History Main / JigsawPuzzlePlot

22nd Sep '16 3:31:27 PM StFan
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[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

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[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]



[[folder:Fan Fiction]]
* ''FanFic/AeonNatumEngel'' tries to recreate a Jigsaw Puzzle Plot where its [[Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion source material]] went for more of a KudzuPlot. (and no, knowing what was going on in canon Eva won't help you that much). Warning: Putting too many pieces together [[GoMadFromTheRevelation may induce maniacal laughter and/or gibbering]].

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[[folder:Fan Fiction]]
Works]]
* ''FanFic/AeonNatumEngel'' ''Fanfic/AeonNatumEngel'' tries to recreate a Jigsaw Puzzle Plot where its [[Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion source material]] went for more of a KudzuPlot. (and no, knowing what was going on in canon Eva won't help you that much). Warning: Putting too many pieces together [[GoMadFromTheRevelation may induce maniacal laughter and/or gibbering]].



[[folder:Film]]

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[[folder:Film]][[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



* The Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse is a downplayed version of this as all of the movies tried to avoid inter-franchise ContinuityLockout as much as possible, but it's still there. A few examples would be the alien invasion in New York (its beginning spawned from ''Film/{{Thor}}'', reached its climax in ''[[Film/TheAvengers2012 The Avengers]]'' and the aftermath is dealt with / kick starts the plot in ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'' (which in turn kick start the [[spoiler:complete dismantle of SHIELD]] plot in ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD''), ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'' (whose plot is also kickstarted by both ''The Avengers'' and ''Winter Soldier'') and ''[[Series/{{Daredevil2015}} Daredevil]]'') and the Black Widow Ops Program (hinted from ''The Avengers'' and ''Winter Soldier'', got more details in ''Series/AgentCarter'' and ''Age Of Ultron'').

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* The Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse is a downplayed version of this as all of the movies tried to avoid inter-franchise ContinuityLockout as much as possible, but it's still there. A few examples would be the alien invasion in New York (its beginning spawned from ''Film/{{Thor}}'', reached its climax in ''[[Film/TheAvengers2012 The Avengers]]'' ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' and the aftermath is dealt with / kick starts the plot in ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'' (which in turn kick start the [[spoiler:complete dismantle of SHIELD]] S.H.I.E.L.D.]] plot in ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD''), ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'' (whose plot is also kickstarted by both ''The Avengers'' and ''Winter Soldier'') and ''[[Series/{{Daredevil2015}} Daredevil]]'') ''Series/{{Daredevil|2015}}'') and the Black Widow Ops Program (hinted from ''The Avengers'' and ''Winter Soldier'', got more details in ''Series/AgentCarter'' and ''Age Of Ultron'').



[[folder:Web Animation]]
* ''WebAnimation/{{TOME}}'' (at least the remake) plays this trope very straight. Most people's original complaints with the series based on the first episode were that they had no idea what was going on. For most of the series you are left with nothing but questions as new characters pop out of nowhere and things happen seemingly without substance or reason. Every time a question is answered, it leaves more questions. The series puts together some of the bigger pieces by the time it reaches the end, but a lot of answers to little questions aren't understood right away without rewatching the entire thing.
* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'' heads to this during season 3, while getting DarkerAndEdgier. While some things have been explained from episode 6 of season 3 forward, a lot is still to be explained about [[spoiler: Ozpin's past, Cinder's intentions and ambitions, the Seasonal Maidens' identities, Yang's Mother]] and others. Lots of fan theories have sparkled since then.
[[/folder]]



* ''{{Webcomic/morphE}}'' is designed this way. It specifically alternates between character development, world building and plot development leaving cookie crumbs to answer the DrivingQuestion.

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* ''{{Webcomic/morphE}}'' ''Webcomic/{{morphE}}'' is designed this way. It specifically alternates between character development, world building and plot development leaving cookie crumbs to answer the DrivingQuestion.



* The series ''WebVideo/{{lonelygirl15}}'' is notably reticent to explain any more than about half of what's going on at any given time.

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* The series ''WebVideo/{{lonelygirl15}}'' ''WebVideo/Lonelygirl15'' is notably reticent to explain any more than about half of what's going on at any given time.



* ''WebOriginal/EverymanHYBRID'' has literal jigsaw pieces scattered across the internet.
* ''WebAnimation/{{TOME}}'' (at least the remake) plays this trope very straight. Most people's original complaints with the series based on the first episode were that they had no idea what was going on. For most of the series you are left with nothing but questions as new characters pop out of nowhere and things happen seemingly without substance or reason. Every time a question is answered, it leaves more questions. The series puts together some of the bigger pieces by the time it reaches the end, but a lot of answers to little questions aren't understood right away without rewatching the entire thing.
* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'' heads to this during season 3, while getting DarkerAndEdgier. While some things have been explained from episode 6 of season 3 forward, a lot is still to be explained about [[spoiler: Ozpin's past, Cinder's intentions and ambitions, the Seasonal Maidens' identities, Yang's Mother]] and others. Lots of fan theories have sparkled since then.

to:

* ''WebOriginal/EverymanHYBRID'' ''WebVideo/EverymanHYBRID'' has literal jigsaw pieces scattered across the internet.
* ''WebAnimation/{{TOME}}'' (at least the remake) plays this trope very straight. Most people's original complaints with the series based on the first episode were that they had no idea what was going on. For most of the series you are left with nothing but questions as new characters pop out of nowhere and things happen seemingly without substance or reason. Every time a question is answered, it leaves more questions. The series puts together some of the bigger pieces by the time it reaches the end, but a lot of answers to little questions aren't understood right away without rewatching the entire thing.
* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'' heads to this during season 3, while getting DarkerAndEdgier. While some things have been explained from episode 6 of season 3 forward, a lot is still to be explained about [[spoiler: Ozpin's past, Cinder's intentions and ambitions, the Seasonal Maidens' identities, Yang's Mother]] and others. Lots of fan theories have sparkled since then.
internet.



* ''[[WesternAnimation/TwelveOunceMouse 12 oz. Mouse]]'' is one of the crowning achievements in narrative complexity. Between the incredibly complicated plot and the...''interesting'' animation, most people watch it without noticing that there's any plot at all. Seriously. Any discussion of the show immediately turns into "there's no point to it" versus "what the hell are you talking about?"

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* ''[[WesternAnimation/TwelveOunceMouse 12 oz. Mouse]]'' ''WesternAnimation/TwelveOunceMouse'' is one of the crowning achievements in narrative complexity. Between the incredibly complicated plot and the... ''interesting'' animation, most people watch it without noticing that there's any plot at all. Seriously. Any discussion of the show immediately turns into "there's no point to it" versus "what the hell are you talking about?"



13th Sep '16 11:03:38 PM Eagal
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* ''VideoGame/OracleOfTao'': Ummm, maybe it's better to visit the site page. It's a bit difficult to example all the many plotlines.

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* ''VideoGame/OracleOfTao'': Ummm, maybe Many things are revealed in this game, spaced out all over the place. There is at the very opening, a WorldSundering, of the New Earth and the Void [[spoiler: which was the old Earth]]. Then Ambrosia gets a series of religious truths foisted on her, along which the revelation that she might not be real, and the realization that she has a LiteralSplitPersonality causing chaos around her. This is to say nothing of [[RashomonStyle the often conflicting (as viewed by histories, versus personal accounts, versus the demon's own account)]] versions of people getting raptured by a demon's coming, various personal plots scattered about the world, Ambrosia's [[QuestForIdentity quest to find her memories of her parents]], and various secrets revealed at the end about her identity, the world, and everything in it. And it's better not even truly over, so there is a second game to visit tie up loose ends, with an additional secret or two [[spoiler: the site page. It's Oracle's role is actually a bit difficult replacement to example all extend the many plotlines.lifespan of God, since without someone to renew the cycle, God and everything else in existence is doomed to return to the Void they came from]].
12th Sep '16 9:00:46 PM Xtifr
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* The short novel ''Literature/EmpireStar'' by Creator/SamuelRDelany is a deliberately crafted jigsaw, designed so the reader isn't even aware they're seeing pieces of a puzzle, until the end, when Delany offers a few last missing key pieces, and then suggests that the reader can now assemble the whole story in their mind. Learning that you're dealing with AnachronicOrder and time travel changes everything.
6th Sep '16 8:12:16 AM matruz
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* ''Franchise/DragonAge'' has this for history and details of the world of Thedas, for which you collect bits and pieces as codex entries that you can spend hours reading them and piecing them together; in fact, the main conflict of ''Videogame/DragonAgeInquisition'' was foreshadowed as early as in ''Videogame/DragonAgeOrigins'' if you took the time to slug through the entries dealing with [[spoiler: the Elven Gods, the fade and the Old Gods]].
19th Aug '16 6:42:05 AM AnotherDuck
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* ''ComicBook/TransformersMoreThanMeetsTheEye'' is a prime example. At first the plot seems fairly straightforward: a crew of Transformers set off on a quest to find the mysterious {{Precursors}} by following an ancient starmap. But soon more and more mysteries and odd events begin appearing and multiple hints are dropped that something bigger is going on. Than the backstories and pasts of the characters and galaxy are slowly told through flashbacks, foreshadowing, subtle dialogue, and background hints (with occasional WordOfGod to fill in less apparent or important things). As the comic goes on, we learn more about how the crew came to be where they are today, with the foggy implication that the crew has ''always'' been linked to each other even before they began their quest. And all of this is told in somewhat AnachronicOrder.

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* ''ComicBook/TransformersMoreThanMeetsTheEye'' is a prime example. At first the plot seems fairly straightforward: a crew of Transformers set off on a quest to find the mysterious {{Precursors}} by following an ancient starmap. But soon more and more mysteries and odd events begin appearing and multiple hints are dropped that something bigger is going on. Than Then the backstories and pasts of the characters and galaxy are slowly told through flashbacks, foreshadowing, subtle dialogue, and background hints (with occasional WordOfGod to fill in less apparent or important things). As the comic goes on, we learn more about how the crew came to be where they are today, with the foggy implication that the crew has ''always'' been linked to each other even before they began their quest. And all of this is told in somewhat AnachronicOrder.
22nd Jul '16 6:19:42 PM jormis29
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* Similar to the ''VideoGame/{{killer7}}'' example above, Suda 51's ''TheSilverCase'' series follows this trope. It begins with ''Moonlight Syndrome'', in which [[spoiler:nearly everyone dies]], moves on to ''The Silver Case'' itself, in which the only detective investigating the events of ''Moonlight Syndrome'' is murdered, and then moves on to FlowerSunAndRain, whose plot is too complicated and fantastic to explain here.

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* Similar to the ''VideoGame/{{killer7}}'' example above, Suda 51's ''TheSilverCase'' ''VideoGame/TheSilverCase'' series follows this trope. It begins with ''Moonlight Syndrome'', in which [[spoiler:nearly everyone dies]], moves on to ''The Silver Case'' itself, in which the only detective investigating the events of ''Moonlight Syndrome'' is murdered, and then moves on to FlowerSunAndRain, whose plot is too complicated and fantastic to explain here.
17th Jul '16 11:23:30 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'': Eight player classes, each with their own story arc and five companions with their own, smaller character arc. The companions from the Consular class have worked with the Trooper's companions ''and'' the Bounty Hunter's. The Jedi Knight's healer used to [[FriendsWithBenefits "date"]] Imperial Agent's terrorist companion. The Imperial Agent sabotaged friends of the Consular's terrorist companion. The Smuggler's companions used to be best friends with the Sith Warrior's companion. The Imperial Agent's opponents include characters from ''everyone else's'' story. This in ''addition'' to all the little story arcs and sidequests that can date back to ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', the ''Tales of the Jedi'' comic, and the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse in general. It's Creator/BioWare, prepare for a ''long'' play-through to understand half of it.

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* ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'': Eight player classes, each with their own story arc and five companions with their own, smaller character arc. The companions from the Consular class have worked with the Trooper's companions ''and'' the Bounty Hunter's. The Jedi Knight's healer used to [[FriendsWithBenefits "date"]] Imperial Agent's terrorist companion. The Imperial Agent sabotaged friends of the Consular's terrorist companion. The Smuggler's companions used to be best friends with the Sith Warrior's companion. The Imperial Agent's opponents include characters from ''everyone else's'' story. This in ''addition'' to all the little story arcs and sidequests that can date back to ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', the ''Tales of the Jedi'' comic, and the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse in general. It's Creator/BioWare, prepare for a ''long'' play-through to understand half of it. [[spoiler: In the expansion ''Knights of the Fallen Empire'' you find out that many of the parts that don't seem to fit, especially the Sith Emperor apparently pursuing several mutually exclusive strategies at once, were due to him deliberately wasting everyone's time while he readied his ''other'' empire to win in the end.]]
5th Jul '16 4:29:40 PM morenohijazo
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* ''VideoGame/TheTalosPrinciple'': The terminals and Alexandra's recordings comprise the bits and pieces of the story.
18th Jun '16 3:26:06 PM Ledinax
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* The ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' mostly averts this practice, as every book is stand-alone, and even in the case where it isn't -- like ''Discworld/LordAndLadies'' -- most of the stuff you need to know is mentioned a second time. However some pieces of character development can only be understood correctly if you read every book where the character in question turns up, and find a lot of things were already mentioned. A major contender for this is Death, who shows up in every book but two, but if you only read the books where he or his granddaughter Susan star in you will never grasp the full depth of his character. It works the same with Sam Vimes, as the "beast" that is inside of him is elaborated on in every book for brief amounts of time, only to be given a starring role of sorts in ''Discworld/NightWatch'' (and even then this subplot is continued afterwards). Another major character is Carrot, who on the surface is a NiceGuy who genuinely wants all people to live in peace and harmony, but in truth there is a massive complexity behind his simpleness which a reader may only begin to understand by reading all of the watch books and the short story "Theater of Cruelty".

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* The ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' mostly averts this practice, as every book is stand-alone, and even in the case where it isn't -- like ''Discworld/LordAndLadies'' ''Discworld/LordsAndLadies'' -- most of the stuff you need to know is mentioned a second time. However some pieces of character development can only be understood correctly if you read every book where the character in question turns up, and find a lot of things were already mentioned. A major contender for this is Death, who shows up in every book but two, but if you only read the books where he or his granddaughter Susan star in you will never grasp the full depth of his character. It works the same with Sam Vimes, as the "beast" that is inside of him is elaborated on in every book for brief amounts of time, only to be given a starring role of sorts in ''Discworld/NightWatch'' (and even then this subplot is continued afterwards). Another major character is Carrot, who on the surface is a NiceGuy who genuinely wants all people to live in peace and harmony, but in truth there is a massive complexity behind his simpleness which a reader may only begin to understand by reading all of the watch books and the short story "Theater of Cruelty".
17th May '16 7:57:48 AM hyphz
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*** In fact, an accepted interpretation of the game is that [[spoiler:the plot itself is a MindScrew created by the mastermind to entrap and torment the player]]. Why? Because [[spoiler:to the characters in the game, the player is a [[YouBastard scary demon]] who [[BreakingTheFourthWall enters from another dimension]] to control their minds!]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.JigsawPuzzlePlot