History Main / OnlyBadGuysCallTheirLawyers

2nd Dec '15 10:15:49 PM Anddrix
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* Done rather badly in ''[[Literature/HushHush Crescendo]]'', when Scott is arrested for breaking into Nora's house (granted, after [[spoiler:she stole something from him and refused to return it]]), and ''the cop who arrests him'' says that Scott sounds guilty because he asks for a lawyer. [[spoiler:Apparently angels posing as detectives don't fuss too much with mortal laws.]]
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* Done rather badly in ''[[Literature/HushHush Crescendo]]'', In ''Literature/{{Crescendo}}'', when Scott is arrested for breaking into Nora's house (granted, after [[spoiler:she stole something from him and refused to return it]]), and ''the cop who arrests him'' says that Scott sounds guilty because he asks for a lawyer. [[spoiler:Apparently angels posing as detectives don't fuss too much with mortal laws.]]laws]].
27th Nov '15 10:49:12 AM dmcreif
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* ''Series/BetterCallSaul'', a prequel series to ''Series/BreakingBad'', [[DiscussedTrope calls BS on this trope]] in the first episode. When the county treasurer is implicated for embezzling $1.6 million, James [=McGill=] tells him that getting a lawyer doesn't make you look guilty, getting arrested does, and that without an attorney it's fairly easy for a detective to twist what you said and get you convicted. ** Makes a more subtle second appearance in ''Five-Oh'', the sixth episode of the first season, when Mike is questioned by police. They do their best to convince him he doesn't need legal counsel because he isn't under arrest, and seem disappointed that as a fellow policeman he isn't willing to cooperate with them by answering questions informally. Mike being Mike, he isn't fooled, and only replies with one word no matter they say: "Lawyer."
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* ''Series/BetterCallSaul'', a prequel series to ''Series/BreakingBad'', [[DiscussedTrope calls BS on this trope]] in the first episode. When the county treasurer Craig Kettleman is implicated for embezzling $1.6 million, James Jimmy [=McGill=] tells him that getting a lawyer doesn't make you look guilty, getting arrested does, and that without an attorney it's fairly easy for a detective to twist what you said and get you convicted. ** Makes a more subtle second appearance in ''Five-Oh'', ''Five-O'', the sixth episode of the first season, when Mike is questioned by police. They do their best to convince him he doesn't need legal counsel because he isn't under arrest, and seem disappointed that as a fellow policeman police officer he isn't willing to cooperate with them by answering questions informally. Mike being Mike, he isn't fooled, and only replies with one word no matter they say: "Lawyer." To take it a step further, he is in fact guilty of the crime they're questioning him for: the revenge-murder of the two corrupt cops who set up Mike's son Matthew to get killed.
13th Nov '15 12:12:18 AM PaulM
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Added DiffLines:
[[folder:Webcomics]] *In ''BloodandSmoke'', Carson's partner evokes this trope during a conversation. [[spoiler: Turns out the trope is averted as the suspect discussed isn't guilty]]. [[/folder]]
18th Oct '15 4:27:42 AM eroock
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changed trope quote, current did not reflect the repercussions of calling a lawyer
->''"I want a lawyer and will not consider saying anything until one is here."'' -->-- '''What to say if you are arrested and interviewed in UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates'''
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->''"I ->''"What is on Kobe's mind? Going to Colorado, around all these white people, and not bringing Johnnie Cochran? Well then they say, 'well if you hire Johnnie Cochran, you're going to look guilty.' Yeah, but you going '''''home'''''! You want a lawyer and will not consider saying anything until one is here.to look innocent in jail? I'd rather look guilty at the mall."'' -->-- '''What to say if you are arrested and interviewed in UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates''' '''Creator/ChrisRock''', talking about the 2003 Kobe Bryant sexual assault case, ''Never Scared''
8th Oct '15 1:32:41 PM case
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** The former police detective also reveals tons of tricks interrogators use, such as agreeing to turn off their tape recorder to make suspects at ease, and very conspicuously turning it off in front of them. It's meaningless, as interrogation rooms have audio and video recording, but can make suspects give statements as they don't realize this. He points out what everyone must always remember--police are allowed to lie, at least in most circumstances.
to:
** The former police detective also reveals tons of tricks interrogators use, such as agreeing to turn off their tape recorder to make suspects at ease, and very conspicuously turning it off in front of them. It's meaningless, as interrogation rooms have audio and video recording, but can make suspects give statements as they don't realize this. He points out what everyone must always remember--police remember--[[LyingToThePerp police are allowed to lie, lie]], at least in most circumstances.
14th Aug '15 5:11:54 PM eroock
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Added DiffLines:
* First defied, then played straight in ''Literature/GoneGirl''. Nick holds off on hiring a lawyer because he's worried that it'll look bad for him; he turns out to be right. Then he winds up hiring a lawyer known for defending extremely guilty dirtbags.
14th Aug '15 5:09:58 PM eroock
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->''I want a lawyer and will not consider saying anything until one is here.'' -->--'''What to say if you are arrested and interviewed in UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates'''
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->''I ->''"I want a lawyer and will not consider saying anything until one is here.'' -->--'''What "'' -->-- '''What to say if you are arrested and interviewed in UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates'''
21st Jul '15 8:35:03 AM rtozier
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In crime dramas, when someone is arrested, they are read their MirandaRights, "You have the right to remain silent," "You have the right to an attorney," etc. It seems, however, that all good, law-abiding citizens are willing to waive their rights and talk to the police without any qualms at all. But as soon as someone demands a lawyer, or refuses to talk without one, you know instantly that he is a sleazeball. Maybe not the one the police are actually seeking, but he is definitely someone of ill repute.
to:
In crime dramas, when someone is arrested, they are read their MirandaRights, "You have the right to remain silent," "You have the right to an attorney," etc. It seems, however, that all good, law-abiding citizens are willing to waive their rights and talk to the police without any qualms at all. But as soon as someone demands a lawyer, or refuses to talk without one, you know instantly that he is they are a sleazeball. Maybe not the one the police are actually seeking, but he is they are definitely someone of ill repute.
21st Jul '15 8:34:23 AM rtozier
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In crime dramas, when someone is arrested, he is read his MirandaRights, "You have the right to remain silent," "You have the right to an attorney," etc. It seems, however, that all good, law-abiding citizens are willing to waive their rights and talk to the police without any qualms at all. But as soon as someone demands a lawyer, or refuses to talk without one, you know instantly that he is a sleazeball. Maybe not the one the police are actually seeking, but he is definitely someone of ill repute.
to:
In crime dramas, when someone is arrested, he is they are read his their MirandaRights, "You have the right to remain silent," "You have the right to an attorney," etc. It seems, however, that all good, law-abiding citizens are willing to waive their rights and talk to the police without any qualms at all. But as soon as someone demands a lawyer, or refuses to talk without one, you know instantly that he is a sleazeball. Maybe not the one the police are actually seeking, but he is definitely someone of ill repute.
13th Jun '15 4:19:16 PM Kid
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** The former police detective also reveals tons of tricks interrogators use, such as agreeing to turn off their tape recorder to make suspects at ease, and very conspicuously turning it off in front of them. It's meaningless, as interrogation rooms have audio and video recording, but can make suspects give statements as they don't realize this. He points out what everyone must always remember-police are allowed to lie, at least in most circumstances.
to:
** The former police detective also reveals tons of tricks interrogators use, such as agreeing to turn off their tape recorder to make suspects at ease, and very conspicuously turning it off in front of them. It's meaningless, as interrogation rooms have audio and video recording, but can make suspects give statements as they don't realize this. He points out what everyone must always remember-police remember--police are allowed to lie, at least in most circumstances.
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