History Main / QuickSandBox

2nd Apr '18 12:39:06 AM SpitbreakFTW
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXI'' would drop you in a starter town with a level 1 weapon suited to your class, unless you were a Monk, in which case you got your fists, ''unless'' you were a Warrior in which case they gave you a one-handed sword, even though a one-handed axe would be far better suited to Warrior (there is no indication that WARs are better with axe than sword). Then they'd point you at either Saruta-Baruta, Gustaberg, or Ronfaure, depending on the city you started in, and wished you the best of luck in a game that would come to include 20 jobs, a subjob function, 99 levels, 8 crafts not counting fishing, fishing, and much more. Thank God there was a wiki.
14th Mar '18 4:50:58 PM rixion
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* Once the ''VideoGame/{{SaGa}}'' games went onto consoles, every single one suffered from this. ''VideoGame/{{SaGa Frontier}}'' plays the trope straight and averts it because of AndNowForSomeoneCompletelyDifferent: Lute and Blue had the most "open" quests (and Blue had "learn magic" as a guidepost), while the other five playable characters had relatively linear stories. Depending on who you chose to play as, you had your pick of linearity.

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* Once the ''VideoGame/{{SaGa}}'' ''[[Franchise/SaGaRPG SaGa]]'' games went onto consoles, every single one suffered from this. ''VideoGame/{{SaGa Frontier}}'' plays the trope straight and averts it because of AndNowForSomeoneCompletelyDifferent: Lute and Blue had the most "open" quests (and Blue had "learn magic" as a guidepost), while the other five playable characters had relatively linear stories. Depending on who you chose to play as, you had your pick of linearity.
15th Feb '18 4:44:21 PM nombretomado
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* Contrary to the PennyArcade page image, ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'' averts this problem for the most part. You go through a few training missions before getting the [[CoolSpaceship Normandy]] to freely fly around the universe, only to be restricted to one ship/planet/asteroid to explore within each star system. Story progression is rather straightforward, despite you being able to play a trio of core missions in whatever order you wish, and a clear goal in mind. In addition, all active missions are logged in the pause menu -- even separated to required and optional missions -- so you never have to wonder what you're supposed to be doing. ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' is also an aversion in spite of more missions and a wider scope of freedom. It's still linear.

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* Contrary to the PennyArcade ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'' page image, ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'' averts this problem for the most part. You go through a few training missions before getting the [[CoolSpaceship Normandy]] to freely fly around the universe, only to be restricted to one ship/planet/asteroid to explore within each star system. Story progression is rather straightforward, despite you being able to play a trio of core missions in whatever order you wish, and a clear goal in mind. In addition, all active missions are logged in the pause menu -- even separated to required and optional missions -- so you never have to wonder what you're supposed to be doing. ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' is also an aversion in spite of more missions and a wider scope of freedom. It's still linear.
5th Feb '18 7:12:49 AM BeerBaron
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* Common in ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series of games:
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'': The world is enormous. You are told to use quick-travel to Daggerfall and the game basically leaves you alone. Given how big the world is, it's ''very'' easy to get lost. If you follow Daggerfall's main quest, you explore maybe a dozen towns and dungeons. The rest of the ''15,000'' locations are optional.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'': The island the game plays on is huge, and it takes almost 45 minutes to walk from one end to the other. In the tutorial you learn in five minutes how to use the controls, then the game kicks you out of the door, hands you a couple of coins and basically says: "Here, this is the world. Have fun". You only get some hints of where to go for the next story mission. The game also doesn't do much hand-holding in your quest log, forcing you to remember people and places from quests you might have received weeks ago in real time.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]''. There's nothing stopping you from exploring all of Skyrim, other than a "Go meet my sister/uncle in Riverwood" spoken by the person you help at the end of the tutorial dungeon. On the one hand, the world is huge (compared to other [=RPGs=]) and incredibly detailed, with dozens upon dozens of quests. On the other, nearly all the quests are neatly catalogued in your pause menu with reminders of what you're doing and geographic markers to where the next objective is located, and each individual quest can activated or deactivated from that menu.

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* Common in throughout ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series series, in large part because of games:
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'':
how early the games [[OpeningTheSandbox Open The world is enormous. You Sandbox]] for you. Typically, after a brief tutorial and a tip on where to go next for the main quest, you're free to go wherever you want and do whatever you want. There are LoadsAndLoadsOfSidequests, as well as full blown [[SidequestSidestory Sidequest Sidestories]] (some of which, particularly the faction questlines, are nearly as expansive as the main quest). To note, specifically by game:
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' has a nigh-infinite (though with significant [[ProceduralGeneration procedural generation]] and [[RandomlyGeneratedLevels Randomly Designed Dungeons]]) game world. After escaping the NoobCave [[ForcedTutorial tutorial dungeon]], you're
told to use quick-travel fast-travel to head to Daggerfall and itself but the game basically otherwise leaves you alone.to your own devices. Given how big the world is, it's ''very'' easy to get lost. If you follow Daggerfall's main quest, you explore maybe a dozen towns and dungeons. The rest of the ''15,000'' locations are optional.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'': The ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', though thousands of times smaller in terms of raw square footage than its predecessor, trades away the procedurally and randomly generated sections for an entirely hand-built game world while still being ''far'' larger than most video game settings. Vvardenfell, the island the game plays on is huge, and it takes almost 45 real-time minutes to walk from one end to the other. other (and that is without stopping to explore along the way). In the tutorial (short but extant) tutorial, you learn in about five minutes how to use the controls, then the game kicks you out of the door, hands you a couple of coins and basically says: "Here, this is the world. Have fun". You world, have fun" while only get some hints of giving you a direction for where to go for to continue the next story mission.main quest. {{Beef Gate}}s and the rare PlotLock are the only impediments to going wherever you want and doing whatever your want. The game also doesn't do much hand-holding in your quest log, forcing you to remember people and places from quests you might have received weeks ago in real time.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]''. There's Skyrim]]'' continue the trend of large and (mostly) hand-built game worlds. After the tutorial in each, other than a direction on where to go next for the main quest, there is nothing stopping you from immediately going and exploring all of Skyrim, other than a "Go meet my sister/uncle in Riverwood" spoken by the person you help at the end entirety of the tutorial dungeon. those game worlds. On the one hand, the world is these worlds are huge (compared to other [=RPGs=]) and are incredibly detailed, with dozens upon dozens of quests. On the other, nearly all the quests are neatly catalogued in your pause character menu with reminders of what you're doing and geographic markers to where the next objective is located, and each individual quest can activated or deactivated from that menu.
22nd Jan '18 2:04:24 PM Wyvern76
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* Common ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series of games:
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'': The world is enormous. You are told to use quick-travel to Daggerfall and the game basically leaves you alone. Given how big the world is - its' ''very'' easy to get lost. If you follow Daggerfall's main quest, you explore maybe a dozen towns and dungeons. The rest of the ''15,000'' locations are optional.

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* Common in ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series of games:
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'': The world is enormous. You are told to use quick-travel to Daggerfall and the game basically leaves you alone. Given how big the world is - its' is, it's ''very'' easy to get lost. If you follow Daggerfall's main quest, you explore maybe a dozen towns and dungeons. The rest of the ''15,000'' locations are optional.
4th Dec '17 11:12:43 AM Cryoclaste
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* Most games in the ''{{Metroid}}'' series suffer from this trope; it becomes very easy to become lost in the game world, even in the newer games which tend to be a bit more linear. ''Super Metroid'' is probably the most well-known for this, which, due to bugs, intentional design decisions and underestimating players' abilities, gives the player several different routes through the game, and many weapons and items are [[SequenceBreaking skippable]] with some ingenuity. Because there's no clear indication of what to do or where to go, putting the game down for even a day can either leave you with no idea how to progress, or stumbling in the right direction.
** The ''[[VideoGame/MetroidPrime Prime]]'' series try avoiding with an optional hint system that shows where the plot will advance.
** ''Zero Mission'' has each Chozo statue set a rough waypoint to the "next" statue, unless you jump off the rails yourself -- if you go SequenceBreaking past the point that one of the statues wants to advise you about, it won't bother when you come back to it later. Since the game clock runs during these hint scenes, it's beneficial for {{speed run}}ners to skip as many as possible.

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* Most games in the ''{{Metroid}}'' ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' series suffer from this trope; it becomes very easy to become lost in the game world, even in the newer games which tend to be a bit more linear. ''Super Metroid'' ''VideoGame/SuperMetroid'' is probably the most well-known for this, which, due to bugs, intentional design decisions and underestimating players' abilities, gives the player several different routes through the game, and many weapons and items are [[SequenceBreaking skippable]] with some ingenuity. Because there's no clear indication of what to do or where to go, putting the game down for even a day can either leave you with no idea how to progress, or stumbling in the right direction.
** The ''[[VideoGame/MetroidPrime ''[[VideoGame/MetroidPrimeTrilogy Prime]]'' series try avoiding with an optional hint system that shows where the plot will advance.
** ''Zero Mission'' ''VideoGame/MetroidZeroMission'' has each Chozo statue set a rough waypoint to the "next" statue, unless you jump off the rails yourself -- if you go SequenceBreaking past the point that one of the statues wants to advise you about, it won't bother when you come back to it later. Since the game clock runs during these hint scenes, it's beneficial for {{speed run}}ners to skip as many as possible.
9th Oct '17 8:12:06 AM TroperNo9001
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* Many LifeSims have the initial struggle to pay for food and housing, requiring some scrambling around at first to keep your character alive, before your enhanced skills give you the free time to explore:

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* Many LifeSims {{Raising Sim}}s have the initial struggle to pay for food and housing, requiring some scrambling around at first to keep your character alive, before your enhanced skills give you the free time to explore:



*** VideoGame/CuteKnightKingdom'' removed a lot of this starting urgency, and thereby left some players with no idea of what to do.

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*** VideoGame/CuteKnightKingdom'' ''VideoGame/CuteKnightKingdom'' removed a lot of this starting urgency, and thereby left some players with no idea of what to do.
2nd Aug '17 8:49:09 PM Rotpar
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* In ''{{VideoGame/Foxhole}}'', it can be daunting for a new player to figure out what to do and where to go; there is no in-game direction as to what you should be doing to win the war. Especially since you start only with a pistol and a hammer, just getting a basic rifle or finding the action takes some getting used to.
19th Jul '17 1:12:46 PM dotchan
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'': The game becomes wide open as soon as you collect four party members and [[spoiler: the new airship]] in the second half of the game...in fact, absolutely nothing stops you from tackling TheVeryFinalDungeon except the ridiculously tough battles that you would face along the way.
10th Jun '17 1:19:01 PM Gosicrystal
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* ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}''. You are thrown into an enormous world without any defined goals at all - players can build huge structures, mine valuables from the ground, slaughter monsters, explore landscapes, become nomadic, construct railroads, seek out the [[spoiler:Ender Dragon]] or do practically anything else.
** This was even worse before the game came with a list of achievements that encourage new players to learn the basics of mining, farming, construction, and combat.
*** This is not helped by the sheer size of the map. You can wander in the direction of the map and go on for hours never finding an end to it all; in one interview Notch said the potential size of the gameplay world can go up to eight times the surface area of '''Earth itself''' (although there isn't any major difference between different sections of the map). Not to mention the various environments all over the place (it is possible to see a snow biome right next to a desert in this game, at least before the 1.8 update) giving you a variety of resources to use in building your desired constructions.
*** Not big enough? Mods like [[http://www.minecraftforum.net/topic/918541-146-mystcraft-09500 Mystcraft]] let you make as many new worlds to explore as you want, and even decorate them with different types of environments.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}''. You are thrown into an enormous world without any defined goals at all - players can build huge structures, mine valuables from the ground, slaughter monsters, explore landscapes, become nomadic, construct railroads, seek out the [[spoiler:Ender Dragon]] or do practically anything else.
**
else. This was even worse before the game came with a list of achievements that encourage new players to learn the basics of mining, farming, construction, and combat.
*** This is not helped by
combat. Then there's the sheer size of the map. You map: you can wander in the one direction of the map and go on for hours never finding an end to it all; in one interview Notch said the potential size of the gameplay world can go up to eight times the surface area of '''Earth itself''' (although there isn't any major difference between different sections of the map). Not to mention the various environments all over the place (it is possible to see a snow biome right next to a desert in this game, at least game before the 1.8 update) giving you a variety of resources to use in building your desired constructions.
*** Not big enough? Mods like [[http://www.minecraftforum.net/topic/918541-146-mystcraft-09500 Mystcraft]] let you make as many new worlds to explore as you want, and even decorate them with different types of environments.
constructions.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.QuickSandBox