History Main / TheStoolPigeon

24th Jul '17 7:54:30 AM Piterpicher
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* A major plot point in the MagnumPI episode "Past Tense", where one of Magnum's ex-colleagues from UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar is broken out of prison.

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* A major plot point in the MagnumPI ''Series/MagnumPI'' episode "Past Tense", where one of Magnum's ex-colleagues from UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar is broken out of prison.
18th Jul '17 5:59:50 PM Njein
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* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as [[TheInformant an informer]] and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Fearing for his life, he accidentally killed a fellow inmate he mistakenly believed had been sent to kill him, and because of the murder, he faced the death penalty. Hoping to get a lesser sentence, Valachi decided to squeal to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Justice Department, the FBI and, in testimony broadcast on radio and television, to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John [=McClellan=] on October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of mob leaders throughout the nation.

to:

* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as [[TheInformant an informer]] and gave him the kiss of death (a - a sign that he was to be killed). killed. Fearing for his life, he accidentally killed a fellow inmate he mistakenly believed had been sent assigned to kill him, and because of the murder, he faced the death penalty. Hoping to get a lesser sentence, Valachi decided to squeal to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Justice Department, the FBI and, in testimony broadcast on radio and television, to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John [=McClellan=] on October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where a curious state police policeman had accidentally discovered stumbled upon a major summit of mob leaders throughout the nation.nation. Also, law enforcement began to crack down on organized crime activities, bolstered by the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act in 1970, where it allowed entire criminal gangs and their leaders to be prosecuted for all of their criminal operations instead of just prosecuting individuals, thereby crippling the Mafia by the 1990s.
13th Jul '17 7:59:52 AM Njein
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* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as an informer and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Fearing for his life, he accidentally killed a fellow inmate he mistakenly believed had been sent to kill him, and because of the murder, he faced the death penalty. Hoping to get a lesser sentence, Valachi decided to squeal to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Justice Department, the FBI and, in testimony broadcast on radio and television, to U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John [=McClellan=] on October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of mob leaders throughout the nation.

to:

* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as [[TheInformant an informer informer]] and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Fearing for his life, he accidentally killed a fellow inmate he mistakenly believed had been sent to kill him, and because of the murder, he faced the death penalty. Hoping to get a lesser sentence, Valachi decided to squeal to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Justice Department, the FBI and, in testimony broadcast on radio and television, to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John [=McClellan=] on October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of mob leaders throughout the nation.
28th Jun '17 7:19:40 PM LongTallShorty64
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* In ''Film/WhereTheSidewalkEnds'', one of Scalise's boys has been got by the police and he tattles on Scalise's secret hideaway, inadvertently saving Mark from being killed by them.
27th Jun '17 8:38:23 AM Njein
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* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as an informer and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Valachi panicked, killed a fellow prisoner who he mistakenly thought was his assassin, and, in revenge against the death threat, squealed to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the FBI, the Justice Department, and the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John L. [=McClellan=] in October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the mob, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of Mafia leaders throughout the nation.

to:

* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as an informer and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Valachi panicked, Fearing for his life, he accidentally killed a fellow prisoner who inmate he mistakenly thought was his assassin, and, in revenge against believed had been sent to kill him, and because of the murder, he faced the death threat, squealed penalty. Hoping to get a lesser sentence, Valachi decided to squeal to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the FBI, the Justice Department, the FBI and, in testimony broadcast on radio and the television, to U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John L. [=McClellan=] in on October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the mob, Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of Mafia mob leaders throughout the nation.
22nd Jun '17 10:19:39 AM Njein
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* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), suspected him (incorrectly) of having become an informer and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Valachi panicked, killed a fellow prisoner who he mistakenly thought was his assassin, and, in revenge against the death threat, told all to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the FBI, the Justice Department, and the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John L. [=McClellan=] in October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its history, operations, structure, and rituals, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be devastating for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of Mafia leaders throughout the nation.

to:

* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), suspected incorrectly branded him (incorrectly) of having become as an informer and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Valachi panicked, killed a fellow prisoner who he mistakenly thought was his assassin, and, in revenge against the death threat, told all squealed to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the FBI, the Justice Department, and the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John L. [=McClellan=] in October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its history, operations, structure, and rituals, inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be devastating damning for the Mafia, mob, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of Mafia leaders throughout the nation.
21st Jun '17 2:28:51 AM Andyroid
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* In ''The BerenstainBears and the Scandal Sheet'', the members of the student underground newspaper, including Brother, get exposed and in trouble for making a false statement about a teacher dating someone when Brother tells his sibling about it, who passes the word to Mama who then informs the authorities. This is a case of a Concerned Claire that actually turned out for the better, as with the exposure, the real student newspaper was able to be reformed, making the student underground unnecessary.
* Melvin Sneedley from the ''Literature/CaptainUnderpants'' books is a Snobby Simon, a book-licking nerd who frequently rats out George and Harold whenever they make mischief.

to:

* In ''The BerenstainBears ''Literature/TheBerenstainBears and the Scandal Sheet'', the members of the student underground newspaper, including Brother, get exposed and in trouble for making a false statement about a teacher dating someone when Brother tells his sibling about it, who passes the word to Mama who then informs the authorities. This is a case of a Concerned Claire that actually turned out for the better, as with the exposure, the real student newspaper was able to be reformed, making the student underground unnecessary.
* Melvin Sneedley from the ''Literature/CaptainUnderpants'' books is a Snobby Simon, a book-licking boot-licking nerd who frequently rats out George and Harold whenever they make mischief.mischief, just to feed his ego about being the "perfect student".
20th Jun '17 4:53:59 PM Andyroid
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* Melvin Sneedley from the ''Literature/CaptainUnderpants'' books is a Snobby Simon, a book-licking nerd who frequently rats out George and Harold whenever they make mischief.
12th Jun '17 6:38:59 PM Njein
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* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), suspected him (incorrectly) of having become an informer and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Valachi panicked, killed a fellow prisoner who he mistakenly thought was his assassin, and, in revenge against the death threat, told all to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the FBI, the Justice Department, and the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John L. McClellan in October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its history, operations and rituals, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. Valachi even described the history of the mob, its membership, its inner workings and its language. He also described its organization, from soldiers on the bottom to caporegimes (lieutenants) in the middle to bosses at the top, with the so-called Mafia Commission moderating disputes between the nationís major crime families. His testimony proved to be devastating for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of Mafia leaders throughout the nation.

to:

* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), suspected him (incorrectly) of having become an informer and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Valachi panicked, killed a fellow prisoner who he mistakenly thought was his assassin, and, in revenge against the death threat, told all to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the FBI, the Justice Department, and the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John L. McClellan [=McClellan=] in October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its history, operations operations, structure, and rituals, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. Valachi even described the history of the mob, its membership, its inner workings and its language. He also described its organization, from soldiers on the bottom to caporegimes (lieutenants) in the middle to bosses at the top, with the so-called Mafia Commission moderating disputes between the nationís major crime families. His testimony proved to be devastating for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of Mafia leaders throughout the nation.
12th Jun '17 10:49:35 AM Njein
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Added DiffLines:

* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), suspected him (incorrectly) of having become an informer and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Valachi panicked, killed a fellow prisoner who he mistakenly thought was his assassin, and, in revenge against the death threat, told all to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the FBI, the Justice Department, and the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John L. McClellan in October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its history, operations and rituals, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. Valachi even described the history of the mob, its membership, its inner workings and its language. He also described its organization, from soldiers on the bottom to caporegimes (lieutenants) in the middle to bosses at the top, with the so-called Mafia Commission moderating disputes between the nationís major crime families. His testimony proved to be devastating for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of Mafia leaders throughout the nation.
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