny (Creator/AnnaGunn has defended the character from the {{hatedom}} as well for the same reasons). Then subverted, as she starts getting involved in Walt's business and proves to be far more level-headed than he.

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* Skyler on ''Series/BreakingBad'' only wants to know what her sick husband was up to while she was at home struggling with a disabled son and another kid on the way. Her notable offences include returning an unattractive piece of jewelery she got from her sister, faking labor to avoid being arrested (for something she didn't do), and being luke warm lukewarm to her husband's sexual advances. She later becomes a typical shrewish, visitation-denying, ex-wife [[spoiler: and an adulterous white collar criminal]], but her main function from early on is to put more pressure on Walt's already stressful double-life, making her somewhat unsympathetic by default. Vince Gilligan has stated that he's disturbed by the level of hatred some of the fans have for her, and if they're still keeping it up by season three it's probably just pure misogyny (Creator/AnnaGunn has defended the character from the {{hatedom}} as well for the same reasons). Then subverted, as she starts getting involved in Walt's business and proves to be far more level-headed than he.him.



* Ocatvio on ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill''. Being voiced [[InkSuitActor and modeled after]] Creator/DannyTrejo, he looks and acts like a hardened criminal, complete with tattoos and an arsenal of guns and knives. But Octavio's actually a harmless guy who occasionally helps Dale with his zany schemes, at worst committing acts of petty fraud like denting Dale's car with a crowbar or selling black market prescription drugs (which, while illegal, is justified in context).
7th Mar '18 10:58:49 PM MasterN
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Meet the Villainy-Free Villain, the very personification of a FelonyMisdemeanor. To make sure that viewer sympathy is still squarely on the protagonist, the Villainy-Free Villain is an antagonist who compensates for their completely socially acceptable aspirations by being as much of a {{Jerkass}} about them as humanly possible. They're not a villain, but they sure act like one. It's as if they don't care about their own well-being, but sees their actions as a wonderful opportunity to crush the protagonist's hopes and dreams.

In any work of fiction in which the protagonist is a LovableRogue or JustifiedCriminal or [[ClearMyName an innocent person who has been framed for a heinous crime]], the law enforcers chasing after him are inevitably going to appear unsympathetic to the audience, even if their motives are beyond reproach. The hero may even end up fighting them as much as the villain. Authority figures who have to control children (teachers, especially) also make fine default antagonists even without being a genuinely malicious SadistTeacher. So do any authority figures [[GoodIsNotNice whose job requires them to be harsh]]: police officers, judges, and [[DrillSergeantNasty drill sergeants]] are all especially prone to this.

Still, this is a clear case of TruthInTelevision. A person doesn't have to kill or steal to be unlikable. If you're a complete jerk and rub your victories in the faces of the people you step over, you'll still be seen in a bad light.

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Meet the Villainy-Free Villain, the very personification of a FelonyMisdemeanor. To make sure that viewer sympathy is still squarely on the protagonist, the Villainy-Free Villain is an antagonist who compensates for their completely socially acceptable aspirations by being as much of a {{Jerkass}} about them as humanly possible. They're not a villain, but they sure act like one. It's as if they don't care about their own well-being, but sees see their actions as a wonderful opportunity to crush the protagonist's hopes and dreams.

In any work of fiction in which the protagonist is a LovableRogue or JustifiedCriminal or [[ClearMyName an innocent person who has been framed for a heinous crime]], the law enforcers chasing after him them are inevitably going to appear unsympathetic to the audience, even if their motives are beyond reproach. The hero may even end up fighting them as much as the villain. Authority figures who have to control children (teachers, especially) also make fine default antagonists even without being a genuinely malicious SadistTeacher. So do any authority figures [[GoodIsNotNice whose job requires them to be harsh]]: police officers, judges, and [[DrillSergeantNasty drill sergeants]] are all especially prone to this.

Still, this is a clear case of TruthInTelevision. A person doesn't have to kill or steal or do anything illegal to be unlikable. If you're a complete jerk and rub your victories in the faces of the people you step over, you'll still be seen in a bad light.
6th Mar '18 9:31:54 AM gophergiggles
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* Filthy Rich in ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirlsLegendOfEverfree'', in [[AdaptationalVillainy stark contrast]] to his BenevolentBoss pony counterpart, acts like an evil CorruptCorporateExecutive yet ''what'' he's actually doing is merely laying claim to some land he has the legal and financial right to. Even giving Gloriosa Daisy an extra month to pay for her land, by a verbal agreement he actually honors in the end, is portrayed as malicious taunting rather than the surprisingly generous act it actually was.
18th Jan '18 6:24:36 PM MasterN
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Still, this a clear case of TruthInTelevision. A person doesn't have to kill or steal to be unlikable. If you're a complete jerk and rub your victories in the faces of the people you step over, you'll still be seen in a bad light.

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Still, this is a clear case of TruthInTelevision. A person doesn't have to kill or steal to be unlikable. If you're a complete jerk and rub your victories in the faces of the people you step over, you'll still be seen in a bad light.
15th Jan '18 6:46:24 PM DrPsyche
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* ''Manga/JojosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable'': The Bank Teller during the "Shigechi's Harvest" arc ends up as a downplayed example. The heroes find a winning lottery ticket and try to cash it, but the Teller is suspicious of how a bunch of teenagers came across a winning ticket especially as the original owner's name is on it. He expresses a huge amount of joy at accusing them of stealing the ticket and tries to get them arrested which all together isn't unreasonable given the information he has. Though after they successfully tricks them, he apologizes, ashamed of the accusations, and happily pays them the money. They even agree to continue to use his bank to store their winnings and at the end of the day there was no real hard feelings.

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* ''Manga/JojosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable'': The Bank Teller during the "Shigechi's Harvest" arc ends up as a downplayed example. The heroes find a winning lottery ticket and try to cash it, but the Teller is suspicious of how a bunch of teenagers came across a winning ticket especially as the original owner's name is on it. He expresses a huge amount of joy at accusing them of stealing the ticket and tries to get them arrested which all together isn't unreasonable given the information he has. Though after they successfully tricks them, trick him, he apologizes, ashamed of the accusations, and happily pays them the money. They even agree to continue to use his bank to store their winnings and at the end of the day there was no real hard feelings.
27th Dec '17 12:01:09 PM lalalei2001
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* Weevil in ''Anime/YuGiOh'' is kind of a jerk (and has a ''really'' bad introduction), but he's the only "villain" who never actually tries to kill anybody. Yugi and friends ''still'' treat him as the scum of the earth.
** Weevil might not count as he does cheat (he sabotages both Yugi's and Joey's decks) but Rex Raptor is a clean - if vicious - player who is also classified as a full fledged villain despite doing even less than Weevil, but being more of a jerk about it.
*** In the anime Weevil and Rex forfeited any rights to be considered Villainy-Free in the Waking the Dragons arc, when they willingly joined Dartz's forces and tried to make Yami and Joey lose their souls (something [[AssholeVictim both of them already knew what's like]]) just to increase the power of their decks. Later, in the Grand Championship Arc, they kidnap an entrant known as Fortunes Salim and steal his cape so they could duel in his place. Since we have no clue to how far the real Fortunes Salim would have gone in the tournament, he could fit the trope by contesting Yugi's victory but was instead seen with other people applauding.
* ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' has several cases of Pokémon trainers who do nothing worse than being huge jerks and fighting against the protagonists with their Pokémon (mainly rivals such as Gary and Paul), which is perfectly normal in the Pokémon world. Quite often, they will [[DefeatMeansFriendship become nicer]] by the end of the episode or the arc, whatever the case may be (although Paul doesn't necessarily come off his high horse, Ash does manage to earn his respect by the end of the ''Diamond & Pearl'' series).

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* Weevil in ''Anime/YuGiOh'' is kind of a jerk (and has a ''really'' bad introduction), but he's the only "villain" who never actually tries to kill anybody. Yugi and friends ''still'' treat him as the scum of the earth.
** Weevil might not count as he does cheat (he sabotages both Yugi's and Joey's decks) but Rex Raptor is a clean - if vicious - player who is also classified as a full fledged villain despite doing even less than Weevil, but being more of a jerk about it.
*** In the anime Weevil and Rex forfeited any rights to be considered Villainy-Free in the Waking the Dragons arc, when they willingly joined Dartz's forces and tried to make Yami and Joey lose their souls (something [[AssholeVictim both of them already knew what's like]]) just to increase the power of their decks. Later, in the Grand Championship Arc, they kidnap an entrant known as Fortunes Salim and steal his cape so they could duel in his place. Since we have no clue to how far the real Fortunes Salim would have gone in the tournament, he could fit the trope by contesting Yugi's victory but was instead seen with other people applauding.
* ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' has several cases of Pokémon trainers who do nothing worse than being huge jerks and fighting against the protagonists with their Pokémon (mainly rivals such as Gary and Paul), Pokémon, which is perfectly normal in the Pokémon world. Quite often, they will [[DefeatMeansFriendship become nicer]] by the end of the episode or the arc, whatever the case may be (although Paul doesn't necessarily come off his high horse, Ash does manage to earn his respect by the end of the ''Diamond & Pearl'' series).be.
27th Dec '17 11:54:43 AM OptimumTaurus
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** A point is also made about how arrogant the Sovereign are about not ever putting any of their kind in danger since each member of the Sovereign is specially bred to be perfect. They may have hired the Guardians to do their dirty work for them because of their arrogance, but the Guardians are freelance mercenaries (meaning their bread and butter is getting paid to do dangerous work for people who don't want to do it themselves) and the Sovereign DID pay them and also handed Nebula over to them. Had Rocket not stolen their batteries they would have been nothing but some weird clients the Guardians did some work for.
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