History Main / FalseCameraEffects

7th Jul '16 10:16:39 AM Willbyr
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* Episode 1 of ''VisionOfEscaflowne'' includes {{Lens Flare}}s in outdoor shots when Hitomi is practicing track and field.

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* Episode 1 of ''VisionOfEscaflowne'' ''Anime/TheVisionOfEscaflowne'' includes {{Lens Flare}}s in outdoor shots when Hitomi is practicing track and field.
31st May '16 9:25:31 AM TheNicestGuy
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* If you outfit your character in ''VideoGame/KillingFloor2'' with eyeglasses, a gas mask, or the like, a glare-on-dust effect is visible when you look toward bright lights. Note that these items are otherwise meant to be purely cosmetic.
27th May '16 10:59:22 PM gophergiggles
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* In the GameCube remake of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil'' if you go into the holding cell [[spoiler:where Chris or Jill was imprisoned in the underground lab]] the FixedCamera is grainy, angled from one of the corners on the ceiling, and has a fish-eye distortion effect as if you're looking at a surveilance camera feed on your tv.
25th May '16 12:23:58 PM Soldancer
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* ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey'' uses the focus effect during cutscenes, often taking a moment to focus on the subject or deliberately blurring the background.
9th Apr '16 7:35:47 PM sorako
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* In episode 6 of ''MidoriNoHibi'' there is a moment when Shiori is speaking about her mother in heaven; it's presented using a pseudo-FishEyeLens, shot from above down into Shioiri's face.

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* In episode 6 of ''MidoriNoHibi'' ''Manga/MidoriDays'' there is a moment when Shiori is speaking about her mother in heaven; it's presented using a pseudo-FishEyeLens, shot from above down into Shioiri's face.
28th Mar '16 9:06:18 AM Soldancer
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* If we're talking about lens flares, pretty much every video game since the first Unreal.
** The ''Franchise/MetalGear'' games had more. Looking around in First Person View when outside can give you a lens flare which shifts, brightens and vanishes as you turn your gaze towards and away from the sun - and changes the background noise to make it sound like it was shot through a SteadiCam.
*** If Snake gets hit in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4'', the camera gets noisy every time he's struck.
** Both ''VideoGame/{{Penumbra}}'' episodes give off a strong effect if the character looks too long on the monsters around him. Used in gameplay, too, because eventually he'll panic and give himself away.
** Similarly in Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth. Looking at monsters (or down when in high areas) make the vision blurry until it's nearly impossible to see anything. (The character still controls normally, however.)

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* If we're talking about lens flares, Some common effects include:
** LensFlare, appearing in
pretty much every video game since the first Unreal.
** Distortion or grain filters, often found in horror games to enhance the atmosphere.
** [[CameraAbuse Blood, water, or cracking effects]] on the "lens" of the non-existent camera.
** MotionBlur, to give the impression that the camera can't keep up with the action on-screen.
** Bouncing, swaying, or otherwise unsteady camera motions to make it appear the shot was done with a handheld camera.
** Focus effects, including blurring background when focusing on the foreground (see page image) or vice-versa, and shots that look like they take a few seconds to focus on the subject entirely.
*
The ''Franchise/MetalGear'' games had more.several. Looking around in First Person View when outside can give you a lens flare which shifts, brightens and vanishes as you turn your gaze towards and away from the sun - and changes the background noise to make it sound like it was shot through a SteadiCam.
*** ** If Snake gets hit in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4'', the camera gets noisy every time he's struck.
** * Both ''VideoGame/{{Penumbra}}'' episodes give off a strong effect if the character looks too long on the monsters around him. Used in gameplay, too, because eventually he'll panic and give himself away.
** Similarly in * Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth. Looking at monsters (or down when in high areas) make the vision blurry until it's nearly impossible to see anything. (The character still controls normally, however.)


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* First-person horror game ''VideoGame/TheTape'' uses grain and distortion filters to give the player the feeling they are watching a well worn VHS FoundFootage tape, through night vision no less. The filters can be adjusted for intensity or turned off entirely, but that sort of defeats the purpose of the game in the first place.


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* ''VideoGame/{{Outlast}}'' plays with this trope. The standard first-person view appears normal, with little to no camera effects. However, the player character has a handheld video camera with optional night vision. Anything viewed through the camera has a grain filter, plus a green tint when in night vision mode. The REC and battery life are also displayed when viewing through the camera. And lastly, [[spoiler: you drop the camera at one point, and the lens is cracked and distorted by the time you find it again.]]
24th Mar '16 1:57:52 PM Willbyr
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* "Yura Yura" the last opening for the original ''{{Naruto}}'' series uses this.

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* "Yura Yura" the last opening for the original ''{{Naruto}}'' ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' series uses this.
24th Mar '16 12:42:00 PM Scorpion451
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* "false" Fish Eye Lens shots, use a type of [[UsefulNotes/GraphicalPerspective drawn perspective]] that replicates the curved shape of the retina and the curved lens of the eye While much more complicated than linear perspective, it creates a better sense of depth and scale, and allows a more immersive field of view.

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* "false" "False" Fish Eye Lens shots, shots use a type of [[UsefulNotes/GraphicalPerspective drawn perspective]] that replicates the curved shape of the retina and the curved lens of the eye eye. While much more complicated than linear perspective, it creates a better sense of depth and scale, and allows a more immersive field of view.



* the depth of field effect depicted in the page image. The last one is easy to demonstrate to yourself in real life: place a finger about a hand's width in front of your nose and look at it. Now look at something behind it. Now look at something behind ''that''. Some people may also notice "double vision" on distant objects when looking at their finger, though the brain may edit this out for people with a strongly dominant eye.

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* the depth of field effect depicted in the page image. The last image, with or without double vision effects. [[note]]This one is easy to demonstrate to yourself in real life: place a finger about a hand's width in front of your nose and look at it. Now look at something behind it. Now look at something behind ''that''. Some people may also notice "double vision" on distant objects when looking at their finger, though finger and doubling of their finger when looking at the distant objects. The brain may edit sometimes edits this out for people with a strongly dominant eye.
eye, however.[[/note]]
24th Mar '16 12:37:25 PM Scorpion451
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Common types of FalseCameraEffects include [[LensFlare lens flares]], FishEyeLens shots, wide-angle shots, simulated scanning lines, and the VertigoEffect. If the action bumps or shakes the "camera", it's CameraAbuse. OminousVisualGlitch can be related. Most often, these effects are replicated because of TheCoconutEffect: for instance, we think of overlapping double exposures as being "what inebriation looks like", even if ''eyes'' [[RealityIsUnrealistic don't work that way]].

Exceptions include "false" Fish Eye Lens shots, which use a type of [[UsefulNotes/GraphicalPerspective drawn perspective]] that replicates the curved shape of the retina, gausian effects for disorientation (say a drugged or concussed character) replicating the loss of the ability to focus the eye's lens, and the depth of field effect depicted in the page image. The last one is easy to demonstrate to yourself by placing a finger in front of your nose and looking at it, and then looking at something behind it; you eyes can only bring one plane into focus at a time.

See also {{Retraux}}.

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Common types of FalseCameraEffects include [[LensFlare lens flares]], FishEyeLens shots, wide-angle shots, simulated scanning lines, and the VertigoEffect. If the action bumps or shakes the "camera", it's CameraAbuse. OminousVisualGlitch can be related. Most often, these effects are replicated because of TheCoconutEffect: for instance, we think of overlapping double exposures [[SingleMaltVision swirling multiple exposures]] as being "what inebriation looks like", even if ''eyes'' [[RealityIsUnrealistic don't work that way]].

Exceptions include There are a few exceptions, however, where false camera effects can be used to add realism by better replicating the eye's mechanisms than standard perspective effects:
*
"false" Fish Eye Lens shots, which use a type of [[UsefulNotes/GraphicalPerspective drawn perspective]] that replicates the curved shape of the retina, gausian retina and the curved lens of the eye While much more complicated than linear perspective, it creates a better sense of depth and scale, and allows a more immersive field of view.
* gaussian and bloom
effects and a single pair of overlapping exposures for disorientation (say a drugged or concussed character) replicating the loss of the character- these replicate impaired ability to focus the eye's lens, contract the pupil, and synchronize one's eyes.
*
the depth of field effect depicted in the page image. The last one is easy to demonstrate to yourself by placing in real life: place a finger about a hand's width in front of your nose and looking look at it, and then looking it. Now look at something behind it; you eyes can only bring one plane into focus it. Now look at something behind ''that''. Some people may also notice "double vision" on distant objects when looking at their finger, though the brain may edit this out for people with a time.

strongly dominant eye.

See also {{Retraux}}.
{{Retraux}} and InterfaceScrew.
24th Mar '16 12:09:25 PM Scorpion451
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Common types of FalseCameraEffects include [[LensFlare lens flares]], FishEyeLens shots, wide-angle shots, simulated scanning lines, and the VertigoEffect. If the action bumps or shakes the "camera", it's CameraAbuse. OminousVisualGlitch can be related. Most often, these effects are replicated because of TheCoconutEffect - we think of a blurry screen as being "what disorientation looks like", even if our actual ''eyes'' [[RealityIsUnrealistic don't work that way]] (with the exception of "false" Fish Eye Lens shots, which use a type of [[UsefulNotes/GraphicalPerspective drawn perspective]] that replicates the curved shape of the retina instead).

to:

Common types of FalseCameraEffects include [[LensFlare lens flares]], FishEyeLens shots, wide-angle shots, simulated scanning lines, and the VertigoEffect. If the action bumps or shakes the "camera", it's CameraAbuse. OminousVisualGlitch can be related. Most often, these effects are replicated because of TheCoconutEffect - TheCoconutEffect: for instance, we think of a blurry screen overlapping double exposures as being "what disorientation inebriation looks like", even if our actual ''eyes'' [[RealityIsUnrealistic don't work that way]] (with the exception of way]].

Exceptions include
"false" Fish Eye Lens shots, which use a type of [[UsefulNotes/GraphicalPerspective drawn perspective]] that replicates the curved shape of the retina instead).
retina, gausian effects for disorientation (say a drugged or concussed character) replicating the loss of the ability to focus the eye's lens, and the depth of field effect depicted in the page image. The last one is easy to demonstrate to yourself by placing a finger in front of your nose and looking at it, and then looking at something behind it; you eyes can only bring one plane into focus at a time.
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