History Main / SlidingScaleOfVideoGameWorldSizeAndScale

25th Jul '16 1:11:29 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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There's also making a large world but locking most of the doors or simply not allowing players to enter most of the buildings. So you travel the distance it should realistically take to go from one side of a large town to another, but because you can't enter most buildings, the company is spared the problem of having to design their interiors. Plot/gameplay-important buildings are likely to be somehow marked, or otherwise made obvious. Some games - notably, the ''SilentHill'' series - go for a somewhat different approach, in which players can explore realistically-sized buildings but most doors are locked.

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There's also making a large world but locking most of the doors or simply not allowing players to enter most of the buildings. So you travel the distance it should realistically take to go from one side of a large town to another, but because you can't enter most buildings, the company is spared the problem of having to design their interiors. Plot/gameplay-important buildings are likely to be somehow marked, or otherwise made obvious. Some games - notably, the ''SilentHill'' ''Franchise/SilentHill'' series - go for a somewhat different approach, in which players can explore realistically-sized buildings but most doors are locked.



* ''SilentHill'' has many realistically-sized environments that you mostly travel to entirely in real-time rather than reaching them via cutscene, and uses the "locked doors" approach.

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* ''SilentHill'' ''Franchise/SilentHill'' has many realistically-sized environments that you mostly travel to entirely in real-time rather than reaching them via cutscene, and uses the "locked doors" approach.
24th Jul '16 12:50:27 PM TheNicestGuy
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* ''VideoGame/ProjectZomboid'' takes place on an ''enormous'' [[IsometricProjection isometric]] map covering the real-world towns of West Point and Muldraugh, Kentucky. The scale is totally realistic, overall, with one map tile being about one meter. ([[https://pzwiki.net/wiki/File:Pzmap-comparison.jpg Here's a comparison.]] Note that the game image here is from an outside utility. In-game, the player only ever sees their surroundings on a personal scale.) There are hundreds, maybe thousands of buildings of all sorts, of realistic dimensions and placement, all breachable and all furnished and stocked inside exactly as you'd expect them. (There's even some variety, since you'll find the odd unfurnished house with moving boxes and a For Sale sign in the yard.) Many real landmarks appear where they should, from bridges over the Ohio River, to the Ohio Valley Raceway. And just to prove that they didn't pull any punches, the vast majority of the map is trackless forest. The only compromise is travel time. A player could cover several kilometers in less than a minute of real time, through a non-exhausting combination of sprinting and walking. On the other hand, the [[VideoGameTime hyperactive game clock]] would have advanced a fairly reasonable amount. To cross the map from end-to-end would probably take up to an in-game week. There is no fast travel, and you would absolutely get lost if you didn't stick to highways (still likely even if you do), not to mention starve or dehydrate if you didn't pack well. Future releases will top this, as the plan is to extend the map even further to cover Fort Knox and Louisville, Kentucky's largest city.
7th Jul '16 6:13:08 AM Quanyails
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* VideoGame/{{Minecraft}} handles this by using individual blocks to make structures and using [[ProceduralGeneration procedural generation]] to create a near-infinite world.

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* VideoGame/{{Minecraft}} ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' handles this by using individual blocks to make structures and using [[ProceduralGeneration procedural generation]] {{procedural generation}} to create a near-infinite world.
6th Jun '16 11:16:42 AM Doug86
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* ''VideoGame/TheConsumingShadow'' uses this approach. You speed across the British Isles by car, from town to town, fighting monsters, finding clues and buying drugs to keep up your SanityMeter. Actual interactive gameplay is limited to Dungeons, which are buildings or parks taken over by minions of the various EldritchAbominations in action. Between each town and dungeon, you get a first-person view of your PlayerCharacter driving their car along a highway.

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* ''VideoGame/TheConsumingShadow'' uses this approach. You speed across the British Isles by car, from town to town, fighting monsters, finding clues and buying drugs to keep up your SanityMeter. Actual interactive gameplay is limited to Dungeons, which are buildings or parks taken over by minions of the various EldritchAbominations {{Eldritch Abomination}}s in action. Between each town and dungeon, you get a first-person view of your PlayerCharacter driving their car along a highway.
4th Jun '16 9:51:00 PM nombretomado
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* The ''Spiderman 2'' game for Gamecube, PS2 and XBox recreated the entire scale of Manhattan! On the other hand, most buildings couldn't be entered, and the few that could didn't let you explore much inside.

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* The ''Spiderman 2'' game for Gamecube, PS2 UsefulNotes/{{PS2}} and XBox UsefulNotes/XBox recreated the entire scale of Manhattan! On the other hand, most buildings couldn't be entered, and the few that could didn't let you explore much inside.
2nd May '16 11:30:54 AM REV6Pilot
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* The various ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' games would fall under a form of '''real-time, small scale world''' (for example you can drive across ''[[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas San Andreas]]'' in a couple of minutes, even though it's meant to represent a whole state). However, the games also usually feature the '''locked doors everywhere''' feature, in that there's usually tons of buildings but few, if any, are actually enterable.
** Driving times ARE shortened by the fact that you're normally driving pedal-to-the-metal without a care about crashing. But even if you did drive like people do IRL, the locations are still much smaller than their real-world inspiration.

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* The various ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' games would fall under a form of '''real-time, small scale world''' (for example you can drive across ''[[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas San Andreas]]'' in a couple of minutes, even though it's meant to represent a whole state). However, the games also usually feature the '''locked doors everywhere''' feature, in that there's usually tons of buildings but few, if any, are actually enterable.
**
enterable. Driving times ARE shortened by the fact that [[DrivesLikeCrazy you're normally driving pedal-to-the-metal without a care about crashing. crashing]]. But even if you did do drive around like people do IRL, the locations are still much smaller than their real-world inspiration.
1st Jul '15 11:27:31 PM Rbade
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* VideoGame/{{Minecraft}} handles this by using individual blocks to make structures and using [[ProceduralGeneration procedural generation]] to create a near-infinite world.
31st May '15 7:01:59 PM Prfnoff
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* ''{{Opoona}}'' has several absolutely massive cities, with truly enormous explorable areas. In addition to huge "business" areas, the apartment areas are also elaborately crafted in such a way that they resemble real apartments--everyone [[NobodyPoops finally has their own bathroom!]] The overworld areas even seem a bit small in comparison, though they're still quite large. And although the first few areas have to be traveled between in flight (the "parts of the map" variant), the later areas get interconnected such that it takes quite a bit of time to traverse them.

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* ''{{Opoona}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Opoona}}'' has several absolutely massive cities, with truly enormous explorable areas. In addition to huge "business" areas, the apartment areas are also elaborately crafted in such a way that they resemble real apartments--everyone [[NobodyPoops finally has their own bathroom!]] The overworld areas even seem a bit small in comparison, though they're still quite large. And although the first few areas have to be traveled between in flight (the "parts of the map" variant), the later areas get interconnected such that it takes quite a bit of time to traverse them.



* VideoGame/AssassinsCreedIII lets you visit parts of the map, the map being the east coast of the USA. The locations are the cities of Boston and New York which are bigger than realistic scale but with locked doors everywhere. The frontier is a Real-time, small scale world version of the New England countryside. Davenport is a very small town made up of less than a dozen individuals that you all personally know, so that its map is of realistic scale with tons of buildings enterable. The mission exclusive parts like Charleston and Captain Kidds treasure locations are of realistic scale but with most of the world in the background.
* VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas is a combination of real-time small scale and realistic scale tons of locked doors. Many parts of the map are done at a realistic scale (such as the Nellis Air Force Base) but the Mojave Desert is a bit on the small side. The setting allows for plenty of justification for the relatively small communities given that its AfterTheEnd and many buildings are boarded up or collapsed.

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* VideoGame/AssassinsCreedIII ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedIII'' lets you visit parts of the map, the map being the east coast of the USA. The locations are the cities of Boston and New York which are bigger than realistic scale but with locked doors everywhere. The frontier is a Real-time, small scale world version of the New England countryside. Davenport is a very small town made up of less than a dozen individuals that you all personally know, so that its map is of realistic scale with tons of buildings enterable. The mission exclusive parts like Charleston and Captain Kidds treasure locations are of realistic scale but with most of the world in the background.
* VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' is a combination of real-time small scale and realistic scale tons of locked doors. Many parts of the map are done at a realistic scale (such as the Nellis Air Force Base) but the Mojave Desert is a bit on the small side. The setting allows for plenty of justification for the relatively small communities given that its AfterTheEnd and many buildings are boarded up or collapsed.
9th Apr '15 10:07:01 PM jormis29
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This is a technique many modern games use. Buildings are as big as they are in real life, cities are, and so on, but you the player are limited to a specific path and you cannot explore the world outside that path, but you can certainly see it. Buildings, mountains, etc. are often in the distance, but you can't ever reach them, as they're there just to make the world feel huge. The distance you physically travel to get from place to place is also realistic within the limited scope you can visit of the world. This approach is favored by ''{{Uncharted}}'', which lets you explore limited parts of jungles, towns, caves, and so on, but has the places you can't reach visible in the background to make them feel believably large. This style tends to be used mostly in linear games, as it would be rather questionable in an open-world game.

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This is a technique many modern games use. Buildings are as big as they are in real life, cities are, and so on, but you the player are limited to a specific path and you cannot explore the world outside that path, but you can certainly see it. Buildings, mountains, etc. are often in the distance, but you can't ever reach them, as they're there just to make the world feel huge. The distance you physically travel to get from place to place is also realistic within the limited scope you can visit of the world. This approach is favored by ''{{Uncharted}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Uncharted}}'', which lets you explore limited parts of jungles, towns, caves, and so on, but has the places you can't reach visible in the background to make them feel believably large. This style tends to be used mostly in linear games, as it would be rather questionable in an open-world game.



* An approach favored by ''{{Uncharted}}''. Cities can have literally hundreds of buildings stretching into the distance, but you're unable to go near them, being limited to the ones important to gameplay.

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* An approach favored by ''{{Uncharted}}''.''VideoGame/{{Uncharted}}''. Cities can have literally hundreds of buildings stretching into the distance, but you're unable to go near them, being limited to the ones important to gameplay.
23rd Mar '15 3:36:58 AM Ninjat126
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* ''VideoGame/TheConsumingShadow'' uses this approach. You speed across the British Isles by car, from town to town, fighting monsters, finding clues and buying drugs to keep up your SanityMeter. Actual interactive gameplay is limited to Dungeons, which are buildings or parks taken over by minions of the various EldritchAbominations in action. Between each town and dungeon, you get a first-person view of your PlayerCharacter driving their car along a highway.
** The catch here, is that the game runs on a 72 hour timer. Driving between towns costs valuable time, meaning that each zoom across the "overworld map" is burning an incredibly finite resource. Dungeons, however, are built to a realistic scale but can only be exited from the way you came in.

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