History Main / TheTeaser

9th May '17 5:23:00 PM RacattackForce
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* Every episode of ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' so far has a cold opening, usually to introduce the object or situation that sets the episode's plot into motion.

to:

* Every episode of ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' so far has a cold opening, usually to introduce the object or situation that sets the episode's plot into motion.motion. In addition, when the hour-long series finale is split in half for reruns, the second half uses a PreviouslyOn segment narrated by Soos.
18th Apr '17 6:01:17 PM nombretomado
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Though it technically does not really set up the plot, as there is usually no lengthy continuous plot, the first sketch right before the opening credits in sketch comedy shows like ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' and ''Series/{{MADtv}}'' is also called a cold opening. (The show ''Studio60OnTheSunsetStrip'' actually had an episode titled "Cold Open" in which the writing of such a sketch is a plot element.) Non-sketch entertainment programming often also uses a comedy sketch as a Cold Open.

to:

Though it technically does not really set up the plot, as there is usually no lengthy continuous plot, the first sketch right before the opening credits in sketch comedy shows like ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' and ''Series/{{MADtv}}'' is also called a cold opening. (The show ''Studio60OnTheSunsetStrip'' ''Series/Studio60OnTheSunsetStrip'' actually had an episode titled "Cold Open" in which the writing of such a sketch is a plot element.) Non-sketch entertainment programming often also uses a comedy sketch as a Cold Open.
25th Mar '17 6:29:28 PM AthenaBlue
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* The first season of ''Series/ThreeTwoOneContact''.



* ''Seris/BandOfBrothers'' mostly avoids the cold opening, except for one or two episodes that start with the interviews of the RealLife veterans. In most other episodes these interviews came immediately after the TitleSequence.
* The 1966 ''Series/{{Batman}}'' series alternates between this and PreviouslyOn.
** The alternating was no coincidence: the series usually offered two-episode stories, with the first having a cold open, the second reminding the viewer of what happened last week in the same story.



* ''Series/TheCosbyShow'' had only one for "Same Time, Next Year" where Olivia came into Cliff's bedroom wearing a Bart Simpson mask (a TakeThat to the show's ratings battle with ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' on Thursday nights).



* ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' uses this to introduce any background story or an important event for each episode.



** The fourth season premiere begins with a "PreviouslyOn" which ended on Ned Stark's execution in S1 by his own sword Ice which leads into a cold open with Tywin Lannister having the blade melted down and made into two and then throwing the scabbard into a fire, symbolizing the Lannister's victory over the Starks.

to:

** The fourth season premiere begins with a "PreviouslyOn" which ended on Ned Stark's execution in S1 by his own sword Ice which leads into a cold open with Tywin Lannister having the blade melted down and made into two and then throwing the scabbard into a fire, symbolizing the Lannister's Lannisters' victory over the Starks.Starks.
* ''Series/TheGeorgeLopezShow'' had some epically long teasers, to the point where you would get to what would seem like a logical point for the first act break, only for the show to cut to the title sequence.
* ''Series/GetSmart'' had one every episode. Several ended with {{Title Drop}}s.



* 16 out of the first 17 episodes of ''Series/LeaveItToBeaver'' had an opening narration to set up the episode done by Hugh Beaumont. The shortest one, from the episode "New Neighbors", went: "To a growing boy boy there are some emotions you can take in your stride. Love. Anger. But fear can play havoc with your little imagination. And that's our story tonight on Leave It To Beaver."

to:

* 16 out of the first 17 episodes of ''Series/LeaveItToBeaver'' had an opening narration to set up the episode done by Hugh Beaumont. The shortest one, from the episode "New Neighbors", went: "To a growing boy boy there are some emotions you can take in your stride. Love. Anger. But fear can play havoc with your little imagination. And that's our story tonight on Leave ''Leave It To Beaver."Beaver''."
* ''{{Series/Lexx}}'' only used these in the fourth season.



* ''[[Series/{{Merlin 2008}} Merlin]]'' always opened with a teaser.
* ''{{Series/Monday Night Raw}}'' has occasionally opened with a teaser, before jumping into the title sequence. Monday Nitro, by contrast, seemed to do it every other week for awhile. Particularly when the nWo storyline was running.



* ''Series/NedsDeclassifiedSchoolSurvivalGuide'' opens with the intro, but every episode, except for "Talent Shows", had a short segment beforehand with the title card appearing as soon as Ned's problem arrived.



* ''Series/{{Psych}}'' normally begins with a clip of a young Shawn getting yelled at by his dad.



* ''Series/RedDwarf'' did it for ''Stoke Me a Clipper''.



* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' started to use cold opens as opposed to Jerry's stand-up routines around season 8.



* The short-lived UPN show ''Series/SpecialUnit2'' always began with a short scene of the MonsterOfTheWeek's handiwork.



* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' always uses this to show the murder that the Winchesters will investigate in the episode. Even arc-related episodes have Teasers. Occasionally the Teaser is simply a recap of previous events before cutting away to the title card.




* ''Series/RedDwarf'' did it for ''Stoke Me a Clipper''.
* The short-lived UPN show ''Series/SpecialUnit2'' always began with a short scene of the MonsterOfTheWeek's handiwork.
* ''Series/{{Psych}}'' normally begins with a clip of a young Shawn getting yelled at by his dad.
* ''Seris/BandOfBrothers'' mostly avoids the cold opening, except for one or two episodes that start with the interviews of the RealLife veterans. In most other episodes these interviews came immediately after the TitleSequence.
* ''{{Series/Lexx}}'' only used these in the fourth season.
* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' always uses this to show the murder that the Winchesters will investigate in the episode. Even arc-related episodes have Teasers. Occasionally the Teaser is simply a recap of previous events before cutting away to the title card.
* The first season of ''Series/ThreeTwoOneContact''.
* The 1966 ''Series/{{Batman}}'' series alternates between this and PreviouslyOn.
** The alternating was no coincidence: the series usually offered two-episode stories, with the first having a cold open, the second reminding the viewer of what happened last week in the same story.
* ''Series/GetSmart'' had one every episode. Several ended with {{Title Drop}}s.
* ''Series/TheCosbyShow'' had only one for "Same Time, Next Year" where Olivia came into Cliff's bedroom wearing a Bart Simpson mask (a TakeThat to the show's ratings battle with ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' on Thursday nights).
* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' started to use cold opens as opposed to Jerry's stand-up routines around season 8.
* ''Series/TheGeorgeLopezShow'' had some epically long teasers, to the point where you would get to what would seem like a logical point for the first act break, only for the show to cut to the title sequence.
* ''[[Series/{{Merlin 2008}} Merlin]]'' always opened with a teaser.
* ''{{Series/Monday Night Raw}}'' has occasionally opened with a teaser, before jumping into the title sequence. Monday Nitro, by contrast, seemed to do it every other week for awhile. Particularly when the nWo storyline was running.
* ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' uses this to introduce any background story or an important event for each episode.
* ''Series/NedsDeclassifiedSchoolSurvivalGuide'' opens with the intro, but every episode, except for "Talent Shows", had a short segment beforehand with the title card appearing as soon as Ned's problem arrived.



* ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' had these, the length of it varying depending on the episode.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' Several prime-time cartoons from 1960s have cold openings. These include ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones'', ''WesternAnimation/TopCat'', ''WesternAnimation/CalvinAndTheColonel'', and ''WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest''.
** Those were actually teasers, although a couple of Flintstones episodes (most notably the episode that introduced Bamm-Bamm) has a cold open.
* On their network runs in the 60s, ''WesternAnimation/{{Underdog}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/TennesseeTuxedoAndHisTales''
had these, teasers.
* A few 1970 and 1971 cartoons used cold opens: ''[[WesternAnimation/TheArchieShow Archie's Funhouse]]'', ''WesternAnimation/SabrinaAndTheGroovieGoolies'', ''WesternAnimation/JosieAndThePussycats ''and ''Will The Real Jerry Lewis Please Sit Down?'' were
the length of it varying depending on 1970s entries; the episode.debut episode of 1971's ''[[WesternAnimation/TheHairBearBunch Help! It's The Hair Bear Bunch!]]'' ("Keep Your Keeper") was the only ep to use a cold open during its CBS run. All sixteen episodes were re-edited for cable/satellite to have cold opens.
** In the 1980s, NBC's cartoon shows had teasers.
* The first season of ''WesternAnimation/AllGrownUp'' had cold opens, but dropped them from the second season onwards.
* ''WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungerForce'' used cold openings featuring Dr. Weird, who would create experiments that would wreck havoc for the Aqua Teens in the show. This lasted three episodes, until Dr. Weird became a nonsensical opening. He was later replaced by Spacecataz. The Dr. Weird openings are set to return, however.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Archer}}'' uses a cold open in every episode, although it usually does involve the episode's plot.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'' always begins with a teaser that's about a minute long, usually with Arthur talking directly to the viewers, followed by a title card.
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold'' has started every episode with one of these so far. One has been an actual LeadIn ("Terror on Dinosaur Island" has Plastic Man in both segments), but as often as not they seem to be used to have fun or introduce a hero we may see in a later episode. The other exception is "[[http://www.veoh.com/browse/videos/category/animation/watch/v192822022sc45ehc Mayhem of the Music Meister!]]", which devoted all of the show's time to the main story.



* ''WesternAnimation/GeneratorRex''.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' usually does not use a cold opening, except sometimes for Halloween specials, they do, however, often use a LeadIn.
** "The Day the Earth Stood Cool" jumps straight from the show's logo to the beginning of the episode.
* Several episodes in the first season of ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' have a cold opening. They more or less disappeared in the second, though there were sporadic pre-opening theme joke adverts for futuristic products. So does "The Prisioner of Benda", one of the episode after the series was {{uncancelled}}.
-->'''Linda:''' Tonight, at 11:00.\\
'''Morbo:''' {{Doom|yDoomsOfDoom}}!
* Many of the early episodes of ''WesternAnimation/TheLifeAndTimesOfJuniperLee'' had teasers that didn't relate much to the plot, except for maybe one mention of where the main part of the story starts. One episode, "It Takes a Pillage", had a teaser which appeared to be setting up the MonsterOfTheWeek by showing him and having him monologue, but right at the point the monster's supposed to say his name, June conks him with a stone.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/GeneratorRex''.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' usually does not use a cold opening, except sometimes for Halloween specials, they do, however, often use a LeadIn.
** "The Day the Earth Stood Cool" jumps straight from the show's logo to the beginning
A large majority of the episode.
* Several
''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' episodes in the first season of ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' have a cold opening. They more or less disappeared in the second, though there were sporadic pre-opening theme joke adverts for futuristic products. So does "The Prisioner of Benda", one of the episode after the series was {{uncancelled}}.
-->'''Linda:''' Tonight, at 11:00.\\
'''Morbo:''' {{Doom|yDoomsOfDoom}}!
* Many of the early episodes of ''WesternAnimation/TheLifeAndTimesOfJuniperLee'' had teasers that didn't relate much to the plot, except for maybe one mention of where the main part of the story starts. One episode, "It Takes a Pillage", had a teaser which appeared to be setting up the MonsterOfTheWeek by showing him and having him monologue, but right at the point the monster's supposed to say his name, June conks him with a stone.
open this way.



* ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003'' frequently started with a FlashForward.
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold'' has started every episode with one of these so far. One has been an actual LeadIn ("Terror on Dinosaur Island" has Plastic Man in both segments), but as often as not they seem to be used to have fun or introduce a hero we may see in a later episode. The other exception is "[[http://www.veoh.com/browse/videos/category/animation/watch/v192822022sc45ehc Mayhem of the Music Meister!]]", which devoted all of the show's time to the main story.



%%* As did ''WesternAnimation/{{Doug}}'', five years earlier.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' used this only one time, in "Timmy the Barbarian".
* ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones'' has teasers. Early in the series, it showed a scene directly from the episode itself, though some of them, particularly in later seasons, show either a one-off gag or use a LeadIn.
** ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'' had them in its original run. However, most current TV/DVD prints remove their teasers, though "The Coming of Astro" has its teaser intact.
* Several episodes in the first season of ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' have a cold opening. They more or less disappeared in the second, though there were sporadic pre-opening theme joke adverts for futuristic products. So does "The Prisioner of Benda", one of the episode after the series was {{uncancelled}}.
-->'''Linda:''' Tonight, at 11:00.\\
'''Morbo:''' {{Doom|yDoomsOfDoom}}!
%%* ''WesternAnimation/GeneratorRex''.
* Every episode of ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' so far has a cold opening, usually to introduce the object or situation that sets the episode's plot into motion.
* Every episode of ''WesternAnimation/JackieChanAdventures'' begins with a teaser.



* ''WesternAnimation/SpaceGhostCoastToCoast'' does this almost every episode. In one particular case, the episode "Joshua" is a super long cold opening promoting "Space Ghost 2000". The actual episode consists of the winners of the "Haikuin' for Space Ghost" contest reading their haikus, and that's about it. "Gallagher"'s cold opening consisted solely of Space Ghost shouting "They've invented the telephone?!", with no lead-up or follow-through, and with no relation to anything in the episode.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretSaturdays'' have this in every episode, to let the viewer know the current situation of the characters.
* The first season of ''WesternAnimation/AllGrownUp'' had cold opens, but dropped them from the second season onwards.
* The 2nd season of ''[[WesternAnimation/{{Witch}} W.I.T.C.H.]]'' added a cold open.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretSaturdays'' have this Many of the early episodes of ''WesternAnimation/TheLifeAndTimesOfJuniperLee'' had teasers that didn't relate much to the plot, except for maybe one mention of where the main part of the story starts. One episode, "It Takes a Pillage", had a teaser which appeared to be setting up the MonsterOfTheWeek by showing him and having him monologue, but right at the point the monster's supposed to say his name, June conks him with a stone.
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' uses cold open
in every episode, to let the viewer know the current situation of the characters.
* The first season of ''WesternAnimation/AllGrownUp'' had cold opens, but dropped them from the second season onwards.
* The 2nd season of ''[[WesternAnimation/{{Witch}} W.I.T.C.H.]]'' added a cold open.
episode.
** As does WesternAnimation/LittlestPetShop2012, another Hub show.



* ''WesternAnimation/WhatsNewScoobyDoo'' and ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooMysteryIncorporated'' were the first two Scooby shows to use a cold open. In the former, someone would run into the MonsterOfTheWeek.
* Every episode of ''WesternAnimation/JackieChanAdventures'' begins with a teaser.
* A large majority of ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' episodes open this way.
* A few 1970 and 1971 cartoons used cold opens: ''[[WesternAnimation/TheArchieShow Archie's Funhouse]]'', ''WesternAnimation/SabrinaAndTheGroovieGoolies'', ''WesternAnimation/JosieAndThePussycats ''and ''Will The Real Jerry Lewis Please Sit Down?'' were the 1970s entries; the debut episode of 1971's ''[[WesternAnimation/TheHairBearBunch Help! It's The Hair Bear Bunch!]]'' ("Keep Your Keeper") was the only ep to use a cold open during its CBS run. All sixteen episodes were re-edited for cable/satellite to have cold opens.
** In the 1980s, NBC's cartoon shows had teasers.
* Several prime-time cartoons from 1960s have cold openings. These include ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones'', ''WesternAnimation/TopCat'', ''WesternAnimation/CalvinAndTheColonel'', and ''WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest''.
** Those were actually teasers, although a couple of Flintstones episodes (most notably the episode that introduced Bamm-Bamm) has a cold open.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' uses cold opens in every episode. In some episodes, they don't even show the opening sequence, though, so it doesn't exactly count. In season one, at least, the ColdOpen would always be drawn in wide screen while the rest of the episode was in full screen.
* Here's a rare theatrical example: a lot of late 1950s widescreen [=CinemaScope=] shorts from Terrytoons have a teaser before the credits. This was dropped after a while, although the final Heckle & Jeckle cartoon ''Messed Up Movie Makers'' (released in 1966) has a teaser, too.
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' uses cold open in every episode.
** As does WesternAnimation/LittlestPetShop2012, another Hub show.
* ''WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungerForce'' used cold openings featuring Dr. Weird, who would create experiments that would wreck havoc for the Aqua Teens in the show. This lasted three episodes, until Dr. Weird became a nonsensical opening. He was later replaced by Spacecataz. The Dr. Weird openings are set to return, however.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'' always begins with a teaser that's about a minute long, usually with Arthur talking directly to the viewers, followed by a title card.
* As did ''WesternAnimation/{{Doug}}'', five years earlier.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Archer}}'' uses a cold open in every episode, although it usually does involve the episode's plot.
* ''WesternAnimation/UglyAmericans'' almost always starts with a cold open that looks like part of a horror film, then turns out to be something fairly mundane (for [[MundaneFantastic that universe]]). Usually used to introduce the Department of Integration's [[MonsterOfTheWeek client of the week]]. Case in point, [[http://www.comedycentral.com/video-clips/a9dcet/ugly-americans-the-demon-chick the pilot.]]

to:

* "Exit 52" is the only episode of ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'' with a cold open, which helps set it up as a WhamEpisode.
* ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'':
''WesternAnimation/WhatsNewScoobyDoo'' and ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooMysteryIncorporated'' were the first two Scooby shows to use a cold open. In the former, someone would run into the MonsterOfTheWeek.
* Every episode of ''WesternAnimation/JackieChanAdventures'' begins with a teaser.
* A large majority of ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' episodes open this way.
* A few 1970 and 1971 cartoons used cold opens: ''[[WesternAnimation/TheArchieShow Archie's Funhouse]]'', ''WesternAnimation/SabrinaAndTheGroovieGoolies'', ''WesternAnimation/JosieAndThePussycats ''and ''Will The Real Jerry Lewis Please Sit Down?'' were the 1970s entries; the debut episode of 1971's ''[[WesternAnimation/TheHairBearBunch Help! It's The Hair Bear Bunch!]]'' ("Keep Your Keeper") was the only ep to use a cold open during its CBS run. All sixteen episodes were re-edited for cable/satellite to have cold opens.
** In the 1980s, NBC's cartoon shows had teasers.
* Several prime-time cartoons from 1960s have cold openings. These include ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones'', ''WesternAnimation/TopCat'', ''WesternAnimation/CalvinAndTheColonel'', and ''WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest''.
** Those were actually teasers, although a couple of Flintstones episodes (most notably the episode that introduced Bamm-Bamm) has a cold open.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' uses cold opens in every episode. In some episodes, they don't even show the opening sequence, though, so it doesn't exactly count. In season one, at least, the ColdOpen would always be drawn in wide screen while the rest of the episode was in full screen.
* Here's a rare theatrical example: a lot of late 1950s widescreen [=CinemaScope=] shorts from Terrytoons have a teaser before the credits. This was dropped after a while, although the final Heckle & Jeckle cartoon ''Messed Up Movie Makers'' (released in 1966) has a teaser, too.
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' uses cold open in every episode.
** As does WesternAnimation/LittlestPetShop2012, another Hub show.
* ''WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungerForce'' used cold openings featuring Dr. Weird, who would create experiments that would wreck havoc for the Aqua Teens in the show. This lasted three episodes, until Dr. Weird became a nonsensical opening. He was later replaced by Spacecataz. The Dr. Weird openings are set to return, however.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'' always begins with a teaser that's about a minute long, usually with Arthur talking directly to the viewers, followed by a title card.
* As did ''WesternAnimation/{{Doug}}'', five years earlier.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Archer}}'' uses a cold open in every episode, although it usually does involve the episode's plot.
* ''WesternAnimation/UglyAmericans'' almost always starts with a cold open that looks like part of a horror film, then turns out to be something fairly mundane (for [[MundaneFantastic that universe]]). Usually used to introduce the Department of Integration's [[MonsterOfTheWeek client of the week]]. Case in point, [[http://www.comedycentral.com/video-clips/a9dcet/ugly-americans-the-demon-chick the pilot.]]
MonsterOfTheWeek.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretSaturdays'' have this in every episode, to let the viewer know the current situation of the characters.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' usually does not use a cold opening, except sometimes for Halloween specials, they do, however, often use a LeadIn.
** "The Day the Earth Stood Cool" jumps straight from the show's logo to the beginning of the episode.
* ''WesternAnimation/SpaceGhostCoastToCoast'' does this almost every episode. In one particular case, the episode "Joshua" is a super long cold opening promoting "Space Ghost 2000". The actual episode consists of the winners of the "Haikuin' for Space Ghost" contest reading their haikus, and that's about it. "Gallagher"'s cold opening consisted solely of Space Ghost shouting "They've invented the telephone?!", with no lead-up or follow-through, and with no relation to anything in the episode.
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'' has them in every episode, most times featuring at least one of the main characters.
* While not before the opening credits, ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' has one before its [[Recap/StevenUniverseS3E20Bismuth 100th episode's]] [[EpisodeTitleCard title card]] shows up. (Usually the title card is shown before the episode starts.)
* ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003'' frequently started with a FlashForward.
* ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' had these, the length of it varying depending on the episode.
* Here's a rare theatrical example: a lot of late 1950s widescreen [=CinemaScope=] shorts from Terrytoons have a teaser before the credits. This was dropped after a while, although the final Heckle & Jeckle cartoon ''Messed Up Movie Makers'' (released in 1966) has a teaser, too.
* A variation is used in ''WesternAnimation/TimeJamValerianAndLaureline''. Episodes start with a recap of the general situation - Earth is gone, Laureline is from the 10th C., they have to work as mercenaties. Then there is a teaser and only after that, the crfedits roll with the OP.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones'' has teasers. Early in the series, it showed a scene directly from the episode itself, though some of them, particularly in later seasons, show either a one-off gag or use a LeadIn.
** ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'' had them in its original run. However, most current TV/DVD prints remove their teasers, though "The Coming of Astro" has its teaser intact.
* On their network runs in the 60s, ''WesternAnimation/{{Underdog}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/TennesseeTuxedoAndHisTales'' had teasers.
* Every episode of ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' so far has a cold opening, usually to introduce the object or situation that sets the episode's plot into motion.
* A variation is used in WesternAnimation/TimeJamValerianAndLaureline . Episodes start with a recap of the general situation - Earth is gone, Laureline is from the 10th C., they have to work as mercenaties. Then there is a teaser and only after that, the crfedits roll with the OP.
* "Exit 52" is the only episode of ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'' with a cold open, which helps set it up as a WhamEpisode.
* While not before the opening credits, ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' has one before its [[Recap/StevenUniverseS3E20Bismuth 100th episode's]] [[EpisodeTitleCard title card]] shows up. (Usually the title card is shown before the episode starts.)
* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' used this only one time, in "Timmy the Barbarian".

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones'' has teasers. Early in the series, it showed a scene directly from the episode itself, though some of them, particularly in later seasons, show either a one-off gag or use a LeadIn.
** ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'' had them in its original run. However, most current TV/DVD prints remove their teasers, though "The Coming of Astro" has its teaser intact.
* On their network runs in the 60s, ''WesternAnimation/{{Underdog}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/TennesseeTuxedoAndHisTales'' had teasers.
* Every episode of ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' so far has
''WesternAnimation/UglyAmericans'' almost always starts with a cold opening, usually open that looks like part of a horror film, then turns out to be something fairly mundane (for [[MundaneFantastic that universe]]). Usually used to introduce the object or situation that sets the episode's plot into motion.
* A variation is used in WesternAnimation/TimeJamValerianAndLaureline . Episodes start with a recap
Department of Integration's [[MonsterOfTheWeek client of the general situation - Earth is gone, Laureline is from week]]. Case in point, [[http://www.comedycentral.com/video-clips/a9dcet/ugly-americans-the-demon-chick the 10th C., pilot.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' uses cold opens in every episode. In some episodes,
they have to work as mercenaties. Then there is a teaser and only after that, the crfedits roll with the OP.
* "Exit 52" is the only episode of ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'' with a cold open, which helps set it up as a WhamEpisode.
* While not before
don't even show the opening credits, ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' has one before its [[Recap/StevenUniverseS3E20Bismuth 100th episode's]] [[EpisodeTitleCard title card]] shows up. (Usually sequence, though, so it doesn't exactly count. In season one, at least, the title card is shown before ColdOpen would always be drawn in wide screen while the rest of the episode starts.)
* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' used this only one time,
was in "Timmy the Barbarian".full screen.
* The 2nd season of ''[[WesternAnimation/{{Witch}} W.I.T.C.H.]]'' added a cold open.
25th Mar '17 6:09:43 PM AthenaBlue
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* ''Series/{{Bonanza}}'': From episode 1 until the Season 13 finale in 1972, episodes began with a teaser opening act, which always set up the main plot of the show, prior to the opening credits. The final season switched these two, i.e., they began with the opening credits before going to the teaser.

to:

* ''Series/{{Bonanza}}'': From episode 1 until the Season 13 finale in 1972, episodes American daytime soap operas began with a teaser opening act, which always using teasers in the 1960s to resolve (or sometimes extend) the previous episode's cliffhanger or set up the main plot of storylines for the show, prior to day. Since the opening credits. The final season switched these two, i.e., they began mid-1970s, all soaps have used teasers, with the opening credits before going exception of ABC soaps from 1998 to the teaser.2003.



** ''Series/{{Alias}}'', with its tongue very firmly in its cheek, decided to take advantage of having the Superbowl as LeadIn in "Phase One".

to:

** ''Series/{{Alias}}'', with its tongue very firmly in its cheek, decided to take advantage of having the Superbowl Super Bowl as LeadIn in "Phase One".One".
* Both ''Series/TheApprentice'' and ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' did not use a cold open to begin with, but they adopted this practice later (''Apprentice'' started this practice around season 4, with ''Survivor'' doing this with the Fiji season).
* All forms of UK ''Series/BigBrother'' [[SpinOff Spin Offs]] had some cold open element- notably in the case of ''Big Mouth'' where that episode's guests would usually be introduced in some nonsensical-[[OnceAnEpisode but-consistent]] fashion.
* ''Series/{{Bonanza}}'': From episode 1 until the Season 13 finale in 1972, episodes began with a teaser opening act, which always set up the main plot of the show, prior to the opening credits. The final season switched these two, i.e., they began with the opening credits before going to the teaser.
* Every episode of ''Series/{{Bones}}'' has a cold open where the characters discover the body. This is usually done in a dark comedic fashion. (Ex. A teenage couple getting naked in a mud spring where a corpse lies beneath.)
* ''Series/BoyMeetsWorld'' used this once, in Season 5's "No Guts, No Cory" by playing the opening titles after the setting had shifted from 1997 to December 9, 1941 & Mr Feeny had made the anouncement that Pearl Harbour had been bombed. The episode itself was part of a crossover between the TGIF shows in which ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'''s Salem had swallowed a ball that sent the to a different time period, and proceeded to run amok by heading to the other shows in the line-up.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'' used these to great effect in multiple ways besides as the continuation of the previous episode's cliffhanger. The first two seasons mostly use straight cold opens (though one is a music video about Walt's Heisenberg persona) but seasons 3, 4, and 5 frequently featured flashbacks that feature a dead character, added depth to the series' world, shed light on certain themes of that episode, or [[FlashForward showed[=/=]alluded to an event that occurred later in the episode]] but without context to make the viewers guess what happened and how it got to the point.



* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' had one in every episode, either to set up the plot or theme of the episode, or, sometimes, just to have a joke at the characters' expense. Each one would always end with the crew being attacked, captured, or put in some other form of distress, causing the music to turn into the opening of the ThemeSong.
* The teasers on ''Series/TheLWord'' are usually set anywhere from a year to several decades in the past, featuring characters we've never met before, but they always end up tying in with what goes on in the episode.
* All the ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' shows use a cold open, with a stock opening title card and narration. The action is either the crime itself or the discovery of a body, and thirty seconds of the detectives opening the investigation. While Jerry Orbach was still with us, almost always ended on a Lenny Briscoe OneLiner.
** ''Series/LawAndOrderCriminalIntent'' rarely showed the main cast in the teaser during the first five seasons. It happened more frequently after original showrunner René Balcer left.

to:

* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' had one in every episode, either to set up the plot or theme Every episode of the episode, or, sometimes, just to have a joke at the characters' expense. Each one would always end ''Series/{{Castle}}'' opens with the crew being attacked, captured, an extreme close up of a dead body before it is discovered or put in some other form of distress, causing the music to turn into the opening of the ThemeSong.
* The teasers on ''Series/TheLWord'' are
investigated, usually set anywhere from a year to several decades in the past, featuring characters we've never met before, but they with some kind of ironic music/pop song.
* ''Series/{{Cheers}}''
always end up tying in with what goes on in the episode.
* All the ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' shows use
had a cold open, with a stock opening title card and narration. The action is either the crime itself or the discovery of a body, and thirty seconds of the detectives opening the investigation. While Jerry Orbach was still with us, almost always ended on a Lenny Briscoe OneLiner.
** ''Series/LawAndOrderCriminalIntent'' rarely showed
teaser unrelated to the main cast in plot of the teaser during the first five seasons. It happened more frequently after original showrunner René Balcer left.episode.



* ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' does the same. It works well with crime shows as the introduction of the episode's case usually fits right into the opening segment. (Beware, however, when the cold opening actually shows the main characters or the [[AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs home base]] - it means that the case will directly involve them, as seen in ''Bête noire''.)
** The very same formula was also used in ''Series/{{JAG}}''.
* ''Series/SapphireAndSteel'' actually delivered its teaser in the ''middle'' of the TitleSequence: a short sequence showing the title and stars was shown, followed by TheTeaser, after which the rest of the sequence (with the ThemeTune and OpeningNarration) was shown. Such a style of opening (title both before and after the cold open) is more common these days. "Pure" teasers only appeared in the first episode of each story, with later episodes reprising the events leading up to the previous episode's cliffhanger.
* ''Series/TheTomorrowPeople'' did something similar.
* The US version of ''Series/TheOffice'' always has a short, one scene gag before the opening scene.

to:

* ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' does ''Series/DoctorWho'' has used it in the same. It works well show consistently since the 2005 revival, often with crime shows as someone getting killed by a monster before the introduction cliffhanger "scream" of the episode's case usually fits right into the opening segment. (Beware, however, when the cold opening actually shows the main characters or the [[AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs home base]] - it means that the case will directly involve them, as seen in ''Bête noire''.)
** The very same formula was also used in ''Series/{{JAG}}''.
* ''Series/SapphireAndSteel'' actually delivered its teaser in the ''middle'' of the TitleSequence: a short sequence showing the title and stars was shown, followed by TheTeaser, after which the rest of the sequence (with the ThemeTune and OpeningNarration) was shown. Such a style of opening (title both before and after the cold open) is more common these days. "Pure" teasers only
theme music. It appeared in only five times before 2005 -- [[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E3TheAmbassadorsOfDeath "The Ambassadors of Death"]] (which also debuted the electronic scream sound the show's theme music is famous for including), [[Recap/DoctorWhoS19E1Castrovalva "Castrovalva"]], [[Recap/DoctorWho20thASTheFiveDoctors "The Five Doctors"]] (consisting of a clip from a previous story to allow the late William Hartnell to make an appearance), [[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E1TimeAndTheRani "Time and the Rani"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E1RemembranceOfTheDaleks "Remembrance of the Daleks"]]; instead, the original run of ''Doctor Who'' used the first episodes of a serial to fulfill the same function as a cold open.
** It isn't the coldest opening because BBC guidelines require their logo to be placed at the beginning of every episode.
** The award for longest teaser would have to go to [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E13TheBigBang "The Big Bang"]], at 7 minutes 39 seconds.
** During Creator/RussellTDavies' tenure as showrunner, episodes introducing a new main companion would forego a teaser -- specifically, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E1Rose "Rose"]] (the
first episode of each story, the new series), [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E1SmithAndJones "Smith and Jones"]] and [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E1PartnersInCrime "Partners in Crime"]]. The practice was abandoned when Creator/StevenMoffat took over.
** 50[[superscript:th]] anniversary special [[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor "The Day of the Doctor"]] doesn't have a teaser, instead beginning
with later episodes reprising [[SpecialEditionTitle the events leading up original title sequence from 1963]].
* Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}'s ''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'' was perhaps the only game show to use a cold open; every episode began with the contestants [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yyMcTFg963w performing a "Physical Challenge"]], followed by the show's introduction.
** So did ''Series/RemoteControl'', ''Series/SingledOut'' and possibly ''Series/{{Trashed}}''.
* ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'' has one every episode, with a segment where the title characters tell a story
to the previous episode's cliffhanger.
audience.
* ''Series/TheTomorrowPeople'' did something similar.
*
''Series/TheDrewCareyShow'' often used its teasers for bizarre stand-alone skits apart from the show's continuity, such as having a guest appearance by [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Daffy Duck]] or Drew battling invading aliens. The US version best known of ''Series/TheOffice'' always has a short, one scene gag before these are the various dance sequences, two of which ended up being used for the opening scene.theme.



* ''Series/TheWestWing'' always has a few minutes-long opening scene before the credits that can vary greatly in style from episode to episode. Most often, it is a set-up of one or more of the headaches the characters will have to deal with. Other times, it is a self-contained scene that is only loosely attached to the plotline; a humorous episode-related clip that ends on a gag of some kind; or simply a shortened extra act.
* ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' was well-known for its cold opens that were completely unrelated to the episode's plot (except for the first episodes of seasons 2 and 6, respectively). The only episodes not to use them are the second parts of two-part episodes, and even the series finale uses one. Unfortunately, they are usually cut out in reruns.
* ''Series/TheWayansBros'' had a cold open unrelated to the plot every episode.
* ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'' has one every episode, with a segment where the title characters tell a story to the audience.

to:

* ''Series/TheWestWing'' ''Series/{{Eureka}}'' often starts with something going wrong. And then goes on for a good period of time after. Probably about ten minutes.
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' had one in every episode, either to set up the plot or theme of the episode, or, sometimes, just to have a joke at the characters' expense. Each one would
always has a few minutes-long end with the crew being attacked, captured, or put in some other form of distress, causing the music to turn into the opening scene before of the credits that can vary greatly ThemeSong.
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' features a literal [[IncrediblyLamePun Cold]] [[ColdOpen Open]]
in style from its pilot, showing three Night's Watchmen encountering the White Walkers. [[ColdOpen Open]] returns in Season 3 (literally, again) and Season 4 premieres, as well as in episode to episode. Most often, it is a set-up 7 of one or more of Season 6.
** The fourth season premiere begins with a "PreviouslyOn" which ended on Ned Stark's execution in S1 by his own sword Ice which leads into a cold open with Tywin Lannister having
the headaches blade melted down and made into two and then throwing the characters will have to deal with. Other times, it is scabbard into a self-contained scene that is only loosely attached to fire, symbolizing the plotline; Lannister's victory over the Starks.
* ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'' would sometimes start with
a humorous episode-related clip that ends on a gag of standard cold opening in which the detectives start their investigation or some kind; or simply a shortened extra act.
* ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' was well-known for its cold opens that were completely
other plot point is introduced, but some would just be like sitcom openings - little sketches unrelated to the episode's plot (except for the first episodes actual story.
* Nearly every episode
of seasons 2 and 6, respectively). The only episodes not to use them are the second parts of two-part episodes, and even the series finale uses one. Unfortunately, they are usually cut out in reruns.
* ''Series/TheWayansBros'' had
''Series/{{House}}'' starts with a cold open unrelated to showing [[MysteryOfTheWeek the plot every episode.
* ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'' has
new patient getting sick]].
** The writers often try to make the patient unexpected by having someone show signs of illness before the ''real'' patient collapses. For example, at the beginning of
one every episode, Cuddy takes a drink of water and starts to cough; but in the background, another character suddenly ''falls off a roof''.
** ''House'' even plays
with a segment where double {{Red Herring}}s, such as the title characters tell opening that follows a story young girl diving off a high dive, who is motionless underwater for some time, and then resurfaces to see that someone else has collapsed. Then it's revealed that ''she'' wasn't the audience.RedHerring, the other guy was: something is wrong with the diver after all.



* ''Series/InPlainSight'' shows the Witsec client of the week and how they ended up having to join Witsec in the first place in the teasers.
* All the ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' shows use a cold open, with a stock opening title card and narration. The action is either the crime itself or the discovery of a body, and thirty seconds of the detectives opening the investigation. While Jerry Orbach was still with us, almost always ended on a Lenny Briscoe OneLiner.
** ''Series/LawAndOrderCriminalIntent'' rarely showed the main cast in the teaser during the first five seasons. It happened more frequently after original showrunner René Balcer left.
* 16 out of the first 17 episodes of ''Series/LeaveItToBeaver'' had an opening narration to set up the episode done by Hugh Beaumont. The shortest one, from the episode "New Neighbors", went: "To a growing boy boy there are some emotions you can take in your stride. Love. Anger. But fear can play havoc with your little imagination. And that's our story tonight on Leave It To Beaver."
* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' always begins with a teaser that establishes the episode's central character, often going into the first flashback/forward before the title card. Some teasers have been over ten minutes, such as "Exodus, Part 2".
* The teasers on ''Series/TheLWord'' are usually set anywhere from a year to several decades in the past, featuring characters we've never met before, but they always end up tying in with what goes on in the episode.
* Early episodes of ''Series/MacGyver'' started with an unrelated short adventure. This practice was dropped pretty quickly.
* ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' was well-known for its cold opens that were completely unrelated to the episode's plot (except for the first episodes of seasons 2 and 6, respectively). The only episodes not to use them are the second parts of two-part episodes, and even the series finale uses one. Unfortunately, they are usually cut out in reruns.
* ''Series/{{Monk}}'' usually begins with the murder being committed.
* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' has the title sequence start after a man walked up to the screen and said "It's...". This was usually only a few seconds but was sometimes stretched out long enough to be considered a ColdOpening. It also must have set the record for the longest one ever in "Scott of the Antarctic" where the man and the title sequence didn't show up until ''halfway through the episode''. Or perhaps not: In other episodes they waited until the ''very end'' to show the opening credits, and occasionally left them out altogether. Which could technically mean that the title credits in the ''next'' episode mark the end of the cold open...



* Both ''Series/TheApprentice'' and ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' did not use a cold open to begin with, but they adopted this practice later (''Apprentice'' started this practice around season 4, with ''Survivor'' doing this with the Fiji season).
* Nearly every episode of ''Series/{{House}}'' starts with a cold open showing [[MysteryOfTheWeek the new patient getting sick]].
** The writers often try to make the patient unexpected by having someone show signs of illness before the ''real'' patient collapses. For example, at the beginning of one episode, Cuddy takes a drink of water and starts to cough; but in the background, another character suddenly ''falls off a roof''.
** ''House'' even plays with double {{Red Herring}}s, such as the opening that follows a young girl diving off a high dive, who is motionless underwater for some time, and then resurfaces to see that someone else has collapsed. Then it's revealed that ''she'' wasn't the RedHerring, the other guy was: something is wrong with the diver after all.
* ''Series/Studio60OnTheSunsetStrip'' devoted its second episode to showcase the main characters working against the clock to create an effective cold open, eventually settling on a fourth-wall breaking rendition of "A Modern Major General" from ''Series/ThePiratesOfPenzance''.

to:

* Both ''Series/TheApprentice'' and ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' did not use a cold open to begin with, but they adopted this practice later (''Apprentice'' started this practice around season 4, ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' does the same. It works well with ''Survivor'' doing this with crime shows as the Fiji season).
* Nearly every episode
introduction of ''Series/{{House}}'' starts with a cold open showing [[MysteryOfTheWeek the new patient getting sick]].
** The writers often try to make the patient unexpected by having someone show signs of illness before the ''real'' patient collapses. For example, at the beginning of one episode, Cuddy takes a drink of water and starts to cough; but in the background, another character suddenly ''falls off a roof''.
** ''House'' even plays with double {{Red Herring}}s, such as
episode's case usually fits right into the opening that follows a young girl diving off a high dive, who is motionless underwater for some time, and then resurfaces to see that someone else has collapsed. Then it's revealed that ''she'' wasn't segment. (Beware, however, when the RedHerring, the other guy was: something is wrong with the diver after all.
* ''Series/Studio60OnTheSunsetStrip'' devoted its second episode to showcase
cold opening actually shows the main characters working against or the clock to create an effective [[AllYourBaseAreBelongToUs home base]] - it means that the case will directly involve them, as seen in "Bête noire".)
** The very same formula was also used in ''Series/{{JAG}}''.
* The GuestHost series of ''Series/NeverMindTheBuzzcocks'' featured a
cold open, eventually settling on open for most episodes, introducing this week's guest.
* ''Series/TheOfficeUS'' always has
a fourth-wall breaking rendition of "A Modern Major General" short, one scene gag before the opening scene.
* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' had one
from ''Series/ThePiratesOfPenzance''.Turbo to Time Force. It was dropped starting with Wild Force, but has returned in Samurai.



* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' has the title sequence start after a man walked up to the screen and said "It's...". This was usually only a few seconds but was sometimes stretched out long enough to be considered a ColdOpening. It also must have set the record for the longest one ever in "Scott of the Antarctic" where the man and the title sequence didn't show up until ''halfway through the episode''. Or perhaps not: In other episodes they waited until the ''very end'' to show the opening credits, and occasionally left them out altogether. Which could technically mean that the title credits in the ''next'' episode mark the end of the cold open...
* ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'' would sometimes start with a standard cold opening in which the detectives start their investigation or some other plot point is introduced, but some would just be like sitcom openings - little sketches unrelated to the actual story.
* ''Series/TheWire'' usually has cold openings that are not related to the main story as such, but instead work as metaphors or thematic commentaries on the episode or the characters themselves.

to:

* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' has the title sequence start after a man walked up to the screen and said "It's...". This was usually only a few seconds but was sometimes stretched out long enough to be considered a ColdOpening. It also must have set the record for the longest one ever in "Scott of the Antarctic" where the man and the title sequence didn't show up until ''halfway through the episode''. Or perhaps not: In other episodes they waited until the ''very end'' to show the opening credits, and occasionally left them out altogether. Which could technically mean that the title credits in the ''next'' ''Series/{{Primeval}}'' it goes like this: RedShirt appears, [[TimePortal Anomaly appears]], MonsterOfTheWeek appears, Standard RedShirt Fate, [[ThemeSong Theme Music]].
* The first
episode mark the end of the cold open...
* ''Series/HomicideLifeOnTheStreet'' would sometimes start with
''Series/PushingDaisies'' has a standard cold opening of ''13'' minutes.
* ''Series/SapphireAndSteel'' actually delivered its teaser
in the ''middle'' of the TitleSequence: a short sequence showing the title and stars was shown, followed by TheTeaser, after which the detectives start their investigation or some other plot point is introduced, but some would just be like sitcom openings - little sketches unrelated to rest of the actual story.
* ''Series/TheWire'' usually has
sequence (with the ThemeTune and OpeningNarration) was shown. Such a style of opening (title both before and after the cold openings that are not related to open) is more common these days. "Pure" teasers only appeared in the main story as such, but instead work as metaphors or thematic commentaries on the first episode or of each story, with later episodes reprising the characters themselves.events leading up to the previous episode's cliffhanger.
* The teasers on ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' kept getting larger and larger as time went on, to the point where they consistently ended up as long as any of the other acts of the show.



* ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'' got a bit carried away with 'em sometimes: a teaser could be up to five minutes long.

to:

* ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'' got a bit carried away with 'em sometimes: a teaser could be up to five minutes long.''Series/StargateSG1''and ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' feature these.



* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' had one from Turbo to Time Force. It was dropped starting with Wild Force, but has returned in Samurai.
* The first episode of ''Series/PushingDaisies'' has a cold opening of ''13'' minutes.
* Every episode of ''Series/{{Bones}}'' has a cold open where the characters discover the body. This is usually done in a dark comedic fashion. (Ex. A teenage couple getting naked in a mud spring where a corpse lies beneath.)
* ''Series/{{Monk}}'' usually begins with the murder being committed.
* ''Series/{{Eureka}}'' often starts with something going wrong. And then goes on for a good period of time after. Probably about ten minutes.
* The teasers on ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' kept getting larger and larger as time went on, to the point where they consistently ended up as long as any of the other acts of the show.
* ''Series/InPlainSight'' shows the Witsec client of the week and how they ended up having to join Witsec in the first place in the teasers.
* ''Series/StargateSG1''and ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' feature these.
* ''Series/TheDrewCareyShow'' often used its teasers for bizarre stand-alone skits apart from the show's continuity, such as having a guest appearance by [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Daffy Duck]] or Drew battling invading aliens. The best known of these are the various dance sequences, two of which ended up being used for the opening theme.
* Early episodes of ''Series/MacGyver'' started with an unrelated short adventure. This practice was dropped pretty quickly.
* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' always begins with a teaser that establishes the episode's central character, often going into the first flashback/forward before the title card. Some teasers have been over ten minutes, such as "Exodus, Part 2".
* ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' always had a teaser unrelated to the main plot of the episode.
* Every episode of ''Series/{{Castle}}'' opens with an extreme close up of a dead body before it is discovered or investigated, usually with some kind of ironic music/pop song.
* All forms of UK ''Series/BigBrother'' [[SpinOff Spin Offs]] had some cold open element- notably in the case of ''Big Mouth'' where that episode's guests would usually be introduced in some nonsensical-[[OnceAnEpisode but-consistent]] fashion.
* The GuestHost series of ''Series/NeverMindTheBuzzcocks'' featured a cold open for most episodes, introducing this week's guest.
* In ''Series/{{Primeval}}'' it goes like this: RedShirt appears, [[TimePortal Anomaly appears]], MonsterOfTheWeek appears, Standard RedShirt Fate, [[ThemeSong Theme Music]].

to:

* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' had one from Turbo to Time Force. It was dropped starting with Wild Force, but has returned in Samurai.
* The first
''Series/Studio60OnTheSunsetStrip'' devoted its second episode of ''Series/PushingDaisies'' has a cold opening of ''13'' minutes.
* Every episode of ''Series/{{Bones}}'' has a cold open where
to showcase the main characters discover working against the body. This is usually done in clock to create an effective cold open, eventually settling on a dark comedic fashion. (Ex. A teenage couple getting naked in a mud spring where a corpse lies beneath.)
* ''Series/{{Monk}}'' usually begins with the murder being committed.
* ''Series/{{Eureka}}'' often starts with
fourth-wall breaking rendition of "A Modern Major General" from ''Series/ThePiratesOfPenzance''.
%%* ''Series/TheTomorrowPeople'' did
something going wrong. And similar.
* ''Series/{{UFO}}'' uses a variation in which the opening theme tune montage plays ''without titles''. This is
then goes on followed by the opening scene, which ends with the title logo appearing as an animated overlay. The cast and production credits appear as captions in act one. One reason for a good period of time after. Probably about ten minutes.
* The teasers on ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' kept getting larger and larger as time went on, to the point where they consistently ended up as long as any of the other acts of the show.
* ''Series/InPlainSight'' shows the Witsec client of the week and how they ended up having to join Witsec in the first place in the teasers.
* ''Series/StargateSG1''and ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' feature these.
* ''Series/TheDrewCareyShow'' often used its teasers for bizarre stand-alone skits apart from
this may have been the show's continuity, such as having a guest appearance by [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Daffy Duck]] or Drew battling invading aliens. The best known of these are the various dance sequences, two of which ended up being used for the opening theme.
* Early episodes of ''Series/MacGyver'' started with an unrelated short adventure. This practice was dropped pretty quickly.
* ''Series/{{Lost}}'' always begins
rotating cast, meaning that they couldn't use credits with a teaser that establishes the episode's central character, often going into the first flashback/forward before the title card. Some teasers have been over ten minutes, such as "Exodus, Part 2".
fixed cast list.
* ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' always ''Series/TheWayansBros'' had a teaser cold open unrelated to the main plot of the every episode.
* Every ''Series/TheWestWing'' always has a few minutes-long opening scene before the credits that can vary greatly in style from episode of ''Series/{{Castle}}'' opens with an extreme close up of a dead body before to episode. Most often, it is discovered a set-up of one or investigated, more of the headaches the characters will have to deal with. Other times, it is a self-contained scene that is only loosely attached to the plotline; a humorous episode-related clip that ends on a gag of some kind; or simply a shortened extra act.
* ''Series/TheWire''
usually with some kind of ironic music/pop song.
* All forms of UK ''Series/BigBrother'' [[SpinOff Spin Offs]] had some
has cold open element- notably in the case of ''Big Mouth'' where openings that episode's guests would usually be introduced in some nonsensical-[[OnceAnEpisode but-consistent]] fashion.
are not related to the main story as such, but instead work as metaphors or thematic commentaries on the episode or the characters themselves.
* The GuestHost series Russian mini-series ''Wolf Messing: Seeing through time'' starts the pilot with the titular character's performance in Moscow and a disturbing vision about the death of ''Series/NeverMindTheBuzzcocks'' featured UsefulNotes/JosefStalin's son in a cold open for most episodes, introducing plane crash. He informs Stalin about this, who promises that the crash will not happen. Later, Messing finds out that the crash still happened, but Stalin's son wasn't on the flight. The HeroicBSOD flows into a flashback of how he got to this week's guest.
point, starting with his childhood in a Polish village.
* In ''Series/{{Primeval}}'' it goes like this: RedShirt appears, [[TimePortal Anomaly appears]], MonsterOfTheWeek appears, Standard RedShirt Fate, [[ThemeSong Theme Music]].''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess'' got a bit carried away with 'em sometimes: a teaser could be up to five minutes long.



* ''Series/DoctorWho'' has used it in the show consistently since the 2005 revival, often with someone getting killed by a monster before the cliffhanger "scream" of the theme music. It appeared only five times before 2005- "The Ambassadors of Death" (which also debuted the electronic scream sound the show's theme music is famous for including), "Castrovalva", "The Five Doctors" (consisting of a clip from a previous story to allow the late William Hartnell to make an appearance), "Time and the Rani" and "Remembrance of the Daleks"; instead, the original run of ''Doctor Who'' used the first episodes of a serial to fulfill the same function as a cold open.
** It isn't the coldest opening because BBC guidelines require their logo to be placed at the beginning of every episode.
** Cold opens are only omitted in the revived series when a new main companion is introduced- in "Rose", "Smith and Jones" and "Partners in Crime". This ceased in "The Eleventh Hour", the first episode of the Creator/MattSmith / Creator/StevenMoffat era, as Moffat opted to continue the cliffhanger from "The End of Time" before the credits.
* Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}'s ''[[Series/DoubleDare1986 Double Dare]]'' was perhaps the only game show to use a cold open; every episode began with the contestants [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yyMcTFg963w performing a "Physical Challenge"]], followed by the show's introduction.
** So did ''Series/RemoteControl'', ''Series/SingledOut'' and possibly ''Series/{{Trashed}}''.



* 16 out of the first 17 episodes of ''Series/LeaveItToBeaver'' had an opening narration to set up the episode done by Hugh Beaumont. The shortest one, from the episode "New Neighbors", went: "To a growing boy boy there are some emotions you can take in your stride. Love. Anger. But fear can play havoc with your little imagination. And that's our story tonight on Leave It To Beaver."



* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' features a literal [[IncrediblyLamePun Cold]] [[ColdOpen Open]] in its pilot, showing three Night's Watchmen encountering the White Walkers. [[ColdOpen Open]] returns in Season 3 (literally, again) and Season 4 premieres, as well as in episode 7 of Season 6.
** The fourth season premiere begins with a "PreviouslyOn" which ended on Ned Stark's execution in S1 by his own sword Ice which leads into a cold open with Tywin Lannister having the blade melted down and made into two and then throwing the scabbard into a fire, symbolizing the Lannister's victory over the Starks.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'' used these to great effect in multiple ways besides as the continuation of the previous episode's cliffhanger. The first two seasons mostly use straight cold opens (though one is a music video about Walt's Heisenberg persona) but seasons 3, 4, and 5 frequently featured flashbacks that feature a dead character, added depth to the series' world, shed light on certain themes of that episode, or [[FlashForward showed[=/=]alluded to an event that occurred later in the episode]] but without context to make the viewers guess what happened and how it got to the point.



* ''Series/{{UFO}}'' uses a variation in which the opening theme tune montage plays ''without titles''. This is then followed by the opening scene, which ends with the title logo appearing as an animated overlay. The cast and production credits appear as captions in act one. One reason for this may have been the show's rotating cast, meaning that they couldn't use credits with a fixed cast list.



* ''Series/BoyMeetsWorld'' used this once, in Season 5's "No Guts, No Cory" by playing the opening titles after the setting had shifted from 1997 to December 9, 1941 & Mr Feeny had made the anouncement that Pearl Harbour had been bombed. The episode itself was part of a crossover between the TGIF shows in which ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'''s Salem had swallowed a ball that sent the to a different time period, and proceeded to run amok by heading to the other shows in the line-up.
* The Russian mini-series ''Wolf Messing: Seeing through time'' starts the pilot with the titular character's performance in Moscow and a disturbing vision about the death of UsefulNotes/JosefStalin's son in a plane crash. He informs Stalin about this, who promises that the crash will not happen. Later, Messing finds out that the crash still happened, but Stalin's son wasn't on the flight. The HeroicBSOD flows into a flashback of how he got to this point, starting with his childhood in a Polish village.



* American daytime soap operas began using teasers in the 1960s to resolve (or sometimes extend) the previous episode's cliffhanger or set up the storylines for the day. Since the mid-1970s, all soaps have used teasers, with the exception of ABC soaps from 1998 to 2003.
10th Mar '17 3:57:47 PM LaptopGuy
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* ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'' has one every episode.

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* ''Series/DrakeAndJosh'' has one every episode.episode, with a segment where the title characters tell a story to the audience.


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* ''Series/NedsDeclassifiedSchoolSurvivalGuide'' opens with the intro, but every episode, except for "Talent Shows", had a short segment beforehand with the title card appearing as soon as Ned's problem arrived.


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* ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' used this only one time, in "Timmy the Barbarian".
3rd Feb '17 1:38:12 AM buihuuduyet
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' features a literal [[IncrediblyLamePun Cold]] [[ColdOpen Open]] in its pilot, showing three Night's Watchmen encountering the White Walkers. [[ColdOpen Open]] returns in Season 3 (literally, again) and Season 4 premiere, as well as in episode 7 of Season 6.

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' features a literal [[IncrediblyLamePun Cold]] [[ColdOpen Open]] in its pilot, showing three Night's Watchmen encountering the White Walkers. [[ColdOpen Open]] returns in Season 3 (literally, again) and Season 4 premiere, premieres, as well as in episode 7 of Season 6.
3rd Feb '17 1:37:33 AM buihuuduyet
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' features a literal [[IncrediblyLamePun Cold]] [[ColdOpen Open]] in its pilot, showing three Night's Watchmen encountering the White Walkers. It's also the only episode of the show to have a teaser; all others begin with the "PreviouslyOn" and TitleSequence.

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' features a literal [[IncrediblyLamePun Cold]] [[ColdOpen Open]] in its pilot, showing three Night's Watchmen encountering the White Walkers. It's also the only [[ColdOpen Open]] returns in Season 3 (literally, again) and Season 4 premiere, as well as in episode 7 of the show to have a teaser; all others begin with the "PreviouslyOn" and TitleSequence.Season 6.
14th Jan '17 6:20:30 PM nombretomado
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* LucasArts likes this one, they've done similar things in several of their point and click adventure games, such as ''VideoGame/IndianaJonesAndTheFateOfAtlantis''.

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* LucasArts Creator/LucasArts likes this one, they've done similar things in several of their point and click adventure games, such as ''VideoGame/IndianaJonesAndTheFateOfAtlantis''.
7th Jan '17 2:59:56 PM nombretomado
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* 16 out of the first 17 episodes of ''LeaveItToBeaver'' had an opening narration to set up the episode done by Hugh Beaumont. The shortest one, from the episode "New Neighbors", went: "To a growing boy boy there are some emotions you can take in your stride. Love. Anger. But fear can play havoc with your little imagination. And that's our story tonight on Leave It To Beaver."

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* 16 out of the first 17 episodes of ''LeaveItToBeaver'' ''Series/LeaveItToBeaver'' had an opening narration to set up the episode done by Hugh Beaumont. The shortest one, from the episode "New Neighbors", went: "To a growing boy boy there are some emotions you can take in your stride. Love. Anger. But fear can play havoc with your little imagination. And that's our story tonight on Leave It To Beaver."
25th Dec '16 11:51:44 AM JezMM
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* ''VideoGame/ConkersBadFurDay'' goes so far as to not even have a title screen. Booting up the game goes through the copyrights and developer logos as one might expect, then straight to the file selection menu. The game's title and logo displays only during the story introduction sequence when starting a new playthrough, at the end of a [[HowWeGotHere How We Got Here]] opening scene. The narration of said scene even accompanies the game's title displaying with a [[TitleDrop Title Drop]] at the same time to boot.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheTeaser