History Main / StrawVulcan

16th Apr '18 4:16:05 PM BreadBull
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* In general, Straw Vulcans will often act as TheCynic and consider [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids the more idealistic choice as illogical and improbable]], even though there's no direct logical connection between logic and pessimism. While many logicians are human and can be driven cynical (especially when they're the OnlySaneMan or are logically justified by a painful life), logic itself does not lean on either side of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism.

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* In general, Straw Vulcans will often act as TheCynic and consider [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids the more idealistic choice as illogical and improbable]], even though there's no direct logical connection between logic and pessimism. While many logicians are human and being logical can be driven sometimes come off as pessimistic or cynical (especially when they're the OnlySaneMan or are logically justified by - such as pointing out how crying isn't going to help a painful life), situation (because it usually really doesn't) - logic itself does not lean on either side of the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism.
16th Apr '18 4:09:58 PM BreadBull
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*** In the same film, Spock argues that Kirk accepting promotion is illogical ("a waste of material") because he makes a better starship captain than an admiral. In most scenarios, choosing to do what one loves over accepting a higher rank is presented as the "emotional" response.



* Happened more than once in ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'', with Spock.
** In "The Galileo Seven", we're shown Spock's first command, as the shuttle he is in charge of crashes on a desolate planet filled with savage aliens. Spock determines that a display of superior force will logically frighten away these aliens while the crew make repairs to the shuttle. Instead, as [[TheMcCoy Dr. McCoy]] points out, the aliens have an emotional reaction and become angry and attack, something Spock did not anticipate. In the end, Spock's desperate act of igniting the fuel from the shuttle to create a beacon proves to be the correct action since it gets the attention of the Enterprise and allows for a rescue. When called on this "emotional" act, Spock replies that the only logical course of action in that instance was one of desperation. The most irritating part of their razzing on him about it was that, even by the narrow definition of "logic" in said episode, that was in fact the most logical choice. The two options were drift and conserve fuel for as long as possible despite a remote chance of being seen and found ultimately and dying anyway, or ignite the fuel source, which might lead to a quicker death from lack of power but would far increase visibility and the chances of being found. The latter of the two choices is smugly called "emotional" despite still being perfectly logical. The part with the aliens doesn't really make sense either. Everyone, including Spock himself, comes down ''hard'' on him when his plan doesn't work, but what did he do that was so wrong? He wanted the aliens to leave them alone and hoped to avoid unnecessary bloodshed in the process. The aliens were enraged rather than frightened, and quickly renewed their attack, but no one could have ''known'' that would happen. He made a ''mistake''; it happens.
** Happens straight in the second Pilot. [[SmartPeoplePlayChess Spock and Kirk play 3D chess]]. Spock is about to win, but Kirk makes an "illogical move" and wins. It'd perhaps be more accurate though to say Kirk used ConfusionFu and made an ''unexpected'' move.
** However, the trope is notably averted at the end of the [[Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan second film]], when Spock makes a HeroicSacrifice on the basis that he alone can survive the radiation exposure long enough to make needed repairs to the warp core, under the premise that "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few or the one." In the same film, Spock argues that Kirk accepting promotion is illogical ("a waste of material") because he makes a better starship captain than an admiral. In most scenarios, choosing to do what one loves over accepting a higher rank is presented as the "emotional" response.
** Averted in "Space Seed", where we see fairly clearly from early on the episode that Kirk, Scotty, and (worst of all) Marla [=McGivers=] are looking at Khan through various sorts of romanticized shades, reading things into him that were never really there and deceiving themselves about who and what he really is. Spock, on the other hand, clearly recognizes that Khan is, fundamentally, just a mass murderer and a power-hungry egotistical thug who escaped from the catastrophe he helped create and is now potentially dangerous.
** Averted in "The City On the Edge of Forever" and "Where No Man Has Gone Before". In the first, Spock's cold, clear-eyed logic reveals to him what the choices before Kirk and himself in the time-trip into the 1930s are, and that Kirk's love for Edith Keeler is beside the point of those choices. He is not unsympathetic, as we see in his quiet words: "He knows, Doctor." after Kirk prevents [=McCoy=] from saving Edith. In WNMHGB, Spock analyzes the necessary implications of the changes in Kirk's then-best-friend Gary Mitchell, and the trend of where those changes are taking Mitchell, and knows that there is no way out: either Mitchell dies or catastrophe follows, and subsequent events prove him right-Kirk very nearly does wait too long out of sentiment, even after Mitchell ''himself'' affirms that Spock is right. In both cases, cold logic is revealing a painful truth that emotion and sentiment can cloud but not change.
** Also subverted in "A Piece of the Action".

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* ''Series/StarTrek'':
**
Happened more than once in ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'', with Spock.
** *** In "The Galileo Seven", we're shown Spock's first command, as the shuttle he is in charge of crashes on a desolate planet filled with savage aliens. Spock determines that a display of superior force will logically frighten away these aliens while the crew make repairs to the shuttle. Instead, as [[TheMcCoy Dr. McCoy]] points out, the aliens have an emotional reaction and become angry and attack, something Spock did not anticipate. In the end, Spock's desperate act of igniting the fuel from the shuttle to create a beacon proves to be the correct action since it gets the attention of the Enterprise and allows for a rescue. When called on this "emotional" act, Spock replies that the only logical course of action in that instance was one of desperation. The most irritating part of their razzing on him about it was that, even by the narrow definition of "logic" in said episode, that was in fact the most logical choice. The two options were drift and conserve fuel for as long as possible despite a remote chance of being seen and found ultimately and dying anyway, or ignite the fuel source, which might lead to a quicker death from lack of power but would far increase visibility and the chances of being found. The latter of the two choices is smugly called "emotional" despite still being perfectly logical. The part with the aliens doesn't really make sense either. Everyone, including Spock himself, comes down ''hard'' on him when his plan doesn't work, but what did he do that was so wrong? He wanted the aliens to leave them alone and hoped to avoid unnecessary bloodshed in the process. The aliens were enraged rather than frightened, and quickly renewed their attack, but no one could have ''known'' that would happen. He made a ''mistake''; it happens.
** *** Happens straight in the second Pilot. [[SmartPeoplePlayChess Spock and Kirk play 3D chess]]. Spock is about to win, but Kirk makes an "illogical move" and wins. It'd perhaps be more accurate though to say Kirk used ConfusionFu and made an ''unexpected'' move.
** However, the trope is notably averted at the end of the [[Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan second film]], when Spock makes a HeroicSacrifice on the basis that he alone can survive the radiation exposure long enough to make needed repairs to the warp core, under the premise that "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few or the one." In the same film, Spock argues that Kirk accepting promotion is illogical ("a waste of material") because he makes a better starship captain than an admiral. In most scenarios, choosing to do what one loves over accepting a higher rank is presented as the "emotional" response.
**
*** Averted in "Space Seed", where we see fairly clearly from early on the episode that Kirk, Scotty, and (worst of all) Marla [=McGivers=] are looking at Khan through various sorts of romanticized shades, reading things into him that were never really there and deceiving themselves about who and what he really is. Spock, on the other hand, clearly recognizes that Khan is, fundamentally, just a mass murderer and a power-hungry egotistical thug who escaped from the catastrophe he helped create and is now potentially dangerous.
** *** Averted in "The City On the Edge of Forever" and "Where No Man Has Gone Before". In the first, Spock's cold, clear-eyed logic reveals to him what the choices before Kirk and himself in the time-trip into the 1930s are, and that Kirk's love for Edith Keeler is beside the point of those choices. He is not unsympathetic, as we see in his quiet words: "He knows, Doctor." after Kirk prevents [=McCoy=] from saving Edith. In WNMHGB, Spock analyzes the necessary implications of the changes in Kirk's then-best-friend Gary Mitchell, and the trend of where those changes are taking Mitchell, and knows that there is no way out: either Mitchell dies or catastrophe follows, and subsequent events prove him right-Kirk very nearly does wait too long out of sentiment, even after Mitchell ''himself'' affirms that Spock is right. In both cases, cold logic is revealing a painful truth that emotion and sentiment can cloud but not change.
** *** Also subverted in "A Piece of the Action".



** Averted in "Court Martial", when the ship's computer's records make it appear as though Kirk murdered another officer. Despite not being able to find any evidence of malfunctioning in the computer, Spock steadfastly maintains his confidence in Kirk's innocence, and is ultimately proven right. Spock knows from extensive personal experience that Kirk is a noble man who is consistently able to keep his cool in life-or-death situations; in his view, believing that Kirk killed someone out of panic or spite is as illogical as expecting a hammer not to fall when dropped.
** Subverted ''and'' inverted in an episode of ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]''; Sarkona, a Vulcan, joins the Maquis because she agrees with their position and believes their rather crude and barbaric actions to achieve "peace" to be logical... but she's called out by ''Quark'', locked in the brig with her after her plans are exposed, noting that, as the Federation had caught the Cardassians (the Maquis' enemies) red-handed supplying their people with weapons to fight against the Maquis, sitting down with them and hammering out an arrangement would bring the peace in better and "at a bargain price" compared to continuing the fight.
** In another episode from ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'', Captain Solok has been hassling Benjamin Sisko across the known galaxy for the past two decades, all in the name of proving that emotional, illogical humans (like Sisko) are inferior to emotionless, logical Vulcans (like himself). Somewhat subverted by the end of the episode, when the Deep Space Nine crew successfully goad Solok into losing his temper, and it's generally implied that Solok is by no means representative of Vulcans, and [[FantasticRacism is really just kind of a jerk.]]
** In one episode of ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration The Next Generation]]'', Troi beats Data at chess. She then explains to him that chess isn't just a game of logic, but also intuition. As the Nitpicker's Guide puts it, "Try playing 'intuitive' chess against a computer and you'll lose in no time flat" (and then suggests that perhaps she had his DifficultyLevel set to "below novice"). Shown for laughs in [[http://xkcd.com/232/ xkcd 232]]. Great chess masters can play via intuition (and indeed, when playing speed chess, it's a necessity), however, intuition when playing a game such as chess is merely the player's experience in playing the game allowing them to make strong plays without thinking too much. Ultimately, that intuition comes FROM logic, as the player has enough experience to recognize generally favorable moves and positions on sight. The Troi example is particularly egregious because she really just reverses the correct terms. Her move was unintuitive, but was entirely logical because it immediately led to victory.
** In early episodes of both ''The Original Series'' and ''The Next Generation'', humans who have uploaded their minds into android bodies discover that they have lost some ineffable, illogical, ''human'' quality in the transfer. Despairing at this loss, they choose to terminate their existence -- a strangely emotional reaction for [[TinMan beings which now supposedly have none]]. Ironically, this is referenced and deconstructed by ''Data'', of all people, in the episode of ''The Measure of a Man''; a scientist wants to disassemble him and dump his memory into a computer so he could study him and learn how to create more like him, and Data refuses, fully believing in that same ineffable quality to memory and believing he, himself would lose it in the transfer, despite ''himself being an android''. In an attempt to explain this, he compares it to how learning how to play poker from a book isn't the same as actually playing the game, in person, implying that the "ineffable quality" being lost is the personal importance and significance of those experiences, the context which makes the event special for that individual, which -- when read out of that context as a mere descriptive text readout -- cannot be fully understood or appreciated -- an actually logical argument when you think about it.
*** This is also the episode in which Data claims to have "read and absorbed every treatise and textbook on the subject" of poker, but was completely surprised by the existence of bluffing. What kind of poker textbook doesn't discuss bluffing?

to:

** *** Averted in "Court Martial", when the ship's computer's records make it appear as though Kirk murdered another officer. Despite not being able to find any evidence of malfunctioning in the computer, Spock steadfastly maintains his confidence in Kirk's innocence, and is ultimately proven right. Spock knows from extensive personal experience that Kirk is a noble man who is consistently able to keep his cool in life-or-death situations; in his view, believing that Kirk killed someone out of panic or spite is as illogical as expecting a hammer not to fall when dropped.
** Subverted ''and'' inverted in an episode of ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]''; Sarkona, a Vulcan, joins the Maquis because she agrees with their position and believes their rather crude and barbaric actions to achieve "peace" to be logical... but she's called out by ''Quark'', locked in the brig with her after her plans are exposed, noting that, as the Federation had caught the Cardassians (the Maquis' enemies) red-handed supplying their people with weapons to fight against the Maquis, sitting down with them and hammering out an arrangement would bring the peace in better and "at a bargain price" compared to continuing the fight.
** In another episode from ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'', Captain Solok has been hassling Benjamin Sisko across the known galaxy for the past two decades, all in the name of proving that emotional, illogical humans (like Sisko) are inferior to emotionless, logical Vulcans (like himself). Somewhat subverted by the end of the episode, when the Deep Space Nine crew successfully goad Solok into losing his temper, and it's generally implied that Solok is by no means representative of Vulcans, and [[FantasticRacism is really just kind of a jerk.]]
** In one episode of ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration The Next Generation]]'', Troi beats Data at chess. She then explains to him that chess isn't just a game of logic, but also intuition. As the Nitpicker's Guide puts it, "Try playing 'intuitive' chess against a computer and you'll lose in no time flat" (and then suggests that perhaps she had his DifficultyLevel set to "below novice"). Shown for laughs in [[http://xkcd.com/232/ xkcd 232]]. Great chess masters can play via intuition (and indeed, when playing speed chess, it's a necessity), however, intuition when playing a game such as chess is merely the player's experience in playing the game allowing them to make strong plays without thinking too much. Ultimately, that intuition comes FROM logic, as the player has enough experience to recognize generally favorable moves and positions on sight. The Troi example is particularly egregious because she really just reverses the correct terms. Her move was unintuitive, but was entirely logical because it immediately led to victory.
** In early episodes of both ''The Original Series'' and ''The Next Generation'', humans who have uploaded their minds into android bodies discover that they have lost some ineffable, illogical, ''human'' quality in the transfer. Despairing at this loss, they choose to terminate their existence -- a strangely emotional reaction for [[TinMan beings which now supposedly have none]]. Ironically, this is referenced and deconstructed by ''Data'', of all people, in the episode of ''The Measure of a Man''; a scientist wants to disassemble him and dump his memory into a computer so he could study him and learn how to create more like him, and Data refuses, fully believing in that same ineffable quality to memory and believing he, himself would lose it in the transfer, despite ''himself being an android''. In an attempt to explain this, he compares it to how learning how to play poker from a book isn't the same as actually playing the game, in person, implying that the "ineffable quality" being lost is the personal importance and significance of those experiences, the context which makes the event special for that individual, which -- when read out of that context as a mere descriptive text readout -- cannot be fully understood or appreciated -- an actually logical argument when you think about it.
*** This is also the episode in which Data claims to have "read and absorbed every treatise and textbook on the subject" of poker, but was completely surprised by the existence of bluffing. What kind of poker textbook doesn't discuss bluffing?
dropped.



** ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration The Next Generation]]'':
*** In early episodes of both ''The Original Series'' and ''The Next Generation'', humans who have uploaded their minds into android bodies discover that they have lost some ineffable, illogical, ''human'' quality in the transfer. Despairing at this loss, they choose to terminate their existence -- a strangely emotional reaction for [[TinMan beings which now supposedly have none]]. Ironically, this is referenced and deconstructed by ''Data'', of all people, in the episode of ''The Measure of a Man''; a scientist wants to disassemble him and dump his memory into a computer so he could study him and learn how to create more like him, and Data refuses, fully believing in that same ineffable quality to memory and believing he, himself would lose it in the transfer, despite ''himself being an android''. In an attempt to explain this, he compares it to how learning how to play poker from a book isn't the same as actually playing the game, in person, implying that the "ineffable quality" being lost is the personal importance and significance of those experiences, the context which makes the event special for that individual, which -- when read out of that context as a mere descriptive text readout -- cannot be fully understood or appreciated -- an actually logical argument when you think about it.
**** This is also the episode in which Data claims to have "read and absorbed every treatise and textbook on the subject" of poker, but was completely surprised by the existence of bluffing. What kind of poker textbook doesn't discuss bluffing?
*** Troi beats Data at chess. She then explains to him that chess isn't just a game of logic, but also intuition. As the Nitpicker's Guide puts it, "Try playing 'intuitive' chess against a computer and you'll lose in no time flat" (and then suggests that perhaps she had his DifficultyLevel set to "below novice"). Shown for laughs in [[http://xkcd.com/232/ xkcd 232]]. Great chess masters can play via intuition (and indeed, when playing speed chess, it's a necessity), however, intuition when playing a game such as chess is merely the player's experience in playing the game allowing them to make strong plays without thinking too much. Ultimately, that intuition comes FROM logic, as the player has enough experience to recognize generally favorable moves and positions on sight. The Troi example is particularly egregious because she really just reverses the correct terms. Her move was unintuitive, but was entirely logical because it immediately led to victory.
** ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'':
*** In an episode of ''''; Sarkona, a Vulcan, joins the Maquis because she agrees with their position and believes their rather crude and barbaric actions to achieve "peace" to be logical... but she's called out by ''Quark'', locked in the brig with her after her plans are exposed, noting that, as the Federation had caught the Cardassians (the Maquis' enemies) red-handed supplying their people with weapons to fight against the Maquis, sitting down with them and hammering out an arrangement would bring the peace in better and "at a bargain price" compared to continuing the fight.
*** In another episode , Captain Solok has been hassling Benjamin Sisko across the known galaxy for the past two decades, all in the name of proving that emotional, illogical humans (like Sisko) are inferior to emotionless, logical Vulcans (like himself). Somewhat subverted by the end of the episode, when the Deep Space Nine crew successfully goad Solok into losing his temper, and it's generally implied that Solok is by no means representative of Vulcans, and [[FantasticRacism is really just kind of a jerk.]]



*** In one episode of Voyager Tuvok is being impersonated, and when he encounters the impostor, they are at a standoff.
---->'''Impostor Tuvok:''' Logic would dictate that neither of us is at an advantage.\\
'''Tuvok:''' [[PreAssKickingOneLiner Your logic is flawed.]] ''[[[CombatPragmatist shines a light in his eyes]]]''
3rd Apr '18 4:40:39 PM marcoasalazarm
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* Albert in ''WesternAnimation/TwasTheNightBeforeChristmas'' is a [[InsufferableGenius genius]] [[MouseWorld mouse]][[TheSpock kid]] who repeatedly expresses disbelief in Santa, and refuses to think with his heart.

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* Albert in ''WesternAnimation/TwasTheNightBeforeChristmas'' is a [[InsufferableGenius genius]] [[MouseWorld mouse]][[TheSpock kid]] who repeatedly expresses disbelief in Santa, and refuses to think with his heart. Even when Santa is literally real, with an actual postal address on the South Pole and everything. Every single fact he says about how he doesn't believes in Santa is InstantlyProvenWrong (for example, he states it as a hard-core fact that grown-ups don't believe in Santa, when not a single adult in the whole film acts that way and even go a long distance in trying to make things right). The calamity of the story happens because he decides to send a letter to Santa where he says he isn't real and he stupidly signs it "all of us" -- meaning Santa believes that ''all of the people in town'' told him to get lost and ''nearly'' decides not to give them presents.
3rd Apr '18 3:48:59 PM GlitterCat
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* Albert in ''WesternAnimation/TwasTheNightBeforeChristmas'' is a [[InsufferableGenius genius]] [[MouseWorld mouse]][[TheShortKidWithGlasses kid]] who repeatedly expresses disbelief in Santa, and refuses to think with his heart.

to:

* Albert in ''WesternAnimation/TwasTheNightBeforeChristmas'' is a [[InsufferableGenius genius]] [[MouseWorld mouse]][[TheShortKidWithGlasses mouse]][[TheSpock kid]] who repeatedly expresses disbelief in Santa, and refuses to think with his heart.
3rd Apr '18 3:48:08 PM GlitterCat
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* Albert in ''WesternAnimation/TwasTheNightBeforeChristmas'' is a [[InsufferableGenius genius]] [[MouseWorld mouse]][[TheShortKidWithGlasses kid]] who repeatedly expresses disbelief in Santa, and refuses to think with his heart.
22nd Feb '18 4:17:22 PM BreadBull
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** Happens straight in the second Pilot. [[SmartPeoplePlayChess Spock and Kirk play 3D chess]]. Spock is about to win, Kirk makes an "illogical move" and wins. So what ''is'' illogical about making the necessary move to win? Sacrificing pieces? Except that's a valid and basic tactic of chess to begin with!

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** Happens straight in the second Pilot. [[SmartPeoplePlayChess Spock and Kirk play 3D chess]]. Spock is about to win, but Kirk makes an "illogical move" and wins. So what ''is'' illogical about making the necessary move It'd perhaps be more accurate though to win? Sacrificing pieces? Except that's a valid say Kirk used ConfusionFu and basic tactic of chess to begin with!made an ''unexpected'' move.
19th Jan '18 9:13:12 PM JackG
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* Averted in ''Series/{{Quark}}'', a parody of ''Star Trek''. A RunningGag involves Quark trying to argue with [[TheSpock Ficus]] that HumansAreSuperior due to their emotions. Ficus always ends up pointing out how Quark's reasoning is InsaneTrollLogic.
17th Jan '18 6:57:19 PM ading
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** Averted ''painfully'' in "The City On the Edge of Forever" and "Where No Man Has Gone Before". In the first Spock's cold, clear-eyed logic reveals to him what the choices before Kirk and himself in the time-trip into the 1930s are, and that Kirk's love for Edith Keeler is beside the point of those choices. He is not unsympathetic, as we see in his quiet words: "He knows, Doctor." after Kirk prevents [=McCoy=] from saving Edith. In WNMHGB, Spock analyzes the necessary implications of the changes in Kirk's then-best-friend Gary Mitchell, and the trend of where those changes are taking Mitchell, and knows that there is no way out, either Mitchell dies or catastrophe follows, and subsequent events prove him right-Kirk very nearly does wait too long out of sentiment, even after Mitchell ''himself'' affirms that Spock is right. In both cases, cold logic is revealing a painful truth that emotion and sentiment can cloud but not change.

to:

** Averted ''painfully'' in "The City On the Edge of Forever" and "Where No Man Has Gone Before". In the first first, Spock's cold, clear-eyed logic reveals to him what the choices before Kirk and himself in the time-trip into the 1930s are, and that Kirk's love for Edith Keeler is beside the point of those choices. He is not unsympathetic, as we see in his quiet words: "He knows, Doctor." after Kirk prevents [=McCoy=] from saving Edith. In WNMHGB, Spock analyzes the necessary implications of the changes in Kirk's then-best-friend Gary Mitchell, and the trend of where those changes are taking Mitchell, and knows that there is no way out, out: either Mitchell dies or catastrophe follows, and subsequent events prove him right-Kirk very nearly does wait too long out of sentiment, even after Mitchell ''himself'' affirms that Spock is right. In both cases, cold logic is revealing a painful truth that emotion and sentiment can cloud but not change.


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** Averted in "Court Martial", when the ship's computer's records make it appear as though Kirk murdered another officer. Despite not being able to find any evidence of malfunctioning in the computer, Spock steadfastly maintains his confidence in Kirk's innocence, and is ultimately proven right. Spock knows from extensive personal experience that Kirk is a noble man who is consistently able to keep his cool in life-or-death situations; in his view, believing that Kirk killed someone out of panic or spite is as illogical as expecting a hammer not to fall when dropped.
10th Jan '18 1:40:51 PM WillKeaton
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* Possible example in Creator/EECummings's poem ''[[http://www.des.emory.edu/mfp/feeling.html since feeling is first]]'', although it doesn't say logic is wrong per se, simply that it's less important than love.

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* Possible example in Creator/EECummings's poem ''[[http://www.des.emory.edu/mfp/feeling.html since feeling is first]]'', first,]]'' although it doesn't say logic is wrong per se, simply that it's less important than love.
20th Nov '17 1:18:22 AM LinAGKar
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* The Straw Vulcan is an intellectual ArrogantKungFuGuy. If, for example, his calculations showcase that there is a 98.99% chance of success in a plan and another scientist proves that there is a 100% chance of success in the same plan (and they both reach the same conclusions using the same data and using the same calculation methods, but the Straw Vulcan is not discovered until later that he forgot to CarryTheOne), the Straw Vulcan will simply clamp down on that 2.1% chance of failure as an ''absolute'' probability of failure and drag his feet into helping as a result (at best) rather than admit the infinitesimally small chance that he's wrong .

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* The Straw Vulcan is an intellectual ArrogantKungFuGuy. If, for example, his calculations showcase that there is a 98.99% chance of success in a plan and another scientist proves that there is a 100% chance of success in the same plan (and they both reach the same conclusions using the same data and using the same calculation methods, but the Straw Vulcan is not discovered until later that he forgot to CarryTheOne), the Straw Vulcan will simply clamp down on that 2.1% 1.01% chance of failure as an ''absolute'' probability of failure and drag his feet into helping as a result (at best) rather than admit the infinitesimally small chance that he's wrong .
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