History Main / TheStoolPigeon

8th Oct '17 1:44:47 PM nombretomado
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* In "The Telling", a third season episode of ''TheMiddle'', we learn that Frankie has been rewarding Brick for years with candy cigarettes for informing on his older siblings.

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* In "The Telling", a third season episode of ''TheMiddle'', ''Series/TheMiddle'', we learn that Frankie has been rewarding Brick for years with candy cigarettes for informing on his older siblings.
2nd Oct '17 2:03:58 PM Njein
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* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as [[TheInformant an informer]] and gave him the kiss of death - a sign that he was to be killed. Fearing for his life, he accidentally killed a fellow inmate he mistakenly believed had been assigned to kill him, and because of the murder, he faced the death penalty. Hoping to get a lesser sentence, Valachi decided to squeal to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Justice Department, the FBI and, in testimony broadcast on radio and television, to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John [=McClellan=] on October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where a curious state policeman had accidentally stumbled upon a major summit of mob leaders throughout the nation. Also, law enforcement began to crack down on organized crime activities, bolstered by the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act in 1970, where it allowed entire criminal gangs and their leaders to be prosecuted for all of their criminal operations instead of just prosecuting individuals, thereby crippling the Mafia by the 1990s.

to:

* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, go states, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as [[TheInformant an informer]] a rat]] and gave him the kiss of death - a sign that he was to be killed. Fearing for his life, he accidentally killed a fellow inmate he mistakenly believed had been assigned to kill him, and because of the murder, he faced the death penalty. Hoping to get a lesser sentence, Valachi decided to squeal on national television to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Justice Department, the FBI and, in testimony broadcast on radio and television, to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John [=McClellan=] on October in late 1963. Although Valachi's his disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, mobsters, he was able to provide many details provided a detailed glimpse of its inner workings, aiding aided in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming and named many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where a curious state policeman had cop accidentally stumbled upon a major summit of mob leaders throughout the nation. Also, law enforcement began to crack down on organized crime activities, bolstered by the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act in 1970, where it which allowed entire criminal gangs and their leaders to be prosecuted for all of their criminal operations instead of just prosecuting individuals, going after low-level grunts, thereby crippling the Mafia by the 1990s.
20th Sep '17 7:19:49 PM infernape612
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* In ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'', when Corelle is found out to have [[spoiler: has sex with Balin Brindle]], she points at Jerin and tells Eldest that [[spoiler: Jerin was seduced by Ren.]]It doesn't work the way she wants to, though.

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* In ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'', when Corelle is found out to have [[spoiler: has sex with Balin Brindle]], she points at Jerin and tells Eldest that [[spoiler: Jerin was seduced by Ren.]]It ]] It doesn't work the way she wants to, though.
12th Sep '17 9:09:43 AM WillyFourEyes
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->''There's a gentleman that's going round\\

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->''There's a gentleman that's going round\\'round\\



However, the motivations of the snitch and how they're regarded in a story can vary wildly. Snitches have the reputation of being cowardly weasels, but there are times where a snitch can be responsible or heroic. Due to the sheer prevalence of this trope, there are several important variations:

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However, the motivations of the snitch and how they're regarded in a story can vary wildly. Snitches have the reputation of being [[DirtyCoward cowardly weasels, weasels]], but there are times where a snitch can be responsible or heroic. Due to the sheer prevalence of this trope, there are several important variations:
7th Sep '17 4:41:19 AM WillyFourEyes
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-->''There's a gentleman that's going round\\

to:

-->''There's ->''There's a gentleman that's going round\\
7th Sep '17 4:40:34 AM WillyFourEyes
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Added DiffLines:

-->''There's a gentleman that's going round\\
Turning the joint upside down\\
Stool pigeon - ha-cha-cha-cha''
-->-- '''Kid Creole and the Coconuts''', "Stool Pigeon"
20th Aug '17 11:06:06 AM TheUnknownUploader
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Added DiffLines:

** Frank ''Film/{{Serpico}}'' brought up the deep corruptions within the New York Police Department.
** Sherron Watkins' examining of accounting irregularities led to the downfall of Enron.
** Linda Tripp recorded Monica Lewinsky's phone calls to President Bill Clinton, leading to the infamous scandal and attempted impeachment.
24th Jul '17 7:54:30 AM Piterpicher
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* A major plot point in the MagnumPI episode "Past Tense", where one of Magnum's ex-colleagues from UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar is broken out of prison.

to:

* A major plot point in the MagnumPI ''Series/MagnumPI'' episode "Past Tense", where one of Magnum's ex-colleagues from UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar is broken out of prison.
18th Jul '17 5:59:50 PM Njein
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* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as [[TheInformant an informer]] and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Fearing for his life, he accidentally killed a fellow inmate he mistakenly believed had been sent to kill him, and because of the murder, he faced the death penalty. Hoping to get a lesser sentence, Valachi decided to squeal to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Justice Department, the FBI and, in testimony broadcast on radio and television, to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John [=McClellan=] on October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of mob leaders throughout the nation.

to:

* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as [[TheInformant an informer]] and gave him the kiss of death (a - a sign that he was to be killed). killed. Fearing for his life, he accidentally killed a fellow inmate he mistakenly believed had been sent assigned to kill him, and because of the murder, he faced the death penalty. Hoping to get a lesser sentence, Valachi decided to squeal to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Justice Department, the FBI and, in testimony broadcast on radio and television, to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John [=McClellan=] on October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where a curious state police policeman had accidentally discovered stumbled upon a major summit of mob leaders throughout the nation.nation. Also, law enforcement began to crack down on organized crime activities, bolstered by the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act in 1970, where it allowed entire criminal gangs and their leaders to be prosecuted for all of their criminal operations instead of just prosecuting individuals, thereby crippling the Mafia by the 1990s.
13th Jul '17 7:59:52 AM Njein
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* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as an informer and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Fearing for his life, he accidentally killed a fellow inmate he mistakenly believed had been sent to kill him, and because of the murder, he faced the death penalty. Hoping to get a lesser sentence, Valachi decided to squeal to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Justice Department, the FBI and, in testimony broadcast on radio and television, to U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John [=McClellan=] on October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of mob leaders throughout the nation.

to:

* Joseph Valachi was the first [[UsefulNotes/TheMafia Mafia member]] to admit in public, on national television that ''Cosa Nostra'' is real. No one knows for sure why he decided to turn on his fellow mobsters, but it's speculated that Vito Genovese, a fellow inmate (and the boss of the Genovese crime family at the time), incorrectly branded him as [[TheInformant an informer informer]] and gave him the kiss of death (a sign that he was to be killed). Fearing for his life, he accidentally killed a fellow inmate he mistakenly believed had been sent to kill him, and because of the murder, he faced the death penalty. Hoping to get a lesser sentence, Valachi decided to squeal to the U.S. Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, the Justice Department, the FBI and, in testimony broadcast on radio and television, to the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, headed by John [=McClellan=] on October 1963. Although Valachi's disclosures never led directly to the prosecution of many Mafia leaders, he was able to provide many details of its inner workings, aiding in the solution of several unsolved murders, as well as naming many members and the major crime families. His testimony proved to be damning for the Mafia, still reeling from the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin debacle of 1957]], where state police had accidentally discovered a major summit of mob leaders throughout the nation.
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