History Main / TheFairFolk

22nd Aug '17 8:45:57 PM PaulA
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** Lackey also touched on this trope in an episode from the first ''Literature/BardicVoices'' book, where Rune has to rescue her Bardic Master/love interest from an Elven king. She succeeds (luckily Elves are vulnerable to music) and forces the king to promise not to come after them or use magic or weapons against them. Sadly Rune isn't quite savvy enough; the enraged king ends up sending a huge-ass thunderstorm (weather being [[LiteralGenie neither magical nor strictly a weapon]]) after them.

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** Lackey also touched on this trope in an episode from the first ''Literature/BardicVoices'' book, ''Literature/TheLarkAndTheWren'', where Rune has to rescue her Bardic Master/love interest from an Elven king. She succeeds (luckily Elves are vulnerable to music) and forces the king to promise not to come after them or use magic or weapons against them. Sadly Rune isn't quite savvy enough; the enraged king ends up sending a huge-ass thunderstorm (weather being [[LiteralGenie neither magical nor strictly a weapon]]) after them.
16th Aug '17 4:05:02 PM GrammarNavi
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** An older oft-remembered Fey that looks like a [[WhenTreesAttack tree]], the Murderjack. They're a case of fluff matching crunch really well, in that they're fully capable of (literally) ripping apart an unprepared party. Murderjacks hunt in packs, strip the skin from your flesh, and heal you when you stop moving (to prolong your agony). They're also described by many players as "essentially [[XMeetsY Tree-]][[Franchise/TheSlenderManMythos Slenderman]]".

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** An older oft-remembered Fey that looks like a [[WhenTreesAttack tree]], the Murderjack. They're a case of fluff matching crunch really well, in that they're fully capable of (literally) ripping apart an unprepared party. Murderjacks hunt in packs, strip the skin from your flesh, and heal you when you stop moving (to prolong your agony). They're also described by many players as "essentially [[XMeetsY [[JustForFun/XMeetsY Tree-]][[Franchise/TheSlenderManMythos Slenderman]]".
15th Aug '17 11:21:02 AM Theriocephalus
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* ''TabletopGame/ChangelingTheLost'' paints Fairies as powerful incomprehensible alien entities that regularly abduct humans and take them off to their homeland, where they are [[InvoluntaryTransformation warped]] to fit their masters' perceptions of them. The Changelings of the title are humans who've managed to escape back to Earth, but who've been [[WhatHaveIBecome changed]] by their time in the world of Faerie and are trying to avoid their former captors at all costs. Notably, ''Changeling'' also directly correlates the modern concept of AlienAbduction with the Fae, explicitly invoking such standbys as lights in the sky, strange experiments, and Keepers taking the form of LittleGreenMen or TheGreys in a number of places.
** It is explained later that the True Fae need conflict to prevent themselves fading away into the random background chaos of Arcadia. As a result, [[FoeYay the closest thing they have to friends among other Fae are their sworn enemies, as by fighting they're keeping each other alive]]. They can also be inanimate objects (Props), legions of lesser beings (Wisp), and entire self-enclosed universes (Realms) in addition to their normal forms (Actors). With enough Titles, they can do the aforementioned simultaneously!
** This is in marked contrast to the earlier ''TabletopGame/ChangelingTheDreaming'', where the PlayerCharacter Changelings are actual ([[HalfHumanHybrid half-]])Faeries using [[HumanityEnsues human disguises]] to protect themselves from Disbelief, in the TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness. Though the Kithain are fae souls shaped by human experiences, some -- especially the Redcaps and Sluagh, and the Sidhe of both Courts just after their return to the Tellurian -- are often chillingly inhuman and capricious, at least when played right. Some sub-groups -- the Sidhe's House Leanhaun, for example -- are specifically meant to reflect the more traditional view of The Good People as rapacious and unsympathetic to their mortal victims.
** ''Dreaming'' also has other types of fae with even less connection to humanity: Thallain are essentially {{Evil Counterpart}}s to the Kithain, being AlwaysChaoticEvil and given to monstrous practices by inclination. The inanimae are fae spirits bound to the elements who find the mysteries of fleshy existence deeply puzzling (they call said mysteries the "Heart Riddle", and have spent centuries trying to figure them out). The adhene are fae who were barred from Earth a very long time ago, only now finally able to return thanks to various supernatural cataclysms, and can be often even more inhuman and capricious than the Kithain.
** Creator/WhiteWolf also published ''Dark Ages: Fae'', which is "officially" considered to be a prequel to TabletopGame/ChangelingTheDreaming, but is so radically different it can also be run as a full AlternateUniverse. In it fairies are divided into the Firstborn, who are true fae without need for that pesky mortal shell; Inanimae, beings whose bodies are based on natural elements, as well as artificial constructs; and Changelings, who in this setting are different from both the above, being human children spirited away and raised as faeries, faerie children raised in the human world, or true HalfHumanHybrids. The fae are divided into 5 courts based around their preferred powers and attitude towards humans. All four of the primary courts, the fifth simply being the neutral group, quite easily come across as this trope. It's been remarked that the difference between good and evil faeries isn't over whether they ''should'' rule over humans, but rather how they should go about it. The Spring Court wants to learn about "modern" humanity and use that knowledge to revive the fear and reverence that they once received. The Summer are the harsh traditionalists, and intend to punish humans for breaking their ancient, and forgotten, oaths, and restore the old order. The Autumn Court, like the Spring, wish to learn more about humans and work with them; however rather then outright respect they wish to manipulate the course of history from behind the scenes. Finally is the Winter Court, which isn't actually AlwaysChaoticEvil, but they do their best to appear so to humanity. The fact that characters tend to have very alien and unique systems of morality is one of the game's major themes.
* The Elves in ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'''s Lorwyn set are horned and hooved, supposedly to remind you of deer and satyrs, but... They are also aristocratic, ruthless, and predatory, and have built a society with castes based on cunning and physical attractiveness. The Castes range from Faultless, Immaculate, Exquisite, to Perfect, the top of the pack. Eyeblights, which includes non-Elves as well as ugly or disfigured Elves, are scum and can (or must) be killed.
** Flavor text for the original Alpha Llanowar Elves: "One bone broken for every twig snapped under foot." Pretty brutal for 1/1 druids that give you green mana.
** There are also Faeries in the Lorwyn setting; they're mostly mischievous and disrupting, if not outright evil. Though they went from being simply mischievous in Lorwyn/Morningtide to being outright evil in Shadowmoor/Eventide. The BigBad for that block was [[spoiler: Oona, Queen of the Fae]]. And [[GameBreaker exceptionally overpowered]].
*** It's not the faeries that are different, though; although the rest of Lorwyn-Shadowmoor cycles every few centuries, Oona's magic protects her faeries from the cycling's effects. They really ''are'' little evil bastards, but while the rest of the plane is in is Lorwyn phase, they tone it down.
** This isn't altogether limited to Lorwyn, although the 'fairy tale' nature of the setting certainly emphasized the various creatures' relevant traits. It's canon that the elves of Llanowar on the 'default' plane of Dominaria consider the life of a tree more important than that of a human, and while Magic's faeries may be the small winged pixie type in general, well, see the flavor text on [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=171 Scryb Sprites]] if you think they're in any way, shape, or form harmless.
** In most Magic sets, Elf creatures are very Tolkien-sian. A bit more xenophobic, but Tolkien's elves could be pretty xenophobic to anyone who wasn't the ChosenOne too. They're still creatures of order and "live and let live", as shown by the fact that (until the Lorwyn block) the color of mana they are most likely to use, after green, is white. Lorwyn, though, is consciously based on faerie tales, so the predatory, capricious and aristocratic aspects of The Fair Folk got emphasized, and for the duration of the block elves were black secondarily to green instead of white. A tribe switching colors is rare, and switching to a rival color like that is almost unheard of.

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* Creator/WhiteWolf games:
**
''TabletopGame/ChangelingTheLost'' paints Fairies as powerful incomprehensible alien entities that regularly abduct humans and take them off to their homeland, where they are [[InvoluntaryTransformation warped]] to fit their masters' perceptions of them. The Changelings of the title are humans who've managed to escape back to Earth, but who've been [[WhatHaveIBecome changed]] by their time in the world of Faerie and are trying to avoid their former captors at all costs. Notably, ''Changeling'' also directly correlates the modern concept of AlienAbduction with the Fae, explicitly invoking such standbys as lights in the sky, strange experiments, and Keepers taking the form of LittleGreenMen or TheGreys in a number of places.
**
places. It is later explained later that the True Fae need conflict to prevent themselves fading away into the random background chaos of Arcadia. As a result, [[FoeYay the closest thing they have to friends among other Fae are their sworn enemies, as by fighting they're keeping each other alive]]. They can also be inanimate objects (Props), legions of lesser beings (Wisp), and entire self-enclosed universes (Realms) in addition to their normal forms (Actors). With enough Titles, they can do the aforementioned simultaneously!
** This is in marked contrast to the earlier ''TabletopGame/ChangelingTheDreaming'', where the PlayerCharacter Changelings are actual ([[HalfHumanHybrid half-]])Faeries using [[HumanityEnsues human disguises]] to protect themselves from Disbelief, in the TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness. TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness.
***
Though the Kithain are fae souls shaped by human experiences, some -- especially the Redcaps and Sluagh, and the Sidhe of both Courts just after their return to the Tellurian -- are often chillingly inhuman and capricious, at least when played right. Some sub-groups -- the Sidhe's House Leanhaun, for example -- are specifically meant to reflect the more traditional view of The Good People as rapacious and unsympathetic to their mortal victims.
** *** ''Dreaming'' also has other types of fae with even less connection to humanity: Thallain are essentially {{Evil Counterpart}}s to the Kithain, being AlwaysChaoticEvil and given to monstrous practices by inclination. The inanimae are fae spirits bound to the elements who find the mysteries of fleshy existence deeply puzzling (they call said mysteries the "Heart Riddle", and have spent centuries trying to figure them out). The adhene are fae who were barred from Earth a very long time ago, only now finally able to return thanks to various supernatural cataclysms, and can be often even more inhuman and capricious than the Kithain.
** Creator/WhiteWolf also published ** ''Dark Ages: Fae'', another White Wolf game which is "officially" considered to be a prequel to TabletopGame/ChangelingTheDreaming, ''TabletopGame/ChangelingTheDreaming'', but is so radically different it can also be run as a full AlternateUniverse. In it fairies are divided into the Firstborn, who are true fae without need for that pesky mortal shell; Inanimae, beings whose bodies are based on natural elements, as well as artificial constructs; and Changelings, who in this setting are different from both the above, being human children spirited away and raised as faeries, faerie children raised in the human world, or true HalfHumanHybrids. The fae are divided into 5 courts based around their preferred powers and attitude towards humans. All four of the primary courts, the fifth simply being the neutral group, quite easily come across as this trope. It's been remarked that the difference between good and evil faeries isn't over whether they ''should'' rule over humans, but rather how they should go about it. The Spring Court wants to learn about "modern" humanity and use that knowledge to revive the fear and reverence that they once received. The Summer are the harsh traditionalists, and intend to punish humans for breaking their ancient, and forgotten, oaths, and restore the old order. The Autumn Court, like the Spring, wish to learn more about humans and work with them; however rather then outright respect they wish to manipulate the course of history from behind the scenes. Finally is the Winter Court, which isn't actually AlwaysChaoticEvil, but they do their best to appear so to humanity. The fact that characters tend to have very alien and unique systems of morality is one of the game's major themes.
* The ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'':
**
Elves often fit this role in ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'''s those world where they're portrayed less as another mortal race and more as amoral, reclusive wardens of the forests.
*** The elves of
Lorwyn set are horned and hooved, supposedly to remind you of deer and satyrs, but... They they are also aristocratic, ruthless, and predatory, and have built a society with castes based on cunning and physical attractiveness. The Castes range from Faultless, Immaculate, Exquisite, to Perfect, the top of the pack. Eyeblights, which includes non-Elves as well as ugly or disfigured Elves, are scum and can (or must) be killed.
** Flavor text for the original Alpha Llanowar Elves: "One bone broken for every twig snapped under foot." Pretty brutal for 1/1 druids that give you green mana.
** There are also Faeries in the Lorwyn setting; they're mostly mischievous and disrupting, if not outright evil. Though they went from being simply mischievous in Lorwyn/Morningtide to being outright evil in Shadowmoor/Eventide. The BigBad for that block was [[spoiler: Oona, Queen of the Fae]]. And [[GameBreaker exceptionally overpowered]].
*** It's not the faeries that are different, though; although the rest of Lorwyn-Shadowmoor cycles every few centuries, Oona's magic protects her faeries from the cycling's effects. They really ''are'' little evil bastards, but while the rest of the plane is in is Lorwyn phase, they tone it down.
** This isn't altogether limited to Lorwyn, although the 'fairy tale' nature of the setting certainly emphasized the various creatures' relevant traits. It's canon that the elves of Llanowar on the 'default' plane of Dominaria consider the life of a tree more important than that of a human, and while Magic's faeries may be the small winged pixie type in general, well, see the flavor text on [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=171 Scryb Sprites]] if you think they're in any way, shape, or form harmless.
**
In most Magic ''Magic'' sets, Elf creatures are very Tolkien-sian. A bit more xenophobic, but Tolkien's elves could be pretty xenophobic to anyone who wasn't the ChosenOne TheChosenOne too. They're still creatures of order and "live and let live", as shown by the fact that (until the Lorwyn block) the color of mana they are most likely to use, after green, is white. Lorwyn, though, is consciously based on faerie tales, so the predatory, capricious and aristocratic aspects of The the Fair Folk got emphasized, and for the duration of the block elves were black secondarily to green instead of white. A tribe switching colors is rare, and switching to a rival color like that is almost unheard of.of.
*** Flavor text for the original Llanowar Elves from Alpha: "One bone broken for every twig snapped under foot." Pretty brutal for 1/1 druids that give you green mana.
** Naturally enough, fairies have also been portrayed as this in various sets.
*** The Faeries of Lorwyn are very mischievous and disrupting, if not outright evil. In Lorwyn/Morningtide they were simply mischievous troublemakers, but became outright evil in Shadowmoor/Eventide. In truth, the faeries are not truly different in the two sets: while the rest of Lorwyn-Shadowmoor cycles from a light, pleasant world to a dark and evil one every few centuries, Oona's magic protects her faeries from the cycling's effects. They really ''are'' little evil bastards, but while the rest of the plane is in its Lorwyn phase, they tone it down. In fact, the BigBad for that block was [[spoiler: Oona, Queen of the Fae]]. And [[GameBreaker exceptionally overpowered]].
*** This isn't altogether limited to Lorwyn, although the "fairy tale" nature of the setting certainly emphasized the various creatures' relevant traits. While ''Magic'''s faeries may be the small winged pixie type in general, well, see the flavor text on [[http://ww2.wizards.com/gatherer/CardDetails.aspx?&id=171 Scryb Sprites]] if you think they're in any way, shape, or form harmless.
--->''The only sound was the gentle clicking of the faeries' wings. Then those intruders who were still standing turned and fled. One thing was certain: they didn't think the Scryb were very funny anymore.''
15th Aug '17 10:34:52 AM Theriocephalus
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* The Generous Ones from FanFic/AlexandraQuick, and other inhabitants of the Lands Below such as Bewi. [[EverybodyHatesHades The Most Deathly Power]] also has a similar shtick.

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* The Generous Ones from FanFic/AlexandraQuick, ''FanFic/AlexandraQuick'', and other inhabitants of the Lands Below such as Bewi. [[EverybodyHatesHades The Most Deathly Power]] also has a similar shtick.


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* ''Fanfic/TheLifeAndTimesOfAWinningPony'': The fey are a group of pony-shaped magical creatures known for their love of contracts (and... [[LiteralGenie interesting]] and [[JackassGenie creative]] ways of interpreting them), their [[BlueAndOrangeMorality unique takes on morality]], their [[CannotTellALie inability to lie]] and their aversion to ColdIron.
** The rusalka in "[[http://www.fimfiction.net/story/127803/1/the-incredibly-thrilling-investigation-of-storm-kicker/the-adventures-of-skunk-mane-and-stalker-mare The Incredibly Thrilling Investigation of Storm Kicker]]". It looks like an earth pony, but just slightly... [[UncannyValley wrong]], and it's described as a trickster spirit that uses what appears to be a form of vocal glamour/mind control to turn ponies into thralls and force them to dance with it, and it's perfectly happy to kill them if they, say, [[FelonyMisdemeanor miss a dance step]], [[ForTheEvulz or if it gets bored]]. It apparently considers this a [[BlueAndOrangeMorality justifiable way to alleviate its loneliness]].
** Muses are fey that feed off of the psychic energy associated with artistic creation. As such, they often associate with artists, inspiring them to create more and greater works in exchange for, essentially, sustenance, [[CreativeSterility although they lack the ability to create truly original works in their own right]].
** There is speculation, in-universe, that unicorns share a closer relationship with they fey than other pony tribes do, due to the fact that cold iron, which hurts and repels fey creatures, also disrupts and impedes unicorn magic. Theories presented in-universe include unicorns being descended from pony/fey hybrids, or from ponies who managed to steal the fey's magic.
10th Aug '17 11:35:40 AM DarkPhoenix94
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* Creator/KieronGillen seems to be going for this in his run of ''ComicBook/IronMan''. Malekith the Accursed calls TheWildHunt on Tony Stark solely because he calls himself "Iron Man" and elves hate anything associated with iron since it's one of their few weaknesses. Gillen has stated that he wants the elves to come across as alien in mindset as anything Tony has encountered in outer space.

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* Creator/KieronGillen seems to be going for this in his run of ''ComicBook/IronMan''. Malekith the Accursed calls TheWildHunt on Tony Stark solely pretty much entirely because he calls himself "Iron Man" and elves hate anything associated with iron since it's one of their few weaknesses. It should be noted one of the Mandarin's Rings wanted him to go after Tony as part of the rings' scheme and was set to mentally manipulate him into doing so, as the other rings had been doing to other wielders [[EvilerThanThou (It backfired horribly)]], but Malekith went along with it anyway, apparently for the hell of it. Gillen has stated that he wants the elves to come across as alien in mindset as anything Tony has encountered in outer space.space.
** It also led to a profoundly satisfying moment or two when Malekith unwisely provokes Tony with a changeling crack or two (Tony had recently discovered that he was adopted), and gloats about [[EatsBabies the sort of things the Elves did with the stolen infants]], leading to Tony [[UnstoppableRage snapping carving a bloody trail through Svartalfheim]] [[TranquilFury without once raising his voice]], using a suit armed with cold iron weapons and, notably, iron filings and fans to cause carnage and hunting down Malekith personally - and Malekith, who it should be noted is someone who actively enjoys pissing off ''Thor'', admits that Tony on the rampage genuinely frightened him.
3rd Aug '17 11:08:05 PM NOYB
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** In the mid-season finale of the third season, we hear of a character known as The Black Fairy, a fairy who was banished years ago for practicing dark magic. [[spoiler: When she finally appears in season six, she manages to [[ParentalAbandonment abandon her own child]],[[InvasionOfTheBabySnatchers steal her own infant grandson]] to raise him away from his parents in a dark dimension where time works differently, turn him into an evil sorcerer, and hospitalize The Blue Fairy, leader of Storybrooke's good fairies. And all of that ''within two episodes'', with only three characters knowing she's even around. Uh oh.]]

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** In the mid-season finale of the third season, we hear of a character known as The Black Fairy, a fairy who was banished years ago for practicing dark magic. [[spoiler: When she finally appears in season six, Season Six, she manages to [[ParentalAbandonment abandon her own child]],[[InvasionOfTheBabySnatchers child]], [[InvasionOfTheBabySnatchers steal her own infant grandson]] to raise him away from his parents in a dark dimension where time works differently, turn him into an evil sorcerer, and hospitalize The Blue Fairy, leader of Storybrooke's good fairies. And all of that ''within two episodes'', with only three characters knowing she's even around. Uh oh.]]
3rd Aug '17 10:53:22 PM NOYB
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* ''Literature/TheWanderingInn'':The annoying little vicious faeries hate Cold Iron and go as far as calling an avalanche to punish whoever dares to show them disrespect.

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* ''Literature/TheWanderingInn'':The ''Literature/TheWanderingInn'': The annoying little vicious faeries hate Cold Iron and go as far as calling an avalanche to punish whoever dares to show them disrespect.
3rd Aug '17 10:51:54 PM NOYB
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* ''Literature/TheLaundryFiles'' brings its own take on the subject in ''The Nightmare Stacks.'' Elves are a HumanSubspecies (that is, of the genus ''homo''; further from ''sapiens'' than ''neanderthalensis'') that diverged half a million years ago in an AlternateUniverse. The most notable divergence, aside from the pointy ears, is the way they discovered magic long before they developed speech. They've since developed into species of sociopathic PlanetLooters of alternate Earths, because while humans are adapted for speech, tool usage, and teamwork, elves are adapted for magic and ''predation''.

to:

* ''Literature/TheLaundryFiles'' brings its own take on the subject in ''The Nightmare Stacks.'' Elves are a HumanSubspecies (that is, of the genus ''homo''; further from ''sapiens'' than ''neanderthalensis'') that diverged half a million years ago in an AlternateUniverse. The most notable divergence, aside from the pointy ears, is the way they discovered magic long before they developed speech. They've since developed into a species of sociopathic PlanetLooters of alternate Earths, because while humans are adapted for speech, tool usage, and teamwork, elves are adapted for magic and ''predation''.
3rd Aug '17 10:46:17 PM NOYB
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** The "Lingerers" as described in ''Morgoth's Ring'', elven spirits are so powerful that their body can't quit hold it and it burns their body away leaving them in a shadowy form. The "Unbodied" are elves that actually died and refused to obey Mandos' summons. Some of these had actually worked for Morgoth. These are the one's to fear while Lingerers are generally nice if strange and unpredictable. These perhaps correspond to the Seelie and the Unseelie.

to:

** The "Lingerers" as described in ''Morgoth's Ring'', elven spirits are so powerful that their body can't quit hold it and it burns their body away leaving them in a shadowy form. The "Unbodied" are elves that actually died and refused to obey Mandos' Mandos's summons. Some of these had actually worked for Morgoth. These are the one's ones to fear while Lingerers are generally nice if strange and unpredictable. These perhaps correspond to the Seelie and the Unseelie.
3rd Aug '17 10:45:40 PM NOYB
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** ''Literature/TheBookOfLostTales'' has a closer connection to the fair folk, as the first presentation of Melian describes her as a "fay", and the link between Lúthien and hemlocks (a rather poisonous plant associated with witchcraft, for instance in Theatre/{{Macbeth}}) persists all the way to {{the Lord of the Rings}}. In the [[Literature/TheSilmarillion Tale of Beren and Lúthien]], the area between Sauron's fortress and Thingol's realm is the battleground for a gigantic WizardDuel between Melien (Thingol's wife) and Sauron. In that place Sauron's evil spells cause part of the nastiness but Melian's spells tend to keep anyone out Thingol doesn't want in his realm, even allies. They appear like Fair Folk because of UnfriendlyFire rather than from pleasure for tormenting mortals.

to:

** ''Literature/TheBookOfLostTales'' has a closer connection to the fair folk, as the first presentation of Melian describes her as a "fay", and the link between Lúthien and hemlocks (a rather poisonous plant associated with witchcraft, for instance in Theatre/{{Macbeth}}) persists all the way to {{the ''{{The Lord of the Rings}}. Rings}}''. In the [[Literature/TheSilmarillion ''[[Literature/TheSilmarillion The Tale of Beren and Lúthien]], Lúthien]]'', the area between Sauron's fortress and Thingol's realm is the battleground for a gigantic WizardDuel between Melien (Thingol's wife) and Sauron. In that place Sauron's evil spells cause part of the nastiness but Melian's spells tend to keep anyone out Thingol doesn't want in his realm, even allies. They appear like Fair Folk because of UnfriendlyFire rather than from pleasure for tormenting mortals.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheFairFolk