History Main / GloriousMotherRussia

13th Jun '18 4:46:55 PM laserviking42
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* Bears. It's true that the bear is a common and well known animal in Russia, inasmuch as Russia having 60% of all Brown Bears in the world (and most of the remaining bears living in Northern Canada and Alaska). But they don't walk the streets of Russian cities[[note]] too often, at least, as there are regular occasions of a bear wandering into smaller Siberian podunk towns in search for food, while from time to time villages and smaller towns may be even besieged by a whole pack of bears or wolves (examples include Vankarem, Yaylyu and Verkhoyansk)[[/note]], and you can see a trained bear only in a circus. Using the bear as a symbol for Russia itself is mainly a foreign thing, although it is used in coats of arms for a number of cities, mostly in Siberia again, as well as the logo for UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin's ruling United Russia party. Bears and any big animals (including wolves) are very rarely seen in a wild by modern Russian urbanite.

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* Bears. It's true that the bear is a common and well known animal in Russia, inasmuch as Russia having 60% of all Brown Bears in the world (and most of the remaining bears living in Northern Canada and Alaska). But they don't walk the streets of Russian cities[[note]] too often, at least, as there are regular occasions of a bear wandering into smaller Siberian podunk towns in search for food, while from time to time villages and smaller towns may be even besieged by a whole pack of bears or wolves (examples include Vankarem, Yaylyu and Verkhoyansk)[[/note]], and you can see a trained bear only in a circus. Bears and any big animals (including wolves) are very rarely seen in a wild by modern Russian urbanite. Using the bear as a symbol for Russia itself is mainly a foreign thing, although it is used in coats of arms for a number of cities, mostly in Siberia again, as well as the logo for UsefulNotes/VladimirPutin's ruling United Russia party. Bears and any big animals (including wolves) are very rarely seen in a wild by modern Russian urbanite.Historically, Russians have used the double-headed eagle as their national symbol.
27th May '18 7:40:57 PM Orbitron24
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* Communism. The old UsefulNotes/ColdWar stereotype of "Russian equals Soviet equals Communist" is not true. Communism is an ideology that had fallen out of fashion in most of the world, including Russia. Soviet is a system of government by workers' councils, a form of parliamentarism, and it outlived Communism in Russia for two years. The modern Russian Communist party is in fact actually rather reactionary in a number of ways, particularly on social policies.
22nd May '18 9:47:42 AM twilicorn
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--> "I practice this surgery on live bear. No anesthesia. They fight."

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--> "I practice this surgery on live bear. No anesthesia. They fight."



* In ''WesternAnimation/TheAdventuresOfRockyAndBullwinkle,'' Boris and Natasha and their accents were from "Pottsylvania," not Russia.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheAdventuresOfRockyAndBullwinkle,'' ''WesternAnimation/RockyAndBullwinkle,'' Boris and Natasha and their accents were from "Pottsylvania," not Russia.
17th May '18 5:34:13 PM Imperios
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* Atheism. UsefulNotes/ColdWar-era Russians are often stereotyped as "godless Communists." The reality is more complex. The Soviet Union did persecute clergymen and dismantle religious institutions. However, the laity was mostly tolerated as the Communists realized that persecuting a group that made up a majority of Russia's population was a bad idea and many lay Christians actually supported the persecution of priests, who were viewed as a [[CorruptChurch greedy and corrupt elite]]. Also, UsefulNotes/JosefStalin himself would revive the Russian Orthodox Church to drum up support for Russia's entry into UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and never really bothered suppressing the Georgian Orthodox Church at all (he was afraid of getting an earful from [[MyBelovedSmother his mother]]). While some of the anti-religious were revived by Krushchev, they were again considerably relaxed from the Brezhnev era onward. Nowadays, the tables have flipped, and Russia has become increasingly religious, with the Russian Orthodox Church now an important player in state politics. However, Orthodox Christianity is seen more as a cultural identity by many Russians than an actual religion: only a half of Russians who call themselves Orthodox actually attend church services, and 80% of them do not even participate in the Eucharist.

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* Atheism. UsefulNotes/ColdWar-era Russians are often stereotyped as "godless Communists." The reality is more complex. The Soviet Union did persecute clergymen and dismantle religious institutions. However, the laity was mostly tolerated as the Communists realized that persecuting a group that made up a majority of Russia's population was a bad idea and many lay Christians actually supported the persecution of priests, who were viewed as a [[CorruptChurch greedy and corrupt elite]]. Also, UsefulNotes/JosefStalin himself would revive the Russian Orthodox Church to drum up support for Russia's entry into UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and never really bothered suppressing the Georgian Orthodox Church at all (he was afraid of getting an earful from [[MyBelovedSmother his mother]]). While some of the anti-religious were revived by Krushchev, they were again considerably relaxed from the Brezhnev era onward.
**
Nowadays, the tables have flipped, and Russia has become increasingly religious, with the Russian Orthodox Church now an important player in state politics. However, Orthodox Christianity is seen more as a cultural identity by many Russians than an actual religion: only a half of Russians who call themselves Orthodox actually attend church services, and 80% of them do not even participate in the Eucharist.
17th May '18 5:33:39 PM Imperios
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* Atheism. UsefulNotes/ColdWar-era Russians are often stereotyped as "godless Communists." The reality is more complex. The Soviet Union did persecute clergymen and dismantle religious institutions. However, the laity was mostly tolerated as the Communists realized that persecuting a group that made up a majority of Russia's population was a bad idea and many lay Christians actually supported the persecution of priests, who were viewed as a [[CorruptChurch greedy and corrupt elite]]. Also, UsefulNotes/JosefStalin himself would revive the Russian Orthodox Church to drum up support for Russia's entry into UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and never really bothered suppressing the Georgian Orthodox Church at all (he was afraid of getting an earful from [[MyBelovedSmother his mother]]). While some of the anti-religious were revived by Krushchev, they were again considerably relaxed from the Brezhnev era onward.

to:

* Atheism. UsefulNotes/ColdWar-era Russians are often stereotyped as "godless Communists." The reality is more complex. The Soviet Union did persecute clergymen and dismantle religious institutions. However, the laity was mostly tolerated as the Communists realized that persecuting a group that made up a majority of Russia's population was a bad idea and many lay Christians actually supported the persecution of priests, who were viewed as a [[CorruptChurch greedy and corrupt elite]]. Also, UsefulNotes/JosefStalin himself would revive the Russian Orthodox Church to drum up support for Russia's entry into UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and never really bothered suppressing the Georgian Orthodox Church at all (he was afraid of getting an earful from [[MyBelovedSmother his mother]]). While some of the anti-religious were revived by Krushchev, they were again considerably relaxed from the Brezhnev era onward. Nowadays, the tables have flipped, and Russia has become increasingly religious, with the Russian Orthodox Church now an important player in state politics. However, Orthodox Christianity is seen more as a cultural identity by many Russians than an actual religion: only a half of Russians who call themselves Orthodox actually attend church services, and 80% of them do not even participate in the Eucharist.
24th Feb '18 2:21:07 PM nombretomado
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* Russian names. In media, they are formed by slapping suffixes like "ov", "ski", "vich" on a bunch of common names like "Boris" or "Vladimir", not caring what those suffixes mean and in what order do various Russian names follow. The end result is something like "Boris Ivanski Vladimirvich", which doesn't sound right at all to a Russian[[note]] "-vich" means literally "son of" and it's always the suffix for middle name / patronymic of a true Russian[[/note]]. See RussianNamingConvention on how to do it right.

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* Russian names. In media, they are formed by slapping suffixes like "ov", "ski", "vich" on a bunch of common names like "Boris" or "Vladimir", not caring what those suffixes mean and in what order do various Russian names follow. The end result is something like "Boris Ivanski Vladimirvich", which doesn't sound right at all to a Russian[[note]] "-vich" means literally "son of" and it's always the suffix for middle name / patronymic of a true Russian[[/note]]. See RussianNamingConvention UsefulNotes/RussianNamingConvention on how to do it right.
24th Feb '18 2:17:13 PM nombretomado
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* Russian language. In media, it is mostly portrayed with a [[FakeRussian ridiculous accent]], [[TheBackwardsR flipped Latin letters]] and a small number of commonly known words like "vodka", "da", "nyet", "pravda", "babushka", "suka", "tovarisch", "rodina", "borsch", "soyuz", "mir", "avtomat", "pulemyot", "slava", "kommunizm", "revolutsyia", "kapitalist", "mudak", "bratva", "gulag", "intelligentsiya", "kosmonaut", "balalaika", "matryoshka", "kazakh", "pogrom", "ruble", "Kopeck", "samovar", "kremlin". "partiya", "cheka", "bolshevik", "Spetsnaz", "commissar", "kapitan" "glasnost", "perestroika", "KGB", "Politburo", "tsar", "Afganistan", "Rossiya", "Chechnya", "dacha", "Amerika", "sharashka", "laika", "Kalashnikov"[[note]]водка, да, нет, правда, бабушка, сука, товарищ, родина, борщ, союз, мир, автомат, пулемёт, слава, коммунизм, револуция, капиталист, мудак, братва, гулаг, интеллигенция, космонавт, балалайка, матрёшка, казах, погром, рубль, копейка, самовар, Кремль, партия, чека, большевик, Спецназ, коммиссар, капитан, гласностъ, перестройка, КГБ, Политбюро, царь, Афганистан, Россия, Чечня, дача, Америка, шарашка, лайка, Калашников, армия. English: vodka, yes, no, truth, grandmother, bitch, comrade, motherland, borsch, union, peace, assault rifle, machine gun, glory, Communism, revolution, capitalist, bastard, brotherhood (gang), gulag, intellectuals, astronaut, balalaika, nesting doll, Kazakh, pogrom, rouble, kopeck, samovar, kremlin, party, cheka, bolshevik, Spetsnaz (SWAT), commissar, captain, glasnost, perestroika, KGB, politburo, tsar, Afghanistan, Russia, Chechnya, summer house, America, sharashka, laika (hunting dog), Kalashnikov[[/note]]. See RussianLanguage for an in-depth look at it and GratuitousRussian for more common ways to do it wrong.

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* Russian language. In media, it is mostly portrayed with a [[FakeRussian ridiculous accent]], [[TheBackwardsR flipped Latin letters]] and a small number of commonly known words like "vodka", "da", "nyet", "pravda", "babushka", "suka", "tovarisch", "rodina", "borsch", "soyuz", "mir", "avtomat", "pulemyot", "slava", "kommunizm", "revolutsyia", "kapitalist", "mudak", "bratva", "gulag", "intelligentsiya", "kosmonaut", "balalaika", "matryoshka", "kazakh", "pogrom", "ruble", "Kopeck", "samovar", "kremlin". "partiya", "cheka", "bolshevik", "Spetsnaz", "commissar", "kapitan" "glasnost", "perestroika", "KGB", "Politburo", "tsar", "Afganistan", "Rossiya", "Chechnya", "dacha", "Amerika", "sharashka", "laika", "Kalashnikov"[[note]]водка, да, нет, правда, бабушка, сука, товарищ, родина, борщ, союз, мир, автомат, пулемёт, слава, коммунизм, револуция, капиталист, мудак, братва, гулаг, интеллигенция, космонавт, балалайка, матрёшка, казах, погром, рубль, копейка, самовар, Кремль, партия, чека, большевик, Спецназ, коммиссар, капитан, гласностъ, перестройка, КГБ, Политбюро, царь, Афганистан, Россия, Чечня, дача, Америка, шарашка, лайка, Калашников, армия. English: vodka, yes, no, truth, grandmother, bitch, comrade, motherland, borsch, union, peace, assault rifle, machine gun, glory, Communism, revolution, capitalist, bastard, brotherhood (gang), gulag, intellectuals, astronaut, balalaika, nesting doll, Kazakh, pogrom, rouble, kopeck, samovar, kremlin, party, cheka, bolshevik, Spetsnaz (SWAT), commissar, captain, glasnost, perestroika, KGB, politburo, tsar, Afghanistan, Russia, Chechnya, summer house, America, sharashka, laika (hunting dog), Kalashnikov[[/note]]. See RussianLanguage UsefulNotes/RussianLanguage for an in-depth look at it and GratuitousRussian for more common ways to do it wrong.
23rd Feb '18 3:46:22 PM ICB-Penguin
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* ''VideoGame/RussianOverkill''. Three Slavs with an entire military's worth of firepower, thousands of hitpoints, and nothing to lose VS TheLegionsOfHell. Time to rock and roll!
19th Feb '18 9:08:03 PM Dipnoi
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** The soviet doctor who removed his own appendix in the Antartic earns a similar lampooning.
--> "I practice this surgery on live bear. No anesthesia. They fight."
19th Feb '18 8:57:51 PM Dipnoi
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* The hosts of''Podcast/FatFrenchAndFabulous'' give the harsh, deprived Ruskie treatment to Ayn Rand of all people.

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* The hosts of''Podcast/FatFrenchAndFabulous'' of ''Podcast/FatFrenchAndFabulous'' give the harsh, deprived Ruskie treatment to Ayn Rand of all people.
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