History Main / OnlyBadGuysCallTheirLawyers

16th May '16 10:53:21 AM StarSword
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* In ''Madam Secretary,'' Elizabeth [=McCord=] is facing possible charges of violating the espionage act. At the suggestion of getting a lawyer, she answers, "I don't want a lawyer. It'll make it look like I need a lawyer."

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* In ''Madam Secretary,'' ''Series/MadamSecretary'', Elizabeth [=McCord=] is facing possible charges of violating the espionage act.Espionage Act. At the suggestion of getting a lawyer, she answers, "I don't want a lawyer. It'll make it look like I need a lawyer." Still wrong, but a {{justified}} attitude in this case due to the realities of ''politics'': as she's the Secretary of State and a longtime friend and coworker of President Dalton, her looking guilty would reflect badly on him as well.
16th May '16 7:34:39 AM tromag
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** It should be noted that [[spoiler: this was all part of Amy's plan. By causing a high-profile missing persons case and framing him for it, he'd be screwed no matter what he did. If he gets a lawyer, he looks guilty to the public, and if he doesn't get a lawyer, he can't effectively defend himself to the police.]]
7th May '16 5:45:45 PM JackG
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* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''. Averted in "Non Sequitur". When Harry Kim realises he's suspected of treason, he refuses to continue without legal counsel. This is likely a ContinuityNod to TNG's "The Drumhead", which had AnAesop about the subject of legal rights.
5th May '16 5:53:40 AM RobTan
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** Averted when [[spoiler:Hotch]] is arrested by InternalAffairs and threatens to ask for a lawyer unless the case against him is explained. The interviewer tries to invoke this by saying that only guilty people call their lawyers, to which [[spoiler:Hotch]] replies "No, smart people do".



* In an episode of ''Series/TakesFromTheCrypt'', a horror writer is arrested near the scene of a grisly murder. He considers calling a lwyer, but decides against it because he believes it'll make him look guilty. Deconstructed when it turns out he is innocent and [[spoiler:the detective is the killer]], but without a lawyer to protect him he's browbeaten into giving a confession and ends up on death row.

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* In an episode of ''Series/TakesFromTheCrypt'', ''Series/TalesFromTheCrypt'', a horror writer is arrested near the scene of a grisly murder. He considers calling a lwyer, lawyer, but decides against it because he believes it'll make him look guilty. Deconstructed when it turns out he is innocent and [[spoiler:the detective is the killer]], but without a lawyer to protect him he's browbeaten into giving a confession and ends up on death row.
12th Apr '16 4:42:14 AM RobTan
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Added DiffLines:

* In an episode of ''Series/TakesFromTheCrypt'', a horror writer is arrested near the scene of a grisly murder. He considers calling a lwyer, but decides against it because he believes it'll make him look guilty. Deconstructed when it turns out he is innocent and [[spoiler:the detective is the killer]], but without a lawyer to protect him he's browbeaten into giving a confession and ends up on death row.
3rd Apr '16 6:15:21 PM dmcreif
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** Discussed again in the season 2 episode "Cobbler" when Daniel Warmolt, a drug dealer who's been ripped off by Nacho, shows up at the parking lot where Mike works as a booth operator, because the police have invited him down for questioning[[note]]He called the cops because Nacho stole his cash, but more importantly, his valuable baseball card collection[[/note]]. Mike, who cut ties because Daniel got reckless with his spending (buying a pimped-out Hummer H2), explains to Daniel that he should turn around and head home, because the police are actually on a fishing trip: having found the hiding space behind his baseboards where he stored his cash, they think Daniel may have committed a crime; when they get him into the interrogation room, they will pretend to be his best friend to lure him into a false sense of security, then sweat him until he cracks. Because Daniel is so insistent on getting his cards back, Mike has to work out an arrangement: Nacho gives Daniel back his cards and $10,000 in cash, in exchange for Daniel's Hummer, which will be destroyed at a chop shop. But this doesn't resolve the issue with the police, so Mike arranges for Daniel to meet with the police detectives, with Jimmy as his lawyer. Of course, Daniel stumbles through the interview, forcing Jimmy to kick him out of the interrogation room, then spin up a bogus story about Daniel using his crawl space to stash special videos for a nonexistent patron, [[BlackComedy of him rubbing his ass on a pie while crying]].

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** Discussed again in the season 2 episode "Cobbler" when Daniel Warmolt, a newtime drug dealer who's been ripped off by Nacho, shows up at the parking lot where Mike works as a booth operator, because the police have invited him down for questioning[[note]]He called the cops because Nacho stole his cash, but more importantly, his valuable baseball card collection[[/note]]. Mike, who cut ties because Daniel got reckless with his spending (buying a pimped-out Hummer H2), explains to Daniel that he should turn around and head home, because the police are actually on a fishing trip: having found the hiding space behind his baseboards where he stored his cash, they think Daniel may have committed a crime; when they get him into the interrogation room, they will pretend to be his best friend to lure him into a false sense of security, then sweat him until he cracks. Because Daniel is so insistent on getting his cards back, Mike has to work out an arrangement: Nacho gives Daniel back his cards and $10,000 in cash, in exchange for Daniel's Hummer, which will be destroyed at a chop shop. But this doesn't resolve the issue with the police, so Mike arranges for Daniel to meet with the police detectives, with Jimmy as his lawyer. Of course, Daniel stumbles through the interview, forcing Jimmy to kick him out of the interrogation room, then spin up a bogus story about Daniel using his crawl space to stash special videos for a nonexistent patron, [[BlackComedy of him rubbing his ass on a pie while crying]].



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26th Feb '16 7:49:51 PM dmcreif
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* Zigzagged in ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', lawyering up happens all the time, and if it does the one doing it is just as likely to be completely innocent as they are guilty of something.



** Played around with in one episode, where a few [=FBI=] agents grab Jesse for a "conversation" and after he realizes they're fishing for evidence he asks for his attorney. They give him a momentary spiel about how there's no need since he's not actually under arrest, how lawyers will just complicate "straightening the matter out", and how it could be taken the wrong way, but he doesn't fall for it.
** In another episode, Gus is called in to discuss possible involvement in [[spoiler: Gale's death.]] This could be the turning point that causes the police to discover Gus's massive drug empire, but since Gus is a VillainWithGoodPublicity, he doesn't call an attorney to speak with the detectives since he knows that would raise suspicions. He instead defuses the situation himself with a quiet, believable alibi.
** In Season 5B, Skyler proves she is well acquainted with how little this trope has to do with reality when [[spoiler:Hank tries to invoke it when asking her to give evidence against Walt]]. Instead of reacting as he'd hoped, she instead sees his attempted manipulation as an instant red flag that [[spoiler: he isn't interested in protecting her, only in getting Walt at any cost.]]
* Zigzagged in ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', lawyering up happens all the time, and if it does the one doing it is just as likely to be completely innocent as they are guilty of something.
* ''Series/BetterCallSaul'':
** It [[DiscussedTrope calls BS on this trope]] in the first episode. When the county treasurer Craig Kettleman is implicated for embezzling $1.6 million, Jimmy [=McGill=] explains that what gets innocent people wrongly convicted is getting wrong what makes you look guilty in the first place: the arrest, not your decision to not lawyer up, and that without an attorney it's fairly easy for a detective to twist what you said and get you convicted.

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** Played around with in one episode, "Face Off", where a few [=FBI=] agents police detectives grab Jesse for a "conversation" "conversation", which is about the poisoning of his girlfriend Andrea's son Brock, and after he realizes they're fishing for evidence he asks for his attorney. They give him a momentary spiel about how there's no need since he's not actually under arrest, how lawyers will just complicate "straightening the matter out", and how it could be taken the wrong way, but he doesn't fall for it.
** In another episode, "Hermanos", Gus is called in to discuss possible involvement in [[spoiler: Gale's death.]] This could be the turning point that causes the police to discover Gus's massive drug empire, but since Gus is a VillainWithGoodPublicity, he doesn't call an attorney to speak with the detectives since he knows that would raise suspicions. He instead defuses the situation himself with a quiet, believable alibi.
** in "Madrigal," Mike invokes this by waiving his rights to an attorney when showing up at the DEA office to be interviewed by Hank and Gomez about his potential involvement in Gus's drug operation.
** In Season 5B, Skyler proves she is well acquainted with how little this trope has to do with reality when [[spoiler:Hank Hank tries to invoke it when asking her to give evidence against Walt]]. Walt. Instead of reacting as he'd hoped, she instead sees through his attempted act of manipulation as an instant red flag that [[spoiler: he isn't interested in protecting her, only in getting Walt at any cost.]]
* Zigzagged in ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', lawyering up happens all ''Series/BetterCallSaul'', the time, and if prequel to ''Breaking Bad'', uses it does the one doing it is just as likely to be completely innocent as they are guilty of something.
* ''Series/BetterCallSaul'':
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** It [[DiscussedTrope calls BS on this trope]] in the first episode."Uno". When the county treasurer Craig Kettleman is implicated for embezzling $1.6 million, Jimmy [=McGill=] explains that what gets innocent people wrongly convicted is getting wrong what makes you look guilty in the first place: the arrest, not your decision to not lawyer up, and that without an attorney it's fairly easy for a detective to twist what you said and get you convicted.



** Discussed again in the season 2 episode "Cobbler" when Daniel Warmolt, a drug dealer who's been ripped off by Nacho, shows up at Mike's parking lot because the police have invited him down for questioning[[note]]He called the cops because Nacho stole his cash, but more importantly, his valuable baseball card collection[[/note]]. Mike explains to Daniel that he should turn around and head home, because the police are actually on a fishing trip: having found the hiding space behind his baseboards where he stored his cash, they think Daniel is up to suspicious activities; when they get him into the interrogation room, they will pretend to be his best friend to lure him into a false sense of security, then sweat him until he cracks. Because Daniel is so insistent on getting his cards back, Mike has to work out an arrangement: Nacho gives Daniel his cards and $10,000 in cash, in exchange for Daniel's Hummer, which will be destroyed at a chop shop. But this doesn't resolve the issue with the police, so Mike arranges for Daniel to meet with the police detectives, with Jimmy as his lawyer. Of course, Daniel stumbles through the interview, forcing Jimmy to kick him out of the interrogation room, then spin up a bogus story about Daniel using his crawl space to stash special videos for a nonexistent patron, [[BlackComedy of him rubbing his ass on a pie while crying]].

to:

** Discussed again in the season 2 episode "Cobbler" when Daniel Warmolt, a drug dealer who's been ripped off by Nacho, shows up at Mike's the parking lot where Mike works as a booth operator, because the police have invited him down for questioning[[note]]He called the cops because Nacho stole his cash, but more importantly, his valuable baseball card collection[[/note]]. Mike Mike, who cut ties because Daniel got reckless with his spending (buying a pimped-out Hummer H2), explains to Daniel that he should turn around and head home, because the police are actually on a fishing trip: having found the hiding space behind his baseboards where he stored his cash, they think Daniel is up to suspicious activities; may have committed a crime; when they get him into the interrogation room, they will pretend to be his best friend to lure him into a false sense of security, then sweat him until he cracks. Because Daniel is so insistent on getting his cards back, Mike has to work out an arrangement: Nacho gives Daniel back his cards and $10,000 in cash, in exchange for Daniel's Hummer, which will be destroyed at a chop shop. But this doesn't resolve the issue with the police, so Mike arranges for Daniel to meet with the police detectives, with Jimmy as his lawyer. Of course, Daniel stumbles through the interview, forcing Jimmy to kick him out of the interrogation room, then spin up a bogus story about Daniel using his crawl space to stash special videos for a nonexistent patron, [[BlackComedy of him rubbing his ass on a pie while crying]].
26th Feb '16 4:49:46 AM Morgenthaler
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** In Season 5B, Skyler proves she is well acquainted with how little this trope has to do with reality when [[spoiler:Hank tries to invoke it when asking her to give evidence against Walt]]. Instead of reacting as he'd hoped, she instead sees his attempted manipulation as an instant red flag that [[spoiler: he isn't interesting in protecting her, only in getting Walt at any cost.]]

to:

** In Season 5B, Skyler proves she is well acquainted with how little this trope has to do with reality when [[spoiler:Hank tries to invoke it when asking her to give evidence against Walt]]. Instead of reacting as he'd hoped, she instead sees his attempted manipulation as an instant red flag that [[spoiler: he isn't interesting interested in protecting her, only in getting Walt at any cost.]]
26th Feb '16 4:43:19 AM Morgenthaler
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* Most crime dramas deliberately invoke this trope. The detectives will try to convince someone that as long as they talk freely and don't ask for a lawyer, they won't be suspect. The true motive, of course, is to get them to reveal their guilt or other pertinent information that a lawyer would keep them quiet about.
26th Feb '16 4:35:17 AM Morgenthaler
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* Averted in ''Fanfic/TheOllivanderChildren'' when ordinary [[{{Muggles}} Muggle]] Mark gets arrested by the Ministry of Magic after being caught in possession of Calliope's wand. Despite being an ignorant idiot at worst, the second thing he does when put on trial is to demand legal counsel since he's GenreSavvy enough to realize he has no idea what he's gotten himself into. (The first is to call [[{{Jerkass}} Dolores Umbridge]] out on her conflict of interest in the case, since she arrested him in the first place.)

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* Averted in ''Fanfic/TheOllivanderChildren'' when ordinary [[{{Muggles}} Muggle]] Mark gets arrested by the Ministry of Magic after being caught in possession of Calliope's wand. Despite being an ignorant idiot at worst, the second thing he does when put on trial is to demand legal counsel since he's GenreSavvy smart enough to realize he has no idea what he's gotten himself into. (The first is to call [[{{Jerkass}} Dolores Umbridge]] out on her conflict of interest in the case, since she arrested him in the first place.)



* Nick in ''Literature/GoneGirl'' is GenreSavvy enough to know about this trope, and holds off on getting a lawyer, even when he's the main suspect for a murder he did not commit, specifically ''because'' of it. And then when he ''does'' get a lawyer, he gets one known for defending extremely guilty dirtbags.

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* Nick in ''Literature/GoneGirl'' is GenreSavvy smart enough to know about this trope, this, and holds off on getting a lawyer, even when he's the main suspect for a murder he did not commit, specifically ''because'' of it. And then when he ''does'' get a lawyer, he gets one known for defending extremely guilty dirtbags.



** In Season 5B, Skyler proves [[GenreSavvy she is well acquainted with how little this trope has to do with reality]] when [[spoiler:Hank tries to invoke it when asking her to give evidence against Walt]]. Instead of reacting as he'd hoped, she instead sees his attempted manipulation as an instant red flag that [[spoiler: he isn't interesting in protecting her, only in getting Walt at any cost.]]

to:

** In Season 5B, Skyler proves [[GenreSavvy she is well acquainted with how little this trope has to do with reality]] reality when [[spoiler:Hank tries to invoke it when asking her to give evidence against Walt]]. Instead of reacting as he'd hoped, she instead sees his attempted manipulation as an instant red flag that [[spoiler: he isn't interesting in protecting her, only in getting Walt at any cost.]]
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