History Main / TheGuardsMustBeCrazy

20th Jun '17 4:36:17 PM Rmpdc
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** Played straight in the credits sequence of the second game, where a German sentry fails to notice a squad of American Rangers, just to his right, no less, about to enter the very compound he's guarding.
5th Jun '17 7:51:49 AM hszmv1
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** Related to this, most military base fences (and border crossings) are not build on the property line but a few feet back. This allows the guards to charge violators with Trespassing since they are technically, already on the property. Area 51 is notorious as the signs warning you about Trespassing are so far away from the property line, that if you get close enough to read them, security is already aware of you because of the huge dust cloud you kicked up while driving down the access road.
2nd May '17 9:26:22 PM Celcey
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* In ''WebVideo/DoorMonster'''s [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uam0KMyZh2E&index=3&list=PL0u5ZHidq4X4QhFAX9FzSiYJLRen74sLF The Guards Themselves]], one guard has earphones in and is listening to music while he's supposed to guarding the prisoners. Needless to say, [[BoomHeadshot he does not last long]].
2nd May '17 3:05:35 PM AthenaBlue
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[[folder:Films -- Animation]]

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[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Animation]]Animated]]
* The guards in ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'' fall prey to a few of these. They're decent enough at their jobs when they're in action, but it's the boring surveillance part of the day that always slips them up. At one point in the movie, they ''all'' leave their posts to check on a colleague who's just collapsed. Later, they don't notice Helen when she's right behind them. She even talks. Later still, nobody is paying attention to the security cameras and are all partying in the background. Only [[PunchClockVillain Mirage]] notices the escapees that don't even bother to avoid the security cameras. Most notably, though, is later in the same scene where it gets absurd enough that Bob {{lampshade|Hanging}}s it. They enter a large room with no-one in it and he absently wonders, "Where are all the guards?"
* Double subversion in ''WesternAnimation/MonstersVsAliens''. The heroes (who consist of an amorphous blob, a fish-man, and a human/cockroach hybrid) adopt {{Paper Thin Disguise}}s to bluff their way past an alien clone. He recognizes one of them as a clone that's "defective beyond repair"... and immediately orders the other two to dispose of him. And gives them a key card. And a gun.
* ''WesternAnimation/StrangeMagic'': The Bog King's {{mooks}} outside his palace, while not competent enough to capture one fairy princess, are at least awake. His personal guards fall asleep on the job in front of him, [[BenevolentBoss causing him to send them to bed.]]
* The Guards in ''Disney/{{Tangled}}''. They cannot find an old lady who has kidnapped the baby princess for almost two decades, when she happened to be in a tower within riding distance. Then said princess's crown gets stolen right under their noses. Then one of the thieves comes back to Corona later with a girl with 70 feet long of hair and they don't notice it, even though he is dancing around. The only competent member is [[CoolHorse Maximus]], and [[spoiler:he's the only one to make crime virtually disappear]]. The same thief was able to walk up to the palace and meet the King and Queen face-to-face.



-->'''Guard''': You're ''lying''. ''He's'' not a slave and ''you're'' not traders. Look at the way he stands. He doesn't carry himself like a slave! Probably ex-military.[[note]]Korso is a former Earth SpaceMarine[[/note]] Akrennians always threaten before asking a favor, ''it's tradition''. And ''your'' robes are made out of ''bedspreads!''
-->'''Preed:''' Er, do we have a 'Plan B'? (''Stith knocks the guard out with a powerful kick'') An intelligent guard! Didn't see that one coming.

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-->'''Guard''': You're ''lying''. ''He's'' not a slave and ''you're'' not traders. Look at the way he stands. He doesn't carry himself like a slave! Probably ex-military.[[note]]Korso is a former Earth SpaceMarine[[/note]] Akrennians always threaten before asking a favor, ''it's tradition''. And ''your'' robes are made out of ''bedspreads!''
-->'''Preed:'''
''bedspreads!''\\
'''Preed:'''
Er, do we have a 'Plan B'? (''Stith "Plan B"? ''[Stith knocks the guard out with a powerful kick'') kick]'' An intelligent guard! Didn't see that one coming.



* Double subversion in ''WesternAnimation/MonstersVsAliens''. The heroes (who consist of an amorphous blob, a fish-man, and a human/cockroach hybrid) adopt {{Paper Thin Disguise}}s to bluff their way past an alien clone. He recognizes one of them as a clone that's "defective beyond repair"... and immediately orders the other two to dispose of him. And gives them a key card. And a gun.
* The Guards in ''Disney/{{Tangled}}''. They cannot find an old lady who has kidnapped the baby princess for almost two decades, when she happened to be in a tower within riding distance. Then said princess's crown gets stolen right under their noses. Then one of the thieves comes back to Corona later with a girl with 70 feet long of hair and they don't notice it, even though he is dancing around. The only competent member is [[CoolHorse Maximus]], and [[spoiler:he's the only one to make crime virtually disappear]]. The same thief was able to walk up to the palace and meet the King and Queen face-to-face.
* The guards in ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'' fall prey to a few of these. They're decent enough at their jobs when they're in action, but it's the boring surveillance part of the day that always slips them up. At one point in the movie, they ''all'' leave their posts to check on a colleague who's just collapsed. Later, they don't notice Helen when she's right behind them. She even talks. Later still, nobody is paying attention to the security cameras and are all partying in the background. Only [[PunchClockVillain Mirage]] notices the escapees that don't even bother to avoid the security cameras. Most notably, though, is later in the same scene where it gets absurd enough that Bob {{lampshade|Hanging}}s it. They enter a large room with no-one in it and he absently wonders, "Where are all the guards?"
* ''WesternAnimation/StrangeMagic'': The Bog King's {{mooks}} outside his palace, while not competent enough to capture one fairy princess, are at least awake. His personal guards fall asleep on the job in front of him, [[BenevolentBoss causing him to send them to bed.]]
* ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' has one scene where Judy and Nick manage to sneak past a group of wolves by imitating a howl, causing the entire wolf squad to howl in response and completely miss out on the two sneaking in.



* ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' has one scene where Judy and Nick manage to sneak past a group of wolves by imitating a howl, causing the entire wolf squad to howl in response and completely miss out on the two sneaking in.



[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]

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[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]



* In ''Charlotte Gray'', which takes place in Nazi-occupied France, the eponymous heroine and a member of the French resistance are being held in a house by Nazis, and manage to distract the guard who's supposed to be watching them by making out, then jump him and run for it when he comes over to separate them.



* In ''Film/MomAndDadSaveTheWorld'', a guard, despite being from a planet of idiots, ''doesn't'' assume Dad is a guard just because he's wearing a uniform... however, she unquestioningly accepts the laughable answers he provides in response to her questioning and lets him go on his way.

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* In ''Film/MomAndDadSaveTheWorld'', Fittingly enough, ''Film/TheGodsMustBeCrazy'' has a guard, despite few examples. When the heroes mount their rescue, the guards fail to notice that they're being from a planet of idiots, ''doesn't'' assume Dad is a guard just because he's wearing a uniform... however, she unquestioningly accepts drugged, or the laughable answers he provides in response to her questioning guy getting highly irritating sap dripped all over him, or the guy they've never seen before going around shooting them with a tiny bow and arrow...
* ''Film/TheGoodTheBadAndTheUgly'' (1966). Wallace
lets him Tuco go on his way.relieve himself. BIG mistake.



* ''Franchise/StarWars: Film/ANewHope'':
** The security guards on the Death Star. Ben uses a JediMindTrick version of this after turning the tractor beam off. This is actually an inversion of ItsProbablyNothing. Presumably, Ben made the guards think they heard something off in the distance, and like intelligent guards, they go to investigate. Unfortunately for them, it really was nothing.
** Averted with the guards in the Death Star's prison block. Luke and Han, dressed as Stormtroopers, come with Chewbacca as the TrojanPrisoner and say to the guards that they're transmitting Chewie to their prison block. The commander doesn't fall for it, since such a transfer should have been documented and communicated beforehand. As the guard is about to check for confirmation, Han and Chewbacca lose their shit and start shooting around. Central command notices and calls in to investigate. Han again tries to bluff his way through, but they demand his serial number as verification, which he can't provide, so central command immediately sends Stormtroopers to take care of them.
** The novel ''Death Star'' turns this on its head. One of the normal human Stormtrooper commanders was sensitive to the Force and really hated his bosses. He misled his own troops and thus allowed Han and the others an easier path to freedom.
** Additionally inverted in that a rather large number of competent major and minor characters all at some point had Imperial guard training or at least Imperial pilot training (which does include some guard training) as the explanation.
* The guards of Swamp Castle in ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'' have a hard time comprehending simple orders. Even if they did, they wouldn't have stood a chance against Lancelot's UnstoppableRage. The guards were expecting guests for the wedding, but even still, calmly watching a screaming knight charging towards you over a field with a sword brandished makes you wonder…
-->"Now, you're not supposed to enter the roo-- ARRGH!"
** None of them even try to stop Lancelot during said UnstoppableRage, or even try to ''[[TooDumbToLive avoid him.]]''
* Justified in ''Film/THX1138'', in that, though the guards are glaringly incompetent, the general population (with the sole exceptions of the hero and his girlfriend) are too stupid/strung out to notice. For example, the guards routinely leave the doors to a high security prison unlocked, but none of the prisoners had ever bothered to check.
* ''Film/RaceForTheYankeeZephyr'' (1981). A mook standing on the edge of a cliff catches the hero sneaking up, intent on braining him with a lump of wood. Instead of grabbing his rifle the mook begins waving his arms about and howling in a highly exaggerated martial arts style. The hero gapes in astonishment then, as the mook turns to deliver a spinning kick, boots him down the mountainside.
* In ''Charlotte Gray'', which takes place in Nazi-occupied France, the eponymous heroine and a member of the French resistance are being held in a house by Nazis, and manage to distract the guard who's supposed to be watching them by making out, then jump him and run for it when he comes over to separate them.
* ''Film/TheGoodTheBadAndTheUgly'' (1966). Wallace lets Tuco go relieve himself. BIG mistake.



* ''Film/{{Goldfinger}}''. Played straight with the foolish guard who enters the cell alone while Film/JamesBond is performing a CeilingCling and subverted by later multiple guards who are more watchful, staying in the same cell with one having a pistol trained on Bond at all times.
* Towards the end of ''Film/{{Octopussy}}'', the BigBad doesn't mind that his guards are DistractedByTheSexy because it gives him and TheDragon a chance to [[VillainExitStageLeft sneak away without being noticed]]. Unfortunately the dancing girls are part of Octopussy's AmazonBrigade, currently sneaking into his palace. Another guard is drinking on duty, and has a NoMoreForMe moment as he looks over the wall and sees a female circus acrobat standing on the head of an elephant.

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* ''Film/JamesBond'':
**
''Film/{{Goldfinger}}''. Played straight with the foolish guard who enters the cell alone while Film/JamesBond is performing a CeilingCling and subverted by later multiple guards who are more watchful, staying in the same cell with one having a pistol trained on Bond at all times.
* ** Towards the end of ''Film/{{Octopussy}}'', the BigBad doesn't mind that his guards are DistractedByTheSexy because it gives him and TheDragon a chance to [[VillainExitStageLeft sneak away without being noticed]]. Unfortunately the dancing girls are part of Octopussy's AmazonBrigade, currently sneaking into his palace. Another guard is drinking on duty, and has a NoMoreForMe moment as he looks over the wall and sees a female circus acrobat standing on the head of an elephant.elephant.
* In ''Film/JurassicWorld'' the ''I. Rex's'' escape is, in spite of it being smart enough to fake an escape by making it look as though it climbed over the wall and hiding, and having enough control over its bodily functions to fool a thermal scanner, still reliant on people being dumb enough to enter its enclosure ''before'' checking if its implanted tracker is still in there, even though this information is a phone call away.
* The hapless security guards in ''Film/{{Lifeforce}}'' are this trope. The first one falls head and heels for the naked [[EvilIsSexy Space Girl]] and gets his LifeEnergy sucked for this, allowing her to escape from the autopsy room. The other three guards that are supposed to stop her FullFrontalAssault on the research facility don't fare any better, with one of them trying to lure her with a half-eaten biscuit only to get zapped for his trouble and another one suffering a similar fate. The last, older guard is scared out of his wits and does nothing as the Space Girl calmly makes an exit.
* In ''Film/MomAndDadSaveTheWorld'', a guard, despite being from a planet of idiots, ''doesn't'' assume Dad is a guard just because he's wearing a uniform... however, she unquestioningly accepts the laughable answers he provides in response to her questioning and lets him go on his way.
* The guards of Swamp Castle in ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'' have a hard time comprehending simple orders. Even if they did, they wouldn't have stood a chance against Lancelot's UnstoppableRage. The guards were expecting guests for the wedding, but even still, calmly watching a screaming knight charging towards you over a field with a sword brandished makes you wonder…
-->"Now, you're not supposed to enter the roo-- ARRGH!"
** None of them even try to stop Lancelot during said UnstoppableRage, or even try to ''[[TooDumbToLive avoid him.]]''



* This Trope can be applied to ''all'' of El Guapo's thugs who act as guards in ''Film/ThreeAmigos''. In one scene, Lucky is chained up in the dungeon, but the guard tosses the keys to his chains on the floor to taunt him, figuring he can't reach them (it takes a few tries, but he does), while Dusty is able to rescue Carmen because the guard in charge of watching her is asleep on duty. (It's the middle of the day.) In fact, El Guapo's men seem only slightly more competent than the would-be heroes are, at most.

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* This Trope can be applied to ''all'' of El Guapo's thugs who act as guards in ''Film/ThreeAmigos''. In one scene, Lucky is chained up in the dungeon, but the guard tosses the keys to his chains ''Film/RaceForTheYankeeZephyr'' (1981). A mook standing on the floor to taunt him, figuring he can't reach them (it takes edge of a few tries, but he does), while Dusty is able to rescue Carmen because cliff catches the guard in charge hero sneaking up, intent on braining him with a lump of watching her is asleep on duty. (It's wood. Instead of grabbing his rifle the middle of mook begins waving his arms about and howling in a highly exaggerated martial arts style. The hero gapes in astonishment then, as the day.) In fact, El Guapo's men seem only slightly more competent than mook turns to deliver a spinning kick, boots him down the would-be heroes are, at most. mountainside.



* ''Film/TronLegacy'' [[SubvertedTrope acts]] like it is about to set this trope up, with a fat guard propping his feet on his desk while watching TV. Then he notices [[InsecurityCamera one of his security camera feeds go out]] and immediately goes to investigate. He only fails to catch Sam Flynn because Sam jumps off the roof of the Encom building to parachute down to the street. Note that the screen glitch didn't trigger a reaction other than tapping the monitor, which appeared to clear it up. It was the door alarm to the server room going off that caused him to give chase.
* Fittingly enough, ''Film/TheGodsMustBeCrazy'' has a few examples. When the heroes mount their rescue, the guards fail to notice that they're being drugged, or the guy getting highly irritating sap dripped all over him, or the guy they've never seen before going around shooting them with a tiny bow and arrow...

to:

* ''Film/TronLegacy'' [[SubvertedTrope acts]] like it is about to set this trope up, with a fat guard propping his feet on his desk while watching TV. Then he notices [[InsecurityCamera one of his ''Franchise/StarWars: Episode IV -- Film/ANewHope'':
** The
security camera feeds go out]] guards on the Death Star. Ben uses a JediMindTrick version of this after turning the tractor beam off. This is actually an inversion of ItsProbablyNothing. Presumably, Ben made the guards think they heard something off in the distance, and immediately goes like intelligent guards, they go to investigate. He only fails to catch Sam Flynn because Sam jumps off the roof of the Encom building to parachute down to the street. Note that the screen glitch didn't trigger a reaction other than tapping the monitor, which appeared to clear Unfortunately for them, it up. It really was the door alarm to the server room going off that caused him to give chase.
* Fittingly enough, ''Film/TheGodsMustBeCrazy'' has a few examples. When the heroes mount their rescue,
nothing.
** Averted with
the guards fail in the Death Star's prison block. Luke and Han, dressed as Stormtroopers, come with Chewbacca as the TrojanPrisoner and say to notice the guards that they're being drugged, or transmitting Chewie to their prison block. The commander doesn't fall for it, since such a transfer should have been documented and communicated beforehand. As the guy getting highly irritating sap dripped all over him, or the guy they've never seen before going around guard is about to check for confirmation, Han and Chewbacca lose their shit and start shooting them with a tiny bow around. Central command notices and arrow...calls in to investigate. Han again tries to bluff his way through, but they demand his serial number as verification, which he can't provide, so central command immediately sends Stormtroopers to take care of them.
** The ''[[Franchise/StarWarsLegends Legends]]'' novel ''Death Star'' turns this on its head. One of the normal human Stormtrooper commanders was sensitive to the Force and really hated his bosses. He misled his own troops and thus allowed Han and the others an easier path to freedom.
** Additionally inverted in that a rather large number of competent major and minor characters all at some point had Imperial guard training or at least Imperial pilot training (which does include some guard training) as the explanation.



* In ''Film/JurassicWorld'' the ''I. Rex's'' escape is, in spite of it being smart enough to fake an escape by making it look as though it climbed over the wall and hiding, and having enough control over its bodily functions to fool a thermal scanner, still reliant on people being dumb enough to enter its enclosure ''before'' checking if its implanted tracker is still in there, even though this information is a phone call away.
* The hapless security guards in ''Film/{{Lifeforce}}'' are this trope. The first one falls head and heels for the naked [[EvilIsSexy Space Girl]] and gets his LifeEnergy sucked for this, allowing her to escape from the autopsy room. The other three guards that are supposed to stop her FullFrontalAssault on the research facility don't fare any better, with one of them trying to lure her with a half-eaten biscuit only to get zapped for his trouble and another one suffering a similar fate. The last, older guard is scared out of his wits and does nothing as the Space Girl calmly makes an exit.

to:

* In ''Film/JurassicWorld'' the ''I. Rex's'' escape is, in spite This Trope can be applied to ''all'' of it being smart enough to fake an escape by making it look El Guapo's thugs who act as though it climbed over the wall and hiding, and having enough control over its bodily functions to fool a thermal scanner, still reliant on people being dumb enough to enter its enclosure ''before'' checking if its implanted tracker is still in there, even though this information is a phone call away.
* The hapless security
guards in ''Film/{{Lifeforce}}'' are this trope. The first ''Film/ThreeAmigos''. In one falls head and heels for scene, Lucky is chained up in the naked [[EvilIsSexy Space Girl]] and gets dungeon, but the guard tosses the keys to his LifeEnergy sucked for this, allowing chains on the floor to taunt him, figuring he can't reach them (it takes a few tries, but he does), while Dusty is able to rescue Carmen because the guard in charge of watching her to escape from is asleep on duty. (It's the autopsy room. The other three middle of the day.) In fact, El Guapo's men seem only slightly more competent than the would-be heroes are, at most.
* Justified in ''Film/THX1138'', in that, though the
guards that are supposed to stop her FullFrontalAssault on glaringly incompetent, the research facility don't fare any better, general population (with the sole exceptions of the hero and his girlfriend) are too stupid/strung out to notice. For example, the guards routinely leave the doors to a high security prison unlocked, but none of the prisoners had ever bothered to check.
* ''Film/TronLegacy'' [[SubvertedTrope acts]] like it is about to set this trope up,
with a fat guard propping his feet on his desk while watching TV. Then he notices [[InsecurityCamera one of them trying his security camera feeds go out]] and immediately goes to lure her with a half-eaten biscuit investigate. He only fails to get zapped for his trouble and another one suffering a similar fate. The last, older guard is scared out of his wits and does nothing as catch Sam Flynn because Sam jumps off the Space Girl calmly makes an exit. roof of the Encom building to parachute down to the street. Note that the screen glitch didn't trigger a reaction other than tapping the monitor, which appeared to clear it up. It was the door alarm to the server room going off that caused him to give chase.



* Both fiercely subverted and then played straight in ''An Oblique Approach'', the first book of the ''Literature/BelisariusSeries'' by David Drake and Eric Flint. The Kushans guarding Princess Shakuntala were so highly disciplined, effective, and intelligently led that Raghunath Rao, greatest assassin in India, knew he could '''never''' rescue her from them. So [[spoiler:Belisarius tricked Venandakatra into '''replacing''' the Kushans with "guards" so inept that Rao had no problem wiping them out -- except for two killed by the princess herself.]]
* In Creator/RobertEHoward's ''Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian'' novel ''The Hour of the Dragon'', Zenobia gets the keys, to the TailorMadePrison no less, by [[DrinkingOnDuty getting them drunk]].



* In ''Literature/{{Doom}}: Hell on Earth'', a pair of bored Clydes are frisking zombies boarding a plane. They fail to notice the heroes [[PretendWereDead Pretending We're Dead]] or catch that one is being carried upright between them.



* Both fiercely subverted and then played straight in ''An Oblique Approach'', the first book of the ''Literature/BelisariusSeries'' by David Drake and Eric Flint. The Kushans guarding Princess Shakuntala were so highly disciplined, effective, and intelligently led that Raghunath Rao, greatest assassin in India, knew he could '''never''' rescue her from them. So [[spoiler:Belisarius tricked Venandakatra into '''replacing''' the Kushans with "guards" so inept that Rao had no problem wiping them out -- except for two killed by the princess herself.]]
* The guards at the "best guarded keep of the stoutest castle" in ''Literature/TheWindInTheWillows'' apparently can't tell the difference between a washerwoman they see every day and is the sister or sister-in-law of the chief warden, and their main prisoner, who is an anthropomorphic toad.

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* Both fiercely subverted and then played straight in ''An Oblique Approach'', In ''Literature/TheHobbit'', the first book Mirkwood elves demonstrate the DrinkingOnDuty variation of this, allowing [[spoiler:the dwarves]] to escape. They don't seem to learn from the experience, since Gollum also escapes from Mirkwood in ''The Fellowship of the ''Literature/BelisariusSeries'' Ring''.
** Speaking of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', averted
by David Drake and Eric Flint. The Kushans guarding Princess Shakuntala were so highly disciplined, effective, and intelligently led Háma, doorward of Meduseld in Edoras. He's smart enough to know that Raghunath Rao, greatest assassin in India, knew he could '''never''' rescue her from them. So [[spoiler:Belisarius tricked Venandakatra into '''replacing''' the Kushans "the staff of a wizard may be more than a prop for age", but lets Gandalf through with "guards" so inept said staff because he deems he's a friend here to help (a judgment that Rao had no problem wiping them out -- except for two killed by is soon vindicated). It's a bit more vague in [[Film/TheLordOfTheRings the princess herself.]]
* The guards at the "best guarded keep
movie]], but it's certainly a plausible interpretation of the stoutest castle" in ''Literature/TheWindInTheWillows'' apparently can't tell the difference between a washerwoman they see every day and is the sister or sister-in-law of the chief warden, and their main prisoner, who is an anthropomorphic toad.his actions there.



* In Creator/RobertEHoward's ''Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian'' novel ''The Hour of the Dragon'', Zenobia gets the keys, to the TailorMadePrison no less, by [[DrinkingOnDuty getting them drunk]].
* Subverted in the novel ''Film/WhereEaglesDare''. The German soldiers searching for the commandos don't check the ladies toilet where they're hiding. When one commando mentions how stupid that is, his superior points out the soldiers were eager to think up excuses to avoid searching places where desperate men might empty a submachine gun into them.
* In ''Syren'', the fifth book of the ''Literature/SeptimusHeap'' series, Septimus gets past a guard in the Trading Post by claiming that he is someone important. Now, Septimus did not in fact lie to him. He ''was'' the Senior Apprentice(with the nifty Magycal cuffs to prove it), and he ''was'' on official business ([[spoiler: getting Jenna, the Princess]]). Trope still applies in that the guard did nothing to verify this.
* In ''Literature/TheHobbit'', the Mirkwood elves demonstrate the DrinkingOnDuty variation of this, allowing [[spoiler:the dwarves]] to escape. They don't seem to learn from the experience, since Gollum also escapes from Mirkwood in ''The Fellowship of the Ring''.
** Speaking of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', averted by Háma, doorward of Meduseld in Edoras. He's smart enough to know that "the staff of a wizard may be more than a prop for age", but lets Gandalf through with said staff because he deems he's a friend here to help (a judgment that is soon vindicated). It's a bit more vague in [[Film/TheLordOfTheRings the movie]], but it's certainly a plausible interpretation of his actions there.
* The secret police force known as DERSO in ''Literature/TheLeonardRegime'' is supposed to be an elite organization of specially trained agents. In reality, they are often stupid, incompetent, or simply indifferent.
* In ''Literature/{{Doom}}: Hell on Earth'', a pair of bored Clydes are frisking zombies boarding a plane. They fail to notice the heroes [[PretendWereDead Pretending We're Dead]] or catch that one is being carried upright between them.



** Generally averted as it is not easy to sneak past the guards in Roalt castle. During ''Literature/AMagesPower'' this is played for laughs when Kasile sheepishly notes that her KingIncognito disguise fooled her bodyguards. Mia replies that they must be "stupidheads".

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** Generally averted averted, as it is not easy to sneak past the guards in Roalt castle. During ''Literature/AMagesPower'' this is played for laughs when Kasile sheepishly notes that her KingIncognito disguise fooled her bodyguards. Mia replies that they must be "stupidheads".



* The secret police force known as DERSO in ''Literature/TheLeonardRegime'' is supposed to be an elite organization of specially trained agents. In reality, they are often stupid, incompetent, or simply indifferent.



* In ''Syren'', the fifth book of the ''Literature/SeptimusHeap'' series, Septimus gets past a guard in the Trading Post by claiming that he is someone important. Now, Septimus did not in fact lie to him. He ''was'' the Senior Apprentice(with the nifty Magykal cuffs to prove it), and he ''was'' on official business ([[spoiler: getting Jenna, the Princess]]). Trope still applies in that the guard did nothing to verify this.



* Subverted in the novel ''Film/WhereEaglesDare''. The German soldiers searching for the commandos don't check the ladies toilet where they're hiding. When one commando mentions how stupid that is, his superior points out the soldiers were eager to think up excuses to avoid searching places where desperate men might empty a submachine gun into them.
* The guards at the "best guarded keep of the stoutest castle" in ''Literature/TheWindInTheWillows'' apparently can't tell the difference between a washerwoman they see every day and is the sister or sister-in-law of the chief warden, and their main prisoner, who is an anthropomorphic toad.



* ''Series/TheChasersWarOnEverything'' proved this was TruthInTelevision at the [[http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2007/09/06/1188783415730.html APEC summit]], getting to George W. Bush's hotel, past two security checkpoints in a fake motorcade, with "insecurity passes" that stated they were NOT official delegates. And a guy dressed as Osama bin Laden in the back seat. See it [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3zKuLgH_l8 here]]. The motorcade had ''runners with handheld cameras.'' Even the Chaser boys themselves started to get scared at how easy it was for them to get in -- they'd been expecting to be stopped at the very first checkpoint! The were finally nabbed when their motorcade began turning around, and "Osama" decided to exit his vehicle and began asking guards why he hadn't been invited. As one commenter pointed out, it appears that day the world's leaders were mainly under the protection of the ''honour system''.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** [[PlayingWithATrope Played with]] in the episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire "Dragonfire"]], when the Doctor distracts a guard by engaging him in a philosophical discussion on the nature of existence, a subject about which the guard is particularly enthusiastic.
** Both averted and played straight in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E4StateOfDecay "State of Decay"]] -- one of the guards recognises that the man claiming to be a guard is, in fact, a known deserter. But the other doesn't... and falls for "the old prisoner trick".
** Lampshaded in the episode "Deadly Assassin" by Security Chief Spandrell's criticisms of Commander Hilred for allowing the Doctor to escape:
--->'''Spandrell:''' Well done, Hilred. An antiquated capsule, for which you get adequate early warning, transducts on the very steps of the Capitol. You are warned that the occupant is a known criminal, therefore you allow him to escape and conceal himself in a building a mere 53 stories high. A clever stratagem, Hildred. You're trying to confuse him, I take it?

to:

* ''Series/TheChasersWarOnEverything'' proved this was TruthInTelevision In ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'', the soldiers guarding Creel appear to have missed out on three fundamental points of guarding. 1: If you are in a secure military base and are set to guard a prisoner, you should be ''looking at the [[http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2007/09/06/1188783415730.html APEC summit]], getting to George W. Bush's hotel, past two security checkpoints in a fake motorcade, with "insecurity passes" that stated they were NOT official delegates. And a guy dressed as Osama bin Laden in prisoner''. Let other people worry about guarding threats from the back seat. See it [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3zKuLgH_l8 here]]. The motorcade had ''runners with handheld cameras.'' Even outside unless something happens. 2: If the Chaser boys themselves started to get scared at how easy it was for them to get in -- they'd been expecting to be stopped at the very first checkpoint! The were finally nabbed when their motorcade began turning around, and "Osama" decided to exit his vehicle and began asking guards why he hadn't been invited. As one commenter pointed out, it prisoner appears that day to have disappeared from his cell, immediately inform people of that. It's better to look stupid radioing back a few seconds later to tell them "Wait, never mind, there he is" than to let his escape go unreported. 3: And this one is really important, ''do not'' open the world's leaders were mainly under cell door. If he hasn't escaped, all opening the protection of door will do is give him the ''honour system''.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** [[PlayingWithATrope Played with]]
chance to escape. And if he has escaped, opening the door isn't going to make him magically reappear in the episode [[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire "Dragonfire"]], when cell, and also will distract you from the Doctor distracts dangerous escaped prisoner. On a guard by engaging him in more plot-specific note, if you know for a philosophical discussion on the nature of existence, a subject about which the guard is particularly enthusiastic.
** Both averted and played straight in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E4StateOfDecay "State of Decay"]] -- one of the guards recognises
fact that the man claiming to be a guard is, in fact, a known deserter. But the other doesn't... guy you're guarding can change his body into any material (and if they didn't, then their superiors are crazy too for not telling them) and falls for "the old prisoner trick".
** Lampshaded in the episode "Deadly Assassin" by Security Chief Spandrell's criticisms
his prison is made of Commander Hilred for allowing the Doctor to escape:
--->'''Spandrell:''' Well done, Hilred. An antiquated capsule, for which
solid glass, then you get adequate early warning, transducts on the very steps of the Capitol. You are warned should consider that he has used this power to blend into the occupant is background rather than immediately assuming he has escaped, especially if there's no visible way he ''could'' have escaped.
* ''Series/{{Alphas}}'' had
a known criminal, therefore you allow him to escape and conceal pair of guards (working for the protagonists, actually) who are given one order: do not open the cell. Shortly thereafter, Parish stabs himself in a building a mere 53 stories high. A clever stratagem, Hildred. You're trying the neck, so they open the door to confuse him, I take it?stop him bleeding to death. Parish, an immortal alpha with a HealingFactor, points out as he's killing them that they should really follow orders.



* ''Series/HogansHeroes'' is built around this trope.
-->"Schuuuuultz!"
* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'':
** In the first episode, two guards go chasing off after some enchanted dice.
** In the fourth episode, they fail to notice a servant girl riding off into the night. What temp agency do they get these guys from?
** You can practically set your watch by the inability of the guards to actually "guard" anything.
** They're bad enough that {{Fanon}} has long decided the guards actually know Merlin's secret and are only pretending not to notice him sneaking around.

to:

* ''Series/HogansHeroes'' is built around this trope.
-->"Schuuuuultz!"
* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'':
**
In the first episode, two ''Series/BabylonFive'' episode "Between the Darkness and the Light", Garibaldi plays on his recent media fame in capturing Sheridan to break him out again. This gets him past the outer guard, but the cell guards go chasing off after some enchanted dice.
** In the fourth episode, they fail to notice a servant girl riding off into the night. What temp agency do they get these guys from?
** You can practically set your
aren't so impressed.
-->'''Guard:''' I don't
watch TV. It's a cultural wasteland filled with inappropriate metaphors and an unrealistic portrayal of life created by the inability of liberal media elite.
* Subverted in ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' in that when someone escapes from a cell it's either a gambit by their captors ([[spoiler:Bulldog, and later Ellen Tigh escaping from the Cylon basestar)]] or because
the guards are in on things (Laura Roslin in Season 2, and Tom Zarek during TheMutiny). Probably the least plausible occasion is when Gina escapes from the ''Pegasus''[='=] brig, makes her way to actually "guard" anything.
Admiral Cain's quarters and shoots her, ''and then'' slips off the battlestar unnoticed. Although she had the help of Baltar, a uniform and things were chaotic in the aftermath of a major attack, it still stretched the bounds of credibility.
** They're bad enough And played straight when you consider that {{Fanon}} has long decided with all the little ''[[ThrownOutTheAirlock accidents]]'' happening there, no one comes up with the bright idea of placing a guard at the airlocks. This is justifiable in the beginning when ''Galactica'' is massively understaffed, but not so much in the later seasons.
** At another point late in the series, [[spoiler:the chief manages to knock out one of the human Cylons, carry them all the way to the brig, create a blackout, and then replace one Cylon with the other in the space of about 5 min.]] Apparently in the middle of a blackout,
the guards actually know Merlin's secret in the next room don't think it's important to double check the status of their genocidal machine prisoner.
* ''Series/BlakesSeven'':
** On the prison transport in ''Space Fall'' they station a lone guard ''inside'' the prisoners' room, whose palm print can open the door from there. Naturally, once the camera is taken out he's overpowered
and coerced to open the door by Gan threatening that they'll simply [[BorrowedBiometicBypass take off his hand]] if he refuses.
** From a review of the episode "Bounty":
-->"...to say nothing of the guards' color codes, which include [[RedAlert Red Standby Alert]] (apparently meaning stand around and do nothing), Red Mobilisation (wander around outside the house), and Blue Mobilisation (allow the President and his daughter to escape in a vintage car accompanied by two terrorists)."
%%* Averted in ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'': ''"Why do I always get the smart ones?"''
* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d by Michael's voiceover in ''Series/BurnNotice''. The two thugs who
are only pretending not supposed to notice him sneaking around. be guarding a kidnapped kid are watching a baseball game on TV instead. Michael snarks that poorly-timed ball games have brought down dictatorships.
* ''Series/TheChasersWarOnEverything'' proved this was TruthInTelevision at the [[http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2007/09/06/1188783415730.html APEC summit]], getting to George W. Bush's hotel, past two security checkpoints in a fake motorcade, with "insecurity passes" that stated they were NOT official delegates. And a guy dressed as Osama bin Laden in the back seat. See it [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3zKuLgH_l8 here]]. The motorcade had ''runners with handheld cameras.'' Even the Chaser boys themselves started to get scared at how easy it was for them to get in -- they'd been expecting to be stopped at the very first checkpoint! The were finally nabbed when their motorcade began turning around, and "Osama" decided to exit his vehicle and began asking guards why he hadn't been invited. As one commenter pointed out, it appears that day the world's leaders were mainly under the protection of the ''honour system''.



* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** Lampshaded in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E3TheDeadlyAssassin "The Deadly Assassin"]] by Security Chief Spandrell's criticisms of Commander Hilred for allowing the Doctor to escape:
--->'''Spandrell:''' Well done, Hilred. An antiquated capsule, for which you get adequate early warning, transducts on the very steps of the Capitol. You are warned that the occupant is a known criminal, therefore you allow him to escape and conceal himself in a building a mere 53 stories high. A clever stratagem, Hildred. You're trying to confuse him, I take it?
** Both averted and played straight in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E4StateOfDecay "State of Decay"]] -- one of the guards recognizes that the man claiming to be a guard is, in fact, a known deserter. But the other doesn't... and falls for "the old prisoner trick".
** [[PlayingWithATrope Played with]] in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire "Dragonfire"]], when the Doctor distracts a guard by engaging him in a philosophical discussion on the nature of existence, a subject about which the guard is particularly enthusiastic.
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
** Subverted with Mord, a turnkey who's so thick that Tyrion Lannister, from the richest family in the Seven Kingdoms, can't even bribe his way out.
-->'''Mord:''' (''searching Tyrion'') No gold!\\
'''Tyrion:''' I don't have it on me! (''Mord thumps him'') Sometimes possession is an abstract concept-- (''thump'')
** But played straight in Season 4. One spectacularly boneheaded guard sees a grappling hook pop over the wall. Rather than calling out to another guard or raising the alarm in any way, he ''very slowly'' investigates the hook he can physically see, and takes an axe to the face for his trouble.
** Jaime Lannister manages to escape by baiting the only guard by killing his cellmate.
** Averted by Brienne, who insists on keeping the talking to a minimum and watching Jaime take a piss. She eventually makes the mistake of getting too close, but it takes weeks.
* ''Series/HogansHeroes'' is built around this trope.
-->"Schuuuuultz!"
* Subverted in the ''Series/KnightRider'' episode, "Indecent Little Town", when the corrupt police arrest Michael Knight and impound KITT. Specifically, when the Mooks try to secure the robot car, he resists by backing up each time they try. Although obviously surprised at this, the head Mook calmly advises one of his minions to simply provoke KITT into backing continually until the robot car inadvertently rolls onto a car garage elevator platform and they elevate it, trapping KITT.
* The team on ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' regularly talk their way past security, but they usually have fake [=ID=]s and the guards are standard office building rent-a-cops. However, in one episode, Hardison talks his way past security to get into an airport's control tower. He has an employee ID, but it is for a female employee, so he makes a big deal of how he is in the middle of a sex change and the guards are too embarrassed to pursue this further. The danger of their negligence becomes apparent when Hardison almost causes a plane to crash. There is a reason why security at airports is supposed to be very tight. Also, the man in charge of the tower, apparently, doesn't know who's supposed to be working for him.
* In season 3 of ''Series/{{Lost}}'', Sawyer tries the whole "prisoners making out" thing to get the guards to come over when he kisses Kate, then overpowers them and takes their gun. It doesn't work, though.
* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'':
** In the first episode, two guards go chasing off after some enchanted dice.
** In the fourth episode, they fail to notice a servant girl riding off into the night. What temp agency do they get these guys from?
** You can practically set your watch by the inability of the guards to actually "guard" anything.
** They're bad enough that {{Fanon}} has long decided the guards actually know Merlin's secret and are only pretending not to notice him sneaking around.
* The prison in ''Series/MyNameIsEarl'' is staffed by incompetents from the ground up. On Earl's first morning in prison he discovers that his cellmate tunneled out of the cell and used a watermelon as a dummy in the bed, the common room has a display case full of shivs with a sign saying "Don't make these", and the Warden once contracted out inmate labour to a ladder company. Randy however proves to be a standout case, taking inmates out for ice cream after a scared straight talk to a middle school and letting them go into the parlour unsupervised while he stayed in the transport van.



* ''Series/BlakesSeven'':
** On the prison transport in ''Space Fall'' they station a lone guard ''inside'' the prisoners' room, whose palm print can open the door from there. Naturally, once the camera is taken out he's overpowered and coerced to open the door by Gan threatening that they'll simply [[BorrowedBiometicBypass take off his hand]] if he refuses.
** From a review of the episode "Bounty":
-->"...to say nothing of the guards' color codes, which include [[RedAlert Red Standby Alert]] (apparently meaning stand around and do nothing), Red Mobilisation (wander around outside the house), and Blue Mobilisation (allow the President and his daughter to escape in a vintage car accompanied by two terrorists)."
%%* Averted in ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'': ''"Why do I always get the smart ones?"''
* In season 3 of ''Series/{{Lost}}'', Sawyer tries the whole "prisoners making out" thing to get the guards to come over when he kisses Kate, then overpowers them and takes their gun. It doesn't work, though.
* The prison in ''Series/MyNameIsEarl'' is staffed by incompetents from the ground up. On Earl's first morning in prison he discovers that his cellmate tunelled out of the cell and used a watermelon as a dummy in the bed, the common room has a display case full of shivs with a sign saying "Don't make these", and the Warden once contracted out inmate labour to a ladder company. Randy however proves to be a standout case, taking inmates out for ice cream after a scared straight talk to a middle school and letting them go into the parlour unsupervised while he stayed in the transport van.
* Subverted in ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'' in that when someone escapes from a cell it's either a gambit by their captors ([[spoiler:Bulldog, and later Ellen Tigh escaping from the Cylon basestar)]] or because the guards are in on things (Laura Roslin in Season 2, and Tom Zarek during TheMutiny). Probably the least plausible occasion is when Gina escapes from the Pegasus brig, makes her way to Admiral Cain's quarters and shoots her, ''and then'' slips off the battlestar unnoticed. Although she had the help of Baltar, a uniform and things were chaotic in the aftermath of a major attack, it still stretched the bounds of credibility.
** And played straight when you consider that with all the little ''[[ThrownOutTheAirlock accidents]]'' happening there, no one comes up with the bright idea of placing a guard at the airlocks. This is justifiable in the beginning when Galactica is massively understaffed, but not so much in the later seasons.
** At another point late in the series, [[spoiler:the chief manages to knock out one of the human cylons, carry them all the way to the brig, create a blackout, and then replace one cylon with the other in the space of about 5 mins.]] Apparently in the middle of a blackout, the guards in the next room don't think it's important to double check the status of their genocidal machine prisoner.
* In the ''Series/BabylonFive'' episode "Between the Darkness and the Light", Garibaldi plays on his recent media fame in capturing Sheridan to break him out again. This gets him past the outer guard, but the cell guards aren't so impressed.
-->'''Guard:''' I don't watch TV. It's a cultural wasteland filled with inappropriate metaphors and an unrealistic portrayal of life created by the liberal media elite.
* Subverted in the ''Series/KnightRider'' episode, "Indecent Little Town", when the corrupt police arrest Michael Knight and impound KITT. Specifically, when the Mooks try to secure the robot car, he resists by backing up each time they try. Although obviously surprised at this, the head Mook calmly advises one of his minions to simply provoke KITT into backing continually until the robot car inadvertently rolls onto a car garage elevator platform and they elevate it, trapping KITT.
* The team on ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' regularly talk their way past security, but they usually have fake [=ID=]s and the guards are standard office building rent-a-cops. However, in one episode Hardison, talks his way past security to get into an airport's control tower. He has an employee ID, but it is for a female employee, so he makes a big deal of how he is in the middle of a sex change and the guards are too embarrassed to pursue this further. The danger of their negligence becomes apparent when Hardison almost causes a plane to crash. There is a reason why security at airports is supposed to be very tight. Also, the man in charge of the tower, apparently, doesn't know who's supposed to be working for him.



* ''Series/{{Alphas}}'' had a pair of guards (working for the protagonists, actually) who are given one order: do not open the cell. Shortly thereafter, Parish stabs himself in the neck, so they open the door to stop him bleeding to death. Parish, an immortal alpha with a HealingFactor, points out as he's killing them that they should really follow orders.
* {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d by Michael's voiceover in ''Series/BurnNotice''. The two thugs who are supposed to be guarding a kidnapped kid are watching a baseball game on TV instead. Michael snarks that poorly-timed ball games have brought down dictatorships.
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
** Subverted with Mord, a turnkey who's so thick that Tyrion Lannister, from the richest family in the Seven Kingdoms, can't even bribe his way out.
-->'''Mord:''' (''searching Tyrion'') No gold!\\
'''Tyrion:''' I don't have it on me! (''Mord thumps him'') Sometimes possession is an abstract concept-- (''thump'')
** But played straight in Season 4. One spectacularly boneheaded guard sees a grappling hook pop over the wall. Rather than calling out to another guard or raising the alarm in any way, he ''very slowly'' investigates the hook he can physically see, and takes an axe to the face for his trouble.
** Jaime Lannister manages to escape by baiting the only guard by killing his cellmate.
** Averted by Brienne, who insists on keeping the talking to a minimum and watching Jaime take a piss. She eventually makes the mistake of getting too close, but it takes weeks.
* In ''Series/AgentsOfShield'', the soldiers guarding Creel appear to have missed out on three fundamental points of guarding. 1. If you are in a secure military base and are set to guard a prisoner, you should be ''looking at the prisoner''. Let other people worry about guarding threats from the outside unless something happens. 2. If the prisoner appears to have disappeared from his cell, immediately inform people of that. It's better to look stupid radioing back a few seconds later to tell them "Wait, never mind, there he is" than to let his escape go unreported. 3. And this one is really important, ''do not'' open the cell door. If he hasn't escaped, all opening the door will do is give him the chance to escape. And if he has escaped, opening the door isn't going to make him magically reappear in the cell, and also will distract you from the dangerous escaped prisoner. On a more plot-specific note, if you know for a fact that the guy you're guarding can change his body into any material (and if they didn't, then their superiors are crazy too for not telling them) and his prison is made of solid glass, then you should consider that he has used this power to blend into the background rather than immediately assuming he has escaped, especially if there's no visible way he ''could'' have escaped.



[[folder:Pinballs]]

to:

[[folder:Pinballs]][[folder:Pinball]]



* The guards on ''TheBouncer'' always follow their job so loyally, in fact even if the place is gonna sink they'll stop at nothing to stop our heroes.

to:

* The guards on ''TheBouncer'' ''VideoGame/TheBouncer'' always follow their job so loyally, in fact even if the place is gonna sink they'll stop at nothing to stop our heroes.



* Since [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Springfield Jail]] is run by Chief Wiggum and his officers, this is pretty much inevitable.

to:

* Since [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Springfield Jail]] is run by Chief Wiggum The Banana Guards in ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' completely ignored a resident who claimed Princess Bubblegum had been kidnapped, preferred to watch reality TV shows over the surveillance tapes that clearly showed her being kidnapped, and his officers, this is pretty much inevitable.only responded to the resident when he claimed he was [[DisproportionateRetribution taking a boat out after 8:00]]. [[spoiler:Fortunately, it was all just a test to determine the efficiency of the Banana Guards, and the candy resident, who was the only one following the clues, became the new chief of police.]]



** Somewhat justified in that without having a miniture zeppelin they would never have gotten in. Indentity would only have to be checked at the entrance and exit. Even if someone did get a guard's uniform there is only one exit and presumably they DO check guards leaving.

to:

** Somewhat justified in that without having a miniture miniature zeppelin they would never have gotten in. Indentity Identity would only have to be checked at the entrance and exit. Even if someone did get a guard's uniform there is only one exit and presumably they DO check guards leaving.



* Played with in the ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeARealAmericanHero'' episode "Grey Hairs and Growing Pains". When the Joes pretend to be civilian customers for Cobra's health spa, they are recognized immediately, and the Cobra agents play along and then trap them. Later, after the Joes get turned into old people and children, they pretend to be a family on a road trip and get into a Cobra base by asking the guard for directions and then for a bathroom. Once inside, they are immediately recognized again. Serpentor orders Dr. Mindbender to arrest the front guard for his incompetence.
* One early episode of ''WesternAnimation/HeyArnold'' featured a night-guard at an aquarium who was too busy feeding the animals cookies to notice Arnold and his grandmother coming in and leaving with a homesick sea turtle.



* Used, played with, subverted and lampshaded frequently in ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'', most often through the misadventures of Number 21 and Number 24, [[ThoseTwoGuys two guards]] who [[MauveShirt somehow manage to survive the carnage of the series]], and give plausible voice to the wit and social skills necessary for career henchmen.
* The Trope was played with in ''WesternAnimation/StrokerAndHoop'', when Stroker has to knock a guard out to get deeper into a complex. After [[DressingAsTheEnemy dressing as the guard]], he gets into the next room where the guard is seemingly fooled by Stroker holding a clipboard over his face and using a bad falsetto. The guard isn't fooled for a second, asking Stroker if he thinks he's some kind of idiot. Stroker complains that [[LampshadeHanging the guard should have been reading a skin mag or watching a sports game instead of monitoring the camera feeds]], causing the guard to retort "Hey, I happen to ''like'' my job."



* Played with in the ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeARealAmericanHero'' episode "Grey Hairs and Growing Pains". When the Joes pretend to be civilian customers for Cobra's health spa, they are recognized immediately, and the Cobra agents play along and then trap them. Later, after the Joes get turned into old people and children, they pretend to be a family on a road trip and get into a Cobra base by asking the guard for directions and then for a bathroom. Once inside, they are immediately recognized again. Serpentor orders Dr. Mindbender to arrest the front guard for his incompetence.
* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2012''. When April feigns a stomachache, the Kraang guard immediately spots (and stops) her father from sneaking away, and isn't affected when April attacks him (being a robot and all).



* The Banana Guards in ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' completely ignored a resident who claimed Princess Bubblegum had been kidnapped, preferred to watch reality TV shows over the surveillance tapes that clearly showed her being kidnapped, and only responded to the resident when he claimed he was [[DisproportionateRetribution taking a boat out after 8:00]]. [[spoiler:Fortunately, it was all just a test to determine the efficiency of the Banana Guards, and the candy resident, who was the only one following the clues, became the new chief of police.]]
* One early episode of ''WesternAnimation/HeyArnold'' featured a night-guard at an aquarium who was too busy feeding the animals cookies to notice Arnold and his grandmother coming in and leaving with a homesick sea turtle.
* WesternAnimation/TheTransformers episode "The Quintesson Journal" has Blaster and Outback convincing a Sharkticon guard to deactivate the bars on their cell by bribing him with an energon cube. Once the bars are gone, the guard is promptly shot, because someone forgot to take the Autobots' weapons before locking them up.
-->'''Blaster''': "Was that as easy as I thought it was?"


Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': Since Springfield Jail is run by Chief Wiggum and his officers, this is pretty much inevitable.
* The Trope was played with in ''WesternAnimation/StrokerAndHoop'', when Stroker has to knock a guard out to get deeper into a complex. After [[DressingAsTheEnemy dressing as the guard]], he gets into the next room where the guard is seemingly fooled by Stroker holding a clipboard over his face and using a bad falsetto. The guard isn't fooled for a second, asking Stroker if he thinks he's some kind of idiot. Stroker complains that [[LampshadeHanging the guard should have been reading a skin mag or watching a sports game instead of monitoring the camera feeds]], causing the guard to retort "Hey, I happen to ''like'' my job."
* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2012''. When April feigns a stomachache, the Kraang guard immediately spots (and stops) her father from sneaking away, and isn't affected when April attacks him (being a robot and all).
* ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformers'' episode "The Quintesson Journal" has Blaster and Outback convincing a Sharkticon guard to deactivate the bars on their cell by bribing him with an energon cube. Once the bars are gone, the guard is promptly shot, because someone forgot to take the Autobots' weapons before locking them up.
-->'''Blaster''': "Was that as easy as I thought it was?"
* Used, played with, subverted and lampshaded frequently in ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'', most often through the misadventures of Number 21 and Number 24, [[ThoseTwoGuys two guards]] who [[MauveShirt somehow manage to survive the carnage of the series]], and give plausible voice to the wit and social skills necessary for career henchmen.
29th Apr '17 12:12:03 PM Kotomikun
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Averted, then played straight in [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0387.html Elan's prison escape.]] His attempts at tricking the guards to let him out don't work. But after he gets Thog to smash their cells open, he tells the guards (while magically disguised as one) that the mess is due to "renovations" and that one of the prisoners (himself) died of "vaporizing flu," which supposedly disintegrated the body and is highly contagious to anyone who stands around asking questions. The guards immediately leave to avoid catching this transparently made-up disease, and Elan and Thog apparently just walk right out of the prison.
22nd Apr '17 3:56:22 AM Ccook1956
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* With guards like Yippey, Yappey and Yahooey (a.k.a. the Goofy Guards from ''WesternAnimation/MagillaGorilla''), who needs villains? What did the king ever do to deserve them?

to:

* With guards like Yippey, Yappey and Yahooey (a.k.a. the Goofy Guards from ''WesternAnimation/MagillaGorilla''), the ''Peter Potamus'' show), who needs villains? What did the king ever do to deserve them?
20th Apr '17 2:47:46 PM Ccook1956
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* With guards like Yippey, Yappey and Yahooey (a.k.a. the Goofy Guards from ''WesternAnimation/TheMagillaGorillaShow''), who needs villains? What did the king ever do to deserve them?

to:

* With guards like Yippey, Yappey and Yahooey (a.k.a. the Goofy Guards from ''WesternAnimation/TheMagillaGorillaShow''), ''WesternAnimation/MagillaGorilla''), who needs villains? What did the king ever do to deserve them?
20th Apr '17 2:45:34 PM Ccook1956
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* With guards like Yippey, Yappey and Yahooey (a.k.a. the Goofy Guards from ''WesternAnimation/TheMagillaGorillaShow''), who needs villains? What did the king ever do to deserve them?
20th Apr '17 2:40:18 PM Ccook1956
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* In ''Film/YellowSubmarine'', the Meanie guard leading the team of four Apple Bonkers doesn't realize that the fifth Apple Bonker is the Beatles, each sitting on one another's shoulders. When he finally catches on, he aims his gun at them but it jams, giving the boys time to escape and drop the giant apple they were holding on him.



* Subverted in ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'': Ford attempts to save himself and Arthur from being [[ThrownOutTheAirlock chucked out an airlock]] by talking a Vogon guard into questioning the purpose of his life, but the guard is [[TooDumbToFool too dumb for Ford to get through to him]]. In fact, the guard really enjoys his job. Including the whole throw people out of the airlock part.

to:

* Subverted in ''Literature/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'': Ford attempts to save himself and Arthur from being [[ThrownOutTheAirlock chucked out an airlock]] by talking a Vogon guard into questioning the purpose of his life, but the guard is [[TooDumbToFool too dumb for Ford to get through to him]]. In fact, the guard really enjoys his job. Including the whole throw people out of the airlock part. And the shouting.
18th Apr '17 3:08:24 AM Mhazard
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* TruthInTelevision: A convict in a US prison was able to escape by dressing up as a guard, because the guards were more familiar with the prisoners than each other.

to:

* TruthInTelevision: A convict in a US prison was able to escape by [[DressingAsTheEnemy dressing up as a guard, guard]], because the guards were more familiar with the prisoners than each other.
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