History Main / InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike

23rd May '16 2:58:00 AM docrock
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Added DiffLines:

*** Averted when Ford Motor Company released its Kuga compact crossover. In Serbo-Croatian (Serbian, Croatian, Bosnian, and Montenegrin languages) and Slovenian, ''Kuga'' means [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast plague]]. The company disregarded the awkward translation and released the model on the aforementioned markets with no name change.
4th May '16 3:07:51 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In the opening of KareKano "Yumei dream" sounds like "You may dream."

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* In the opening of KareKano ''Manga/KareKano'' "Yumei dream" sounds like "You may dream."
21st Apr '16 7:42:30 PM Andyroid
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** ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'' largely takes place in an Uberwald town called Bonk (it's pronounced "Beyonk"). The same book mentions that "morpork" (as in Ankh-Morpork, the central city of the series) sounds like "a part of women's underwear" in Überwaldian.

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** ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'' largely takes place in an Uberwald town called Bonk (it's pronounced "Beyonk"). The same book mentions that "morpork" (as in Ankh-Morpork, the central city of the series) sounds like "a part the name of a piece of women's underwear" underwear in Überwaldian.



** This trope became a running gag in ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', in which Rincewind's screams of "Arrrgh!" were variously translated into homonymous phrases that mean "I would like to eat your foot" or "Your wife is a big hippo". One tribe has acheived a not-entirely unmerited reputation for cruelty since to them it means "Quick! More boiling oil!"

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** This trope became a running gag in ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', in which Rincewind's screams of "Arrrgh!" were variously translated into homonymous homophonic phrases that mean "I would like to eat your foot" or "Your wife is a big hippo". One tribe has acheived achieved a not-entirely unmerited reputation for cruelty since to them it "arrrgh" means "Quick! More boiling oil!"
2nd Apr '16 8:19:29 PM escamilla
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**The iconic Māori facial tattos are also called ''moko''.



* In fact, Japanese and Spanish (and possibly other Romance languages like French, Italian and others) share similar words, despite how different those languages are to Japanese. Here are some very visible examples:
** UsefulNotes/{{Pettanko}} normally means ''flat-chested'', but in Mexican Spanish, it sounds very similar to the word ''petacón'' (male) or ''petacona'' (female), which is a Mexican slang for ''big ass''.
** The Japanese slang word ''manko'' (Pussy) sounds the same as the Mexican slang word ''manco'' which means "someone without an arm".

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* In fact, Japanese and Spanish (and possibly other Romance languages like French, Italian and others) share similar words, despite how different those languages are to from Japanese. Here are some very visible examples:
** UsefulNotes/{{Pettanko}} normally means ''flat-chested'', but in Mexican Spanish, it sounds very similar to the word ''petacón'' (male) or ''petacona'' (female), which is a Mexican slang for ''big ass''.
** The Japanese slang word ''manko'' (Pussy) (pussy) sounds the same as the Mexican slang word ''manco'' which means "someone without an arm".



*** And in Polish it means "fraud".

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*** And in In Polish it means "fraud".



** {{Manga}} sounds the same like the Spanish word for "sleeve". The only difference is in Spanish, the Japanese word is spelled in masculine form (''El'' manga), while in Spanish it's pronounced in femenine form (''La'' manga).

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** {{Manga}} sounds the same like as the Spanish word for "sleeve". The only difference is in In Spanish, however, the Japanese word is spelled in masculine form (''El'' manga), while in Spanish it's pronounced in femenine form (''La'' manga).



*** In Russian, it's also a slang for "balls", causing all the Russian-speaking readers of ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' to possibly laugh each time Dio uses The World.
* In the same way, Korean and Japanese, being similar languages, have some words which sound similar but differ in meaning:
** The Korean dish ''Kimchi'' sounds disturbingly similar to ''kimochi-ii'' (to feel good, in a sexual way). This is even parodied by a Japanese brand of Kimchi, who even released a song named ''Kimchi no Kimochi-ii'' (Feeling Good with Kimchi).

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*** In Russian, it's also a slang for "balls", causing all the Russian-speaking readers of ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' to possibly laugh each time Dio uses The World.
"balls."
* In the same way, Korean and Japanese, being similar languages, Japanese have some words which sound similar but differ in meaning:
** The Korean dish ''Kimchi'' sounds disturbingly similar to ''kimochi-ii'' (to feel good, in a sexual way). good). This is even parodied nodded at by a Japanese brand of Kimchi, who even which released a song named called ''Kimchi no Kimochi-ii'' (Feeling Good with Kimchi).



** Korean ''Oppa'' (Male big brother) sounds similar to ''Oppai'' (Japanese for [[GagBoobs Big Boobs]]).

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** Korean ''Oppa'' (Male big (big brother) sounds similar to ''Oppai'' (Japanese for [[GagBoobs Big Boobs]]).



** Don't get spooked when you see a French bakery. Even if it is likely to have only word on the sign: "Pain". Yeah, that's French for "bread". "Pain/Pan" (or its homophones) also means "bread" in several other languages -- including Japanese (in which case, it actually is a word borrowed from Portuguese).

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** Don't get spooked when you see a French bakery. Even if it is likely to have only word on the sign: "Pain". Yeah, that's French for "bread". "Pain/Pan" (or its homophones) also means "bread" in several other languages -- including Japanese (in which case, it actually is a word borrowed from Portuguese).



** "Fanny" used to be a nickname for "Frances". It's still a common girl name in French-speaking countries. But in the United States, it means butt, and in the British Commonwealth, it refers to a [[CountryMatters ruder part of a woman's anatomy]]. The opening titles to Fran Drescher's ''Series/TheNanny'' take on a decidedly ruder meaning in New Zealand.

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** "Fanny" used to be a nickname for "Frances". It's still a common girl name in French-speaking countries. But in In the United States, it means butt, and in the British Commonwealth, it refers to a [[CountryMatters ruder part of a woman's anatomy]]. The opening titles to Fran Drescher's ''Series/TheNanny'' take on a decidedly ruder meaning in New Zealand.



** Taco can mean lots of stuff in Spanish. In Chile it can also mean 'traffic jam'.

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** Taco can mean lots of stuff in Spanish. In Chile it can also mean 'traffic jam'.



** In Italia, "fagotto" is either a bundle or a bassoon. No offense to gay people implied.
** The word "fagot" is also in English and French and in reference to a bundle (usually sticks or something similar).

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** In Italia, Italian, "fagotto" is either a bundle or a bassoon. No offense to gay people implied.
In Japanese, Russian, German, and Polish, a close homonym is the word for bassoon.
** The word "fagot" is also exists in archaic English and French and in reference to a bundle (usually sticks or something similar).



** "Fagot" is Russian and Polish for bassoon.
** "Fagott" is the German word for bassoon as well. It's "bassoon" in English, "basson" in French, and "faggot" (or a homophone thereof) in every other language. It's not uncommon for bilingual dictionaries to have a note warning of the false friend in English.



* In Spanish, "rape" means "angler fish", "al rape" means "close-cropped" (refering to hair) and "rapé" means "snuff". "to bother" is "molestar."

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* In Spanish, "rape" means "angler fish", "al rape" means "close-cropped" (refering to hair) and "rapé" means "snuff".
* In Spanish,
"to bother" is "molestar."



* (All transliterated:) The Hebrew word "Oti" means "me". The Hebrew word "mi" means "who?". The Hebrew word "hu" (pronounced, yes, "who") means "he". And, for kicks, the Hebrew word "he" means "she".
** All of this makes a lot more sense if you're aware of their Arabic cognates, which sound less like the English words: Hebrew "mi"=Arabic "men" (OK, that's another can of worms) "hu"="huwa," and "he"="hiya."

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* (All transliterated:) The Hebrew word "Oti" means "me". The Hebrew word "mi" means "who?". The Hebrew word "hu" (pronounced, yes, (pronounced "who") means "he". And, for kicks, And the Hebrew word "he" means "she".
** All of this makes a lot more sense if you're aware of their Arabic cognates, which sound less like the English words: Hebrew "mi"=Arabic "men" (OK, that's another can of worms) "hu"="huwa," "men"; "hu"="huwa"; and "he"="hiya."



** Same thing with modern German, which has the same origins as modern English: "Wer?" means "who?". "Wo?" means "where?". "Wenn" actually means "when", but "wen?" means "whom?".

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** Same thing with modern German, which has the same origins as modern English: "Wer?" means "who?". "Wo?" means "where?". "Wenn" actually means "when", "if", but "wen?" means "whom?".



** And even more so with Dutch. 'Wie' (pronounced like English 'we') in Dutch is 'who', while in German in translates to 'how'. 'Hoe' (pronounced like 'who') translates to 'how' (German 'wie'). 'Waar' is Dutch for 'where', 'war' is German for was, both are pronounced like the word that denotes a violent and potentially deadly conflict in English. 'Was' (German for 'what') translates to either 'wash', the first person singular past of 'to be', or 'wax' in Dutch.

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** And even more so with Dutch. 'Wie' (pronounced like English 'we') in Dutch is 'who', while in German in translates to 'how'. 'Hoe' (pronounced like 'who') translates to 'how' (German 'wie'). 'Waar' is Dutch for 'where', 'war' is German for was, 'was,' both are pronounced like the word that denotes a violent and potentially deadly conflict in English. 'Was' (German for 'what') translates to either 'wash', the first person singular past of 'to be', or 'wax' in Dutch.



* In Spanish, ''embarazada'' means ''pregnant'', not "embarrassed". Watch out for this if you've been drunk and need to apologize for your behavior.
* And who could forget the wonderful Austrian village by the name of '''''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fucking,_Austria Fucking]]''''', whose residents used to spend surprisingly large amounts of money on replacing stolen road signs until they ended up putting a sign made of concrete?
** More recently, a beer named "Fucking Hell" has appeared, its name referring to this place and its color, "hell" meaning "light" or "pale". This one was probably intentional though.
** There is also a different town in Australia called "Eromanga". In Japanese, "ero manga" (erotic manga) are risqué or outright explicit comics, essentially.
** Austria also has the more obscure but equally delightful "Windpassing".

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* In Spanish, ''embarazada'' means ''pregnant'', not "embarrassed". Watch out for this if you've been drunk and need to apologize for your behavior.\n
* And who could forget the wonderful There is an Austrian village by the name of '''''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fucking,_Austria Fucking]]''''', whose residents used to spend surprisingly large amounts of money on replacing stolen road signs until they ended up putting a sign made of concrete?
** More recently, a beer named "Fucking Hell" has appeared, its name referring to this place and its color, "hell" meaning "light" or "pale". This one was probably intentional though.\n
** There is also a different town in Australia called "Eromanga". In Japanese, "ero manga" (erotic manga) are risqué or outright explicit comics, essentially.
comics.
** Austria also has the more obscure but equally delightful a town called "Windpassing".



* One Chinese word for "don't need" is "bu bi". It's pronounced like...
** There's also the phrase for "give us..." (written 给我们). The phonetics for it is "gei wo men." Cue snickering in pretty much all first-year Chinese-language courses.

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* One Chinese word for "don't need" is "bu bi". It's pronounced like...
** There's also the phrase for
"give us..." (written 给我们). The phonetics for it 给我们) in Mandarin Chinese is romanized "gei wo men." Cue snickering in pretty much all first-year Chinese-language courses.



** While not outright unprintable, many words in English and other European languages are impossible to literally translate to Russian, being that Russian is a very literal language with complex grammar far different than that of most Indo-European and even other Slavic languages, translators to Russian usually work around this with loose translations.



** A classic among French students (well, it was a classic back when Latin was widely studied in high school) : conjugation for the verb "amare" (to love) goes like this : ''amabo'', ''amabis'', ''amabit'', with the third one being pronounced exactly like "Ah, ma bite" ("Ah, my cock")

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** A classic among French students (well, it was a classic back when Latin was widely studied in high school) : students: conjugation for the verb "amare" (to love) goes like this : ''amabo'', ''amabis'', ''amabit'', with the third one being pronounced exactly like "Ah, ma bite" ("Ah, my cock")



* In Denmark, a timetable will likely be labelled "fartplan". Cue snickering English-speaking tourists.
* A popular Iranian cleaning product is called "Barf", the Persian word for snow. Most English speakers snicker at the idea of putting barf all over their dishes or filling their washing machines up with barf.
* In Italy, Brasil and Spain,when a toast is made it's common to say "cin cin!"/"tim tim"/"chin chin" (pronounced "cheen cheen" -an onomatopoeia for the sound of glasses clinking together). In Japan, doing this would be very unfortunate, as "chinchin" is slang for "penis".

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* In Denmark, a timetable will likely be labelled "fartplan". Cue snickering English-speaking tourists.\n
* A popular Iranian cleaning product is called "Barf", the Persian word for snow. Most English speakers snicker at the idea of putting barf all over their dishes or filling their washing machines up with barf.\n
* In Italy, Brasil and Spain,when a toast is made it's common to say "cin cin!"/"tim tim"/"chin chin" (pronounced "cheen cheen" -an onomatopoeia for the sound of glasses clinking together). In Japan, doing this would be very unfortunate, as "chinchin" is slang a word for "penis".



** Any wonder why the Bimbo company, also a major bakery in the US, mainly make Arnold or Oroweat bread?
** While in Japanese, bimbo (na) means poor, as in, not having money.

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** Any wonder why the Bimbo company, also a major bakery in the US, U.S., mainly make Arnold or Oroweat bread?
** While in Japanese, bimbo (na) means poor, as in, not "poor" (not having money.money).



** Czerstwy chleb in Polish means "old bread" while in many Slavic languages it means fresh. Further confusing in Polish "czerstwy staruszek" (staruszek means old man) which means he is in good form rather then bad.

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** Czerstwy chleb in Polish means "old bread" while in many Slavic languages it means fresh. "fresh." Further confusing in Polish "czerstwy staruszek" (staruszek means old man) "old man") which means he is in good form rather then bad.



* Not dirty but still amusing: In the Korean martial arts style Tang Soo Do, what most people would call a bo staff (a long, smooth staff intended for striking, for the unfamiliar) is referred to as a bong.
* The title of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Minister_of_Wales First Minister of Wales]] in Welsh is "Prif Weinidog Cymru." That's right. "Minister" in Welsh sounds ''exactly'' like "whiny dog." No doubt this has caused a lot of jokes in Wales.

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* Not dirty but still amusing: In the Korean martial arts style Tang Soo Do, what most people would call a bo staff (a long, smooth staff intended for striking, for the unfamiliar) striking) is referred to as a bong.
* The title of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Minister_of_Wales First Minister of Wales]] in Welsh is "Prif Weinidog Cymru." That's right. "Minister" in Welsh sounds ''exactly'' like "whiny dog." No doubt this has caused a lot of jokes in Wales.



** It's worse in French: ''putain'' (one-letter difference, and pronounced basically the same) means "whore" or "bitch", used as an expletive for "fucking". As a result, French language authorities have resorted to spelling his name "Poutine", which makes some sense (it produces the closest possible French equivalent to how it's pronounced in Russian), but is also ''exactly'' the name of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poutine a Canadian dish of French fries served with cheese curds and hot gravy]]. Cue snickers across Quebec.

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** It's worse in French: ''putain'' (one-letter difference, and pronounced basically the same) means "whore" or "bitch", used as an expletive for "fucking". As a result, French language authorities have resorted to spelling his name "Poutine", which makes some sense (it produces the closest possible French equivalent to how it's pronounced in Russian), but is also ''exactly'' the name of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poutine a Canadian dish of French fries served with cheese curds and hot gravy]]. Cue snickers across Quebec.



* An example of this trope across two dialects of French; in French, the slang term for "children" is "gosses". In Quebec French, the same word is the slang term for "testicles". So when a French parent his telling a Quebecois tourist he hugs his kids before putting them to bed, the Quebecois gets a very bizarre mental image...

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* An example of this trope across two dialects of French; in French, the slang term for "children" is "gosses". In Quebec French, the same word is the slang term for "testicles". So when a French parent his telling a Quebecois tourist he hugs his kids before putting them to bed, the Quebecois gets a very bizarre mental image...



** Technically, this is based on where the word "retarded" came from in the first place - it itself used to be a euphemism meaning "delayed" or "slowed", as a replacement for the words "idiot" or "moron".



** There is even an old Russian joke about a Japanese racecar driver named Toyama Tokanawa. "To yama to kanava" in Russian means something like "either a pit or a gully" (i.e. the guy can't drive straight). That's far from being the only such joke.
* Rather like the French example with "gosses", UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents can give identical words very different meanings. One dialect uses ''haizi'' to mean "[[http://lang-8.com/64745/journals/207435 shoes]]" while it means "Child(ren)" in standard Mandarin. An adult claiming they've lost their ''haizi'' on the train can just be grumbling in one part of China and the cause of bloody panic in another.

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** There is even an old Russian joke about a Japanese racecar driver named Toyama Tokanawa. "To yama to kanava" in Russian means something like "either a pit or a gully" (i.e. the guy can't drive straight). That's far from being the only such joke.\n
* Rather like the French example with "gosses", UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents can give identical words very different meanings. One dialect uses ''haizi'' to mean "[[http://lang-8.com/64745/journals/207435 shoes]]" while it means "Child(ren)" in standard Mandarin. An adult claiming they've lost their ''haizi'' on the train can just be grumbling in one part of China and the cause of bloody panic in another.



* Israelis with the name Itai or Shiri (masculine and feminine first names, respectively) are often embarrassed to find out their names mean ‘painful’ and ‘arse’ respectively in Japanese.

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* Israelis with the name Itai or Shiri (masculine and feminine first names, respectively) are often embarrassed to find out their names mean ‘painful’ and ‘arse’ ‘butt’ respectively in Japanese.



** In fact, Japanese names are an eternal source for cheap laughs in Spanish, due of hoy many of them can sound like naughty or weird stuff in Spanish. The best example of this is the name of the author of ''LightNovel/LogHorizon'' and ''LightNovel/MaoyuuMaouYuusha'' light novels, ''Mamare Touno''. His name in Spanish sounds like ''Mamaré Todo'', as ''(I will) suck everything''.
* While not as exaggerated as in Japanese, Portuguese names, especially Brazilian ones, are more or less this, due of the nicknaming culture of those countries. The worse offenders are the ones used by soccer players, who goes from the ordinary ones (Ronaldo, Ronaldinho Gaucho, Rivaldo, etc.) to really weird-sounding ones, especially in Spanish:
** In maybe one of the most unfortunate examples of this, the name of Brazilian soccer player ''Kaká'' sounds almost the same (without the accent) as the Latin form used in many other Romance languages (Spanish and French mainly) to say ''crap''.
** Another Brazilian soccer player, ''Borracha'', sounds the same as the Mexican Spanish word for ''drunken woman''. The worst thing is, the player is ''male''.
** Even legendary soccer stars aren't safe of this: ''Pele'' sounds the same as the past form of the Spanish word for ''To peel something'' and also as a Mexican slang for both ''to escape'' and ''to give a damn''. Another former Brazilian star, ''Tostao'' sounds as a Mexican accented speech for ''toasted''.
* Also, it goes without saying that there’s a lot of embarrassment involved in having the (fortunately fairly rare) Israeli last name ‘Pines’ (pronounced ‘pea-ness’, but we all know what that ''really'' sounds like). Notable cases include:

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** In fact, Japanese names are an eternal source for cheap laughs in Spanish, due of hoy to how many of them can sound like naughty or weird stuff in Spanish. The best example of this is For example, the name of the author of ''LightNovel/LogHorizon'' and ''LightNovel/MaoyuuMaouYuusha'' light novels, ''Mamare Touno''. His name in Spanish sounds like ''Mamaré Todo'', as in ''(I will) suck everything''.
* While not as exaggerated as in Japanese, Brazilian Portuguese names, especially Brazilian ones, are more or less this, due of the nicknaming culture of those countries. also offers many examples.
**
The worse offenders are the ones used by soccer players, who goes from the ordinary ones (Ronaldo, Ronaldinho Gaucho, Rivaldo, etc.) to really weird-sounding ones, especially in Spanish:
** In maybe one of the most unfortunate examples of this, the
name of Brazilian soccer player ''Kaká'' sounds almost the same (without the accent) as the Latin form used in many other Romance languages (Spanish and French mainly) to say ''crap''.
** Another Brazilian soccer player, ''Borracha'', sounds the same as the Mexican Spanish word for ''drunken woman''. The worst thing is, the player is ''male''.
** Even legendary soccer stars aren't safe of this: ''Pele'' sounds the same as the past form of the Spanish word for ''To peel something'' and also as a Mexican slang for both ''to escape'' and ''to give a damn''. Another former Brazilian star, ''Tostao'' sounds as a like Mexican accented speech Portuguese for ''toasted''.
* Also, it goes without saying that there’s a lot of embarrassment involved in having the (fortunately The fairly rare) rare Israeli last name ‘Pines’ (pronounced ‘pea-ness’, but we all know what that ''really'' sounds like).‘pea-ness’). Notable cases include:



** Ofir Pines-Paz, Israeli politician, who was made Minister of Interior, making Anglophone news reporters everywhere giggle.

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** Ofir Pines-Paz, Israeli politician, who was made Minister of Interior, making Anglophone news reporters everywhere giggle.Interior.



* In Hungarian, the last name of Ferdinand ''Foch'' (French marshal during WWI) means "(liquid) shit". When taught in history class, usually nobody can keep a straight face.

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* In Hungarian, the last name of Ferdinand ''Foch'' (French marshal during WWI) means "(liquid) shit". When taught in history class, usually nobody can keep a straight face.



* The iconic Māori facial tattos are called "tā moko" in the Māori language. "Moko" souns like the spanish word "moco" that means "snot" as in the nasal mucus.



* In Tiberias, Israel, there's a inn named [[http://www.maman-mansion.co.il/index-e.asp Maman Mansion]]. The hilarity came with the fact the word ''Maman'' is the Japanese slang equivalent of the phrase '''MILF'''.

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* In Tiberias, Israel, there's a inn named [[http://www.maman-mansion.co.il/index-e.asp Maman Mansion]]. The hilarity came with the fact the word ''Maman'' is the Japanese slang equivalent of the phrase '''MILF'''.



* "Deception" means, or sounds similar to the word meaning, ''disappointment'' in several Romance languages. Not as humorous as other examples, but still a common source of misunderstanding.

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* "Deception" means, or sounds similar to the word meaning, ''disappointment'' in several Romance languages. Not as humorous as other examples, but still a common source of misunderstanding.



* The last name of the Nigerian soccer players (and also brothers) Celestine and Emmanuel ''Babayaro'' could sound extremely hilarious for Japanese speakers: It sounds very disturbingly similar to ''bakayarou'', who is normally translated as ''Dumbass''. It also sounds like ''Babaayarou'', translated as ''Old hag bitch''.

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* The last name of the Nigerian soccer players (and also brothers) Celestine and Emmanuel ''Babayaro'' could sound extremely hilarious for Japanese speakers: It sounds very disturbingly similar to ''bakayarou'', who is normally translated as which means ''Dumbass''. It also sounds like ''Babaayarou'', translated as ''Old hag bitch''.



* There's a river in western part of Latvia called Pērse - which tends to amuse Estonians due to the fact that the name of the river in Estonian means "ass".
* Irishwomen named Órfhlaith (pronounced ORE-lah, lit. ‘gold [[EverythingIsBetterWithPrincesses princess]]’) are in for an unpleasant surprise if they ever visit Israel, as their name sounds a lot like ''‘orlá''[[labelnote:Hebrew]]ערלה[[/labelnote]], ‘foreskin’.
* "College" in French is used for a school accepting children between 11 and 15. More than a few translators seem to forget that when translating from English to French, which gives the impression that in English speaking countries 20 year olds are still attending primary school, or that 12 year olds have a very active love life.
* "Tröja" is a Swedish word meaning "sweater". It's also unfortunately (and hilariously) similar to Italian "troia", which means "whore".

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* There's a river in western part of Latvia called Pērse - which tends to amuse Estonians due to the fact that the name of the river in Estonian means "ass".
"ass" in Estonian.
* Irishwomen named Órfhlaith (pronounced ORE-lah, lit. ‘gold [[EverythingIsBetterWithPrincesses princess]]’) are in for an unpleasant surprise if they ever visit Israel, as their name sounds a lot like ''‘orlá''[[labelnote:Hebrew]]ערלה[[/labelnote]], ‘foreskin’.
Israel;''‘orlá''[[labelnote:Hebrew]]ערלה[[/labelnote]] means ‘foreskin’ in Hebrew.
* "College" in French is used for a school accepting children between 11 and 15. More than a few translators seem to forget that when translating from English to French, which gives the impression that in English speaking countries 20 year olds are still attending primary school, or that 12 year olds have a very active love life.\n
* "Tröja" is a Swedish word meaning "sweater". It's also unfortunately (and hilariously) similar to Italian "troia", which "troia" means "whore".



* The British actor Tony Osoba's surname is rather funny in Czech, because it means "person".
* "Hai" means "yes" in Japanese but "shark" in German.
* In a rather unfortunate coincidence, the Italian word for "down", "giù", sounds exactly like "Jew".
* The German verb "bekommen" does not mean "to become" (that's "werden") but "to receive".

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* The British actor Tony Osoba's surname is rather funny in Czech, because it means "person".
"person" in Czech.
* "Hai" means "yes" "yes," "lungs," and several other things in Japanese Japanese, but means "shark" in German.
German and Norwegian.
* In a rather unfortunate coincidence, the The Italian word for "down", "giù", "giù," sounds exactly like "Jew".
* The German verb "bekommen" does not mean "to become" (that's "werden") "werden"), but "to receive".



* The German word for "yes" is "ja", causing some confusion in Japan, where "iya" means "no" or "I don't want" (although the negative termination of verbs is "-nai"). Similarly, in Romance and Germanic languages the word for "no" usually starts with an n… but in Greek, "nai" (pronounced "neh") means "yes".
* A English-borrowed case: in Japanese a confession (of any sort) is sometimes called a "kaminguauto" (coming-out). It can be a little awkward for English speakers, to whom it specifically means revealing your homosexuality.

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* The German word for "yes" is "ja", causing some confusion in Japan, where "iya" means "no" or "I don't want" (although the negative termination of verbs is "-nai"). Similarly, in Romance and Germanic languages the word for "no" usually starts with an n… but in Greek, "nai" (pronounced "neh") means "yes".
want".
* A English-borrowed case: in Japanese a confession (of any sort) is sometimes called a "kaminguauto" (coming-out). It can be a little awkward for English speakers, to whom it specifically means revealing your homosexuality.
12th Mar '16 10:00:27 AM luisedgarf
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Added DiffLines:

** ''LightNovel/{{Durarara}}'' sounds like saying ''(It will) la-la-last''.
7th Mar '16 6:28:39 PM luisedgarf
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* The last name of the Nigerian soccer players (and also brothers) Celestine and Emmanuel ''Babayaro'' could sound extremely hilarious for Japanese speakers: It sounds very disturbingly similar to ''bakayarou'', who is normally translated as ''Dumbass''.

to:

* The last name of the Nigerian soccer players (and also brothers) Celestine and Emmanuel ''Babayaro'' could sound extremely hilarious for Japanese speakers: It sounds very disturbingly similar to ''bakayarou'', who is normally translated as ''Dumbass''. It also sounds like ''Babaayarou'', translated as ''Old hag bitch''.
28th Feb '16 10:16:14 AM Darthrai
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** In Japanese, Magmar is called Boober and Mandibuzz is called Vulgina, which sound like female body parts to English-speakers. Similarly, Umbreon is called Blacky, which is a portmanteau of the [[GratuitiousEnglish English words]] "black" and "lucky" but sounds like a racist slur.

to:

** In Japanese, Magmar is called Boober and Mandibuzz is called Vulgina, which sound like female body parts to English-speakers. Similarly, Umbreon is called Blacky, which is a portmanteau of the [[GratuitiousEnglish [[GratuitousEnglish English words]] "black" and "lucky" but sounds like a racist slur.
28th Feb '16 10:13:18 AM Darthrai
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* ''Franchise/{{Pokémon}}'':

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Pokémon}}'':''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'':
28th Feb '16 10:12:47 AM Darthrai
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* In the French version of ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'', Seismitoad is called [[ScunthorpeProblem Crapustule]] (from ''crapaud'', meaning "toad").

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Pokémon}}'':
**
In the French version of ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'', Seismitoad is called [[ScunthorpeProblem Crapustule]] (from ''crapaud'', meaning "toad").


Added DiffLines:

** In Japanese, Magmar is called Boober and Mandibuzz is called Vulgina, which sound like female body parts to English-speakers. Similarly, Umbreon is called Blacky, which is a portmanteau of the [[GratuitiousEnglish English words]] "black" and "lucky" but sounds like a racist slur.
27th Feb '16 7:06:39 PM luisedgarf
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Added DiffLines:

** [[Manga/OsomatsuKun Chibi]][[Anime/OsomatsuSan ta]] sounds the same as the Mexican Spanish word for ''little goat'' (chivita).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike