History Main / ElSpanishO

18th Oct '16 5:10:29 PM nombretomado
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* In ''{{Friends}}'', Joey shows off his terrible Italian accent: "That's-a what I suspected-a!"

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* In ''{{Friends}}'', ''Series/{{Friends}}'', Joey shows off his terrible Italian accent: "That's-a what I suspected-a!"
12th Oct '16 4:29:10 PM Odacon_Spy
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* ''[[WebVideo/TwoBestFriendsPlay Super Best Friends Play]]'' has Woolie's alternate wrestling/rustling persona, "EL Woolio".

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* ''[[WebVideo/TwoBestFriendsPlay Super Best Friends Play]]'' has Woolie's alternate wrestling/rustling persona, "EL "El Woolio".
12th Oct '16 10:42:41 AM darkknight109
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* A lot of words in Spanish end with vowels (nouns and adjectives mostly). So, to show that [[InvertedTrope a Spanish speaker really doesn't know any english]], is to just cut out the final vowel. [[note]]This is, of course, TruthInTelevision with some words. (idiota-idiot, importante-important, inteligente-intelligent).[[/note]]

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* A lot of words in Spanish end with vowels (nouns and adjectives mostly). So, to show that [[InvertedTrope a Spanish speaker really doesn't know any english]], is to just cut out the final vowel. [[note]]This is, of course, TruthInTelevision with some words. (idiota-idiot, importante-important, inteligente-intelligent).inteligente-intelligent).
* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperforeignism Hyperforeignism]] is a downplayed version of this trope. It occurs when someone applies what they assume to be correct foreign pronunciation rules to a foreign loan word/phrase that doesn't actually use them. Probably one of the most well-known examples in English is the phrase "coup de grace", borrowed from French and used to denote a final killing blow. Pronounced correctly (coo de grahs, with a non-silent "s" sound on the end), it translates as "blow of mercy"; however, most English-speakers assume that the -ce suffix is supposed to be silent, and pronounce it "coo de grah". To a native French speaker, this doesn't actually mean anything, although it sounds a bit like "coup de gros" ("blow of fat", although "fat" in this case is an adjective, so it doesn't make much grammatical sense). Alternatively, if you have a bad pronunciation and pronounce "grace" the way it is pronounced in English, it is a dead ringer for "coup de graisse" (also "blow of fat", although this time it's a noun, so it actually sounds proper, albeit rather silly).
[[/note]]
12th Oct '16 10:25:00 AM darkknight109
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* In ''WesternAnimation/CowAndChicken'', the Red Guy, attempting to track down Supercow, who only speaks (proper) Spanish, dresses up in a sombrero and holds maracas and goes up to the front door of the main characters' house. When Cow answers, he asks her if there's anyone she knows who speaks "El Española." Cow, of course, says she has no idea what he's talking about and slams the door on his face.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/CowAndChicken'', the Red Guy, attempting to track down Supercow, who only speaks (proper) Spanish, dresses up in a sombrero and holds maracas and goes up to the front door of the main characters' house. When Cow answers, he asks her if there's anyone she knows who speaks "El Española." Cow, of course, says she has no idea what he's talking about and slams the door on his face. Averted later in the same episode when Chicken is required to impersonate Supercow to rescue his captive sister - he speaks proper Spanish, albeit by reading directly from a Spanish-English dictionary and mangling the pronunciation horribly.
27th Sep '16 3:36:41 PM Naram-Sin
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* ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' has the ''¡La Fantoma!'' comics, about a superheroine [[XMeetsY halfway between]] ''Comics/BatGirl'' and ''Comics/ThePhantom''. While they were smart enough to realize that a female would have a name ending in "-a" and use the article "la" instead of "-o" and "el", and that "ph" is not pronounced like "f" in Spanish, the word for phantom in Spanish is actually ''fantasma''.
24th Sep '16 5:58:32 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/DharmaAndGreg'' has Dharma pulling this for fun, when she goes around and pretends to be a German tourist, using phrases such as "ein {{Donald Trump}}en poofenschweater".

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* ''Series/DharmaAndGreg'' has Dharma pulling this for fun, when she goes around and pretends to be a German tourist, using phrases such as "ein {{Donald Creator/{{Donald Trump}}en poofenschweater".
17th Sep '16 2:32:02 PM GranChi
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This is usually a joke, but sometimes it's just plain desperation, if not outright insensitivity. In the U.S., [[UsefulNotes/SpanishLanguage Spanish]] is the language that most commonly gets this treatment, with the article "el" being put in front of English words and the masculine ending "-o" being put on the end. For example, an English speaker who wanted beer might ask a Spanish-speaker for "el beero"[[note]]to get a beer instead of a dumbfounded (or perhaps sneering or angry) look from a Spaniard, ask for "una cerveza"[[/note]]. Other languages get this treatment too. French, for example, will have the masculine article "le" placed in front of English words with the ending "-é" occasionally added. [[note]] In French the "-é" tends to come at the end of adjectives, not nouns. [[/note]] Russian will get "-ov" or "-ski" added to the ends of names and words, Latin with "-us," German with "-en," Chinese with "-ee" or "-ing," and Italian with "-a." [[note]] Interestingly, both Spanish and Italian use "-o" (masculine) and "-a" (feminine) endings, but somehow dog Spanish always takes the "-o" and dog Italian the "-a." This might be because Spanish is viewed as the "macho" language, while Italian is more pretty and "romantic." [[/note]] English itself in some languages takes this treatment with words in said languages ending with "-ation".

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This is usually a joke, but sometimes it's just plain desperation, if not outright insensitivity. In the U.S., [[UsefulNotes/SpanishLanguage Spanish]] is the language that most commonly gets this treatment, with the article "el" being put in front of English words and the masculine ending "-o" being put on the end. For example, an English speaker who wanted beer might ask a Spanish-speaker for "el beero"[[note]]to get a beer instead of a dumbfounded (or perhaps sneering or angry) look from a Spaniard, Spanish speaker, ask for "una cerveza"[[/note]]. Other languages get this treatment too. French, for example, will have the masculine article "le" placed in front of English words with the ending "-é" occasionally added. [[note]] In French the "-é" tends to come at the end of adjectives, not nouns. [[/note]] Russian will get "-ov" or "-ski" added to the ends of names and words, Latin with "-us," German with "-en," Chinese with "-ee" or "-ing," and Italian with "-a." [[note]] Interestingly, both Spanish and Italian use "-o" (masculine) and "-a" (feminine) endings, but somehow dog Spanish always takes the "-o" and dog Italian the "-a." This might be because Spanish is viewed as the "macho" language, while Italian is more pretty and "romantic." [[/note]] English itself in some languages takes this treatment with words in said languages ending with "-ation".
24th Aug '16 5:00:48 PM Pinokio
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Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/SausageParty'': "Once you go taco, you never go back-o."
24th Aug '16 2:26:07 PM margdean56
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* In one episode of ''Series/{{Mash}}'' a family of Koreans set up housekeeping in the middle of the camp. Henry tries to tell them to leave: "Go-ee home-ee!" Then he [[HyperCompetentSidekick asks Radar]] to tell then to leave. So Radar does: [[SubvertedTrope "Go-ee home-ee!"]][[note]]He should say "Jib-e gaeso!" (pronounced "kasao")[[/note]]

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* In one episode of ''Series/{{Mash}}'' a family of Koreans set up housekeeping in the middle of the camp. Henry tries to tell them to leave: "Go-ee home-ee!" Then he [[HyperCompetentSidekick asks Radar]] to tell then them to leave. So Radar does: [[SubvertedTrope "Go-ee home-ee!"]][[note]]He should say "Jib-e gaeso!" (pronounced "kasao")[[/note]]
24th Aug '16 2:21:21 PM margdean56
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* When a Spanish speaker who cannot speak English tries to speak it, the usual is adding -ation (pronounced "eishon" o "eichon") to the end of Spanish words. Oddly, this actually works for some words that describe actions ("preocupación" ⇒ "preocupeichon" ⇒ "preocupation"). The massive amount of French loanwords in English is to thank/blame here.

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* When a Spanish speaker who cannot speak English tries to speak it, the usual is adding -ation (pronounced "eishon" o "eichon") to the end of Spanish words. Oddly, this actually works for some words that describe actions ("preocupación" ⇒ "preocupeichon" ⇒ "preocupation"). The massive amount number of French loanwords in English is to thank/blame here.



** This phenom can happen to some Spanish dialects as well. In 2015, Valencia's Mayoress Rita Barberá became memetic in Spain due to her spectacularly failed attempt of giving a speech in Valencian, a language she ostensibly had no bloody clue of. She mixed words in Valencian and Spanish, made up completely other words, and finally flavored the speech with the now infamous "caloret" (a non-existant word formed by "calor," Spanish for "heat", and "-et," a popular Valencian suffix which in this case is ''not'' the correct way to translate the word to the language).

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** This phenom can happen to some Spanish dialects as well. In 2015, Valencia's Mayoress Rita Barberá became memetic in Spain due to her spectacularly failed attempt of giving a speech in Valencian, a language she ostensibly had no bloody clue of.about. She mixed words in Valencian and Spanish, made up completely other words, and finally flavored the speech with the now infamous "caloret" (a non-existant word formed by "calor," Spanish for "heat", and "-et," a popular Valencian suffix which in this case is ''not'' the correct way to translate the word to the language).
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