History Main / SociopathicHero

16th Jan '17 12:35:12 PM Luppercus
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* ''Manga/DeathNote'' has two examples:
** Mello is a ruthless mafia boss whose methods include kidnapping, extortion, and killing his own men and anyone who gets in his way, but he is technically speaking on the same side as [[SympatheticInspectorAntagonist the detectives.]]
** Near is even more manipulative than L, and treats the case as if it were a game or puzzle and the other people in it merely expendable pawns.
* ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'': [[MadScientist Mayuri Kurotsuchi]] and [[BloodKnight Kenpachi Zaraki]] are sometimes depicted this way but can also veer into the HeroicComedicSociopath trope as well.
* ''Manga/DragonBallZ'' has Vegeta when he was the TokenEvilTeammate.
* ''LightNovel/{{Baccano}}'':
** [[spoiler:Elmer C. Albatross]] is a genuine "essence of pure evil" {{sociopath}} who, thankfully for the world around him, decided that working ForHappiness was more interesting than working ForTheEvulz.
** [[spoiler:Claire Stanfield]] is a bloodthirsty assassin who honestly believes that [[ItsAllAboutme the world revolves around him]], but nonetheless decides to help defend the passengers of the Flying Pussyfoot.



* Griffin (the Invisible Man), Captain Nemo, and Mr. Hyde in ''Comicbook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen''. [[spoiler:Griffin commits a FaceHeelTurn. Hyde does not, and takes Griffin's betrayal... Poorly.]]

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* Griffin (the Invisible Man), Captain Nemo, Man) and Mr. Hyde in ''Comicbook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen''. [[spoiler:Griffin commits a FaceHeelTurn. Hyde does not, and takes Griffin's betrayal... Poorly.]]



* Midnighter of ''ComicBook/TheAuthority'' definitely counts. The whole team can cross into this territory DependingOnTheWriter, but Midnighter is the go-to guy for killing foes en mass and grinning maniacally about it. He has had moments of strange compassion, though, such as the time he changed tactics halfway through getting his ass kicked by Tank Man and instead [[TalkingTheMonsterToDeath talked him into recognising his own self-worth and retiring]]. They became pen pals afterwards!



* ComicBook/{{Huntress}} has killed a lot of people, and has never seemed to feel any guilt about it. Yes, the people she kills are dangerous criminals, and generally deserve to die, but she is never shown feeling any guilt or moral qualms about it.



* [[ComicBook/{{Robin}} Damian Wayne]], biological son of Batman, is this often. Someone once asked him "I like this Mr. Super Spy. How did he survive knowing you?" (Mr.Super Spy is ''Comicbook/{{Grayson}}''.)



* Michael Keaton's Film/{{Batman}} is probably the closest this character has come to appearing as a sociopath on film. He's not ''really'' a sociopath in that he will genuinely care about you [[GoodIsNotNice (though not be sentimental about it)]] ''as long as you're a good guy''. [[AssholeVictim If not]], then he'll have no problem with killing you, sometimes even gleefully.
** It can be argued that he is only as dark towards his enemies as they are towards everyone else and given what his enemies are like...it comes across as necessary.
* Zack Snyder's Batman from ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'' is also an excellent example of this trope, as he has been indiscriminately killing criminals for decades by the time [=BvS=] occurs.

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* Michael Keaton's Film/{{Batman}} is probably the closest this character has come to appearing as a sociopath on film. He's not ''really'' a sociopath in that he will genuinely care about you [[GoodIsNotNice (though not be sentimental about it)]] ''as long as you're a good guy''. [[AssholeVictim If not]], then he'll have no problem with killing you, sometimes even gleefully.
** It can be argued that he is only as dark towards his enemies as they are towards everyone else and given what his enemies are like...it comes across as necessary.
* Zack Snyder's Batman from ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'' is also an excellent example of this trope, as he has been indiscriminately killing criminals for decades by the time [=BvS=] occurs.



* Depending on the actor, Film/JamesBond is a borderline case. Being a 00 agent requires it, in some ways, as one has to kill in cold blood; that is, without the deceased having been any direct, active threat to the agent.
** Daniel Craig's is explicitly intended to play this trope straight, showing no remorse for killing two men, and feeling perfectly justified in breaking into his supervisor's home in the middle of the night. However, he mellows considerably later on, and continues to do so in the sequels, [[spoiler: grieving when M is killed in Skyfall]].



* Ripley in ''Film/AlienResurrection''. This Ripley is extremely cynical and callous, due to partially merging with the Aliens. A doctor theorizes that she has some form of emotional autism. Some examples of her sociopathy are trying to strangle Dr. Wren on a whim, breaking another doctor's arm immediately after she wakes up (in a deleted scene), and looking at another character getting dragged off by the Aliens with curious fascination. The only time she shows any real emotion is when she finds her other clones and incinerates them, and when her "son" (the Newborn) dies.
** She does, however, clearly form an emotional bond with [[RobotGirl Call]], which is shown increasingly clearer at the end of the movie. In fact, said bond between a hybrid human-alien creature and a synthetic, the latter of which is probably the character with the most intact moral compass in the entire film, who cares most about humanity and the threat the Xenomorphs present to it, seems to be part of an Aesop.



* Private Joker from ''Film/FullMetalJacket'' proudly states he joined the Marines for ''the sole purpose'' of killing people and bragging about it. Though his actions throughout the film somewhat contradict this.
* In the Churchill biopic ''Film/IntoTheStorm2009'', we have General "Bomber" Harris, who is the one to suggest and execute the bombing of Dresden and in one scene ''brags about it''.



* Literature/JamesBond shows considerable devotion to MI6, to Britain and to long-time friends like Felix Leiter - but he does fit this trope. To his credit, he is not as relentless as many other examples; a {{Mook}} that can be gotten out of the way non-fatally will generally not be killed 'because it's easier'.
** Partly due to [[CharacterizationMarchesOn Characterization Marching On]], Bond eventually steps out of this role, becoming much less sociopathic and more likable. Some of the short stories in particular, such as "For Your Eyes Only" and "The Hildebrand Rarity" in ''[[Literature/ForYourEyesOnly For Your Eyes Only]]'' and "The Living Daylights" in ''[[Literature/OctopussyAndTheLivingDaylights Octopussy and the Living Daylights]]'', reveal a Bond uncomfortable with targeted assassinations (as opposed to killing in defense of himself and others) and capable of considerable empathy. ''Literature/FromRussiaWithLove'' also has him feeling discomfort when Kerim shoots a fleeing hitman in the back. And in ''Literature/DrNo'', when Bond is forced to shoot the three guards, he feels very uncomfortable doing it, even though said men could have been the Three Blind Mice and were heading off to gang-rape Honey.



* In the 4th, 5th and 6th seasons of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', [[spoiler:the soulless vampire Spike]] plays this role, at first against his will, under the influence of an implanted chip that causes him pain when he attacks something with a soul. Now, his only outlet for his violent predilection is beating up monsters and demons. He sides with the heroes more out of boredom, looking for something to do. Later, he begins to do good for the love of a female character, but only because that's what she would want him to do. His transition to true selflessness occurs without him ever becoming capable of the soulful qualities that distinguish humans from Buffyverse vampires; for that reason, his final act of Season 6 is to seek a real soul.
* In the 5th season of ''Series/{{Angel}}'', [[spoiler:the vampire Harmony]] works for the good guys, but her motivation is her own personal development. She does good because it seems like an interesting thing to do. [[spoiler:In the finale, she turns on Angel, because as a soulless demon, it's just not in her nature to do good. Angel [[GenreSavvy saw this coming]] and made it part of his plan--he even left a Letter of Recommendation for her, since he was going to blow up the firm and wasn't planning on killing her.]]



* Shane in ''Series/TheWalkingDead'' slowly slides into this role. By the second season [[spoiler:when he shoots Otis in the leg and leaves him to be killed by zombies]] he's this fully.



* In the BBC's ''{{Series/Jekyll}}'', "Hyde is love - and love is a psychopath."



* [[GoodIsNotNice Sherlock Holmes]] of ''Series/{{Sherlock}}'' certainly plays with the trope a lot, with Sherlock even referring to himself as a "high-functioning sociopath" on two occasions. He doesn't seem to care at all about the people who bring him his cases, [[ItsAllAboutMe only solves them to keep himself from getting bored]], and is definitely not above [[TheCharmer charming]], [[ConsummateLiar lying to]], and {{manipulati|veBastard}}ng anyone - including his best friend, John - as long as it helps solve the mystery.
** From Season 2 on, it becomes increasingly clear that, although he identifies himself as a "high-functioning sociopath", he really isn't, and Creator/StevenMoffat [[WordOfGod has more or less confirmed it.]] While he is seldom sympathetic, he is occasionally ''empathetic'' (a trait most true sociopaths lack), and genuinely caring about the few people he has allowed into his life; John, Mrs. Hudson, [=LeStrade=], Molly and Mary.
16th Jan '17 11:19:45 AM Prfnoff
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They are {{antihero}}es who have a fundamental LackOfEmpathy, a [[TheSociopath sociopathic]] disregard for their enemies' lives, and possibly a lack of concern for even the people they save. They may be motivated [[ItAmusedMe by boredom]], or by some sort of carrot-and-stick arrangement - [[RestrainingBolt a chip in the head]], [[MoralityChain an attachment to some person or thing that requires them to do good]], or a [[MoralSociopathy pragmatic code that prevents their truly inhuman nature from landing them in jail]].

They may solve their problems in much the [[NotSoDifferent same way as a villain would]]--ruthlessly manipulating and killing their way to their goal. They may routinely torture, murder, and/or commit evil acts nearly as bad as the BigBad. [[TheUnfettered They'll do whatever it takes to win]]. The people they fight beside are shocked with their behavior, but try to tell themselves, "[[GladHesOnOurSide At least they're on our side]]."

Common rationalizations either by the hero himself or on the hero's behalf include AssholeVictim, UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans, or ItsWhatIDo.

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They are {{antihero}}es who have a fundamental LackOfEmpathy, a [[TheSociopath sociopathic]] disregard for their enemies' lives, and possibly a lack of concern for even the people they save. They may be motivated [[ItAmusedMe by boredom]], a [[BloodKnight raw thirst for combat]], or by some sort of carrot-and-stick arrangement - [[RestrainingBolt a chip in the head]], [[MoralityChain an attachment to some person or thing that requires them to do good]], or a [[MoralSociopathy pragmatic code that prevents their truly inhuman nature from landing them in jail]].

jail]].

They may solve their problems in much the [[NotSoDifferent same way as a villain would]]--ruthlessly manipulating and killing their way to their goal. They may routinely torture, murder, and/or commit evil acts nearly as bad as the BigBad. [[TheUnfettered They'll do whatever it takes to win]]. The people they fight beside are shocked with their behavior, but try to tell themselves, "[[GladHesOnOurSide At least they're on our side]]."

" Even that may not be true in the end.

Common rationalizations either by the hero himself or on the hero's behalf include AssholeVictim, UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans, ItsAllAboutMe, or ItsWhatIDo.
10th Jan '17 6:31:47 PM eaterofworlds
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* Any main character in QuentinTarantino's films qualify as this, when they're not portrayed as villain protagonist.
9th Jan '17 3:51:43 PM Jake18
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* Raiden from the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series was a child soldier in Liberia since 1989. He seems to be harmless in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' but in ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'' has him going back to his sociopathic, more psychopathic persona as a major plot point later on. However [[WellIntentionedExtremist Raiden was hell-bent on saving the children from being forced into being killer cyborgs since he wants to prevent them from the same horrific childhood happening to others.]]

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* Raiden from the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series was a child soldier in Liberia since 1989. He seems to be harmless in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' but in ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'' has him going back to his sociopathic, more psychopathic persona as a major plot point later on. However [[WellIntentionedExtremist Raiden was hell-bent on saving the children from being forced into being killer cyborgs since he wants to prevent them from experiencing the same horrific childhood happening to others.he had.]]
17th Dec '16 3:15:08 PM Huthman
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* Warren Hidler and the Blood Order Theriomorphs in ''Literature/TheriomorphChronicles'' is nothing but composed of it. They disturbingly overlap with KidHero, NominalHero and UnscrupulousHero, siding on the [[ALighterShadeOfBlack extreme dark grey]] compared to [[NebulousEvilOrganization Megiddo]] and their [[AlwaysChaoticEvil Theriomorphs]] and [[{{Main/Mooks}} Minions]]
16th Dec '16 7:56:48 PM MagBas
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* To some degree this could be the case of PeterPan, probably much to the surprise of those only familiar with the LighterAndSofter adaptations. Peter spends an awful lot of his time killing off pirates, and often is willing to put his friends in danger simply because it would be interesting or even funny. This is because of the basic nature of his character; being a child forever, he's inherently selfish and often amoral. This is played up a bit in the 2003 film, but most adaptations soften the edges off the character. It is mentioned that during the fights between the Lost Boys and the pirates, if the pirates seem to be at a disadvantage, Peter will join their side to even things out. That's right, he will happily fight and ''kill'' his friends just because it's more of a challenge. Evidently, Lost Boys come and go, and Peter doesn't have any real interest in keeping track of them. Nevertheless Peter Pan is suppose to be a kid, and as such, his conduct can not be considered sociopathic yet, as it takes to be 18 year old at least to be considered sociopath.

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* To some degree this could be the case of * PeterPan, probably much to the surprise of those only familiar with the LighterAndSofter adaptations. Peter spends an awful lot of his time killing off pirates, and often is willing to put his friends in danger simply because it would be interesting or even funny. This is because of the basic nature of his character; being a child forever, he's inherently selfish and often amoral. This is played up a bit in the 2003 film, but most adaptations soften the edges off the character. It is mentioned that during the fights between the Lost Boys and the pirates, if the pirates seem to be at a disadvantage, Peter will join their side to even things out. That's right, he will happily fight and ''kill'' his friends just because it's more of a challenge. Evidently, Lost Boys come and go, and Peter doesn't have any real interest in keeping track of them. Nevertheless Peter Pan is suppose to be a kid, and as such, his conduct can not be considered sociopathic yet, as it takes to be 18 year old at least to be considered sociopath.
16th Dec '16 7:45:23 PM Luppercus
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* To some degree this could be the case of PeterPan, probably much to the surprise of those only familiar with the LighterAndSofter adaptations. Peter spends an awful lot of his time killing off pirates, and often is willing to put his friends in danger simply because it would be interesting or even funny. This is because of the basic nature of his character; being a child forever, he's inherently selfish and often amoral. This is played up a bit in the 2003 film, but most adaptations soften the edges off the character. It is mentioned that during the fights between the Lost Boys and the pirates, if the pirates seem to be at a disadvantage, Peter will join their side to even things out. That's right, he will happily fight and ''kill'' his friends just because it's more of a challenge. Evidently, Lost Boys come and go, and Peter doesn't have any real interest in keeping track of them. Nevertheless most be rememberd that Peter Pan is suppose to be a kid, and as such, his conduct can not be considered sociopathic yet, as it takes to be 18 year old at least to be considered sociopath.

to:

* To some degree this could be the case of PeterPan, probably much to the surprise of those only familiar with the LighterAndSofter adaptations. Peter spends an awful lot of his time killing off pirates, and often is willing to put his friends in danger simply because it would be interesting or even funny. This is because of the basic nature of his character; being a child forever, he's inherently selfish and often amoral. This is played up a bit in the 2003 film, but most adaptations soften the edges off the character. It is mentioned that during the fights between the Lost Boys and the pirates, if the pirates seem to be at a disadvantage, Peter will join their side to even things out. That's right, he will happily fight and ''kill'' his friends just because it's more of a challenge. Evidently, Lost Boys come and go, and Peter doesn't have any real interest in keeping track of them. Nevertheless most be rememberd that Peter Pan is suppose to be a kid, and as such, his conduct can not be considered sociopathic yet, as it takes to be 18 year old at least to be considered sociopath.
16th Dec '16 7:43:07 PM Luppercus
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* PeterPan, probably much to the surprise of those only familiar with the LighterAndSofter adaptations. Peter spends an awful lot of his time killing off pirates, and often is willing to put his friends in danger simply because it would be interesting or even funny. This is because of the basic nature of his character; being a child forever, he's inherently selfish and often amoral. This is played up a bit in the 2003 film, but most adaptations soften the edges off the character.
** It is mentioned that during the fights between the Lost Boys and the pirates, if the pirates seem to be at a disadvantage, Peter will join their side to even things out. That's right, he will happily fight and ''kill'' his friends just because it's more of a challenge. Evidently, Lost Boys come and go, and Peter doesn't have any real interest in keeping track of them.

to:

* To some degree this could be the case of PeterPan, probably much to the surprise of those only familiar with the LighterAndSofter adaptations. Peter spends an awful lot of his time killing off pirates, and often is willing to put his friends in danger simply because it would be interesting or even funny. This is because of the basic nature of his character; being a child forever, he's inherently selfish and often amoral. This is played up a bit in the 2003 film, but most adaptations soften the edges off the character.
**
character. It is mentioned that during the fights between the Lost Boys and the pirates, if the pirates seem to be at a disadvantage, Peter will join their side to even things out. That's right, he will happily fight and ''kill'' his friends just because it's more of a challenge. Evidently, Lost Boys come and go, and Peter doesn't have any real interest in keeping track of them. Nevertheless most be rememberd that Peter Pan is suppose to be a kid, and as such, his conduct can not be considered sociopathic yet, as it takes to be 18 year old at least to be considered sociopath.
16th Dec '16 7:33:29 PM MagBas
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** Disregarding the fact that Peter Pan is a kid, and you have to be at least 18 to be considered sociopathic.
16th Dec '16 3:48:45 PM Luppercus
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** Disregarding the fact that Peter Pan is a kid, and you have to be at least 18 to be considered sociopathic.
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