History Main / JigsawPuzzlePlot

22nd Jul '16 6:19:42 PM jormis29
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* Similar to the ''VideoGame/{{killer7}}'' example above, Suda 51's ''TheSilverCase'' series follows this trope. It begins with ''Moonlight Syndrome'', in which [[spoiler:nearly everyone dies]], moves on to ''The Silver Case'' itself, in which the only detective investigating the events of ''Moonlight Syndrome'' is murdered, and then moves on to FlowerSunAndRain, whose plot is too complicated and fantastic to explain here.

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* Similar to the ''VideoGame/{{killer7}}'' example above, Suda 51's ''TheSilverCase'' ''VideoGame/TheSilverCase'' series follows this trope. It begins with ''Moonlight Syndrome'', in which [[spoiler:nearly everyone dies]], moves on to ''The Silver Case'' itself, in which the only detective investigating the events of ''Moonlight Syndrome'' is murdered, and then moves on to FlowerSunAndRain, whose plot is too complicated and fantastic to explain here.
17th Jul '16 11:23:30 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'': Eight player classes, each with their own story arc and five companions with their own, smaller character arc. The companions from the Consular class have worked with the Trooper's companions ''and'' the Bounty Hunter's. The Jedi Knight's healer used to [[FriendsWithBenefits "date"]] Imperial Agent's terrorist companion. The Imperial Agent sabotaged friends of the Consular's terrorist companion. The Smuggler's companions used to be best friends with the Sith Warrior's companion. The Imperial Agent's opponents include characters from ''everyone else's'' story. This in ''addition'' to all the little story arcs and sidequests that can date back to ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', the ''Tales of the Jedi'' comic, and the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse in general. It's Creator/BioWare, prepare for a ''long'' play-through to understand half of it.

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* ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'': Eight player classes, each with their own story arc and five companions with their own, smaller character arc. The companions from the Consular class have worked with the Trooper's companions ''and'' the Bounty Hunter's. The Jedi Knight's healer used to [[FriendsWithBenefits "date"]] Imperial Agent's terrorist companion. The Imperial Agent sabotaged friends of the Consular's terrorist companion. The Smuggler's companions used to be best friends with the Sith Warrior's companion. The Imperial Agent's opponents include characters from ''everyone else's'' story. This in ''addition'' to all the little story arcs and sidequests that can date back to ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'', the ''Tales of the Jedi'' comic, and the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse in general. It's Creator/BioWare, prepare for a ''long'' play-through to understand half of it. [[spoiler: In the expansion ''Knights of the Fallen Empire'' you find out that many of the parts that don't seem to fit, especially the Sith Emperor apparently pursuing several mutually exclusive strategies at once, were due to him deliberately wasting everyone's time while he readied his ''other'' empire to win in the end.]]
5th Jul '16 4:29:40 PM morenohijazo
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* ''VideoGame/TheTalosPrinciple'': The terminals and Alexandra's recordings comprise the bits and pieces of the story.
18th Jun '16 3:26:06 PM Ledinax
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* The ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' mostly averts this practice, as every book is stand-alone, and even in the case where it isn't -- like ''Discworld/LordAndLadies'' -- most of the stuff you need to know is mentioned a second time. However some pieces of character development can only be understood correctly if you read every book where the character in question turns up, and find a lot of things were already mentioned. A major contender for this is Death, who shows up in every book but two, but if you only read the books where he or his granddaughter Susan star in you will never grasp the full depth of his character. It works the same with Sam Vimes, as the "beast" that is inside of him is elaborated on in every book for brief amounts of time, only to be given a starring role of sorts in ''Discworld/NightWatch'' (and even then this subplot is continued afterwards). Another major character is Carrot, who on the surface is a NiceGuy who genuinely wants all people to live in peace and harmony, but in truth there is a massive complexity behind his simpleness which a reader may only begin to understand by reading all of the watch books and the short story "Theater of Cruelty".

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* The ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' mostly averts this practice, as every book is stand-alone, and even in the case where it isn't -- like ''Discworld/LordAndLadies'' ''Discworld/LordsAndLadies'' -- most of the stuff you need to know is mentioned a second time. However some pieces of character development can only be understood correctly if you read every book where the character in question turns up, and find a lot of things were already mentioned. A major contender for this is Death, who shows up in every book but two, but if you only read the books where he or his granddaughter Susan star in you will never grasp the full depth of his character. It works the same with Sam Vimes, as the "beast" that is inside of him is elaborated on in every book for brief amounts of time, only to be given a starring role of sorts in ''Discworld/NightWatch'' (and even then this subplot is continued afterwards). Another major character is Carrot, who on the surface is a NiceGuy who genuinely wants all people to live in peace and harmony, but in truth there is a massive complexity behind his simpleness which a reader may only begin to understand by reading all of the watch books and the short story "Theater of Cruelty".
17th May '16 7:57:48 AM hyphz
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*** In fact, an accepted interpretation of the game is that [[spoiler:the plot itself is a MindScrew created by the mastermind to entrap and torment the player]]. Why? Because [[spoiler:to the characters in the game, the player is a [[YouBastard scary demon]] who [[BreakingTheFourthWall enters from another dimension]] to control their minds!]]
16th May '16 9:33:40 AM hyphz
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* ''VisualNovel/{{Remember 11}}'' has a pretty serious case of this. If you don't get any bad ends, it's a fairly coherent story with most of the unanswered questions being possible to figure out, if not easy. But the more bad ends you get, the more material you have to work with such as ''why'' everything is happening, who everyone is and everything else. When you have the most information about the story is when you truly realize you have no idea what just happened, and you never will know for sure.



** And ''VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors'' turns it up to 11 - [[spoiler:you're not actually playing the apparent player character, Junpei; you're playing Akane in the past, using the morphogenetic field to communicate with Junpei in the future and lead him to safety and to resolve a problem Akane couldn't solve... and ''you'' staged the entire situation Junpei is in because [[StableTimeLoop having previously communicated with future-Junpei, you had to make sure those events actually happened to Junpei later on.]].]]

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** And ''VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors'' turns it up to 11 - [[spoiler:you're not actually playing the apparent player character, Junpei; you're playing Akane in the past, using the morphogenetic field to communicate with Junpei in the future and lead him to safety and to resolve a problem Akane couldn't solve... and ''you'' staged the entire situation Junpei is in because [[StableTimeLoop having previously communicated with future-Junpei, you had to make sure those events actually happened to Junpei later on.]].]]]]
** And ''VisualNovel/{{Remember 11}}'' rips off the dial. Its plot is so convoluted and divided over 33 (!) routes that it is said even the author was losing track by the end. If you don't get any bad ends, it's a fairly coherent story with most of the unanswered questions being possible to figure out, if not easy. But the more bad ends you get, the more material you have to work with such as ''why'' everything is happening, who everyone is and everything else. When you have the most information about the story is when you truly realize you have no idea what just happened, and you never will know for sure. At least one of the routes has one of the protagonists possessed [[BreakingTheFourthWall by the player]], roaring with rage at being in a world that makes so little sense.
16th May '16 2:27:32 AM greenhill
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** At the time of writing, the currently unreleased ''VisualNovel/ZeroTimeDilemma'' has turned this trope has into an actual gameplay mechanic. Every in game 90 minutes consists of one 'fragment' within the story, and upon completing one, it's placed in the global timeline of the game, showing what route and what time the fragment took place, and finally rewarding the player with more fragments to complete
28th Apr '16 5:59:56 PM RaisenRhaasen
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* Creator/BrandonSanderson loves this trope and is shown in both ''Literature/TheStormLightArchive'' and in ''Literature/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy''. Reading the ''Mistborn'' books twice will reveal just how much of the more left-field twists of ''Mistborn: The Hero of Ages'' (the final book in the trilogy) were foreshadowed with the puzzle-pieces hidden in plain sight.

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* Creator/BrandonSanderson loves this trope and is shown in both ''Literature/TheStormLightArchive'' ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'' and in ''Literature/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy''. Reading the ''Mistborn'' books twice will reveal just how much of the more left-field twists of ''Mistborn: The Hero of Ages'' (the final book in the trilogy) were foreshadowed with the puzzle-pieces hidden in plain sight.
18th Apr '16 8:49:42 PM Lemia
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* ''VideoGame/CubeEscape'': The [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness first released installment]] was a simplistic game about fishing at a lake with some SurrealHorror {{Jump Scares}} thrown in, but the games since then have each revealed parts of an increasingly complicated and symbolism-laden plot/backstory involving the mysterious death of a woman, a lake that runs on people's extracted memories, bird-headed creatures who may or may not be demigods, and much more.

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* ''VideoGame/CubeEscape'': The [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness first released installment]] was a simplistic game about fishing at a lake with some SurrealHorror {{Jump Scares}} Scare}}s thrown in, but the games since then have each revealed parts of an increasingly complicated and symbolism-laden plot/backstory involving the mysterious death of a woman, a lake that runs on people's extracted memories, bird-headed creatures who may or may not be demigods, and much more.
13th Apr '16 12:03:23 PM Lemia
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* ''VideoGame/CubeEscape'': The [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness first released installment]] was a simplistic game about fishing at a lake with some SurrealHorror {{Jump Scares}} thrown in, but the games since then have each revealed parts of an increasingly complicated and symbolism-laden plot/backstory involving the mysterious death of a woman, a lake that runs on people's extracted memories, bird-headed creatures who may or may not be demigods, and much more.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.JigsawPuzzlePlot