History Main / FantasyWorldMap

14th Nov '16 12:54:47 AM Theriocephalus
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* ''Webcomic/IrregularWebcomic'': The Fantasy theme has [[http://www.irregularwebcomic.net/cast/fantasy_map_1600.jpg a map]] on the cast page showing the various locations mentioned or visited so far in the comic.
12th Nov '16 12:42:58 PM TheFantasyChronicler
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* Perhaps because of its novel origin, ''LightNovel/TheTwelveKingdoms'' very frequently show the map of the world in order to the situate the action. Also to remind you of what the names of all the countries and cities are, since there are so many to keep track of.
* ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'' occasionally shows a map of the world, especially during the opening.
* The original manga version of ''Manga/NausicaaOfTheValleyOfTheWind'' has a pull-out map section in each volume. They're surprisingly unhelpful in determining where everything in the AfterTheEnd setting is in relation to the current world.
** If you squint a bit, it ''might'' be the southern US and Mexico with parts of Central and South America thrown in, with the coastlines heavily altered by the effects of GlobalWarming and/or nuclear bombardment. There is a region on the map called Utah, [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas which just goes to show that the Mormons are really good at surviving the apocalypse]].
* ''Manhwa/VagrantSoldierAres'' has a map of the Kingdom of Chronos and its neighboring kingdoms.



* The finale of ''Anime/RahXephon: Pluralitas Concentio'' briefly shows a shot of Earth with an approx. Africa-sized extra continent in the middle of the Pacific. Kinda justified since [[EndOfTheWorldSpecial the world has just been destroyed and recreated]].
* ''Manga/RaveMaster'' features an impressively vague map, showing little more than the outlines of continents and locations the characters previously visited, on a single page in one volume halfway through the series. Topography is clearly not Mashima Hiro's strong point.
* In ''Manga/MahouSenseiNegima'', during the Magic World arc various maps of the MagicWorld (global, regional and local) get shown, sometimes with the map of Japan superimposed for size comparison purposes. Actually a subversion as [[spoiler:its actually an accurate map of ''Mars'' with oceans filled in]] which you [[GeniusBonus might notice]] early if you know some astronomy.
* In ''Anime/QueensBlade'', a map of The Continent (the land when the whole story takes place) appears at the beginning of each episode, at least during the first season.



* In ''Manga/MahouSenseiNegima'', during the Magic World arc various maps of the MagicWorld (global, regional and local) get shown, sometimes with the map of Japan superimposed for size comparison purposes. Actually a subversion as [[spoiler:its actually an accurate map of ''Mars'' with oceans filled in]] which you [[GeniusBonus might notice]] early if you know some astronomy.
* The original manga version of ''Manga/NausicaaOfTheValleyOfTheWind'' has a pull-out map section in each volume. They're surprisingly unhelpful in determining where everything in the AfterTheEnd setting is in relation to the current world.
** If you squint a bit, it ''might'' be the southern US and Mexico with parts of Central and South America thrown in, with the coastlines heavily altered by the effects of GlobalWarming and/or nuclear bombardment. There is a region on the map called Utah, [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas which just goes to show that the Mormons are really good at surviving the apocalypse]].
* In ''Anime/QueensBlade'', a map of The Continent (the land when the whole story takes place) appears at the beginning of each episode, at least during the first season.
* The finale of ''Anime/RahXephon: Pluralitas Concentio'' briefly shows a shot of Earth with an approx. Africa-sized extra continent in the middle of the Pacific. Kinda justified since [[EndOfTheWorldSpecial the world has just been destroyed and recreated]].
* ''Manga/RaveMaster'' features an impressively vague map, showing little more than the outlines of continents and locations the characters previously visited, on a single page in one volume halfway through the series. Topography is clearly not Mashima Hiro's strong point.
* ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'' occasionally shows a map of the world, especially during the opening.
* Perhaps because of its novel origin, ''LightNovel/TheTwelveKingdoms'' very frequently show the map of the world in order to the situate the action. Also to remind you of what the names of all the countries and cities are, since there are so many to keep track of.
* ''Manhwa/VagrantSoldierAres'' has a map of the Kingdom of Chronos and its neighboring kingdoms.



* ''Literature/TheKaturranOdyssey'' has a rather elaborate map of Katurra on the endpapers, modelled rather creatively with [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals basilosaur]] HereBeDragons and with monkeys on the edges representing the FourElements (albeit rather randomly). The story locations have rather random distances, [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale unfortunately]].

to:

* ''Literature/TheKaturranOdyssey'' has The original releases of the ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfSamuraiCat'' books featured a rather elaborate map of Katurra the areas visited in the book, showing them in relation to each other; they also all including an area labeled 'Vermont,' with a spot marked 'Author's House.'
* Each of the ''Literature/AgeOfFire'' books has a map of the region the series takes place in, but each one is varied depending
on the endpapers, modelled rather creatively book -- for example, Wistala's solo focus book only shows the lands between the Inland Ocean and the Red Mountains, [=AuRon=]'s includes those lands but also spreads further east, and the Copper's shows the underground network of tunnels that form the Lower World, because those are the areas where those books are focused. Also, each map has a series of footnotes marking where key events from that specific book takes place.
* Creator/AnneBishop's works:
** There are maps in ''Tir Alainn'' and ''Literature/TheOthers'' books which have notes underneath them reading, "This map was created by a geographically challenged author. All distances are whimsical and subject to change without notice."
** Inverted in her ''Ephemera'' books: you couldn't draw a map even if you wanted because two different people can end up in two different places by going through the same gate depending on where the "heart resonates" with.
* Each book of ''Literature/TheBalancedSword'' has a map of Zarathan in the front, and sometimes also more detailed maps of specific regions visited in that book. Zarathan, which was developed as a setting for roleplaying games as well as novels, was created to be large enough that the heroes have no chance of visiting every place on it, and there's room for multiple epic adventures to be going on simultaneously.
* The ''Literature/{{Belgariad}}'' is especially symptomatic of the "must visit every places on it" syndrome. David Eddings, in ''The Rivan Codex'', argued that an aspiring quest author needed to draw a map or they'd get lost.
** He also mentions that he ''started''
with [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals basilosaur]] HereBeDragons and with monkeys on the edges representing map before he wrote a word of the FourElements (albeit rather randomly). The story locations have rather story. Indeed, the map was the inspiration for the story, because he started out doodling a random distances, [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale unfortunately]].fantasy map during breakfast with gibberish names for the countries. After cleaning it up a bit, he decided to write a story set in it.
*** He also references the first part of the Tolkien quote above regarding this decision, so the comments on this page about Eddings being responsible for the map-first idea are a little off-target.



* The doorstopper version of the ''Literature/{{Hurog}}'' duology includes a map, which is justified, as there is quite a lot of talking about taking a ship or the land route, and discussions of whether the enemy is good enough at geography to know that this or that distance is too far to get there in a certain period of time. The map only takes up one page, which is relatively small, compared to the LOTR map.
* Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium
** ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' is the TropeCodifier. WordOfGod states that showing the maps in the FilmOfTheBook was helpful in doing all the required exposition to make the story make sense without seeming contrived.
** And before it, ''Literature/TheHobbit'', with two maps.
** ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'' also includes a map, although there was at least one other, quite different, version Tolkien created for Beleriand besides the one actually published.
* Viciously parodied in the 1969 paperback ''Literature/BoredOfTheRings'', whose map of "Lower Middle Earth" includes such features as "The Legendary Drillingrigs", "The Land of the Knee-walking Turkeys", "The Islets of the Langerhans", "The Tiny X-Shaped Forest", and a body of water shaped like the profile of UsefulNotes/RichardNixon called "The Bay of Milhous". It also includes a compass rose with the directions Up, Down, Right (pointing left) and Left (pointing right). (This last may be an intentional ShoutOut to the original maps of Oz -- see below.) Fortunately for the competency-challenged cast, they didn't have to visit ''every'' labeled spot on it, and those they do visit don't have to be in geographical proximity.
* The former page quote (now on the [[Quotes/FantasyWorldMap quotes page]]) from ''Literature/TheFirstLaw'' trilogy is spoken by a character reading a fantasy novel (''in'' a bleedin' fantasy novel) as a not so subtle TakeThat to the entire trope. (Or, possibly, to ''Lord of the Rings'').
** Definitely to ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''. "There And Back Again" is the in-setting name for ''Literature/TheHobbit''.
* ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' has one for the Westlands, and the Westlands only, as about 99% of the story takes place there. A [[AllThereInTheManual Manual text]] was released that includes a map of the whole world. This map is useless to the actual story, but looking at it does reveal that the planet is Earth after massive geographical change, and the Westlands are in what used to be Europe.
* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' has several for the different continents. However it doesn't completely show any of the continents, reflecting limitations in the Middle Ages.
* ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'' likewise has several, although it's not always clear how the different continents relate to each other.
** A fan (and troper) created a map showing the continents in several different configurations and Steven Erikson eventually confirmed one as mostly accurate; it can be found on various fan sites.
* The ''Literature/{{Belgariad}}'' is especially symptomatic of the "must visit every places on it" syndrome. David Eddings, in ''The Rivan Codex'', argued that an aspiring quest author needed to draw a map or they'd get lost.
** He also mentions that he ''started'' with the map before he wrote a word of the story. Indeed, the map was the inspiration for the story, because he started out doodling a random fantasy map during breakfast with gibberish names for the countries. After cleaning it up a bit, he decided to write a story set in it.
*** He also references the first part of the Tolkien quote above regarding this decision, so the comments on this page about Eddings being responsible for the map-first idea are a little off-target.
* Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin's ''Literature/{{Earthsea}}'' series has a map showing various parts of the archipelago. Certain editions will include close-ups on the map when the characters are spending time in that particular reach (very very useful!)
* Le Guin's more recent YA series, of which the first is entitled ''Gifts,'' also has such a map, but notably the characters in ''Gifts'' only ever occupy a small upper-right hand corner of the map. Presumably they'll venture forth in the sequels.
** They do, but in ''Voices'' the action is confined to the bottom left-hand corner, so there's a city map as well. In ''Powers'' there's much more travelling, but no map at all in the British edition (not even a reprint of the large map from the first two books).



* The ''Literature/MagicKingdomOfLandover'' series has a map of Landover.
* ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'' includes a map of Earwa, the continent upon which all the action takes place.
* ''Literature/KushielsLegacy'' has them, despite it being basically Europe & North Africa with names making the FantasyCounterpartCulture even more obvious.
* ''Literature/WatershipDown'' has a map, and is fantasy, but it takes place in England and the map is of a real area.

to:

* P.C. Hodgell includes many maps in her ''Literature/ChroniclesOfTheKencyrath'' series, drawn in a consciously Tolkien-influenced style, as well as plans of many of the cities and fortresses encountered. The most recent book, ''To Ride a Rathorn'', has four pages of maps in the front and eight pages of more detailed maps in the back.
* ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' also inverts the "map came first" notion of David Eddings, since none of the books included a map until they were first bound together in one {{Doorstopper}}. As a result, as with Pratchett the land and its environs 'grew with the telling' and were all worked out in the text, so that the map could be drawn with great accuracy and even beauty. The gorgeous artwork of Aslan's face must be seen to be believed.
* Each of the five books in Lloyd Alexander's ''Literature/ChroniclesOfPrydain'' features a map at the beginning which is relevant to the plot of the story. Since they take place in different parts of Prydain, the map naturally changes; the map also notes what happens where. It should be noted that this map bears an obvious resemblance to that of Wales, though "Prydain is not Wales--[[FantasyCounterpartCulture not entirely, at least.]]"
* The ''Literature/MagicKingdomOfLandover'' map of The Land in ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfThomasCovenant'' is quite necessary, both because it was reshaped by past events and because much changes amongst the inhabitants in the considerable time that passes between Covenant's visits. Unfortunately, it can be only partially legible in the cheaply printed paperback editions.
* Creator/TamoraPierce's ''Literature/CircleOfMagic''
series has its own map showing the location of Winding Circle Temple as relative to nearby cities, but not a perhaps more useful map of Winding Circle ''itself.'' The ''Circle Opens'' quartet each have a map of Landover.
* ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'' includes a map of Earwa,
the continent upon which all city they take place in as well, and ''The Will of the action takes place.
* ''Literature/KushielsLegacy'' has them, despite it being basically Europe & North Africa with names making the FantasyCounterpartCulture even more obvious.
* ''Literature/WatershipDown''
Empress'' has a map, although not a very detailed one, of Sandry's home country of Namorn.
** Her Literature/TortallUniverse also has maps. It's remained largely consistent--starting with Tortall
and is fantasy, but it takes place in England its immediate land neighbors, then adding entries as the setting expanded and the plot took characters to more places. There are also smaller maps if the story's setting is in one place, e.g. the Corus city map is in ''Literature/ProvostsDog''.
* Each book in the ''Literature/CodexAlera'' contains a stylized map
of Alera itself and parts of its surrounding lands.
* Robert E. Howard included
a real area.map with the ''Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian'' stories, though given Howard's rather slam-bang style of world-building, it wasn't so much a physical map as a series of political borders. It's mentioned at one point in "Literature/ThePhoenixOnTheSword," where King Conan adds the northern lands where he came from to the maps of the Aquilonian court.



* The ''Literature/{{Redwall}}'' books always have a map of the journey that the heroes will be taking. The map generally includes every place they'll be visiting along the way.
** It's interesting to compare the variations of the maps' depictions of Mossflower Wood (the location of Redwall Abbey) over time. Some general ideas remain consistent, but others (such as how big/powerful the River Moss is) vary, and the further away from the Abbey things get more impermanent (such as the mountain range between Mossflower and Salamandastron, or the giant lake located far in the south).
** The biggest offender for inconsistency are the maps from ''Mattimeo'' and ''Loamhedge'', which depict the abbey ruins as being on a huge plateau to the southeast that is nowhere to be seen on other maps. Even those two maps have trouble deciding which side of the ravine has the bell and badger rocks.
* ''The Literature/SwordOfTruth'' had one... because [[ExecutiveMeddling the publisher insisted]]. Goodkind didn't see the need. He drew the map himself, updated it once for the second book, and never changed it again even when the story went way beyond its borders.
* The ''Literature/WellWorld'' novels by Jack Chalker are a sci-fi example, but also something of a subversion as the Well World is composed almost entirely of tessellated hexagons, the edges of which define not only the borders of the various "nations" but also the larger bodies of water.

to:

* The ''Literature/{{Redwall}}'' books always have Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin's ''Literature/{{Earthsea}}'' series has a map showing various parts of the archipelago. Certain editions will include close-ups on the map when the characters are spending time in that particular reach (very very useful!)
* ''[[Literature/InheritanceCycle Eragon]]'' has a map. It's even drawn by the author.
* ''Literature/AFireUponTheDeep'' by Creator/VernorVinge. While a science fiction novel, it has
a map of the journey that the heroes will be taking. The map generally galaxy done in fantasy style. It includes every place a delineation of the "Zones of Thought", which regulate FTL travel, as well as the path the protagonists' ship takes.
* The former page quote (now on the [[Quotes/FantasyWorldMap quotes page]]) from ''Literature/TheFirstLaw'' trilogy is spoken by a character reading a fantasy novel (''in'' a bleedin' fantasy novel) as a not so subtle TakeThat to the entire trope. (Or, possibly, to ''Lord of the Rings'').
** Definitely to ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''. "There And Back Again" is the in-setting name for ''Literature/TheHobbit''.
* Le Guin's more recent YA series, of which the first is entitled ''Gifts,'' also has such a map, but notably the characters in ''Gifts'' only ever occupy a small upper-right hand corner of the map. Presumably
they'll be visiting along venture forth in the way.
sequels.
** It's interesting to compare They do, but in ''Voices'' the variations action is confined to the bottom left-hand corner, so there's a city map as well. In ''Powers'' there's much more travelling, but no map at all in the British edition (not even a reprint of the maps' depictions of Mossflower Wood (the location of Redwall Abbey) over time. Some general ideas remain consistent, but others (such as how big/powerful the River Moss is) vary, and the further away large map from the Abbey things get more impermanent (such as the mountain range between Mossflower and Salamandastron, or the giant lake located far in the south).
** The biggest offender for inconsistency are the maps from ''Mattimeo'' and ''Loamhedge'', which depict the abbey ruins as being on a huge plateau to the southeast that is nowhere to be seen on other maps. Even those
first two maps have trouble deciding which side of the ravine has the bell and badger rocks.
* ''The Literature/SwordOfTruth'' had one... because [[ExecutiveMeddling the publisher insisted]]. Goodkind didn't see the need. He drew the map himself, updated it once for the second book, and never changed it again even when the story went way beyond its borders.
* The ''Literature/WellWorld'' novels by Jack Chalker are a sci-fi example, but also something of a subversion as the Well World is composed almost entirely of tessellated hexagons, the edges of which define not only the borders of the various "nations" but also the larger bodies of water.
books).



* Parodied in Piers Anthony's ''Literature/{{Xanth}}'' books by using the state of Florida as the map of Xanth.
** He went on to use Italy, Greece and Korea in later installments in the series, which was {{hand wave}}d with the explanation that Xanth connects with the real world at multiple places and time periods, but most of the novels use modern Florida as the point where Earth connects to Xanth.
* ''Literature/TheToughGuideToFantasyland'' notes that if you see a map at the start of a novel, you can expect to "go to every damn place on it." The book itself has a map which is very obviously Europe upside-down, with all the countries given anagrammatic names.
* Brin's ''Literature/{{Uplift}}'' series is another science fiction example.
* Orson Scott Card's ''Literature/TheTalesOfAlvinMaker'' books all include a map of the wildly alternate early-19th-Century North America in which the novels are set.
* ''[[Literature/InheritanceCycle Eragon]]'' has a map. It's even drawn by the author.
* Creator/TamoraPierce's ''Literature/CircleOfMagic'' series has its own map showing the location of Winding Circle Temple as relative to nearby cities, but not a perhaps more useful map of Winding Circle ''itself.'' The ''Circle Opens'' quartet each have a map of the city they take place in as well, and ''The Will of the Empress'' has a map, although not a very detailed one, of Sandry's home country of Namorn.
* Her Literature/TortallUniverse also has maps. It's remained largely consistent--starting with Tortall and its immediate land neighbors, then adding entries as the setting expanded and the plot took characters to more places. There are also smaller maps if the story's setting is in one place, e.g. the Corus city map in ''Literature/ProvostsDog''.

to:

* Parodied in Piers Anthony's ''Literature/{{Xanth}}'' books by using the state of Florida as the map of Xanth.
** He went on to use Italy, Greece and Korea in later installments in the series, which was {{hand wave}}d with the explanation that Xanth connects with the real world at multiple places and time periods, but most
The doorstopper version of the novels use modern Florida as the point where Earth connects to Xanth.
* ''Literature/TheToughGuideToFantasyland'' notes that if you see
''Literature/{{Hurog}}'' duology includes a map at the start of a novel, you can expect to "go to every damn place on it." The book itself has a map map, which is very obviously justified, as there is quite a lot of talking about taking a ship or the land route, and discussions of whether the enemy is good enough at geography to know that this or that distance is too far to get there in a certain period of time. The map only takes up one page, which is relatively small, compared to the LOTR map.
* ''Literature/TheKaturranOdyssey'' has a rather elaborate map of Katurra on the endpapers, modelled rather creatively with [[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeMammals basilosaur]] HereBeDragons and with monkeys on the edges representing the FourElements (albeit rather randomly). The story locations have rather random distances, [[SciFiWritersHaveNoSenseOfScale unfortunately]].
* ''Literature/KushielsLegacy'' has them, despite it being basically
Europe upside-down, with all the countries given anagrammatic names.
* Brin's ''Literature/{{Uplift}}'' series is another science fiction example.
* Orson Scott Card's ''Literature/TheTalesOfAlvinMaker'' books all include a map of the wildly alternate early-19th-Century
& North America in which Africa with names making the novels are set.
* ''[[Literature/InheritanceCycle Eragon]]'' has a map. It's
FantasyCounterpartCulture even drawn by the author.
* Creator/TamoraPierce's ''Literature/CircleOfMagic'' series has its own map showing the location of Winding Circle Temple as relative to nearby cities, but not a perhaps
more useful map of Winding Circle ''itself.'' The ''Circle Opens'' quartet each have a map of the city they take place in as well, and ''The Will of the Empress'' has a map, although not a very detailed one, of Sandry's home country of Namorn.
* Her Literature/TortallUniverse also has maps. It's remained largely consistent--starting with Tortall and its immediate land neighbors, then adding entries as the setting expanded and the plot took characters to more places. There are also smaller maps if the story's setting is in one place, e.g. the Corus city map in ''Literature/ProvostsDog''.
obvious.



* Each of the five books in Lloyd Alexander's ''Literature/ChroniclesOfPrydain'' features a map at the beginning which is relevant to the plot of the story. Since they take place in different parts of Prydain, the map naturally changes; the map also notes what happens where. It should be noted that this map bears an obvious resemblance to that of Wales, though "Prydain is not Wales--[[FantasyCounterpartCulture not entirely, at least.]]"
* Creator/AnneBishop's works:
** There are maps in ''Tir Alainn'' and ''Literature/TheOthers'' books which have notes underneath them reading, "This map was created by a geographically challenged author. All distances are whimsical and subject to change without notice."
** Inverted in her ''Ephemera'' books: you couldn't draw a map even if you wanted because two different people can end up in two different places by going through the same gate depending on where the "heart resonates" with.
* The ''Literature/{{Shannara}}'' series has maps, which show places destroyed in earlier books or, in one of the prequels, a place that didn't exist then.
* Creator/AlanDeanFoster's ''Literature/{{Spellsinger}}'' books have a map. At first it covers only the Bellwoods and immediate environs, with an added portion east of Zaryt's Teeth, because that's where the story is focused. (And true to form, while not every place on the Bellwoods map is visited, almost all the ones east of the Teeth are.) Book three introduces a whole new expanded map of the whole world which afterward never changes--although each subsequent book usually includes a secondary map showing what's 'just off the edge' or expanding on a small region.
* ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' also inverts the "map came first" notion of David Eddings, since none of the books included a map until they were first bound together in one {{Doorstopper}}. As a result, as with Pratchett the land and its environs 'grew with the telling' and were all worked out in the text, so that the map could be drawn with great accuracy and even beauty. The gorgeous artwork of Aslan's face must be seen to be believed.
* Robert E. Howard included a map with the ''Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian'' stories, though given Howard's rather slam-bang style of world-building, it wasn't so much a physical map as a series of political borders. It's mentioned at one point in "Literature/ThePhoenixOnTheSword," where King Conan adds the northern lands where he came from to the maps of the Aquilonian court.

to:

* Each of the five books in Lloyd Alexander's ''Literature/ChroniclesOfPrydain'' features a map at the beginning which is relevant to the plot of the story. Since they take place in different parts of Prydain, the map naturally changes; the map also notes what happens where. It should be noted that this map bears an obvious resemblance to that of Wales, though "Prydain is not Wales--[[FantasyCounterpartCulture not entirely, at least.]]"
* Creator/AnneBishop's works:
** There are maps in ''Tir Alainn'' and ''Literature/TheOthers'' books which have notes underneath them reading, "This map was created by a geographically challenged author. All distances are whimsical and subject to change without notice."
** Inverted in her ''Ephemera'' books: you couldn't draw a map even if you wanted because two different people can end up in two different places by going through the same gate depending on where the "heart resonates" with.
* The ''Literature/{{Shannara}}'' ''Literature/MagicKingdomOfLandover'' series has maps, which show places destroyed in earlier books or, in one of the prequels, a place that didn't exist then.
* Creator/AlanDeanFoster's ''Literature/{{Spellsinger}}'' books have a map. At first it covers only the Bellwoods and immediate environs, with an added portion east of Zaryt's Teeth, because that's where the story is focused. (And true to form, while not every place on the Bellwoods map is visited, almost all the ones east of the Teeth are.) Book three introduces a whole new expanded
map of Landover.
* ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'' likewise has several, although it's not always clear how
the whole world which afterward never changes--although different continents relate to each subsequent book usually includes other.
** A fan (and troper) created
a secondary map showing what's 'just off the edge' or expanding on a small region.
* ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' also inverts the "map came first" notion of David Eddings, since none of the books included a map until they were first bound together
continents in several different configurations and Steven Erikson eventually confirmed one {{Doorstopper}}. As a result, as with Pratchett the land and its environs 'grew with the telling' and were all worked out in the text, so that the map could mostly accurate; it can be drawn with great accuracy and even beauty. The gorgeous artwork of Aslan's face must be seen to be believed.
* Robert E. Howard included a map with the ''Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian'' stories, though given Howard's rather slam-bang style of world-building, it wasn't so much a physical map as a series of political borders. It's mentioned at one point in "Literature/ThePhoenixOnTheSword," where King Conan adds the northern lands where he came from to the maps of the Aquilonian court.
found on various fan sites.



* P.C. Hodgell includes many maps in her ''Literature/ChroniclesOfTheKencyrath'' series, drawn in a consciously Tolkien-influenced style, as well as plans of many of the cities and fortresses encountered. The most recent book, ''To Ride a Rathorn'', has four pages of maps in the front and eight pages of more detailed maps in the back.
* Wilbert Awdry, creator of ''ThomasTheTankEngine,'' was forced to map out Thomas's 14-mile railway line to prove to his children that a story involving a race between a train and a bus had an equal number of obstacles to both parties. Realizing it could be useful as a means of enforcing continuity he kept it, and decided to expand on it, resulting in him dropping approximately 3000 square miles of fictional island (the Island Of Sodor) into the Irish Sea off the coast of the UK. He then spent decades creating a complete political, social, geological, industrial and linguistic 'Tolkien-lite' history of the Island in collaboration with his historian brother (just for fun!)... and then they got said history published as a book over which collectors now fight to the death. Awesome.
* Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/TheSharingKnife'' series of books contain maps of The Wide Green World, becoming grander in scale in each book as the characters do more and more travelling. The maps are based on, but not particularly close to, the eastern half of the USA, particularly Ohio.

to:

* P.C. Hodgell includes many maps in her ''Literature/ChroniclesOfTheKencyrath'' series, drawn in ''Literature/TheNameOfTheWind'' has a consciously Tolkien-influenced style, as well as plans of many of map, but does not follow the cities and fortresses encountered. The most recent book, ''To Ride a Rathorn'', has four pages of maps in "if it's on the front and eight pages of more detailed maps in the back.
* Wilbert Awdry, creator of ''ThomasTheTankEngine,'' was forced to map out Thomas's 14-mile railway line to prove to his children that a story involving a race between a train and a bus had an equal number of obstacles to both parties. Realizing it could be useful as a means of enforcing continuity he kept it, and decided to expand on it, resulting in him dropping approximately 3000 square miles of fictional island (the Island Of Sodor) into the Irish Sea off the coast of the UK. He then spent decades creating a complete political, social, geological, industrial and linguistic 'Tolkien-lite' history of the Island in collaboration with his historian brother (just for fun!)... and then they got said history published as a book over which collectors now fight to the death. Awesome.
* Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/TheSharingKnife'' series of books contain maps of The Wide Green World, becoming grander in scale in each book as
map, the characters do more and more travelling. will go there" rule of most fantasy; many places that are mentioned or visited are not detailed on the map even if they're in the geographic area.
*
The maps are based on, but not particularly close to, the eastern half ''Literature/{{Noob}}'' novels. The only media of the USA, particularly Ohio.franchise that shows the whole thing.
* ''[[Literature/ThursdayNext One Of Our Thursdays Is Missing]]'' has a map of the [=BookWorld=] as it stands after the [[CosmicRetcon version update]] that gave it some actual geography.



* ''Franchise/StarWars'' got the Fantasy World Map treatment in form of "The Essential Atlas", which is just what it is. The authors had to not only go through the [[Franchise/StarWars six movies]], but also the [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse TV shows, comic books, novels, e-stories and video games]]. All in all this encompasses to a Fantasy [[TheVerse Galaxy]] Map.
** By 2000, the StarWars Galaxy had a map establishing the key regions and locations for a couple dozens of major planets. By 2010, it had a full Atlas, with over '''60 astro-maps''' and precise locations of over '''4,500''' planets.
** The ''Literature/NewJediOrder'' series included a galaxy map marked with key star systems and regions in its hardcover editions. The black swathe showing the [[ScaryDogmaticAliens Yuuzhan Vong]] conquests was updated as the series progressed.
* ''Literature/AFireUponTheDeep'' by Creator/VernorVinge. While a science fiction novel, it has a map of the galaxy done in fantasy style. It includes a delineation of the "Zones of Thought", which regulate FTL travel, as well as the path the protagonists' ship takes.
* ''Literature/TheNameOfTheWind'' has a map, but does not follow the "if it's on the map, the characters will go there" rule of most fantasy; many places that are mentioned or visited are not detailed on the map even if they're in the geographic area.
* ''[[Literature/ThursdayNext One Of Our Thursdays Is Missing]]'' has a map of the [=BookWorld=] as it stands after the [[CosmicRetcon version update]] that gave it some actual geography.
* The ''[[Literature/TheSteerswoman Steerswoman]]'' books have a world map, as befits their fantasy trappings. Since those trappings cover a chewy science-fictional center with lots of exploration, the map gets more filled in as the series goes on.
* Creator/AndreNorton's early ''WitchWorld'' novels had a small world map drawn by Jack Gaughan, showing the three main kingdoms with the ocean to the west. In some of the later novels there are two maps covering a much wider area, one of which depicts the lands on either side of the western ocean, and the other depicting the rest of the eastern continent.



* The original releases of the ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfSamuraiCat'' books featured a map of the areas visited in the book, showing them in relation to each other; they also all including an area labeled 'Vermont,' with a spot marked 'Author's House.'
* Erin Hunter's ''Literature/WarriorCats'' and ''Literature/SeekerBears'' series both have two two-page maps per book: One is the "animal view" map, which is more decorative, having houses and trees and everything drawn out, and labeling it with the animals' names for landmarks. The second is a "human view" map, which labels the landmarks with human names. It also looks more like a proper map: rather than drawing the forest, there is a map key, and it just uses the symbol for "tree" lots of times.
* Notably averted in ''Literature/TheWitcher'' series: no canon map of the Continent has ever been released by the author, so the large number of maps found on the net are all fan-made approximations based on the geographical detail given in the books. Not even the maps featured in the [[VideoGame/TheWitcher video]] [[VideoGame/TheWitcher2AssassinsOfKings games]] are canon, though WordOfGod is that they are "reasonably accurate".

to:

* The original releases of the ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfSamuraiCat'' ''Literature/{{Redwall}}'' books featured always have a map of the areas visited journey that the heroes will be taking. The map generally includes every place they'll be visiting along the way.
** It's interesting to compare the variations of the maps' depictions of Mossflower Wood (the location of Redwall Abbey) over time. Some general ideas remain consistent, but others (such as how big/powerful the River Moss is) vary, and the further away from the Abbey things get more impermanent (such as the mountain range between Mossflower and Salamandastron, or the giant lake located far
in the book, showing them in relation south).
** The biggest offender for inconsistency are the maps from ''Mattimeo'' and ''Loamhedge'', which depict the abbey ruins as being on a huge plateau
to each other; they also the southeast that is nowhere to be seen on other maps. Even those two maps have trouble deciding which side of the ravine has the bell and badger rocks.
* ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'' includes a map of Earwa, the continent upon which
all including an area labeled 'Vermont,' with a spot marked 'Author's House.'
the action takes place.
* Erin Hunter's ''Literature/WarriorCats'' and ''Literature/SeekerBears'' The ''Literature/{{Shannara}}'' series both have two two-page maps per book: One is the "animal view" map, has maps, which is show places destroyed in earlier books or, in one of the prequels, a place that didn't exist then.
* Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/TheSharingKnife'' series of books contain maps of The Wide Green World, becoming grander in scale in each book as the characters do
more decorative, having houses and trees more travelling. The maps are based on, but not particularly close to, the eastern half of the USA, particularly Ohio.
* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' has several for the different continents. However it doesn't completely show any of the continents, reflecting limitations in the Middle Ages.
* Creator/AlanDeanFoster's ''Literature/{{Spellsinger}}'' books have a map. At first it covers only the Bellwoods
and everything drawn out, and labeling it immediate environs, with an added portion east of Zaryt's Teeth, because that's where the animals' names for landmarks. The second story is a "human view" map, which labels focused. (And true to form, while not every place on the landmarks with human names. It also looks more like a proper map: rather than drawing Bellwoods map is visited, almost all the forest, there is a map key, and it just uses ones east of the symbol for "tree" lots of times.
* Notably averted in ''Literature/TheWitcher'' series: no canon
Teeth are.) Book three introduces a whole new expanded map of the Continent has ever been released by whole world which afterward never changes--although each subsequent book usually includes a secondary map showing what's 'just off the author, so edge' or expanding on a small region.
* ''Franchise/StarWars'' got
the large number Fantasy World Map treatment in form of maps found on "The Essential Atlas", which is just what it is. The authors had to not only go through the net are [[Franchise/StarWars six movies]], but also the [[Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse TV shows, comic books, novels, e-stories and video games]]. All in all fan-made approximations based on this encompasses to a Fantasy [[TheVerse Galaxy]] Map.
** By 2000,
the geographical detail given in StarWars Galaxy had a map establishing the books. Not key regions and locations for a couple dozens of major planets. By 2010, it had a full Atlas, with over '''60 astro-maps''' and precise locations of over '''4,500''' planets.
** The ''Literature/NewJediOrder'' series included a galaxy map marked with key star systems and regions in its hardcover editions. The black swathe showing the [[ScaryDogmaticAliens Yuuzhan Vong]] conquests was updated as the series progressed.
* The ''[[Literature/TheSteerswoman Steerswoman]]'' books have a world map, as befits their fantasy trappings. Since those trappings cover a chewy science-fictional center with lots of exploration, the map gets more filled in as the series goes on.
* ''The Literature/SwordOfTruth'' had one... because [[ExecutiveMeddling the publisher insisted]]. Goodkind didn't see the need. He drew the map himself, updated it once for the second book, and never changed it again
even when the maps featured in story went way beyond its borders.
* The book ''[[Literature/TakeBackTheSkies Take Back
the [[VideoGame/TheWitcher video]] [[VideoGame/TheWitcher2AssassinsOfKings games]] are canon, though WordOfGod is Skies]]'' contains a map of the fictional world of Tellus, including the thick, tumultuous storms that they surround its islands.
* Orson Scott Card's ''Literature/TheTalesOfAlvinMaker'' books all include a map of the wildly alternate early-19th-Century North America in which the novels
are "reasonably accurate".set.



* The ''Literature/{{Noob}}'' novels. The only media of the franchise that shows the whole thing.
* The book ''[[Literature/TakeBackTheSkies Take Back the Skies]]'' contains a map of the fictional world of Tellus, including the thick, tumultuous storms that surround its islands.
* The map of The Land in ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfThomasCovenant'' is quite necessary, both because it was reshaped by past events and because much changes amongst the inhabitants in the considerable time that passes between Covenant's visits. Unfortunately, it can be only partially legible in the cheaply printed paperback editions.
* The map of the continent Pyrrhia in ''Literature/WingsOfFire'', which is shaped like a huge dragon.
* Each book of ''Literature/TheBalancedSword'' has a map of Zarathan in the front, and sometimes also more detailed maps of specific regions visited in that book. Zarathan, which was developed as a setting for roleplaying games as well as novels, was created to be large enough that the heroes have no chance of visiting every place on it, and there's room for multiple epic adventures to be going on simultaneously.
* Each book in the ''Literature/CodexAlera'' contains a stylized map of Alera itself and parts of its surrounding lands.
* Each of the ''Literature/AgeOfFire'' books has a map of the region the series takes place in, but each one is varied depending on the book -- for example, Wistala's solo focus book only shows the lands between the Inland Ocean and the Red Mountains, [=AuRon=]'s includes those lands but also spreads further east, and the Copper's shows the underground network of tunnels that form the Lower World, because those are the areas where those books are focused. Also, each map has a series of footnotes marking where key events from that specific book takes place.

to:

* The ''Literature/{{Noob}}'' novels. The only media Wilbert Awdry, creator of ''ThomasTheTankEngine,'' was forced to map out Thomas's 14-mile railway line to prove to his children that a story involving a race between a train and a bus had an equal number of obstacles to both parties. Realizing it could be useful as a means of enforcing continuity he kept it, and decided to expand on it, resulting in him dropping approximately 3000 square miles of fictional island (the Island Of Sodor) into the Irish Sea off the coast of the franchise UK. He then spent decades creating a complete political, social, geological, industrial and linguistic 'Tolkien-lite' history of the Island in collaboration with his historian brother (just for fun!)... and then they got said history published as a book over which collectors now fight to the death. Awesome.
* Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium
** ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' is the TropeCodifier. WordOfGod states
that shows showing the whole thing.
maps in the FilmOfTheBook was helpful in doing all the required exposition to make the story make sense without seeming contrived.
** And before it, ''Literature/TheHobbit'', with two maps.
** ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'' also includes a map, although there was at least one other, quite different, version Tolkien created for Beleriand besides the one actually published.
** Viciously parodied in the 1969 paperback ''Literature/BoredOfTheRings'', whose map of "Lower Middle Earth" includes such features as "The Legendary Drillingrigs", "The Land of the Knee-walking Turkeys", "The Islets of the Langerhans", "The Tiny X-Shaped Forest", and a body of water shaped like the profile of UsefulNotes/RichardNixon called "The Bay of Milhous". It also includes a compass rose with the directions Up, Down, Right (pointing left) and Left (pointing right). (This last may be an intentional ShoutOut to the original maps of Oz -- see below.) Fortunately for the competency-challenged cast, they didn't have to visit ''every'' labeled spot on it, and those they do visit don't have to be in geographical proximity.
* ''Literature/TheToughGuideToFantasyland'' notes that if you see a map at the start of a novel, you can expect to "go to every damn place on it." The book ''[[Literature/TakeBackTheSkies Take Back itself has a map which is very obviously Europe upside-down, with all the Skies]]'' contains countries given anagrammatic names.
* Brin's ''Literature/{{Uplift}}'' series is another science fiction example.
* Erin Hunter's ''Literature/WarriorCats'' and ''Literature/SeekerBears'' series both have two two-page maps per book: One is the "animal view" map, which is more decorative, having houses and trees and everything drawn out, and labeling it with the animals' names for landmarks. The second is a "human view" map, which labels the landmarks with human names. It also looks more like a proper map: rather than drawing the forest, there is a map key, and it just uses the symbol for "tree" lots of times.
* ''Literature/WatershipDown'' has a map, and is fantasy, but it takes place in England and the map is of a real area.
* The ''Literature/WellWorld'' novels by Jack Chalker are a sci-fi example, but also something of a subversion as the Well World is composed almost entirely of tessellated hexagons, the edges of which define not only the borders of the various "nations" but also the larger bodies of water.
* ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' has one for the Westlands, and the Westlands only, as about 99% of the story takes place there. A [[AllThereInTheManual Manual text]] was released that includes
a map of the fictional world of Tellus, including whole world. This map is useless to the thick, tumultuous storms actual story, but looking at it does reveal that surround its islands.
* The map of The Land in ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfThomasCovenant''
the planet is quite necessary, both because it was reshaped by past events Earth after massive geographical change, and because much changes amongst the inhabitants Westlands are in the considerable time that passes between Covenant's visits. Unfortunately, it can what used to be only partially legible in the cheaply printed paperback editions.
Europe.
* The map of the continent Pyrrhia in ''Literature/WingsOfFire'', which is shaped like a huge dragon. \n
* Each book of ''Literature/TheBalancedSword'' has Creator/AndreNorton's early ''WitchWorld'' novels had a small world map of Zarathan in drawn by Jack Gaughan, showing the front, and sometimes also more detailed maps of specific regions visited in that book. Zarathan, which was developed as a setting for roleplaying games as well as novels, was created to be large enough that three main kingdoms with the heroes have no chance of visiting every place on it, and there's room for multiple epic adventures ocean to be going on simultaneously.
* Each book in
the ''Literature/CodexAlera'' contains a stylized map of Alera itself and parts of its surrounding lands.
* Each
west. In some of the ''Literature/AgeOfFire'' books has later novels there are two maps covering a much wider area, one of which depicts the lands on either side of the western ocean, and the other depicting the rest of the eastern continent.
* Notably averted in ''Literature/TheWitcher'' series: no canon
map of the region Continent has ever been released by the series takes place in, but each one is varied depending author, so the large number of maps found on the book -- for example, Wistala's solo focus book only shows net are all fan-made approximations based on the lands between geographical detail given in the Inland Ocean and books. Not even the Red Mountains, [=AuRon=]'s includes those lands but also spreads further east, and maps featured in the Copper's shows the underground network of tunnels [[VideoGame/TheWitcher video]] [[VideoGame/TheWitcher2AssassinsOfKings games]] are canon, though WordOfGod is that form they are "reasonably accurate".
* Parodied in Piers Anthony's ''Literature/{{Xanth}}'' books by using
the Lower World, because those are state of Florida as the areas map of Xanth.
** He went on to use Italy, Greece and Korea in later installments in the series, which was {{hand wave}}d with the explanation that Xanth connects with the real world at multiple places and time periods, but most of the novels use modern Florida as the point
where those books are focused. Also, each map has a series of footnotes marking where key events from that specific book takes place.Earth connects to Xanth.



* ''Series/TheTenthKingdom'' also has a map thoughtfully provided for the viewers' enjoyment, on the wall of Snow White Memorial Prison, so that both the hapless heroes TrappedInAnotherWorld and the viewers can learn exactly what the Nine Kingdoms look like. Unlike most versions of the fantasy map, it displays places which are never visited in the miniseries, since the story remains confined to the Fourth Kingdom (with brief forays into the Third and Ninth). It also has the amusing location marker "You Are Imprisoned Here" -- this becomes a slight RunningGag in the {{Novelization}} with a map in Kissing Town marked "You Are Romantically Here" -- and has the interesting feature of being remarkably similar in outlines to Europe... a feature which has led to some interesting EpilepticTrees among the fandom, ranging from [[AlternateHistory the Nine Kingdoms having diverged from our timeline centuries ago]] to our world being a non-magical, cursed offshoot of the Kingdoms.



* ''Series/TheTenthKingdom'' also has a map thoughtfully provided for the viewers' enjoyment, on the wall of Snow White Memorial Prison, so that both the hapless heroes TrappedInAnotherWorld and the viewers can learn exactly what the Nine Kingdoms look like. Unlike most versions of the fantasy map, it displays places which are never visited in the miniseries, since the story remains confined to the Fourth Kingdom (with brief forays into the Third and Ninth). It also has the amusing location marker "You Are Imprisoned Here" -- this becomes a slight RunningGag in the {{Novelization}} with a map in Kissing Town marked "You Are Romantically Here" -- and has the interesting feature of being remarkably similar in outlines to Europe... a feature which has led to some interesting EpilepticTrees among the fandom, ranging from [[AlternateHistory the Nine Kingdoms having diverged from our timeline centuries ago]] to our world being a non-magical, cursed offshoot of the Kingdoms.



* Drawing up the map is a vital part of group creation in ''TabletopGame/OnMightyThews''.



* Drawing up the map is a vital part of group creation in ''TabletopGame/OnMightyThews''.



* Strangereal, a [[AlternateUniverse parallel Earth]] in which most of the ''AceCombat'' series takes place, has its own [[http://www.imaginaryatlas.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/strangereal.jpg world map.]]
* ''VideoGame/BrutalLegend'' has an in-game map [[WideOpenSandbox that you must uncover throughout the game]]. Here is a [[http://images.roosterteeth.com/images/4ad6590960ef2_bighugemap.jpg complete copy]].
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' has a map that you use whenever you choose which location you want to go to next. It's not a real world map, since it only shows one country (Ferelden), which is part of a much larger world (Thedas). Creator/BioWare also released a true world map that shows all of Thedas (see it [[http://dragonage.wikia.com/wiki/File:ThedasMap.jpg here]]), but this map does not appear in the game itself.
** The limited edition also has a {{Feelie}} map printed on cloth.
* ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'', which [[WordOfGod its creator]] describes as a "fantasy world generator", naturally starts off by creating one of these through ProceduralGeneration. Unlike a lot of fantasy authors, however, he [[ShownTheirWork read some geology and meteorology textbooks first]].
* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls Adventures: Redguard, VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind, VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion,'' and their related [[ExpansionPackWorld expansion packs]] come with paper maps (a cloth map, for ''Redguard'') packaged in the boxes. They are designed to look like someone who actually lives in ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''' world drew them -- ''Oblivion's'' map even has a watermark and signature.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' also comes with a rather detailed paper map of the province.
* All ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games have maps wherein, due to the linear plot, you are forced to visit almost every location on it simply to accomplish the story. The few places you don't visit can be found with simple exploring once the world becomes a WideOpenSandbox.



* In ''VideoGame/GemsOfWar'', there's a PointAndClickMap of the world on which the icons of the various kingdoms you can travel to are displayed, featuring the usual grasslands, forests, mountains, and such. Parts of it which you can't access yet are partly covered in cloud, so there's an aspect of pushing back the frontiers (although you can see the rough shape of the land anyway).
* The ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'' games have a world map you can access by hitting R while outside of cities and dungeons. ''The Lost Age'' was sold with a paper map of Weyard and a character relationship chart. ''VideoGame/GoldenSunDarkDawn'''s map of Angara contradicts most of what was established in the first two games, due to the events of the first two games causing the world to change rather drastically. It's still changing 30 years after the fact, which is when ''Dark Dawn'' takes place. Judging by the shape of Angara and surrounds, Weyard is slowly becoming Earth.
* ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' has ''three'' separate maps, one for each of its stand-alone campaigns, with the [[ExpansionPack Eye of the North]] expansion nearly doubling the size of the original Tyrian Map. Each map has its own separate continent, and players switch from one to another when they travel from to different continents. Each full-sized map only shows an apparent section of the continent (and only half of that is actually explorable) suggesting that the world is actually very large (and leaving room for infinite expansions).
* ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxterThePrecursorLegacy'' has a poster map/game manual in one. The map is bordered with a long passage written in the in-game writing system; those who bother to translate it will find it's full of references to the first game and future storylines.
* Besides having MedievalStasis the Hyrule seen in ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' is stuck with this.
* ''VideoGame/{{Myst}}'' features a profusion of maps and designs describing its miniature worlds, which are themselves literary descriptions made reality.
* The [[XtremeKoolLetterz Urth]] map of ''VideoGame/PrimalRage'' is shaped in the form of a ''Tyrannosaurus'' skull. With flames in the mouth.
* ''RavenmarkScourgeOfEstellion'' includes a map of Eclisse, the game world. In-between missions, the player is shown his army's position on the map.



* Many of the games in the ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' series included actual cloth maps of the world as {{Feelies}}. Useful for navigation in-game, but they were labeled in a pseudo-runic cypher.



* Besides having MedievalStasis the Hyrule seen in ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' is stuck with this.
* ''VideoGame/{{Myst}}'' features a profusion of maps and designs describing its miniature worlds, which are themselves literary descriptions made reality.
* ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' has ''three'' separate maps, one for each of its stand-alone campaigns, with the [[ExpansionPack Eye of the North]] expansion nearly doubling the size of the original Tyrian Map. Each map has its own separate continent, and players switch from one to another when they travel from to different continents. Each full-sized map only shows an apparent section of the continent (and only half of that is actually explorable) suggesting that the world is actually very large (and leaving room for infinite expansions).
* All ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games have maps wherein, due to the linear plot, you are forced to visit almost every location on it simply to accomplish the story. The few places you don't visit can be found with simple exploring once the world becomes a WideOpenSandbox.
* Many of the games in the ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' series included actual cloth maps of the world as {{Feelies}}. Useful for navigation in-game, but they were labeled in a pseudo-runic cypher.
* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls Adventures: Redguard, VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind, VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion,'' and their related [[ExpansionPackWorld expansion packs]] come with paper maps (a cloth map, for ''Redguard'') packaged in the boxes. They are designed to look like someone who actually lives in ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''' world drew them -- ''Oblivion's'' map even has a watermark and signature.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' also comes with a rather detailed paper map of the province.
* ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxterThePrecursorLegacy'' has a poster map/game manual in one. The map is bordered with a long passage written in the in-game writing system; those who bother to translate it will find it's full of references to the first game and future storylines.
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' has a map that you use whenever you choose which location you want to go to next. It's not a real world map, since it only shows one country (Ferelden), which is part of a much larger world (Thedas). Creator/BioWare also released a true world map that shows all of Thedas (see it [[http://dragonage.wikia.com/wiki/File:ThedasMap.jpg here]]), but this map does not appear in the game itself.
** The limited edition also has a {{Feelie}} map printed on cloth.
* ''VideoGame/BrutalLegend'' has an in-game map [[WideOpenSandbox that you must uncover throughout the game]]. Here is a [[http://images.roosterteeth.com/images/4ad6590960ef2_bighugemap.jpg complete copy]].



* The ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'' games have a world map you can access by hitting R while outside of cities and dungeons. ''The Lost Age'' was sold with a paper map of Weyard and a character relationship chart. ''VideoGame/GoldenSunDarkDawn'''s map of Angara contradicts most of what was established in the first two games, due to the events of the first two games causing the world to change rather drastically. It's still changing 30 years after the fact, which is when ''Dark Dawn'' takes place. Judging by the shape of Angara and surrounds, Weyard is slowly becoming Earth.
* ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'', which [[WordOfGod its creator]] describes as a "fantasy world generator", naturally starts off by creating one of these through ProceduralGeneration. Unlike a lot of fantasy authors, however, he [[ShownTheirWork read some geology and meteorology textbooks first]].
* Strangereal, a [[AlternateUniverse parallel Earth]] in which most of the ''AceCombat'' series takes place, has its own [[http://www.imaginaryatlas.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/strangereal.jpg world map.]]
* ''RavenmarkScourgeOfEstellion'' includes a map of Eclisse, the game world. In-between missions, the player is shown his army's position on the map.
* The [[XtremeKoolLetterz Urth]] map of ''VideoGame/PrimalRage'' is shaped in the form of a ''Tyrannosaurus'' skull. With flames in the mouth.
* In ''VideoGame/GemsOfWar'', there's a PointAndClickMap of the world on which the icons of the various kingdoms you can travel to are displayed, featuring the usual grasslands, forests, mountains, and such. Parts of it which you can't access yet are partly covered in cloud, so there's an aspect of pushing back the frontiers (although you can see the rough shape of the land anyway).



* ''Webcomic/SluggyFreelance'' includes some maps of Stuffaroth [[http://www.sluggy.com/daily.php?date=080816 before]] and [[http://www.sluggy.com/daily.php?date=080907 after]] its expansion pack during the "[[http://www.sluggy.com/daily.php?date=080728 Years of Yarncraft]]" storyline.



* ''Webcomic/SluggyFreelance'' includes some maps of Stuffaroth [[http://www.sluggy.com/daily.php?date=080816 before]] and [[http://www.sluggy.com/daily.php?date=080907 after]] its expansion pack during the "[[http://www.sluggy.com/daily.php?date=080728 Years of Yarncraft]]" storyline.



* ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' has one for the Land of Ooo.



* On ''WesternAnimation/BeanyAndCecil'', Captain Huffenpuff would show a map of the team's latest adventure. The focal points of the map are labeled with some outrageous puns.
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' has [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-uj5l0C_W9Ps/Vh9gxWnaXKI/AAAAAAAAA98/kYLCGxpkHmI/s1600/eq_map.jpg a map of Equestria]], and the journey to A.K. Yearling’s house in the episode ''[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E4DaringDont Daring Don’t]]'' can be [[http://cheezburger.com/7946296576 retraced on it]].



* ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' has one for the Land of Ooo.
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' has [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-uj5l0C_W9Ps/Vh9gxWnaXKI/AAAAAAAAA98/kYLCGxpkHmI/s1600/eq_map.jpg a map of Equestria]], and the journey to A.K. Yearling’s house in the episode ''[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E4DaringDont Daring Don’t]]'' can be [[http://cheezburger.com/7946296576 retraced on it]].
* On ''WesternAnimation/BeanyAndCecil'', Captain Huffenpuff would show a map of the team's latest adventure. The focal points of the map are labeled with some outrageous puns.
24th Oct '16 8:33:25 AM TheNerevarine
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* The ''ComicBook/MouseGuard'' [=TPBs=] provide the reader with a map of Mouse Territories

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* The ''ComicBook/MouseGuard'' [=TPBs=] provide the reader with a map of Mouse TerritoriesTerritories.
* ''ComicBook/RequiemVampireKnight'' had a [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/resurrection_world_map.jpg map for Résurrection in Volume 4]], which is basically [[BizarroWorld our Earth, but with land and sea reversed]], with several countries positioned in what would be the Atlantic Ocean.
28th Sep '16 7:20:25 PM PaulA
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* Inverted in Creator/HalClement's science fiction novel ''Mission of Gravity''. Clement created a globe of the planet Mesklin and wrote the story around it, but the book didn't include a map.

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* Inverted in Creator/HalClement's science fiction novel ''Mission of Gravity''.''Literature/MissionOfGravity''. Clement created a globe of the planet Mesklin and wrote the story around it, but the book didn't include a map.
31st Aug '16 3:54:15 AM Morgenthaler
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* The ''WellWorld'' novels by Jack Chalker are a sci-fi example, but also something of a subversion as the Well World is composed almost entirely of tessellated hexagons, the edges of which define not only the borders of the various "nations" but also the larger bodies of water.

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* The ''WellWorld'' ''Literature/WellWorld'' novels by Jack Chalker are a sci-fi example, but also something of a subversion as the Well World is composed almost entirely of tessellated hexagons, the edges of which define not only the borders of the various "nations" but also the larger bodies of water.



** This is common in AlternateHistory, as it's a helpful way of letting the reader know exactly how the world is different in the novel's timeline. ''Fatherland'', to quote one other example, has both a map of the Nazi-dominated Europe and a map of the central district of Berlin as it would have been had Albert Speer got his opportunity to rebuild the city in his and Hitler's image.

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** This is common in AlternateHistory, as it's a helpful way of letting the reader know exactly how the world is different in the novel's timeline. ''Fatherland'', ''Literature/{{Fatherland}}'', to quote one other example, has both a map of the Nazi-dominated Europe and a map of the central district of Berlin as it would have been had Albert Speer got his opportunity to rebuild the city in his and Hitler's image.
12th Aug '16 12:02:01 AM PaulA
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* LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/TheSharingKnife'' series of books contain maps of The Wide Green World, becoming grander in scale in each book as the characters do more and more travelling. The maps are based on, but not particularly close to, the eastern half of the USA, particularly Ohio.

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* LoisMcMasterBujold's Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/TheSharingKnife'' series of books contain maps of The Wide Green World, becoming grander in scale in each book as the characters do more and more travelling. The maps are based on, but not particularly close to, the eastern half of the USA, particularly Ohio.
4th Aug '16 2:43:17 AM PaulA
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* The ''MagicKingdomOfLandover'' series has a map of Landover.

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* The ''MagicKingdomOfLandover'' ''Literature/MagicKingdomOfLandover'' series has a map of Landover.
2nd Aug '16 9:14:47 PM mindstalk
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Added DiffLines:

** And before it, ''Literature/TheHobbit'', with two maps.
27th Jul '16 8:42:10 PM PaulA
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* There's are maps in Creator/AnneBishop's ''Tir Alainn'' and ''Literature/TheOthers'' books which have notes underneath them reading, "This map was created by a geographically challenged author. All distances are whimsical and subject to change without notice."
** Inverted in her ''Emphera'' books: you couldn't draw a map even if you wanted because two different people can end up in two different places by going through the same gate depending on where the "heart resonates" with.

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* There's are maps in Creator/AnneBishop's works:
** There are maps in
''Tir Alainn'' and ''Literature/TheOthers'' books which have notes underneath them reading, "This map was created by a geographically challenged author. All distances are whimsical and subject to change without notice."
** Inverted in her ''Emphera'' ''Ephemera'' books: you couldn't draw a map even if you wanted because two different people can end up in two different places by going through the same gate depending on where the "heart resonates" with.
26th Jul '16 9:39:07 PM PaulA
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* UrsulaKLeGuin's ''Literature/EarthseaTrilogy'' has a map showing various parts of the archipelago. Certain editions will include close-ups on the map when the characters are spending time in that particular reach (very very useful!) Her more recent YA series, of which the first is entitled ''Gifts,'' also has such a map, but notably the characters in ''Gifts'' only ever occupy a small upper-right hand corner of the map. Presumably they'll venture forth in the sequels.

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* UrsulaKLeGuin's ''Literature/EarthseaTrilogy'' Creator/UrsulaKLeGuin's ''Literature/{{Earthsea}}'' series has a map showing various parts of the archipelago. Certain editions will include close-ups on the map when the characters are spending time in that particular reach (very very useful!) Her useful!)
* Le Guin's
more recent YA series, of which the first is entitled ''Gifts,'' also has such a map, but notably the characters in ''Gifts'' only ever occupy a small upper-right hand corner of the map. Presumably they'll venture forth in the sequels.
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