History Main / NoOntologicalInertia

17th Mar '17 7:02:23 PM nombretomado
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** All {{Nasuverse}} examples avert this trope if you have any real familiarity with how that world works. Gaia, the will of the planet, exerts the force necessary to take anything of magical origin out of existence. In other words, magic has ontological inertia, but the planet destroys it constantly in the same way that it deals with normal inertia through the force of gravity.

to:

** All {{Nasuverse}} {{Franchise/Nasuverse}} examples avert this trope if you have any real familiarity with how that world works. Gaia, the will of the planet, exerts the force necessary to take anything of magical origin out of existence. In other words, magic has ontological inertia, but the planet destroys it constantly in the same way that it deals with normal inertia through the force of gravity.
13th Mar '17 3:35:15 PM AthenaBlue
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* Extremely common in kids' shows, but perhaps best exemplified by ''Franchise/PowerRangers''. In such series, the destruction of a monster almost always reverses whatever effect his power has wrought on the community. In ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', even objects stolen by the villains will also be returned when the MonsterOfTheWeek is slain -- when it wasn't even that monster that took them. The most ridiculous example of this is in one episode of ''[[Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder Dino Thunder]]'' where the ocean-controlling monster has used his powers to summon a tsunami out of the depths, which is about to hit the city. The Rangers destroy the monster just as the wave is about to hit, and the tsunami fades away into nothingness.
** ''Franchise/SuperSentai'' does this as well, with occasional LampshadeHanging.
* Played straight in Series/HikoninSentaiAkibaranger but is usually justified due to the [[MonsterOfTheWeek monsters of the week]] being mere delusions. [[spoiler: Until the delusions manage to cross into reality that is...]]
* ''Series/KamenRiderDenO'' has an interesting dual case of this. Similar to the other kids show example above, when monsters go back in time to wreak havoc and the title character defeats them, any changes they've made to the timeline are reversed... almost. ''Human beings'' have no ontological inertia, since their existence is dependent on memories others have of them. So if someone is killed in the past, but everyone that knew them in the present loses their memories of them at the same time, that person won't come back to life, and will be forced to wander the timestream. This leads to a very glaring plot hole later in the series. Ryotaro isn't worried when [[spoiler:Yuuto is killed in the past, erasing his future self]] because by killing the MonsterOfTheWeek, all the damage is restored. Unfortunately, [[spoiler:Yuuto doesn't return because "Ryotaro never knew Yuuto at that age".]] All well and good, until it gets revealed that [[spoiler:Airi and Sakurai's plan to hide their child hinged on Ryotaro's memory: basically, the ''entire'' timeline would be reconstructed from his memory, sans the baby which was erased from his memories by the Zeronos Cards. What about all the other people that Ryotaro had never met?]]
* Averted in ''Series/KamenRiderDouble'''s portion of the {{Crossover}} ''Movie Wars CORE'': the Spider Dopant has the ability to plant "spider bombs" in people that go off if they get too close to their loved ones. The bombs are still active after his defeat, which forced Double's mentor to avoid his own daughter for the last decade.
* Averted in ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'': When Roshuo (the king of the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Inves]]) is killed, it does absolutely nothing to stop the spread of the [[AlienKudzu Forest of Helheim]] or the other Inves attacking; the only way to permanently end the threat is for someone to take Roshuo's place as the master of Helheim, abandoning their humanity in the process.
** Which turns out to not be a breach of the rule: it was ''thought'' that the Overlords were the {{Big Bad}}s sending the Helheim Forest into our world, but in fact, the forest [[spoiler: has a will of its own, personified in a guy we'd thought was a normal human, and has its own ideas as to why its spread is necessary. Roshuo's the top monster in ''his'' world, having claimed the key to some control of the forest, but he's far from the "master" of the series' events.]]
* In ''Series/SuperhumanSamuraiSyberSquad,'' it's not automatic, but Servo and his accompanying HumongousMecha have a yellow beam to shine on damaged circuitry, reverting anything that's been reprogrammed or ''outright smashed'' to normal. On top of that, sometimes doing so fixes damage to the real world (for example, one MonsterOfTheWeek caused a factory to start putting out toxic gas. Fixing the damage in the Digital World that represents reprogramming some air filters means it doesn't put out any more gas? Understandable. ''This means the gas instantly fades?'' Uh...



* Averted and lampshaded in ''Series/TheAquabatsSuperShow'' episode "The Floating Eye of Death!". The titular eye turns several people into zombies, and Jimmy the Robot is actually rather surprised when they don't go back to normal after he destroys it.
* Averted in ''Series/BigWolfOnCampus'' when a medusa turns Merton to stone. The medusa is defeated, but Merton can't be changed back without Tommy and Lori going through an arduous process to obtain a special potion. Also, defeating the evil librarian (don't ask) doesn't save the people trapped in her books. [[spoiler:Reading the books does, though.]]



* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' was very bad, and inconsistent about this.
* ''Series/{{House}}'' is a regular offender. However, depending on the dramatic level of the episode, they might avert this.

to:

* %%* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' was very bad, and inconsistent about this.
* ''Series/{{House}}'' ''Series/DoctorWho:''
** Played straight in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E2TheDaleks "The Daleks"]]. The Thals' anti-radiation drugs seem to restore the Doctor and company, who were nearly ''close to death from radiation poisoning'', almost instantly.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet "The Tenth Planet"]] ends with the titular planet's destruction sparking the death of all Cybermen on Earth. While it's said they were wholly dependent on power from Mondas, thus explaining why they died alongside it, not only do they drop dead almost instantly, but their organic parts, for almost no reason, disintegrate completely.
** Played straight in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E1TerrorOfTheAutons "Terror of the Autons"]], the Master's somewhat inauspicious debut. He awakens a dormant meteorite containing the Nestene Consciousness, which animates a group of Autons (plastic automata) he created, which go on to create second-generation Autons that also come alive with the Nestene Consciousness. When the Autons take care of the first phase of the invasion, the Master uses a radio telescope to broadcast some kind of energy that allows a Nestene mothership to instantly materialize in Earth's sky. When the Doctor reverses the polarity of the telescope, not only does the mothership disappear, but ''every Auton falls lifelessly to the ground''. Justified in that the Autons are not independently intelligent, but are directly controlled by the Nestene Consciousness.
** The ending of [[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E4ColonyInSpace "Colony in Space"]] implies that without the radiation caused by the Doomsday Weapon, the planet will instantly become fertile and provide ample sustenance to the colony who has chosen to continue living there.
** Also played straight in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E1NewEarth "New Earth"]]. The Doctor uses a vaccine to cure ArtificialHumans used as lab rats, complete with the visible signs of their illness disappearing before our eyes.
--->'''The Doctor:''' I'm the Doctor, and ''I cured them!''
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E6TheVampiresOfVenice "The Vampires of Venice"]]; when Eleven turns off the generator that begun to give Venice its own natural-disaster apocalypse, including a tidal wave started by an earthquake, within less than a second the sky clears up, the clouds move, and everything
is sunshine and rainbows.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E3TheCurseOfTheBlackSpot "The Curse of the Black Spot"]] features
a regular offender. However, depending MonsterOfTheWeek that enters our world using reflective surfaces as a gateway. At one point she does this via a crown; the Doctor responds by tossing said crown into the sea. This somehow causes the monster to vanish. The "monster" was actually a projection from a ship on the dramatic level other side. Throwing the crown in the water severed the connection.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E10InTheForestOfTheNight "In the Forest
of the episode, they might avert this.Night"]]: After the solar flare, all the trees just melt away into fairy dust.



* ''Series/{{House}}'' is a regular offender. However, depending on the dramatic level of the episode, they might avert this.
* ''Series/KamenRiderDenO'' has an interesting dual case of this. Similar to the other kids show example above, when monsters go back in time to wreak havoc and the title character defeats them, any changes they've made to the timeline are reversed... almost. ''Human beings'' have no ontological inertia, since their existence is dependent on memories others have of them. So if someone is killed in the past, but everyone that knew them in the present loses their memories of them at the same time, that person won't come back to life, and will be forced to wander the timestream. This leads to a very glaring plot hole later in the series. Ryotaro isn't worried when [[spoiler:Yuuto is killed in the past, erasing his future self]] because by killing the MonsterOfTheWeek, all the damage is restored. Unfortunately, [[spoiler:Yuuto doesn't return because "Ryotaro never knew Yuuto at that age".]] All well and good, until it gets revealed that [[spoiler:Airi and Sakurai's plan to hide their child hinged on Ryotaro's memory: basically, the ''entire'' timeline would be reconstructed from his memory, sans the baby which was erased from his memories by the Zeronos Cards. What about all the other people that Ryotaro had never met?]]
* Averted in ''Series/KamenRiderDouble'''s portion of the {{Crossover}} ''Movie Wars CORE'': the Spider Dopant has the ability to plant "spider bombs" in people that go off if they get too close to their loved ones. The bombs are still active after his defeat, which forced Double's mentor to avoid his own daughter for the last decade.
* Averted in ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'': When Roshuo (the king of the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Inves]]) is killed, it does absolutely nothing to stop the spread of the [[AlienKudzu Forest of Helheim]] or the other Inves attacking; the only way to permanently end the threat is for someone to take Roshuo's place as the master of Helheim, abandoning their humanity in the process.
** Which turns out to not be a breach of the rule: it was ''thought'' that the Overlords were the {{Big Bad}}s sending the Helheim Forest into our world, but in fact, the forest [[spoiler: has a will of its own, personified in a guy we'd thought was a normal human, and has its own ideas as to why its spread is necessary. Roshuo's the top monster in ''his'' world, having claimed the key to some control of the forest, but he's far from the "master" of the series' events.]]



* In ''Series/LostGirl'', The Djieine's venom instantly disappears from its victims' bodies as soon as its heart is destroyed. Lauren starts to give a perfectly rational and sensible explanation (something to do with magnetic fields) for why it stopped instantly, but trails off when she sees that Bo doesn't understand any of it.
* In the ''Series/{{Merlin 1998}}'' series, Queen Mab's spells begin to lose their power and fade away after she disappears. It seems to take at least a few years, though.
* Extremely common in kids' shows, but perhaps best exemplified by ''Franchise/PowerRangers''. In such series, the destruction of a monster almost always reverses whatever effect his power has wrought on the community. In ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', even objects stolen by the villains will also be returned when the MonsterOfTheWeek is slain -- when it wasn't even that monster that took them. The most ridiculous example of this is in one episode of ''[[Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder Dino Thunder]]'' where the ocean-controlling monster has used his powers to summon a tsunami out of the depths, which is about to hit the city. The Rangers destroy the monster just as the wave is about to hit, and the tsunami fades away into nothingness.
** ''Franchise/SuperSentai'' does this as well, with occasional LampshadeHanging.
** Played straight in Series/HikoninSentaiAkibaranger but is usually justified due to the [[MonsterOfTheWeek monsters of the week]] being mere delusions. [[spoiler: Until the delusions manage to cross into reality that is...]]
* In Assignment 3 of ''Series/SapphireAndSteel'', the Changeling can reduce things to dust by touching them. When Steel returns him to his original condition, everything he had touched is instantly restored.
* Averted in ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures''' "Eye of the Gorgon". Defeating the Gorgon doesn't turn the people it's petrified back. You need to use the talisman, and it only works if they haven't been stone too long.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "The Deadly Years". A strange form of radiation causes Kirk, Spock, [=McCoy=] and Scotty to age at a rate of 10 years per day until they're all senior citizens. Once a medicine that neutralizes the radiation's effect is administered, they quickly de-age back to their original ages.
* Averted in the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' series finale. Picard (who is moving back and forth through time by Q) is warned by Q that he will be responsible for destroying humanity. In each time frame Picard travels to the Neutral Zone to investigate a "spatial anomaly". Eventually, Picard realizes that the inverse tachyon pulses he is using to scan the anomaly are [[NiceJobBreakingItHero actually creating it]] and will, in the far past, prevent the human race from ever coming into being ([[FromBadToWorse and all other life on earth, apparently]]). Turning off the beams does nothing, however, and Picard bemuses "Why isn't the anomaly being affected?" Turns out the anomaly does have ontological inertia, and the Enterprise has to find a way to repair it.
** Played straight in [[Film/StarTrekInsurrection Insurrection]] with Geordi La Forge's eyes being regenerated to normal functioning eyes, only to become blind again after the effect had caused it had worn off, as if healthy eyes require some kind of constant external effect to remain healthy and functional.
* In ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'''s two-part episode "Year of Hell", destroying the Krenim time-ship also undoes all of the changes it made to the timeline.
** While the above is Justified in the show[[note]]destroying the time ship caused it to erase ''itself'' from history, retroactively undoing all of its actions[[/note]], ''Voyager'' earned itself the nickname ''U.S.S. ResetButton'' for a combination of this and StatusQuoIsGod.
* In ''Series/SuperhumanSamuraiSyberSquad,'' it's not automatic, but Servo and his accompanying HumongousMecha have a yellow beam to shine on damaged circuitry, reverting anything that's been reprogrammed or ''outright smashed'' to normal. On top of that, sometimes doing so fixes damage to the real world (for example, one MonsterOfTheWeek caused a factory to start putting out toxic gas. Fixing the damage in the Digital World that represents reprogramming some air filters means it doesn't put out any more gas? Understandable. ''This means the gas instantly fades?'' Uh...



* Averted in ''Series/BigWolfOnCampus'' when a medusa turns Merton to stone. The medusa is defeated, but Merton can't be changed back without Tommy and Lori going through an arduous process to obtain a special potion. Also, defeating the evil librarian (don't ask) doesn't save the people trapped in her books. [[spoiler:Reading the books does, though.]]



* Averted in ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures''' "Eye of the Gorgon". Defeating the Gorgon doesn't turn the people it's petrified back. You need to use the talisman, and it only works if they haven't been stone too long.
* ''Series/DoctorWho:''
** Played straight in ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E2TheDaleks The Daleks]]''. The Thals' anti-radiation drugs seem to restore the Doctor and company, who were nearly ''close to death from radiation poisoning'', almost instantly.
** ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E2TheTenthPlanet The Tenth Planet]]'' ends with the titular planet's destruction sparking the death of all Cybermen on Earth. While it's said they were wholly dependent on power from Mondas, thus explaining why they died alongside it, not only do they drop dead almost instantly, but their organic parts, for almost no reason, disintigrate completely.
** Played straight in ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E1TerrorOfTheAutons Terror of the Autons]]'', the Master's somewhat inauspicious debut. He awakens a dormant meteorite containing the Nestene Consciousness, which animates a group of Autons (plastic automata) he created, which go on to create second-generation Autons that also come alive with the Nestene Consciousness. When the Autons take care of the first phase of the invasion, the Master uses a radio telescope to broadcast some kind of energy that allows a Nestene mothership to instantly materialize in Earth's sky. When the Doctor reverses the polarity of the telescope, not only does the mothership disappear, but ''every Auton falls lifelessly to the ground''. Justified in that the Autons are not independently intelligent, but are directly controlled by the Nestene Consciousness.
** Also played straight in ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E1NewEarth New Earth]]''. The Doctor uses a vaccine to cure a zombie apocalypse, complete with their rotting flesh re-forming before our eyes.
--->'''The Doctor:''' I'm the Doctor, and ''I cured them!''
** In ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E6TheVampiresOfVenice The Vampires of Venice]]''; when Eleven turns off the generator that begun to give Venice its own natural-disaster apocalypse, including a tidal wave started by an earthquake, within less than a second the sky clears up, the clouds move, and everything is sunshine and rainbows.
** The ending of ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E4ColonyInSpace Colony in Space]]'' implies that without the radiation caused by the Doomsday Weapon, the planet will instantly become fertile and provide ample sustenance to the colony who has chosen to continue living there.
** ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E3TheCurseOfTheBlackSpot The Curse of the Black Spot]]'' features a MonsterOfTheWeek that enters our world using reflective surfaces as a gateway. At one point she does this via a crown; the Doctor responds by tossing said crown into the sea. This somehow causes the monster to vanish. The "monster" was actually a projection from a ship on the other side. Throwing the crown in the water severed the connection.
** In ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E10InTheForestOfTheNight In The Forest Of The Night]]'', after the flare, all the trees just melt away into fairy dust.



* In the ''Series/{{Merlin 1998}}'' series, Queen Mab's spells begin to lose their power and fade away after she disappears. It seems to take at least a few years, though.



* In Assignment 3 of ''Series/SapphireAndSteel'', the Changeling can reduce things to dust by touching them. When Steel returns him to his original condition, everything he had touched is instantly restored.
* In ''Series/LostGirl'', The Djieine's venom instantly disappears from its victims' bodies as soon as its heart is destroyed. Lauren starts to give a perfectly rational and sensible explanation (something to do with magnetic fields) for why it stopped instantly, but trails off when she sees that Bo doesn't understand any of it.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "The Deadly Years". A strange form of radiation causes Kirk, Spock, [=McCoy=] and Scotty to age at a rate of 10 years per day until they're all senior citizens. Once a medicine that neutralizes the radiation's effect is administered, they quickly de-age back to their original ages.
* Averted in the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' series finale. Picard (who is moving back and forth through time by Q) is warned by Q that he will be responsible for destroying humanity. In each time frame Picard travels to the Neutral Zone to investigate a "spatial anomaly". Eventually, Picard realizes that the inverse tachyon pulses he is using to scan the anomaly are [[NiceJobBreakingItHero actually creating it]] and will, in the far past, prevent the human race from ever coming into being ([[FromBadToWorse and all other life on earth, apparently]]). Turning off the beams does nothing, however, and Picard bemuses "Why isn't the anomaly being affected?" Turns out the anomaly does have ontological inertia, and the Enterprise has to find a way to repair it.
** Played straight in [[Film/StarTrekInsurrection Insurrection]] with Geordi La Forge's eyes being regenerated to normal functioning eyes, only to become blind again after the effect had caused it had worn off, as if healthy eyes require some kind of constant external effect to remain healthy and functional.
* In ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'''s two-part episode "Year of Hell", destroying the Krenim time-ship also undoes all of the changes it made to the timeline.
** While the above is Justified in the show[[note]]destroying the time ship caused it to erase ''itself'' from history, retroactively undoing all of its actions[[/note]], ''Voyager'' earned itself the nickname ''U.S.S. ResetButton'' for a combination of this and StatusQuoIsGod.
* Averted and lampshaded in ''Series/TheAquabatsSuperShow'' episode "The Floating Eye of Death!". The titular eye turns several people into zombies, and Jimmy the Robot is actually rather surprised when they don't go back to normal after he destroys it.
7th Mar '17 5:19:34 PM Sharysa
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Added DiffLines:

-->Parodied EVEN MORE when said Fear Demon, who has an ominous depiction in the book's illustration of him, arrives. [[spoiler: He's literally the size of the drawing, and Buffy just stomps him with her foot.]]
7th Mar '17 4:28:24 PM Sharysa
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Added DiffLines:

** Referenced by Professor Slughorn, who received an enchanted fish from Harry's mother Lily, one of his former students. Several years later, at the height of magical Britain's civil war, he came into the room with its bowl one morning and the fish had vanished--so he [[TearJerker immediately knew that Lily died.]]
1st Feb '17 11:52:15 PM Dattix
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*** Engineers who switch wrenches will have their buildings destroyed, since each wrench provides a specific bonus tied to buildings (usually at different points in the building's life, such as one wrench making things build faster, while another one lets you teleport back to base, and a third one allowing you to build a quick-deploying combat mini-sentry instead of the regular sentry gun) and would be exploited for changing out wrenches before actually heading out with the buildings. However, if your client loses connection to the item server and you have a special wrench equipped, the game will automatically force you into the stock wrench and destroy your buildings, even though you never intended to change.

to:

*** Engineers who switch wrenches between the Gunslinger (a mechanical hand that gives him 25 extra HP and replaces his normal sentry with a combat mini-sentry) and any wrench will have their buildings sentry destroyed, since each wrench provides a specific bonus tied presumably to buildings (usually at different points in keep him from having the building's life, such as one wrench making things build faster, while another one lets you teleport back to base, Gunslinger's benefits and a third one allowing you to build a quick-deploying combat mini-sentry instead of the regular level 3 sentry gun) and would be exploited for changing out wrenches before actually heading out with gun at the buildings. However, if your client loses connection to the item server and you have a special wrench equipped, the game will automatically force you into the stock wrench and destroy your same time. Previously, switching melee weapons at all destroyed ''all'' his buildings, even though you never intended forcing him to change.have to start again from scratch.
28th Jan '17 9:03:06 PM PhantomRider
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Added DiffLines:

**In ''Anime/DigimonFrontier,'' the TransformationTrinkets will take 'extra' data from a defeated enemy such as whatever data he sucked up to gain power, and any spell placed on them by the major villains. Therefore, whacking the MonsterOfTheWeek hard enough lets you restore them to their former selves if they're under TheCorruption, and fix anything they broke. Apparently, all the world's data knows who and what it's supposed to be, so it's a matter of weakening the enemy enough to make it capturable, and then releasing it. By the end of the series, the ''world'' has been reduced to crumbs to revive the SealedEvilInACan and the ''moons'' were ''shattered'' by the first battle with him. When he's defeated at long last, all goes back to normal.


Added DiffLines:

*In ''Series/SuperhumanSamuraiSyberSquad,'' it's not automatic, but Servo and his accompanying HumongousMecha have a yellow beam to shine on damaged circuitry, reverting anything that's been reprogrammed or ''outright smashed'' to normal. On top of that, sometimes doing so fixes damage to the real world (for example, one MonsterOfTheWeek caused a factory to start putting out toxic gas. Fixing the damage in the Digital World that represents reprogramming some air filters means it doesn't put out any more gas? Understandable. ''This means the gas instantly fades?'' Uh...
28th Jan '17 8:29:29 PM PhantomRider
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**Which turns out to not be a breach of the rule: it was ''thought'' that the Overlords were the {{Big Bad}}s sending the Helheim Forest into our world, but in fact, the forest [[spoiler: has a will of its own, personified in a guy we'd thought was a normal human, and has its own ideas as to why its spread is necessary. Roshuo's the top monster in ''his'' world, having claimed the key to some control of the forest, but he's far from the "master" of the series' events.]]



** Adam Monroe (spoilers ahead). [[spoiler:He's over 400 years old, but looks to be in his mid-twenties. However, once Arthur Petrelli steals his healing ability, [[NoImmortalInertia Monroe ages all 400 years, dies, and turns to dust. His youth and health have no ontological inertia.]] This is particularly aggravating in that it makes no sense with the way Monroe's powers work. They don't cover up his age or mask it, he has highly advanced regenerative capabilities. Logically, once he loses his power, he should just be normal, still young, but able to age and be hurt NOW.]]

to:

** Adam Monroe (spoilers ahead). [[spoiler:He's over 400 years old, but looks to be in his mid-twenties. However, once Arthur Petrelli steals his healing ability, [[NoImmortalInertia Monroe ages all 400 years, dies, and turns to dust. His youth and health have no ontological inertia.]] This is particularly aggravating in that it makes no sense with the way Monroe's powers work. They don't cover up his age or mask it, he has highly advanced regenerative capabilities. Logically, once he loses his power, he should just be normal, still young, but able to age and be hurt NOW.]] It's especially glaring with Claire, having the same healing powers, as a main character. When we first met her, her hobby was jumping from heights of several hundred feet just so her twisting her mangled limbs back into place and healing can be filmed, or severing body parts just to watch them grow back. A period of depowerment should mean an instant and gruesome death. Insteead... she's just normal, able to age and be hurt ''now.'']]
11th Jan '17 11:46:10 PM PaulA
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* In ''Film/FlashGordon'', the moon was only a few seconds away from crashing into the Earth when Ming was killed, instantly restoring everything to normal. Ontological inertia wasn't even necessary at this point - normal physical inertia, or even the Earth's gravity, should have allowed the moon to keep moving for at least a few more seconds. Not to mention that Ming was using a machine to move the moon, so even without ontological inertia someone must have turned it off before Ming even hit the ground. However, it's possible that the countdown was to the point where the moon was too far gone to stop, rather than the actual collision.

to:

* In ''Film/FlashGordon'', ''Film/{{Flash Gordon|1980}}'', the moon was only a few seconds away from crashing into the Earth when Ming was killed, instantly restoring everything to normal. Ontological inertia wasn't even necessary at this point - normal physical inertia, or even the Earth's gravity, should have allowed the moon to keep moving for at least a few more seconds. Not to mention that Ming was using a machine to move the moon, so even without ontological inertia someone must have turned it off before Ming even hit the ground. However, it's possible that the countdown was to the point where the moon was too far gone to stop, rather than the actual collision.
30th Dec '16 4:37:17 PM Kadorhal
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* According to the original plot for ''VideoGame/{{Killer7}}'', managing to kill a being called the "Final Smile" would have caused the regular Heaven's Smiles the player faces throughout the game to cease existing. The Final Smile isn't in the released game, though.
** However, Garcian ends up killing the Big Boss, which is implied to be the sire that fertilizes all the egg-laying heaven's smiles - killing him will result in the eventual extinction of the smiles, since reproduction by conversion isn't a valid long-term tactic. The sire is [[spoiler:Izuna, one of Harman's (Garcian's boss) servants, who is revealed to be a clone of Kun Lan, the antagonist.]]

to:

* According to the original plot for ''VideoGame/{{Killer7}}'', managing to kill a being called the "Final "Final" or "Last Shot Smile" would have caused the regular Heaven's Smiles the player faces throughout the game to cease existing. The Final Smile isn't in the released game, though.
** However,
though the supplementary "Hand in killer7" material is still based on an earlier version of the story where an FBI agent was manipulating the direction of the plot from behind the scenes to find and destroy it himself. Garcian ends Smith does end up killing the Big Boss, however, which is implied to be the sire that fertilizes all the egg-laying heaven's smiles Heaven's Smiles - killing him will result in the eventual extinction of the smiles, Smiles, since reproduction by conversion isn't a valid long-term tactic. The sire is [[spoiler:Izuna, [[spoiler:Iwazaru, one of Harman's (Garcian's boss) servants, who is revealed to be a clone of Kun Lan, the primary antagonist.]]
26th Dec '16 10:38:17 AM justanid
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See also LiquidAssets and NoImmortalInertia -- though these are more about LifeEnergy, they still represent states that can be easily restored to "normal". Similarly, ThisWasHisTrueForm is this trope applied to shapeshifters. This is a type of ResetButton. DestructionEqualsOffSwitch is arguably a subtrope. Contrast OffscreenInertia. Compare WhatHappenedToTheMouse, where not only does something disappear, but the author fails to give any clue why. Not to be confused with StatusQuoIsGod, where the reversion happens offscreen and no reason is ever given.

to:

See also LiquidAssets and NoImmortalInertia -- though these are more about LifeEnergy, they still represent states that can be easily restored to "normal". Similarly, ThisWasHisTrueForm is this trope applied to shapeshifters. This is a type of ResetButton. DestructionEqualsOffSwitch is arguably a subtrope.subtrope.

Compare with CriticalExistenceFailure, when something has no intermediate state between functionally perfect and completely destroyed; and WhatHappenedToTheMouse, where not only does something disappear, but the author fails to give any clue why.
Contrast OffscreenInertia. Compare WhatHappenedToTheMouse, where not only does something disappear, but the author fails See also LiquidAssets and NoImmortalInertia -- though these are more about LifeEnergy, they still represent states that can be easily restored to give any clue why. "normal".

Not to be confused with StatusQuoIsGod, where the reversion happens offscreen and no reason is ever given.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NoOntologicalInertia