History Main / FutureSlang

29th Apr '17 10:59:16 AM nombretomado
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* TimothyZahn's ''Angel Mass'' uses the verb 'nurk' as the catch-all nurking expletive.

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* TimothyZahn's Creator/TimothyZahn's ''Angel Mass'' uses the verb 'nurk' as the catch-all nurking expletive.
23rd Apr '17 4:22:05 PM nombretomado
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* ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}} TranshumanSpace'' occasionally dabbles in this, sometimes to the extent that some people ''in the 22nd century'' aren't entirely certain what the slang words mean. From [[http://mail.sjgames.com/pipermail/teralogosnews/2003/000024.html Teralogos News]]:

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* ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}} TranshumanSpace'' TabletopGame/TranshumanSpace'' occasionally dabbles in this, sometimes to the extent that some people ''in the 22nd century'' aren't entirely certain what the slang words mean. From [[http://mail.sjgames.com/pipermail/teralogosnews/2003/000024.html Teralogos News]]:
9th Apr '17 2:30:24 PM iowaforever
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* How WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack got his name; when he arrived in the future he crash landed in the path of a giant crushing robot and had to fight his way out, impressing a trio of street punks that happened to be nearby. "Jack" is the equivalent of "dude" that they toss about, and the samurai takes it up as an alias in his battle against Aku.
6th Apr '17 7:17:48 PM nombretomado
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* In an interesting past-slang example, the TabletopGame/{{Planescape setting}} for ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' (And the PlanescapeTorment PC game) had Planar Cant, largely derived from old English thieves' jargon and Cockney rhyming slang. There's a whole sodding dictionary of it [[http://mimir.net/cant/cant2.html here.]]

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* In an interesting past-slang example, the TabletopGame/{{Planescape setting}} for ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' (And the PlanescapeTorment ''VideoGame/PlanescapeTorment'' PC game) had Planar Cant, largely derived from old English thieves' jargon and Cockney rhyming slang. There's a whole sodding dictionary of it [[http://mimir.net/cant/cant2.html here.]]
27th Mar '17 2:57:30 PM eroock
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* In ''Film/BladeRunner'', Edward James Olmos' character Gaff speaks in a mixture of Spanish, French, Chinese, German, Hungarian, and Japanese. Olmos created a small dictionary of words for the so-called "City Speak".
16th Mar '17 9:59:05 AM nombretomado
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* In the ''"Jet-Star and the Kobra Kid/Traffic Report"'' interlude on MyChemicalRomance's 4th album Danger Days, Doctor Death Defying talks about how two members of the Killjoys got in a ''"clap"'' with an exterminator and it went ''"all Costa-Rico"'' and they found themselves ''"ghosted"''.

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* In the ''"Jet-Star and the Kobra Kid/Traffic Report"'' interlude on MyChemicalRomance's Music/MyChemicalRomance's 4th album Danger Days, Doctor Death Defying talks about how two members of the Killjoys got in a ''"clap"'' with an exterminator and it went ''"all Costa-Rico"'' and they found themselves ''"ghosted"''.
13th Mar '17 10:16:01 AM ChronoLegion
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* In the Russian film ''Film/AsirisNuna'', based on Creator/SergeyLukyanenko's novel ''Today, Mom!'', the speech of the future sounds a lot like modern street slang, although even the protagonists (teenage boys from our time) have a little trouble understanding them. Strangely enough, [[CatFolk Shidla]]'s speech is far more normal than that of the humans.
13th Mar '17 10:12:04 AM ChronoLegion
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* ''Videogame/{{Aquanox}}'': "Light" is a commonly-used greeting in the series, probably due to the fact that it's really dark at the bottom of the ocean.

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* ''Videogame/{{Aquanox}}'': "Light" is a commonly-used greeting in the series, probably due to the fact that it's really dark at the bottom of the ocean. Also, for some reason, Flint pronounces the name of his sub ''Succubus'' as "zoo-koo-bus" instead of "suck-cube-oos".
12th Mar '17 10:15:28 PM AthenaBlue
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* ''LightNovel/HorizonInTheMiddleOfNowhere'' uses Judge and Tes, short for Judgement and Testament, as replacements for yes in their homelands, this also doubles as an easy way of knowing who is from where.



* ''LightNovel/HorizonInTheMiddleOfNowhere'' uses Judge and Tes, short for Judgement and Testament, as replacements for yes in their homelands, this also doubles as an easy way of knowing who is from where.



* ''Film/ChildrenOfMen'' had both "fishes" (LaResistance led by Julian) and "fujis" (refugees).



* ''Film/TheFifthElement'' has the word 'green' and variations of it being used as a generic positive like awesome. In the scene where the authorities are sweeping Corbin's building, one unfortunate chap flips off the cops and yells "Smoke you!". It does not end well for him.
* ''Film/{{Gattaca}}'' used this primarily as ways to deride people born through natural conception -- "godchild", "faithbirth" and so on.
* Like its TV counterpart, ''Film/{{Serenity}}'' uses future slang. (See {{Series/Firefly}} below for examples.)
* ''Film/{{Zenon}}: Girl of the 21st Century'': Cetus lapetus, guys! The movie is totally lunar! An entire song whose lyrics include nothing but future slang (i.e. a bunch of unrelated scientific terms all jammed together) features at one point. Interestingly, this seems to be a feature of space culture, with the Earth scenes showing much more "ordinary" names and conversation.
** Interestingly, the boys on the "space stay" actually don't like Microbe because their lyrics ''make sense''. Apparently, "interplanetary megastellar hydrostatic" makes perfect sense to them.

to:

* ''Film/TheFifthElement'' ''Film/BillAndTedsBogusJourney'' has the word 'green' "station", which is both a greeting and variations of it being used as a generic positive like awesome. In compliment in the scene where vein of "excellent". Later in the authorities are sweeping Corbin's building, one unfortunate chap flips off the cops film we learn it probably originated from [[spoiler:the alien duo ''named'' Station, who use PokemonSpeak]].
* ''Film/ChildrenOfMen'' had both "fishes" (LaResistance led by Julian)
and yells "Smoke you!". It does not end well for him.
"fujis" (refugees).
* ''Film/{{Gattaca}}'' used this primarily as ways to deride people born through natural conception -- "godchild", "faithbirth" and so on.
* Like its TV counterpart, ''Film/{{Serenity}}'' uses future slang. (See {{Series/Firefly}} below for examples.)
* ''Film/{{Zenon}}: Girl of the 21st Century'': Cetus lapetus, guys!
The movie is totally lunar! An entire song whose lyrics include nothing but film of ''Film/AClockworkOrange'' has "Nadsat," a kind of future slang (i.e. a bunch of unrelated scientific terms all jammed together) features at based largely on Russian (for example, one point. Interestingly, of Alex's favorite adjectives, "horrorshow," sounds a bit like Russian ''khorosho'', "very good") ... but not as much as the book did.
* In ''Film/CloudAtlas'', Sonmi's era has been hit hard by
this seems to be a feature of space culture, trope. Anything that began with 'ex' now only starts with 'x', and everyday items are referred to by the Earth scenes showing much more "ordinary" names and conversation.
** Interestingly,
brand we would most readily associate with them, only without the boys capital letter. Hence nikes (running shoes), sonys (computers), disneys (movies) etc. Explicitly an example of BrandNameTakeover on the "space stay" actually don't like Microbe because a global scale, as her world is run by corporations. The humans of Zachry's era developed their lyrics ''make sense''. Apparently, "interplanetary megastellar hydrostatic" makes perfect sense to them.own future slang as well, though it's more primitive.



* ''Film/BillAndTedsBogusJourney'' has the word "station", which is both a greeting and a compliment in the vein of "excellent". Later in the film we learn it probably originated from [[spoiler:the alien duo ''named'' Station, who use PokemonSpeak]].

to:

* ''Film/BillAndTedsBogusJourney'' ''Film/TheFifthElement'' has the word "station", which is both a greeting 'green' and variations of it being used as a compliment in generic positive like awesome. In the vein of "excellent". Later in scene where the film we learn it probably originated from [[spoiler:the alien duo ''named'' Station, who use PokemonSpeak]].authorities are sweeping Corbin's building, one unfortunate chap flips off the cops and yells "Smoke you!". It does not end well for him.
* ''Film/{{Gattaca}}'' used this primarily as ways to deride people born through natural conception -- "godchild", "faithbirth" and so on.



* In ''Film/CloudAtlas'', Sonmi's era has been hit hard by this trope. Anything that began with 'ex' now only starts with 'x', and everyday items are referred to by the brand we would most readily associate with them, only without the capital letter. Hence nikes (running shoes), sonys (computers), disneys (movies) etc. Explicitly an example of BrandNameTakeover on a global scale, as her world is run by corporations. The humans of Zachry's era developed their own future slang as well, though it's more primitive.
* The film of ''Film/AClockworkOrange'' has "Nadsat," a kind of future slang based largely on Russian (for example, one of Alex's favorite adjectives, "horrorshow," sounds a bit like Russian ''khorosho'', "very good") ... but not as much as the book did.



* Like its TV counterpart, ''Film/{{Serenity}}'' uses future slang. (See {{Series/Firefly}} below for examples.)
* ''Film/{{Zenon}}: Girl of the 21st Century'': Cetus lapetus, guys! The movie is totally lunar! An entire song whose lyrics include nothing but future slang (i.e. a bunch of unrelated scientific terms all jammed together) features at one point. Interestingly, this seems to be a feature of space culture, with the Earth scenes showing much more "ordinary" names and conversation.
** Interestingly, the boys on the "space stay" actually don't like Microbe because their lyrics ''make sense''. Apparently, "interplanetary megastellar hydrostatic" makes perfect sense to them.



* ''[[Literature/TheMazeRunner The Maze Runner Trilogy]]'' is riddled with this. "Shanks," "Slinthead," "Greenie," and "Slim it" being prominent examples, with [[spoiler:Group B]] being implied to have their own.
* Golden age Science fiction is full of {{Unusual Euphemism}}s, like 'Space!' or 'Unity!' are kid-friendly curses.

to:

* ''[[Literature/TheMazeRunner The Maze Runner Trilogy]]'' is riddled with this. "Shanks," "Slinthead," "Greenie," and "Slim it" being prominent examples, with [[spoiler:Group B]] being implied to have their own.
* Golden age Science Age science fiction is full of {{Unusual Euphemism}}s, like 'Space!' or 'Unity!' are as kid-friendly curses.curses.
* TimothyZahn's ''Angel Mass'' uses the verb 'nurk' as the catch-all nurking expletive.
* Critic John Clute's SF novel ''Appleseed'' (nothing to do with the [[Manga/{{Appleseed}} manga]]) is so dense with unexplained terminology and slang that the book is mostly known for the amount of work it takes to extract meaning from its text.



* Lampshaded in ''Literature/PerryRhodan'', most of the main cast being immortal sometime use old terran slang that surprise regular human of said era. The opposite happen also, ''CrowningMomentOfAwesome'' when a Starship commander use "By Rhodan!" when Rhodan himself is not far.

to:

* Lampshaded in ''Literature/PerryRhodan'', most Creator/AnthonyBoucher's story ''{{Literature/Barrier}}'' has multiple ''kinds'' of future language. The first sort is that native to the future, based on English but with a few new words (most significantly "stapper" from "Gestapo" and "slanduch" from "Auslanddeutsch") and it's been "regularized" (there are no irregular verbs or articles, leading to sentences like "Article bees prime corruptor of speech"). The second is the language spoken by one of the main cast being immortal sometime use old terran travelers from even ''further'' in the future, who comes out with "Eeyboy taws so fuy, but I nasta. Wy cachoo nasta me?" And then there's the language spoken by the ''Venusian'' from the future, who seems to have the idea that Earth had a single unified language, so his sentences are nearly unreadable mishmashes of English, French, Latin, and who knows what else.
* Creator/TanithLee's ''Literature/BitingTheSun'' has a list of about 12 words of
slang for the adolescent 'Jang' caste of the dystopian novel.
%%* This occurs quite frequently in Bot Wars.
* ''Literature/BubbleWorld'' has a ton of this. Friends are called friendlies, dating is linking, "de-vicious" means gorgeous or cool, "flippy" means weird, and happy juice and sleepy juice refer to drinks
that surprise regular human make you happy or tired.
* In ''Literature/{{Bumped}}'' by Megan [=McCafferty=], which takes place in 2036, all
of said era. The opposite happen also, ''CrowningMomentOfAwesome'' when a Starship commander use "By Rhodan!" when Rhodan himself the slang relates to pregnancy or reproduction. In this society, everyone over 18 is not far.infertile, so teens are paid top dollar to be surrogate parents for rich older couples.



* In ''Literature/{{Coda}}'', "tracking" is slang for listening to the Corp's music, and "choice" means something is cool.
* The favorite exclamation in ''Literature/DarkLife'' is "Glacial!", relating to the fact that the story's set in a post-Global-Warming, risen-sea future.
* The futuristic slang word "kruk" was introduced in the ''Doctor Who'' spin-off novels produced by Virgin after the BBC complained of the use of "fuck" in some of the earlier novels. Strangely enough, some people preferred the word, probably due to the presence of another [[Creator/GeorgeCarlin aggressive k]].



* ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy''

to:

* ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy''As mentioned in the entry on Golden Age Science-Fiction, ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' used curses that were primarily space-based. One character in particular was fond of venting his spleen by shouting "ga-LAX-y!" Later in the series, curses and oaths appeared based on the religion of science created by Salvor Hardin after the first Seldon Crisis.
* ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'':



** Of course there's the one word that's the most offensive on every planet in the universe, except one. It's only ever uttered by loose tongued people like Zaphod Beeblebrox in dire situations. [[spoiler: The word is Belgium.]]
*** [[spoiler: Some editions of some books replace 'Belgium' with 'Fuck'. The movie adaptation has Ford us the word 'Belgium' rather a lot, but then, rather a lot of unpleasant, stupid, stupidly unpleasant, and unpleasantly stupid things happen to him.]]

to:

** Of course there's the one word that's the most offensive on every planet in the universe, except one. It's only ever uttered by loose tongued people like Zaphod Beeblebrox in dire situations. [[spoiler: The word is Belgium."Belgium".]]
*** [[spoiler: Some editions of some books replace 'Belgium' "Belgium" with 'Fuck'. "Fuck". The movie adaptation has Ford us the word 'Belgium' "Belgium" rather a lot, but then, rather a lot of unpleasant, stupid, stupidly unpleasant, and unpleasantly stupid things happen to him.]]



* ''[[Literature/TheMazeRunner The Maze Runner Trilogy]]'' is riddled with this. "Shanks," "Slinthead," "Greenie," and "Slim it" being prominent examples, with [[spoiler:Group B]] being implied to have their own.



* Lampshaded in ''Literature/PerryRhodan'', most of the main cast being immortal sometime use old Terran slang that surprise regular human of said era. The opposite happen also, ''CrowningMomentOfAwesome'' when a Starship commander use "By Rhodan!" when Rhodan himself is not far.
* The ''Literature/PlanetPirates'' series by Creator/AnneMcCaffrey, Creator/ElizabethMoon and Creator/JodyLynnNye has "Muhlah!" or "Mullah!" where we'd use "God!" or "Christ!" While this is clearly some sort of religious figure (there's also "Thank Muhlah!" and "Muhlah knew..."), further details are not provided. "Plasmic!" gets used once by a young boy as the equivalent of "cool!" or "awesome!"
* Widely used in ''Literature/TheQuantumThief'' and its sequel, ''Fractal Prince'', though rather than slang, it's meant to represent new technical terminology that always pops up with new innovations. It rarely gets explicitly described, leaving the reader to deduce what a Gevulot is, what Gogols are, or how a Vir differs from a Realmscape. The matter is complicated even further by that some groups use different words for the same concept. The people of Sirr, for example, call Spimescape "Athar", and describe it in almost religious or magical terms.
* ''Literature/TheRadix'' by A. A. Attanasio introduces the slang term "jooch" which means to trick, con or deceive.
* In ''Random Acts of Senseless Violence'', the central character starts out speaking standard English. As her life (and sanity) declines, her language changes as well.



* Critic John Clute's SF novel ''Appleseed'' (no, nothing to do with ''that'' Manga/{{Appleseed}}) is so dense with unexplained terminology and slang that the book is mostly known for the amount of work it takes to extract meaning from its text.
* Radix by A. A. Attanasio introduces the slang term "jooch" which means to trick, con or deceive.
* In ''Random Acts of Senseless Violence'', the central character starts out speaking standard English. As her life (and sanity) declines, her language changes as well.
* The ''[[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Star Wars]]'' expanded Universe uses a kriff-load of this karking shavit.

to:

* Critic John Clute's SF novel ''Appleseed'' (no, nothing to do with ''that'' Manga/{{Appleseed}}) is so dense with unexplained terminology and slang that ''Literature/StarCarrier: Deep Space'' has the book is mostly known occasional use of "'cubing" for the amount FasterThanLightTravel. It's presumably a derivative of work it takes to extract meaning from its text.
"AlcubierreDrive".
* Radix by A. A. Attanasio introduces the slang term "jooch" which means to trick, con or deceive.
* In ''Random Acts of Senseless Violence'', the central character starts out speaking standard English. As her life (and sanity) declines, her language changes as well.
* The ''[[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse Star Wars]]'' expanded Universe
''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' uses a kriff-load of this karking shavit.



** In addition, ''Star Wars'' has actually taken Future Slang from other series: "[[Creator/SpiderRobinson kark]]," "[[Series/{{Farscape}} frell]]," and "[[Series/BattlestarGalactica1978 frak]]" are all canon.

to:

** In addition, ''Star Wars'' has actually taken Future Slang from other series: "[[Creator/SpiderRobinson kark]]," kark]]", "[[Series/{{Farscape}} frell]]," frell]]", and "[[Series/BattlestarGalactica1978 frak]]" are all canon.



* The ''Literature/{{Sten}}'' series by Alan Cole and Chris Bunch uses "clot" in almost every sense that we would use "fuck" -- except for referring to the actual, literal sex act. This is actually modern-day New Orleans slang.
* In ''Literature/StormThief'', the main character says "Frek" or "frekking" to describe something annoying -- much like the other word it much resembles.
* In ''Literature/TimeScout'', this is mostly averted, but at one point Margo comes to Shangri La from a semester at college with a little uptime slang that hasn't filtered through Primary. Also, the series has its own jargon regarding the time portals and time travel.
** Also inverted with the downtime destinations. The language barrier doesn't exist in London or Denver, right? Wrong; after more than a century, the language and slang are wildly different. [[ShowDontTell Or show we're told.]]



* The ''Literature/{{Sten}}'' series by Alan Cole and Chris Bunch uses "clot" in almost every sense that we would use "fuck" -- except for referring to the actual, literal sex act. This is actually modern-day New Orleans slang.
* TimothyZahn's ''Angel Mass'' uses the verb 'nurk' as the catch-all nurking expletive.
* Creator/TanithLee's ''Literature/BitingTheSun'' has a list of about 12 words of slang for the adolescent 'Jang' caste of the dystopian novel.
* As mentioned in the entry on Golden Age Science-Fiction, ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' used curses that were primarily space-based. One character in particular was fond of venting his spleen by shouting "ga-LAX-y!" Later in the series, curses and oaths appeared based on the religion of science created by Salvor Hardin after the first Seldon Crisis.
* In ''Literature/{{Bumped}}'' by Megan [=McCafferty=], which takes place in 2036, all of the slang relates to pregnancy or reproduction. In this society, everyone over 18 is infertile, so teens are paid top dollar to be surrogate parents for rich older couples.
* The favorite exclamation in Literature/DarkLife is "Glacial!", relating to the fact that the story's set in a post-Global-Warming, risen-sea future.
* In ''Literature/StormThief,'' the main character says "Frek" or "frekking" to describe something annoying -- much like the other word it much resembles.
* In Literature/TimeScout, this is mostly averted, but at one point Margo comes to Shangri La from a semester at college with a little uptime slang that hasn't filtered through Primary. Also, the series has its own jargon regarding the time portals and time travel.
** Also inverted with the downtime destinations. The language barrier doesn't exist in London or Denver, right? Wrong; after more than a century, the language and slang are wildly different. [[ShowDontTell Or show we're told.]]
* The futuristic slang word "kruk" was introduced in the Doctor Who spin-off novels produced by Virgin after the BBC complained of the use of "fuck" in some of the earlier novels. Strangely enough, some people preferred the word, probably due to the presence of another [[Creator/GeorgeCarlin aggressive k]].
* Widely used in ''Literature/TheQuantumThief'' and its sequel, ''Fractal Prince'', though rather than slang, it's meant to represent new technical terminology that always pops up with new innovations. It rarely gets explicitly described, leaving the reader to deduce what a Gevulot is, what Gogols are, or how a Vir differs from a Realmscape. The matter is complicated even further by that some groups use different words for the same concept. The people of Sirr, for example, call Spimescape "Athar", and describe it in almost religious or magical terms.
* Alternate History Slang, technically, but Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''[[WorldWar Colonization]]'' books have teens all over the world adopt [[LizardFolk Race]] mannerisms, learn their SssssnakeTalk, shave their heads, and wear BodyPaint instead of clothing. At least American teens also adopt the word "hot" to have the same connotation as "cool" for modern teens instead of the modern slang "hot" meaning "sexy". Sam Yeager muses that his son Jonathan, who's one of those teens, wouldn't understand him if he started using [=40s=] or [=50s=] slang in front of him. Interestingly, this meaning for "hot" doesn't come directly from the lizards, as they themselves don't really have slang words, but from the fact that lizards really like heat, so anything hot must be good. No lizard would ever consider the word "cool" to be good.
* In ''Literature/{{Coda}}'', "tracking" is slang for listening to the Corp's music, and "choice" means something is cool.
* ''Literature/StarCarrier: Deep Space'' has the occasional use of "'cubing" for FasterThanLightTravel. It's presumably a derivative of "AlcubierreDrive".
* Creator/AnthonyBoucher's story ''{{Literature/Barrier}}'' has multiple ''kinds'' of future language. The first sort is that native to the future, based on English but with a few new words (most significantly "stapper" from "Gestapo" and "slanduch" from "Auslanddeutsch") and it's been "regularized" (there are no irregular verbs or articles, leading to sentences like "Article bees prime corruptor of speech"). The second is the language spoken by one of the travelers from even ''further'' in the future, who comes out with "Eeyboy taws so fuy, but I nasta. Wy cachoo nasta me?" And then there's the language spoken by the ''Venusian'' from the future, who seems to have the idea that Earth had a single unified language, so his sentences are nearly unreadable mishmashes of English, French, Latin, and who knows what else.
* ''Literature/BubbleWorld'' has a ton of this. Friends are called friendlies, dating is linking, "de-vicious" means gorgeous or cool, "flippy" means weird, and happy juice and sleepy juice refer to drinks that make you happy or tired.
* The ''Literature/PlanetPirates'' series by Creator/AnneMcCaffrey, Creator/ElizabethMoon and Creator/JodyLynnNye has "Muhlah!" or "Mullah!" where we'd use "God!" or "Christ!" While this is clearly some sort of religious figure (there's also "Thank Muhlah!" and "Muhlah knew..."), further details are not provided. "Plasmic!" gets used once by a young boy as the equivalent of "cool!" or "awesome!"
* This occurs quite frequently in Bot Wars.

to:

* The ''Literature/{{Sten}}'' series by Alan Cole and Chris Bunch uses "clot" in almost every sense that we would use "fuck" -- except for referring to the actual, literal sex act. This is actually modern-day New Orleans slang.
* TimothyZahn's ''Angel Mass'' uses the verb 'nurk' as the catch-all nurking expletive.
* Creator/TanithLee's ''Literature/BitingTheSun'' has a list of about 12 words of slang for the adolescent 'Jang' caste of the dystopian novel.
* As mentioned in the entry on Golden Age Science-Fiction, ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' used curses that were primarily space-based. One character in particular was fond of venting his spleen by shouting "ga-LAX-y!" Later in the series, curses and oaths appeared based on the religion of science created by Salvor Hardin after the first Seldon Crisis.
* In ''Literature/{{Bumped}}'' by Megan [=McCafferty=], which takes place in 2036, all of the slang relates to pregnancy or reproduction. In this society, everyone over 18 is infertile, so teens are paid top dollar to be surrogate parents for rich older couples.
* The favorite exclamation in Literature/DarkLife is "Glacial!", relating to the fact that the story's set in a post-Global-Warming, risen-sea future.
* In ''Literature/StormThief,'' the main character says "Frek" or "frekking" to describe something annoying -- much like the other word it much resembles.
* In Literature/TimeScout, this is mostly averted, but at one point Margo comes to Shangri La from a semester at college with a little uptime slang that hasn't filtered through Primary. Also, the series has its own jargon regarding the time portals and time travel.
** Also inverted with the downtime destinations. The language barrier doesn't exist in London or Denver, right? Wrong; after more than a century, the language and slang are wildly different. [[ShowDontTell Or show we're told.]]
* The futuristic slang word "kruk" was introduced in the Doctor Who spin-off novels produced by Virgin after the BBC complained of the use of "fuck" in some of the earlier novels. Strangely enough, some people preferred the word, probably due to the presence of another [[Creator/GeorgeCarlin aggressive k]].
* Widely used in ''Literature/TheQuantumThief'' and its sequel, ''Fractal Prince'', though rather than slang, it's meant to represent new technical terminology that always pops up with new innovations. It rarely gets explicitly described, leaving the reader to deduce what a Gevulot is, what Gogols are, or how a Vir differs from a Realmscape. The matter is complicated even further by that some groups use different words for the same concept. The people of Sirr, for example, call Spimescape "Athar", and describe it in almost religious or magical terms.
* Alternate History Slang, technically, but Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''[[WorldWar Colonization]]'' ''Literature/{{Worldwar}}'' books have teens all over the world adopt [[LizardFolk Race]] mannerisms, learn their SssssnakeTalk, shave their heads, and wear BodyPaint instead of clothing. At least American teens also adopt the word "hot" to have the same connotation as "cool" for modern teens instead of the modern slang "hot" meaning "sexy". Sam Yeager muses that his son Jonathan, who's one of those teens, wouldn't understand him if he started using [=40s=] or [=50s=] slang in front of him. Interestingly, this meaning for "hot" doesn't come directly from the lizards, as they themselves don't really have slang words, but from the fact that lizards really like heat, so anything hot must be good. No lizard would ever consider the word "cool" to be good.
* In ''Literature/{{Coda}}'', "tracking" is slang for listening to the Corp's music, and "choice" means something is cool.
* ''Literature/StarCarrier: Deep Space'' has the occasional use of "'cubing" for FasterThanLightTravel. It's presumably a derivative of "AlcubierreDrive".
* Creator/AnthonyBoucher's story ''{{Literature/Barrier}}'' has multiple ''kinds'' of future language. The first sort is that native to the future, based on English but with a few new words (most significantly "stapper" from "Gestapo" and "slanduch" from "Auslanddeutsch") and it's been "regularized" (there are no irregular verbs or articles, leading to sentences like "Article bees prime corruptor of speech"). The second is the language spoken by one of the travelers from even ''further'' in the future, who comes out with "Eeyboy taws so fuy, but I nasta. Wy cachoo nasta me?" And then there's the language spoken by the ''Venusian'' from the future, who seems to have the idea that Earth had a single unified language, so his sentences are nearly unreadable mishmashes of English, French, Latin, and who knows what else.
* ''Literature/BubbleWorld'' has a ton of this. Friends are called friendlies, dating is linking, "de-vicious" means gorgeous or cool, "flippy" means weird, and happy juice and sleepy juice refer to drinks that make you happy or tired.
* The ''Literature/PlanetPirates'' series by Creator/AnneMcCaffrey, Creator/ElizabethMoon and Creator/JodyLynnNye has "Muhlah!" or "Mullah!" where we'd use "God!" or "Christ!" While this is clearly some sort of religious figure (there's also "Thank Muhlah!" and "Muhlah knew..."), further details are not provided. "Plasmic!" gets used once by a young boy as the equivalent of "cool!" or "awesome!"
* This occurs quite frequently in Bot Wars.
good.



** "Paradise Towers" is a particularly ''ice hot'' example.
** In ''Carnival of Monsters'', Vorg tries talking to the Pertwee Doctor in 'carnival lingo', assuming from his outrageous dress scene that he's a fellow entertainer. For once the Doctor's miraculous language abilities let him down (the Amazing Translating TARDIS was not yet canon). Amusingly enough, the 'polari' Vorg uses is actual, real-world carnival slang (carnival, not circus).
** In "The Sontaran Experiment," the human spacemen use a 'future English' that sounds vaguely South African, with words like 'yunnerstan?'.

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** "Paradise Towers" is a particularly ''ice hot'' example.
** In ''Carnival [[Recap/DoctorWhoS10E2CarnivalOfMonsters "Carnival of Monsters'', Monsters"]], Vorg tries talking to the Pertwee Doctor in 'carnival lingo', "carnival lingo", assuming from his outrageous dress scene that he's a fellow entertainer. For once the Doctor's miraculous language abilities let him down (the Amazing Translating TARDIS was not yet canon). Amusingly enough, the 'polari' "polari" Vorg uses is actual, real-world carnival slang (carnival, not circus).
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E3TheSontaranExperiment "The Sontaran Experiment," Experiment"]], the human spacemen use a 'future English' that sounds vaguely South African, with words like 'yunnerstan?'.'yunnerstan?'.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E2ParadiseTowers "Paradise Towers"]] is a particularly ''ice hot'' example.



* ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' had a few uses "Alternate Universe Slang" for the series' MirrorUniverse (introduced at the end of Season 2), where the technology is about a century ahead of our own.
** A "Junior" is a $20 bill, in reference to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (whose face is on the $20 bill in this world).
** A "show-me" is a universal ID card issued by the United States government.
* On ''Series/QuantumLeap'', which takes place [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture in the near future,]] Al frequently uses "nozzle" as an insult.



* On ''Series/QuantumLeap'', which takes place [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture in the near future,]] Al frequently uses "nozzle" as an insult.
* ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' had a few uses "Alternate Universe Slang" for the series' MirrorUniverse (introduced at the end of Season 2), where the technology is about a century ahead of our own.
** A "Junior" is a $20 bill, in reference to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (whose face is on the $20 bill in this world).
** A "show-me" is a universal ID card issued by the United States government.
20th Feb '17 9:59:55 AM JoeMerl
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* Parodied on ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' in the "Go God Go" two-parter; in the future, religion has been phased out of human society, leading to turns-of-phrase like "Sciencedammit!" and "Science, Age, and Logic!".

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* Parodied on ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' in the "Go God Go" two-parter; in the future, [[OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions religion has been phased out of human society, society]], leading to turns-of-phrase like "Sciencedammit!" and "Science, Age, and Logic!"."Science H. Logic!" (The general themes of these episodes is that without religion, people will just treat other ideologies as religions anyway.)



* It's a plot point in ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice''. In the episode "Bloodlines", time-traveler Impulse explains that "crash" is good and "mode" is the absolute worst-- it's always better to "crash the mode." He also uses "meat" to refer to people he isn't impressed by. [[spoiler:Earlier episodes featured the "Partner" of the bad guys' group using "meat" in the same way. Meanwhile, the VillainOfTheWeek is being monitored by a pair of shadowy aliens, who comment that the exercise is "on-mode" and abort the mission when the mode begins to crash. TheStinger reveals that Impulse is from a BadFuture, and the entire point of his trip was to crash the mode]].

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* It's a plot point in ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice''. In the episode "Bloodlines", time-traveler Impulse explains that "crash" is good and "mode" is the absolute worst-- it's worst--it's always better to "crash the mode." He also uses "meat" to refer to people he isn't impressed by. [[spoiler:Earlier episodes featured [[spoiler:All this slang is derived from [[GalacticConqueror the "Partner" of Reach]], who have conquered the bad guys' group using "meat" Earth in the same way. Meanwhile, the VillainOfTheWeek is being monitored by a pair of shadowy aliens, who comment that the exercise is "on-mode" and abort the mission when the mode begins to crash. TheStinger reveals BadFuture that Impulse [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong is from a BadFuture, here to prevent]]. The audience [[{{Foreshadowing}} hears them use these terms]] during and the entire point of his trip was to crash the mode]].before Impulse's premiere episode]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FutureSlang