History Main / SpiritedYoungLady

22nd Aug '16 7:34:19 AM XFllo
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* Diane Chambers from ''Series/{{Cheers}}'' is a "modern-day" (during TheEighties, when it first aired) example of this trope--while she as a rule retains the classic characteristics: spirited and at times quite feisty, Diane is nonetheless typically well-mannered, proper, and ''very'' ladylike. Ironically enough, she is actually on the ''opposite'' end of the typical female "pairing" described at the top of the page, as the show's other female regular (her [[FriendlyEnemies Friendly Enemy]]) is TheLadette [[TomboyAndGirlyGirl and relative tomboy]] Carla Tortelli.



* Katherine Pierce/Katerina Petrova from ''Series/TheVampireDiaries'' is an example of this both in the books and the series. Charming and intelligent, yet conniving, outspoken, and bold, she's not a lady you want to mess with.
21st Aug '16 10:27:14 AM nombretomado
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%% * In ''TheDreamer'', Beatrice Whaley's 18th century counterpart.

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%% * In ''TheDreamer'', ''Webcomic/TheDreamer'', Beatrice Whaley's 18th century counterpart.
25th Jul '16 3:46:47 AM XFllo
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* Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/{{Chalion}}'' series:
** Royesse Iselle from ''Literature/TheCurseOfChalion''. Though a royesse is technically a princess, Iselle fits the description on this page. (There's probably a reason for this, since Ms. Bujold is a known fan of Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen.) She would never do anything so improper and counterproductive (in her situation) as running away to become an Action Girl. [[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething Chalion needs her and her tactical brain right where they are,]] so instead she attempts to thwart the EvilChancellor's plans and lift the [[HereditaryCurse royal family's curse]] by more Proper means, specifically [[spoiler:arranging her own [[ArrangedMarriage marriage]] to a neighboring prince she's never seen. It only partly works. [[PerfectlyArrangedMarriage But at least they like each other.]]]]
** In ''Literature/PaladinOfSouls'', Cattilara is a slight subversion in that she ''does'' need a man to give her life purpose. Specifically, she needs her husband Arhys to give her life purpose. This also makes her a villainous example (or at least an anti-villain example) of the trope when her determination to keep Arhys as her husband rises to WellIntentionedExtremist levels [[spoiler:after he is killed.]]

to:

* Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/{{Chalion}}'' series:
**
series: Royesse Iselle from ''Literature/TheCurseOfChalion''. Though a royesse is technically a princess, Iselle fits the description on this page. (There's probably a reason for this, since Ms. Bujold is a known fan of Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen.) She would never do anything so improper and counterproductive (in her situation) as running away to become an Action Girl. [[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething Chalion needs her and her tactical brain right where they are,]] so instead she attempts to thwart the EvilChancellor's plans and lift the [[HereditaryCurse royal family's curse]] by more Proper means, specifically [[spoiler:arranging her own [[ArrangedMarriage marriage]] to a neighboring prince she's never seen. It only partly works. [[PerfectlyArrangedMarriage But at least they like each other.]]]]
** In ''Literature/PaladinOfSouls'', Cattilara is a slight subversion in that she ''does'' need a man to give her life purpose. Specifically, she needs her husband Arhys to give her life purpose. This also makes her a villainous example (or at least an anti-villain example) of the trope when her determination to keep Arhys as her husband rises to WellIntentionedExtremist levels [[spoiler:after he is killed.]]
]]]]
25th Jul '16 2:17:31 AM PaulA
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* Royesse Iselle from Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's novel ''[[Literature/{{Chalion}} The Curse of Chalion]]''. Though a royesse is technically a princess, Iselle fits the description on this page. (There's probably a reason for this, since Ms. Bujold is a known fan of Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen.) She would never do anything so improper and counterproductive (in her situation) as running away to become an Action Girl. [[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething Chalion needs her and her tactical brain right where they are,]] so instead she attempts to thwart the EvilChancellor's plans and lift the [[HereditaryCurse royal family's curse]] by more Proper means, specifically [[spoiler:arranging her own [[ArrangedMarriage marriage]] to a neighboring prince she's never seen. It only partly works. [[PerfectlyArrangedMarriage But at least they like each other.]]]]
* In ''[[Literature/{{Chalion}} Paladin of Souls]]'', Cattilara is a slight subversion in that she ''does'' need a man to give her life purpose. Specifically, she needs her husband Arhys to give her life purpose. This also makes her a villainous example (or at least an anti-villain example) of the trope when her determination to keep Arhys as her husband rises to WellIntentionedExtremist levels [[spoiler:after he is killed.]]

to:

* Royesse Iselle from Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's novel ''[[Literature/{{Chalion}} The Curse of Chalion]]''.''Literature/{{Chalion}}'' series:
** Royesse Iselle from ''Literature/TheCurseOfChalion''.
Though a royesse is technically a princess, Iselle fits the description on this page. (There's probably a reason for this, since Ms. Bujold is a known fan of Georgette Heyer and Jane Austen.) She would never do anything so improper and counterproductive (in her situation) as running away to become an Action Girl. [[RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething Chalion needs her and her tactical brain right where they are,]] so instead she attempts to thwart the EvilChancellor's plans and lift the [[HereditaryCurse royal family's curse]] by more Proper means, specifically [[spoiler:arranging her own [[ArrangedMarriage marriage]] to a neighboring prince she's never seen. It only partly works. [[PerfectlyArrangedMarriage But at least they like each other.]]]]
* ** In ''[[Literature/{{Chalion}} Paladin of Souls]]'', ''Literature/PaladinOfSouls'', Cattilara is a slight subversion in that she ''does'' need a man to give her life purpose. Specifically, she needs her husband Arhys to give her life purpose. This also makes her a villainous example (or at least an anti-villain example) of the trope when her determination to keep Arhys as her husband rises to WellIntentionedExtremist levels [[spoiler:after he is killed.]]
15th Jul '16 4:52:14 AM XFllo
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* Charlotte Bronte, author of ''Literature/JaneEyre'', who based the protagonist heavily on herself. Her sisters, Emily and Anne were much the same.
11th Jul '16 10:18:20 AM MacedonianKing
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* Charlotte Bronte, author of ''Literature/JaneEyre'', who based the protagonist heavily on herself. Her sisters, Emily and Anne were much the same.
9th May '16 2:03:24 AM XFllo
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** Marrianne Dashwood from ''Literature/SenseAndSensibility'', dashing and lively, described by the narrator as sensible and clever, but too eager in everything she does, both her sorrows and her joys. She is generous, amiable, interesting, but not prudent.
9th May '16 1:37:53 AM XFllo
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* Creator/GeorgetteHeyer used this trope in several books. One example is the protagonist of ''Literature/{{Frederica}}'', who at 24 is running her younger brother's estate and bringing up her younger siblings. As one character notes, "the girl has breeding," and knows how to act in polite society -- but when she's alone with Alverstoke, she peppers her conversations with boxing slang and other decidedly unfeminine references. Some of the tension in the book arises from her trying to flout what she considers stupid rules; for example, when she takes a walk alone with her dog instead of taking a maid with her.
** Sophy in ''Literature/TheGrandSophy'' is another example. She flouts conventions and has spirited quarrels with the bossy head of the house.
** Other examples include Amanda in ''The Sprig Muslin'', Deborah in ''Faro's Daughter'' and Phoebe in ''Sylvester''.

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* Creator/GeorgetteHeyer used this trope in several books. One example is the Creator/GeorgetteHeyer:
** The
protagonist of ''Literature/{{Frederica}}'', who at 24 is running her younger brother's estate and bringing up her younger siblings. As one character notes, "the girl has breeding," breeding", and knows how to act in polite society -- but when she's alone with Alverstoke, she peppers her conversations with boxing slang and other decidedly unfeminine references. Some of the tension in the book arises from her trying to flout what she considers stupid rules; for example, when she takes a walk alone with her dog instead of taking a maid with her.
** Sophy in ''Literature/TheGrandSophy'' is another example.''Literature/TheGrandSophy''. She flouts conventions and has spirited quarrels with the bossy head of the house.
%% ** Other examples include Amanda in ''The Sprig Muslin'', Muslin''
%% **
Deborah in ''Faro's Daughter'' and Daughter''
%% **
Phoebe in ''Sylvester''.''Sylvester''
8th May '16 7:41:28 AM Lin_Mei_Wei
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** Sophy in ''Literature/TheGrandSophy'' is another example. She flouts conventions and has spirited quarrels with the bossy head of the house.
** Other examples include Amanda in ''The Sprig Muslin'', Deborah in ''Faro's Daughter'' and Phoebe in ''Sylvester''.
2nd Apr '16 11:23:24 PM DeathsApprentice
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Added DiffLines:

* Angelica Schuyler Church from ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}'' is definitely a ''lady'', but she's also very intelligent, opinionated, and able to hold her own against Alexander Hamilton. In contrast, her little sister Eliza is more of a ProperLady.
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