History Main / EpicInstrumentalOpener

3rd Aug '17 8:10:03 PM PrincessSunflowerRainbow
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* Music/{{Avantasia}} does this sometimes. In the ''Metal Opera I'', the first track is titled "Prelude" and is completely instrumental. Also, "Let the Storm Descend Upon You" has just over a minute and a half of instrumentals before the lyrics start. "The Scarecrow" has a minute of instrumentals before the lyrics start. "The Wicked Symphony"'s intro is just shy of a full two minutes before the lyrics. And "Savior in the Clockwork"'s intro actually does surpass two minutes. Many other songs have intros around 30-40 seconds long.
11th Jul '17 2:49:54 AM Coyotek4
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* The intro to 'Panic Song' by Music/GreenDay lasts almost two minutes. The rest of the song lasts about 90 seconds.
11th Jun '17 11:29:58 AM nombretomado
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* Music/MichaelJackson's ''Dangerous'' has this in a few tracks, such as "Black and White" (with a mostly spoken intro featuring [[Music/GunsNRoses Slash's guitar]], translated into a comedic segment with MacaulayCulkin in the video) and "Will You Be There" (a chant taken from Creator/LudwigVanBeethoven's Ninth) - which are thankfully shortened on the singles and [[GreatestHitsAlbum compilations]].

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* Music/MichaelJackson's ''Dangerous'' has this in a few tracks, such as "Black and White" (with a mostly spoken intro featuring [[Music/GunsNRoses Slash's guitar]], translated into a comedic segment with MacaulayCulkin in the video) and "Will You Be There" (a chant taken from Creator/LudwigVanBeethoven's Music/LudwigVanBeethoven's Ninth) - which are thankfully shortened on the singles and [[GreatestHitsAlbum compilations]].
10th Jun '17 11:05:17 AM nombretomado
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* In a Classical music example, the aria "Martern Aller Arten" from [[Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Mozart's]] opera ''The Abduction from the Seraglio'' has almost two ''minutes'' of fanfare and concertante-style orchestral solos before Konstanze starts singing.

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* In a Classical music example, the aria "Martern Aller Arten" from [[Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart [[Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Mozart's]] opera ''The Abduction from the Seraglio'' has almost two ''minutes'' of fanfare and concertante-style orchestral solos before Konstanze starts singing.
3rd Jun '17 12:39:15 AM bt8257
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* A concerto, written for a featured instrument with a larger ensemble (such as violin and orchestra), often opens with the first theme introduced by the ensemble while the soloist waits. When the soloist enters, it is often to end the first theme and introduce another. Depending on the overall scale of the piece, the soloist might sit by for several minutes; as time went on and pieces, in general, grew longer, an audience member might be forgiven for wondering whether the soloist was ever going to play. On the other hand, many composers, particularly during the later Romantic era, chose to open with a dramatic statement by the soloist, possibly as a deliberate subversion of the traditional approach.[[note]]Just to name a few of the most famous examples where the soloist enters either immediately or within the first two or three bars: Mozart's "Jeunehomme" piano concerto, Beethoven's fourth and fifth ("Emperor") piano concerti, Mendelssohn's violin concerto, Schumann's piano concerto, Brahms' second piano concerto, Grieg's piano concerto, Tchaikovsky's first piano concerto, Elgar's cello concerto, and Rachmaninov's first three piano concerti.[[/note]]

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* A concerto, written for a featured instrument with a larger ensemble (such as violin and orchestra), often opens with the first theme introduced by the ensemble while the soloist waits. When the soloist enters, it is often to end the first theme and introduce another. Depending on the overall scale of the piece, the soloist might sit by for several minutes; as time went on and pieces, in general, grew longer, an audience member might be forgiven for wondering whether the soloist was ever going to play. On the other hand, many composers, particularly during the later Romantic era, chose to open with a dramatic statement by the soloist, possibly as a deliberate subversion of the traditional approach.[[note]]Just to name a few of the most famous examples where the soloist enters either immediately or within the first two or three bars: Mozart's "Jeunehomme" piano concerto, Beethoven's fourth and fifth ("Emperor") piano concerti, Mendelssohn's violin concerto, Schumann's piano concerto, Brahms' second piano concerto, Grieg's piano concerto, Tchaikovsky's first piano concerto, Elgar's cello concerto, and Rachmaninov's Rachmaninoff's first three piano concerti.[[/note]]



** Rachmaninov's second symphony opens with a slow, four-minute introduction, featuring two themes based on scalar motion. The rest of the first movement is based around a faster version of these themes, which also recur (often as accompanying motifs, sometimes as featured melodies) throughout the third and fourth movements.
** Dvorak's ninth symphony[[note]]originally published as No.5[[/note]], the "New World" symphony, opens with a slow introduction in first the lower strings, then the upper woodwinds. Then, the whole orchestra enters as the tempo suddenly increases, before subsiding again, then building once more as the main theme for the first movement begins to take shape. The first movement "proper" finally begins after about two minutes, based on the theme from the end of the introduction. It appears again during a climax in the middle of the second movement, as a transitory figure before the "trio" section and then again in the coda in the third movement, and once again in the coda of the finale (first as part of a whirlwind of themes from across all four movements, then as an accompanying figure just before the final bars).

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** Rachmaninov's Rachmaninoff's second symphony opens with a slow, four-minute introduction, featuring two themes based on scalar motion. The rest of the first movement is based around a faster version of these themes, which also recur (often as accompanying motifs, sometimes as featured melodies) throughout the third and fourth movements.
** Dvorak's ninth symphony[[note]]originally published as No.5[[/note]], the "New World" symphony, New World Symphony, opens with a slow introduction in first the lower strings, then the upper woodwinds. Then, the whole orchestra enters as the tempo suddenly increases, before subsiding again, then building once more as the main theme for the first movement begins to take shape. The first movement "proper" finally begins after about two minutes, based on the theme from the end of the introduction. It appears again during a climax in the middle of the second movement, as a transitory figure before the "trio" section and then again in the coda in the third movement, and once again in the coda of the finale (first as part of a whirlwind of themes from across all four movements, then as an accompanying figure just before the final bars).
3rd Jun '17 12:19:38 AM bt8257
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A subtrope of EpicRocking.

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A subtrope SubTrope of EpicRocking.



* Music/{{Santana}}'s cover of "Black Magic Woman" from ''Music/{{Abraxas}}'' had a very long opening.[[note]] By contrast, the original by Music/FleetwoodMac opens with a single distorted guitar chord before the vocals begin.[[/note]]

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* Music/{{Santana}}'s cover of "Black Magic Woman" from ''Music/{{Abraxas}}'' had a very long opening.[[note]] By In contrast, the original by Music/FleetwoodMac opens with a single distorted guitar chord before the vocals begin.[[/note]]



* In a similar vein, about half of "Theme from Film/{{Shaft}}" by Music/IsaacHayes is the instrumental opening. Since this song isn't [[EpicRocking overly long]], there isn't much time left for actual lyrics.
* Played with by Music/{{Typhoon}}: "Prelude," the first song on White Lighter, is instrumental but just eighteen seconds long.
* "Where The Streets Have No Name" by Music/{{U2}}, which also opens the ''Joshua Tree'' album.

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* In a similar vein, about half of "Theme from Film/{{Shaft}}" by Music/IsaacHayes is the instrumental opening. Since this song isn't [[EpicRocking overly very long]], there isn't much time left for actual lyrics.
* Played with by Music/{{Typhoon}}: "Prelude," "Prelude", the first song on White Lighter, is instrumental but just eighteen seconds long.
* "Where The the Streets Have No Name" by Music/{{U2}}, which also opens the ''Joshua Tree'' album.



** The {{Greatest Hits Album}}s use "Eruption" as an overall epic instrumental opener -- while in the album ''Van Halen'', track one is "[[ImageSong Runnin' with the Devil]]".

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** The {{Greatest Hits Album}}s use "Eruption" as an one overall epic instrumental opener -- while in the album ''Van Halen'', track one is "[[ImageSong Runnin' with the Devil]]".
13th May '17 1:49:18 PM nombretomado
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* "Money for Nothing" by Music/DireStraits has an intro that's 2:05 long (featuring guest vocals by Sting singing "I want my {{MTV}}" to the tune from the chorus of Music/ThePolice's 1980 hit "Don't Stand So Close to Me").

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* "Money for Nothing" by Music/DireStraits has an intro that's 2:05 long (featuring guest vocals by Sting singing "I want my {{MTV}}" Creator/{{MTV}}" to the tune from the chorus of Music/ThePolice's 1980 hit "Don't Stand So Close to Me").
10th May '17 1:45:31 PM KidDynamite
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* "I Need A Lover" by Music/JohnMellencamp goes on for 2:20 before John starts singing.
1st May '17 6:06:17 PM N1KF
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** Of course, their ultimate example of this trope is "Procession", an EpicInstrumentalOpener for their ''entire second album.'' What really drives this home is that it [[FadingIntoTheNextSong segues into the next track, "Father To Son".]]

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** Of course, their ultimate example of this trope is "Procession", an EpicInstrumentalOpener Epic Instrumental Opener for their ''entire second album.'' What really drives this home is that it [[FadingIntoTheNextSong segues into the next track, "Father To Son".]]
17th Apr '17 6:20:38 AM Gemfyre
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* 'To Bid You Farewell' by Music/Opeth has 4 and half minutes of intro before the first verse, (and only contains about 2 minutes of singing in an 11 minute long song).
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