History Main / OurDwarvesAreAlltheSame

28th Apr '16 8:30:47 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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Ever since Tolkien did his thing with some modified [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse myths]], the dwarves have been rolling off the assembly line as the same basic model. Tolkien's importance to this can be gauged by the fact that the plural form ''dwarves'', which he used to distinguish his dwarves from other dwarfs, [[note]]It was originally a recurring mistake during the writing of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' (or rather "a private piece of bad grammar" that sneaked into the text), but it quickly became an AscendedGlitch.[[/note]] is now regarded by many as the standard plural (at least regarding fantasy -- humans with dwarfism are still called "dwarfs," although many today prefer the term "little people"). Fantasy writers who use "dwarfs", like Creator/TerryPratchett, are now the unusual ones. [[note]]There is a small group that contents that the proper plural should be "dwarrows," as "dwarrow" was the word from which "dwarf" originated. Linguists are quick to point out that that has ''never'' been a word used in modern English and its use is considered, at best, ''very'' non-standard.[[/note]] (Many "Tolkienesque" Dwarves, however, are more like the ThemeParkVersion.) Since TheFilmOfTheBook(s), they now even all talk the same. A lot of dwarves are Scottish (or northern, rural, English, whose accents can sound indistinguishable from Scottish accents to most people), Irish, or Russian. An [[PlanetOfHats entire race]] of miners and [[TheBlacksmith blacksmiths]], with names like [[LukeNounverber Dwarfaxe Dwarfbeard and Grimli Stonesack]], who are [[HairTriggertemper overly sensitive about any perceived slight]], always [[ViolentGlaswegian spoiling for a fight]], unable to speak two sentences in a row without calling someone "lad" or "lass," and possessed of [[GoldFever a love of gold and jewels]] that drives them to live in {{Underground Cit|y}}ies where they dig deep and greedily ([[DugTooDeep often with catastrophic results]]). Expect [[FastballSpecial dwarf-tossing]] jokes.

to:

Ever since Tolkien did his thing with some modified [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse myths]], the dwarves have been rolling off the assembly line as the same basic model. Tolkien's importance to this can be gauged by the fact that the plural form ''dwarves'', which he used to distinguish his dwarves from other dwarfs, [[note]]It was originally a recurring mistake during the writing of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' (or rather "a private piece of bad grammar" that sneaked into the text), but it quickly became an AscendedGlitch.[[/note]] is now regarded by many as the standard plural (at least regarding fantasy -- humans with dwarfism are still called "dwarfs," although many today prefer the term "little people"). Fantasy writers who use "dwarfs", like Creator/TerryPratchett, are now the unusual ones. [[note]]There is a small group that contents that the proper plural should be "dwarrows," as "dwarrow" was the word from which "dwarf" originated. Linguists are quick to point out that that has ''never'' been a word used in modern English and its use is considered, at best, ''very'' non-standard.[[/note]] (Many "Tolkienesque" Dwarves, dwarves, however, are more like the ThemeParkVersion.) Since TheFilmOfTheBook(s), they now even all talk the same. A lot of dwarves are Scottish (or northern, rural, English, whose accents can sound indistinguishable from Scottish accents to most people), Irish, or Russian. An [[PlanetOfHats entire race]] of miners and [[TheBlacksmith blacksmiths]], with names like [[LukeNounverber Dwarfaxe Dwarfbeard and Grimli Stonesack]], who are [[HairTriggertemper overly sensitive about any perceived slight]], always [[ViolentGlaswegian spoiling for a fight]], unable to speak two sentences in a row without calling someone "lad" or "lass," and possessed of [[GoldFever a love of gold and jewels]] that drives them to live in {{Underground Cit|y}}ies where they dig deep and greedily ([[DugTooDeep often with catastrophic results]]). Expect [[FastballSpecial dwarf-tossing]] jokes.
28th Apr '16 8:30:33 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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You know them. Gruff, practical, industrious, [[StoutStrength stout]], [[{{Greed}} gold-loving]], [[BeigeProse blunt-speaking]], [[UsefulNotes/BritishAccents Scottish-accented]], [[HornyVikings Viking-helmed]], [[TheAlcoholic booze-swilling]], [[ElvesVsDwarves Elf-hating]], [[AnAxeToGrind ax-swinging]], [[BadassBeard long-bearded]], stolid and unimaginative, [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy boastful of their battle prowess]] and their vast echoing [[ElaborateUndergroundBase underground halls]] and mainly just the fact [[HaveIMentionedIAmADwarfToday that they are]] '''[[HaveIMentionedIAmADwarfToday Dwarves]]'''.

Ever since Tolkien did his thing with some modified [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse myths]], the Dwarves have been rolling off the assembly line as the same basic model. Tolkien's importance to this can be gauged by the fact that the plural form ''Dwarves'', which he used to distinguish his Dwarves from other Dwarfs, [[note]]It was originally a recurring mistake during the writing of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' (or rather "a private piece of bad grammar" that sneaked into the text), but it quickly became an AscendedGlitch.[[/note]] is now regarded by many as the standard plural (with regards to fantasy, at least -- humans with dwarfism are still called "dwarfs," although many today prefer the term "little people"). Fantasy writers who use "Dwarfs", like Creator/TerryPratchett, are now the unusual ones. [[note]]There is a small group that contents that the proper plural should be "Dwarrow" based on the original plural of the word. Linguists are quick to point out that that has ''never'' been a word used in Modern English and its use is considered, at best, ''very'' non-standard.[[/note]] (Many "Tolkienesque" Dwarves, however, are more like the ThemeParkVersion.) Since TheFilmOfTheBook(s), they now even all talk the same. A lot of dwarves are Scottish (or northern, rural, English, whose accents can sound indistinguishable from Scottish accents to most people), Irish, or Russian. An [[PlanetOfHats entire race]] of miners and [[TheBlacksmith blacksmiths]], with names like [[LukeNounverber Dwarfaxe Dwarfbeard and Grimli Stonesack]], who are [[HairTriggertemper overly sensitive about any perceived slight]], always [[ViolentGlaswegian spoiling for a fight]], unable to speak two sentences in a row without calling someone "lad" or "lass," and possessed of [[GoldFever a love of gold and jewels]] that drives them to live in {{Underground Cit|y}}ies where they dig deep and greedily ([[DugTooDeep often with catastrophic results]]). Expect [[FastballSpecial dwarf-tossing]] jokes.

to:

You know them. Gruff, practical, industrious, [[StoutStrength stout]], [[{{Greed}} gold-loving]], [[BeigeProse blunt-speaking]], [[UsefulNotes/BritishAccents Scottish-accented]], [[HornyVikings Viking-helmed]], [[TheAlcoholic booze-swilling]], [[ElvesVsDwarves Elf-hating]], [[AnAxeToGrind ax-swinging]], [[BadassBeard long-bearded]], stolid and unimaginative, [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy boastful of their battle prowess]] and their vast echoing [[ElaborateUndergroundBase underground halls]] and mainly just the fact [[HaveIMentionedIAmADwarfToday that they are]] '''[[HaveIMentionedIAmADwarfToday Dwarves]]'''.

dwarves]]'''.

Ever since Tolkien did his thing with some modified [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse myths]], the Dwarves dwarves have been rolling off the assembly line as the same basic model. Tolkien's importance to this can be gauged by the fact that the plural form ''Dwarves'', ''dwarves'', which he used to distinguish his Dwarves dwarves from other Dwarfs, dwarfs, [[note]]It was originally a recurring mistake during the writing of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' (or rather "a private piece of bad grammar" that sneaked into the text), but it quickly became an AscendedGlitch.[[/note]] is now regarded by many as the standard plural (with regards to fantasy, at (at least regarding fantasy -- humans with dwarfism are still called "dwarfs," although many today prefer the term "little people"). Fantasy writers who use "Dwarfs", "dwarfs", like Creator/TerryPratchett, are now the unusual ones. [[note]]There is a small group that contents that the proper plural should be "Dwarrow" based on "dwarrows," as "dwarrow" was the original plural of the word. word from which "dwarf" originated. Linguists are quick to point out that that has ''never'' been a word used in Modern modern English and its use is considered, at best, ''very'' non-standard.[[/note]] (Many "Tolkienesque" Dwarves, however, are more like the ThemeParkVersion.) Since TheFilmOfTheBook(s), they now even all talk the same. A lot of dwarves are Scottish (or northern, rural, English, whose accents can sound indistinguishable from Scottish accents to most people), Irish, or Russian. An [[PlanetOfHats entire race]] of miners and [[TheBlacksmith blacksmiths]], with names like [[LukeNounverber Dwarfaxe Dwarfbeard and Grimli Stonesack]], who are [[HairTriggertemper overly sensitive about any perceived slight]], always [[ViolentGlaswegian spoiling for a fight]], unable to speak two sentences in a row without calling someone "lad" or "lass," and possessed of [[GoldFever a love of gold and jewels]] that drives them to live in {{Underground Cit|y}}ies where they dig deep and greedily ([[DugTooDeep often with catastrophic results]]). Expect [[FastballSpecial dwarf-tossing]] jokes.



See also FiveRaces. Not to be confused with LittlePeopleAreSurreal or DepravedDwarf.

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See also FiveRaces. Not to be confused with LittlePeopleAreSurreal or DepravedDwarf.
DepravedDwarf -- once again, dwar'''''ve'''''s are fantasy creatures; dwar'''''f'''''s are little people.
28th Apr '16 8:26:06 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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Ever since Tolkien did his thing with some modified [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse myths]], the Dwarves have been rolling off the assembly line as the same basic model. Tolkien's importance to this can be gauged by the fact that the plural form ''Dwarves'' that he used to distinguish his Dwarves from other Dwarfs[[note]]It was originally a recurring mistake during the writing of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' (or rather "a private piece of bad grammar" that sneaked into the text), but it quickly became an AscendedGlitch.[[/note]] is now regarded by many as the standard plural, and people who use "Dwarfs", like Creator/TerryPratchett, are now the unusual ones. [[note]]There is a small group that contents that the proper plural should be "Dwarrow" based on the original plural of the word. Linguists are quick to point out that that has ''never'' been a word used in Modern English and its use is considered, at best, ''very'' non-standard.[[/note]] (Many "Tolkienesque" Dwarves, however, are more like the ThemeParkVersion.) Since TheFilmOfTheBook(s), they now even all talk the same. A lot of dwarves are Scottish (or northern, rural, English, whose accents can sound indistinguishable from Scottish accents to most people), Irish, or Russian. An [[PlanetOfHats entire race]] of miners and [[TheBlacksmith blacksmiths]], with names like [[LukeNounverber Dwarfaxe Dwarfbeard and Grimli Stonesack]], who are [[HairTriggertemper overly sensitive about any perceived slight]], always [[ViolentGlaswegian spoiling for a fight]], unable to speak two sentences in a row without calling someone "lad" or "lass," and possessed of [[GoldFever a love of gold and jewels]] that drives them to live in {{Underground Cit|y}}ies where they dig deep and greedily ([[DugTooDeep often with catastrophic results]]). Expect [[FastballSpecial dwarf-tossing]] jokes.

to:

Ever since Tolkien did his thing with some modified [[Myth/NorseMythology Norse myths]], the Dwarves have been rolling off the assembly line as the same basic model. Tolkien's importance to this can be gauged by the fact that the plural form ''Dwarves'' that ''Dwarves'', which he used to distinguish his Dwarves from other Dwarfs[[note]]It Dwarfs, [[note]]It was originally a recurring mistake during the writing of ''Literature/TheHobbit'' (or rather "a private piece of bad grammar" that sneaked into the text), but it quickly became an AscendedGlitch.[[/note]] is now regarded by many as the standard plural, and people plural (with regards to fantasy, at least -- humans with dwarfism are still called "dwarfs," although many today prefer the term "little people"). Fantasy writers who use "Dwarfs", like Creator/TerryPratchett, are now the unusual ones. [[note]]There is a small group that contents that the proper plural should be "Dwarrow" based on the original plural of the word. Linguists are quick to point out that that has ''never'' been a word used in Modern English and its use is considered, at best, ''very'' non-standard.[[/note]] (Many "Tolkienesque" Dwarves, however, are more like the ThemeParkVersion.) Since TheFilmOfTheBook(s), they now even all talk the same. A lot of dwarves are Scottish (or northern, rural, English, whose accents can sound indistinguishable from Scottish accents to most people), Irish, or Russian. An [[PlanetOfHats entire race]] of miners and [[TheBlacksmith blacksmiths]], with names like [[LukeNounverber Dwarfaxe Dwarfbeard and Grimli Stonesack]], who are [[HairTriggertemper overly sensitive about any perceived slight]], always [[ViolentGlaswegian spoiling for a fight]], unable to speak two sentences in a row without calling someone "lad" or "lass," and possessed of [[GoldFever a love of gold and jewels]] that drives them to live in {{Underground Cit|y}}ies where they dig deep and greedily ([[DugTooDeep often with catastrophic results]]). Expect [[FastballSpecial dwarf-tossing]] jokes.



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25th Apr '16 8:45:25 PM fnhornguy
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16th Apr '16 3:25:53 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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Added DiffLines:

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* On Music/{{Gloryhammer}}'s second album ''Space 1992: Rise of the Chaos Wizards'', we are introduced to the Astral Dwarves of Aberdeen whose king wields a "Crystal Laser Battle Axe."
15th Apr '16 9:24:36 AM Theriocephalus
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** Also, a nod to the 'craftsman' stereotype in that they are good at ''any'' craft. Mostly the typical metalworking and stoneworking, but they are very good at anything. In particular they are as good at ''baking'' as they are at metalwork and stonecarving. However, their bakery is mostly good for weaponry. They grind down rocks to make the flour. The best way to enjoy Dwarfbread is to keep it uneaten, so that ''any'' other food will taste good by comparison. The "Scottish" stereotype is brought up here as the Low King (low being better than high for a mining people) of the Dwarves being crowned on the Scone of Stone. In Scotland, Kings were always crowned on a giant stone called the ''Stone of Scone'' (pronounced Skoon) because it was held in Scone Abbey, Perthshire.
*** They also practically monopolize the cosmetics industry, most likely because they have real chemistry instead of alchemy..

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** Also, a nod to the 'craftsman' stereotype in that they are good at ''any'' craft. Mostly the typical metalworking and stoneworking, but they are very good at anything. In particular they are as good at ''baking'' as they are at metalwork and stonecarving. However, their bakery is mostly good for weaponry. They grind down rocks to make the flour. The best way to enjoy Dwarfbread is to keep it uneaten, so that ''any'' other food will taste good by comparison. The "Scottish" stereotype is brought up here as the Low King (low being better than high for a mining people) of the Dwarves being crowned on the Scone of Stone. In Scotland, Kings were always crowned on a giant stone called the ''Stone of Scone'' (pronounced Skoon) because it was held in Scone Abbey, Perthshire.
***
Perthshire. They also practically monopolize the cosmetics industry, most likely because they have real chemistry instead of alchemy..alchemy.
15th Apr '16 9:19:30 AM Theriocephalus
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** He at least hand-waived the in-universe dichotomy between their quasi-Semitic language and their decidedly non-Semitic names in one of the appendices (or in ''The Silmarillion''): the dwarven names are actually pseudonyms dwarves use when in contact with any non-dwarves, never mentioning their true names. This is due to their secretive nature especially when names and language are concerned: Khuzdul (the dwarven tongue) is ''only'' spoken in purely dwarven communities and ''never'' revealed to an outsider -- with all others, they speak the Common Tongue and, depending on region, other dominant regional human languages. The sole exception is in the dwarven BattleCry, "''Baruk Khazâd! Khazâd ai-mênu!''" ("Axes of the Dwarves! The Dwarves are upon you!") In-universe, there are only two or three non-dwarves in history who learned the language. In the case of the names, it apparently went even further, since even Balin's tomb in Moria (which can safely be assumed as having been a dwarf-only community) bears an inscription in Khuzdul, which gives his name as Balin -- even on a tombstone among his own people, his true name is not recorded.

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** He at least hand-waived handwaved the in-universe dichotomy between their quasi-Semitic language and their decidedly non-Semitic names in one of the appendices (or in ''The Silmarillion''): the dwarven names are actually pseudonyms dwarves use when in contact with any non-dwarves, never mentioning their true names. This is due to their secretive nature especially when names and language are concerned: Khuzdul (the dwarven tongue) is ''only'' spoken in purely dwarven communities and ''never'' revealed to an outsider -- with all others, they speak the Common Tongue and, depending on region, other dominant regional human languages. The sole exception is in the dwarven BattleCry, "''Baruk Khazâd! Khazâd ai-mênu!''" ("Axes of the Dwarves! The Dwarves are upon you!") In-universe, there are only two or three non-dwarves in history who learned the language. In the case of the names, it apparently went even further, since even Balin's tomb in Moria (which can safely be assumed as having been a dwarf-only community) bears an inscription in Khuzdul, which gives his name as Balin -- even on a tombstone among his own people, his true name is not recorded.
14th Apr '16 8:59:52 AM ImpudentInfidel
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** Among the playable races (Human, Elf, Dwarf, and [[VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition later]] [[HornedHumanoid Qun]][[ProudWarriorRaceGuy ari]]), the Dwarves are unique in one way: they cannot be mages. For whatever reason (believed to be their constant exposure to Lyrium, the magic mineral that boosts spellcasting in other races) they lack a connection to the Fade, and thus cannot draw on it to use in spells like the other races can. The only Dwarves who are anywhere near averting this restriction are Dagna, a scholar who learned how to enchant things through sheer optimistic determination, and a Dwarven [[VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition Inquisitor]], who was given the ability to open and close Rifts between Thedas and the Fade by [[spoiler: ancient Elven technology]] and being either insanely (un)lucky or being guided by the hand of the Maker (who Dwarves don't believe in, because of the aforementioned Fade insensitivity).

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** Among the playable races (Human, Elf, Dwarf, and [[VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition later]] [[HornedHumanoid Qun]][[ProudWarriorRaceGuy ari]]), the Dwarves are unique in one way: they cannot be mages. For whatever reason (believed to be their constant exposure to Lyrium, the magic mineral that boosts spellcasting in other races) they lack a connection to the Fade, and thus cannot draw on it to use in spells like the other races can. The only Dwarves who are anywhere near averting this restriction are Dagna, a scholar who learned how to enchant things through sheer optimistic determination, and a Dwarven [[VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition Inquisitor]], who was given the ability to open and close Rifts between Thedas and the Fade by [[spoiler: ancient Elven technology]] and being either insanely (un)lucky or being guided by the hand of the Maker (who Dwarves don't believe in, because of the aforementioned Fade insensitivity). Oddly enough, Dwarf-descended Darkspawn that can use magic are fairly common.
2nd Apr '16 6:52:37 PM StClair
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*** The classic supplement ''The Dwarves of Rockhome'' goes out of its way to justify the trope by explaining the modern dwarves' backstory, which they themselves don't generally know: after the Blackmoor civilization in its wisdom accidentally wiped itself out in a quasi-nuclear cataclysm that tilted the very axis of the planet, the Immortal Kagyar -- not so coincidentally the patron of craftsmen -- took some of the few surviving Kogolors and turned them into a new race highly resistant to poison and radiation (and incidentally magic as well) and with a predilection for living underground so that even if a similar disaster should strike the world again, dwarven culture and its achievements would be able to survive in spite of it. Thus, dwarven underground cities essentially serve double duty as a potential ''fallout shelters'' for their inhabitants.
*** It also plays with the idea that dwarves are always craftsmen by including a clan of dwarf ''farmers'', descended from criminals who'd been sentenced to the "humiliating" task of growing food. The Wyrwarfs, tired of being treated like riffraff, voice their discontent by threatening to withhold food from the other clans: if they're unwilling to acknowledge the farmers are equal to the miners and artisans, the rest can huddle down deep with their trinkets and eat rocks.
** The largely forgotten ''Chainmail'' D&D Miniatures game (The early 2000s relaunch, not the classic 60s version that inspired D&D) ended up using pretty standard D&D dwarves, but oh WhatCouldHaveBeen. The original design specs called for a dwarf faction that had deposed their king, abandoned faith in their god, and become communist factory workers and miners. The Dwarves would have dressed like something out of a 30s era Soviet propaganda poster and built mecha golems.

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*** The classic supplement ''The Dwarves of Rockhome'' goes out of its way to justify the trope by explaining the modern dwarves' backstory, which they themselves don't generally know: after the Blackmoor civilization in its wisdom accidentally wiped itself out in a quasi-nuclear cataclysm that tilted the very axis of the planet, the Immortal Kagyar -- not so coincidentally the patron of craftsmen -- took some of the few surviving Kogolors and turned them into a new race highly resistant to poison and radiation (and incidentally magic as well) and with a predilection for living underground underground, so that even if a similar disaster should strike the world again, dwarven culture and its achievements would be able to survive in spite of it. Thus, dwarven underground cities essentially serve double duty as a potential ''fallout shelters'' for their inhabitants.
*** It also plays with the idea that dwarves are always craftsmen by including a clan of dwarf ''farmers'', descended from criminals who'd been sentenced to the "humiliating" task of growing food. The Wyrwarfs, tired of being treated like riffraff, voice voiced their discontent by threatening to withhold food from the other clans: if they're unwilling the clans refused to acknowledge the farmers are as equal to the miners and artisans, the rest can they could huddle down deep with their trinkets and eat rocks.
** The largely forgotten ''Chainmail'' D&D Miniatures game (The (the early 2000s relaunch, not the classic 60s version that inspired D&D) ended up using pretty standard D&D dwarves, but oh WhatCouldHaveBeen. The original design specs called for a dwarf faction that had deposed their king, abandoned faith in their god, and become communist factory workers and miners. The Dwarves would have dressed like something out of a 30s era Soviet propaganda poster and built mecha golems.



* TabletopGame/DragonDice plays it straight with standard, Tolkien inspired dwarves -- not surprising for a game from TSR that was significantly inspired by ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. They are composed of the elements of earth and fire, have beards, are expert craftsmen and miners, live in the mountains, wield axes, and wear horned helms...

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* TabletopGame/DragonDice ''TabletopGame/DragonDice'' plays it straight with standard, Tolkien inspired dwarves -- not surprising for a game from TSR that was significantly inspired by ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. They are composed of the elements of earth and fire, have beards, are expert craftsmen and miners, live in the mountains, wield axes, and wear horned helms...



* ''TabletopGame/BurningWheel'' not only plays straight dwarf stereotypes but even builds upon the tale of Moria from ''Literature/LordOfTheRings'' by working an attribute called "Greed" into the rule system: all dwarves are covetous. The higher a dwarf's Greed, the more likely they are to betray others, or even go AxCrazy, in the pursuit of possessing objects of high value and/or craftsmanship. They get bonuses to rolls done in the pursuit of wealth. However, if the Greed attribute reaches its maximum through indulgence of the vice the dwarf hides himself away with his hoard of goods in paranoid seclusion never to be seen again.

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* ''TabletopGame/BurningWheel'' not only plays straight dwarf stereotypes but even builds upon the tale of Moria from ''Literature/LordOfTheRings'' by working an attribute called "Greed" into the rule system: all dwarves are covetous. The higher a dwarf's Greed, the more likely they are to betray others, or even go AxCrazy, in the pursuit of possessing objects of high value and/or craftsmanship. They get bonuses to rolls done made in the pursuit of wealth. However, if the Greed attribute reaches its maximum through indulgence of the vice vice, the dwarf hides himself away with his hoard of goods in paranoid seclusion seclusion, never to be seen again.
27th Feb '16 11:37:41 PM JSKT
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* [[PlayingWithATrope Played with]] Khal is what you would expect a Gimli {{Expy}} to be, except he was actually kicked out of his dwarven home because he actively spoke against the rigid clannishness of his culture through ''love poems''.

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* In ComicBook/DungeonsAndDragons [[PlayingWithATrope Played played with]] Khal is what you would expect a Gimli {{Expy}} to be, except he was actually kicked out of his dwarven home because he actively spoke against the rigid clannishness of his culture through ''love poems''.
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