History Main / DeterminedWidow

4th Feb '18 6:08:10 PM Gamermaster
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* The title character in ''Manga/TheLegendOfMotherSarah'' lost her husband and her kids in a riot. [[spoiler: Subverted in that her husband has actually survived the riot... only to die in the finale, making Sarah a widow for good.-]]

to:

* The title character in ''Manga/TheLegendOfMotherSarah'' lost her husband and her kids in a riot. [[spoiler: Subverted in that her husband has actually survived the riot... only to die in the finale, making Sarah a widow for good.-]]]]
23rd Jan '18 9:03:50 PM mirisu92
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to "democracy"[[note]]in quotes because in reality, it was immediately dominated by elite oligarch families, many of whom were already in power before Martial Law sidelined them in 1972, or else by upstart political dynasties founded by appointees whom Cory placed in various jurisdictions[[/note]]. Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport[[note]]not that this has stopped the airport from deteriorating over the years to the point that it's landed on several "worst airport in the world" lists for several years running, and has been plagued with various maintenance and legal problems besides[[/note]]. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won—in a way qualifying him for the title of "Determined ''Orphan''", as both of his parents were now dead by this point).

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to "democracy"[[note]]in quotes because in reality, it was immediately dominated by elite oligarch families, many of whom were already in power before Martial Law sidelined them in 1972, or else by upstart political dynasties founded by appointees whom Cory placed in various jurisdictions[[/note]]. Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport[[note]]not that this has stopped the airport management from deteriorating allowing it to deteriorate over the years to the point that it's landed on several "worst airport in the world" lists for several years running, and has been plagued with various maintenance and legal problems besides[[/note]]. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won—in a way qualifying him for the title of "Determined ''Orphan''", as both of his parents were now dead by this point).
23rd Jan '18 9:01:02 PM mirisu92
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to "democracy"[[note]]in quotes because in reality, it was immediately dominated by elite oligarch families, many of whom were already in power before Martial Law sidelined them in 1972, or else by upstart political dynasties founded by appointees whom Cory placed in various jurisdictions[[/note]]. Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport[[note]]not that this has stopped the airport from deteriorating over the years to the point that it's landed on several "worst airport in the world" lists for several years running, and has been plagued with various maintenance and legal problems besides[[/note]]. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won—in a way qualifying him for the title of "Determined ''Orphan'', as both of his parents were now dead by this point).

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to "democracy"[[note]]in quotes because in reality, it was immediately dominated by elite oligarch families, many of whom were already in power before Martial Law sidelined them in 1972, or else by upstart political dynasties founded by appointees whom Cory placed in various jurisdictions[[/note]]. Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport[[note]]not that this has stopped the airport from deteriorating over the years to the point that it's landed on several "worst airport in the world" lists for several years running, and has been plagued with various maintenance and legal problems besides[[/note]]. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won—in a way qualifying him for the title of "Determined ''Orphan'', ''Orphan''", as both of his parents were now dead by this point).
23rd Jan '18 8:59:10 PM mirisu92
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to "democracy"[[note]]in quotes because in reality, it was immediately dominated by elite oligarch families, many of whom were already in power before Martial Law sidelined them in 1972, or else by upstart political dynasties founded by appointees whom Cory placed in various jurisdictions[[/note]]. Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport[[note]]not that this has stopped the airport from deteriorating over the years to the point that it's landed on several "worst airport in the world" lists for several years running, and has been plagued with various maintenance and legal problems besides[[/note]]. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won).

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to "democracy"[[note]]in quotes because in reality, it was immediately dominated by elite oligarch families, many of whom were already in power before Martial Law sidelined them in 1972, or else by upstart political dynasties founded by appointees whom Cory placed in various jurisdictions[[/note]]. Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport[[note]]not that this has stopped the airport from deteriorating over the years to the point that it's landed on several "worst airport in the world" lists for several years running, and has been plagued with various maintenance and legal problems besides[[/note]]. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won).won—in a way qualifying him for the title of "Determined ''Orphan'', as both of his parents were now dead by this point).
19th Jan '18 11:59:24 PM mirisu92
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** This is actually a common trope in Philippine politics—the phenomenon of grieving wives or relatives running to supposedly "continue the legacy" of their dead loved ones[[note]]so common, in fact, that it's gotten its own name: ''necropolitics''[[/note]]. Current vice president Leni Robredo, as one example, decided to run for Congress in 2013 (and then the vice-presidency in 2016), after her husband, erstwhile Interior & Local Government Secretary Jesse Robredo, died in a plane crash in 2012. Critics took to calling her a GenerationXerox of Cory Aquino (even if they weren't directly related) given all the parallels—a yellow motif, a grieving and very devoutly Catholic widow, and an association with the Philippine Liberal Party.

to:

** This trope is actually a common trope in Philippine politics—the politics: the phenomenon of grieving wives or relatives running to supposedly "continue the legacy" of their dead loved ones[[note]]so common, common a phenomenon, in fact, that it's gotten its own name: ''necropolitics''[[/note]].''necropolitics''[[/note]], often regardless of whether they're competent to run or serve in office themselves. Current vice president Leni Robredo, as one example, decided to run for Congress in 2013 (and then the vice-presidency in 2016), after her husband, erstwhile Interior & Local Government Secretary Jesse Robredo, died in a plane crash in 2012. Critics took to calling her a GenerationXerox of Cory Aquino (even if they weren't directly related) given all the parallels—a yellow motif, a grieving and very devoutly Catholic widow, and an association with the Philippine Liberal Party.
19th Jan '18 11:56:36 PM mirisu92
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to "democracy"[[note]]in quotes because in reality, it was immediately dominated by elite oligarch families, many of whom were already in power before Martial Law sidelined them in 1972, or else by upstart political dynasties founded by appointees whom Cory placed in various jurisdictions[[/note]]. Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won).

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to "democracy"[[note]]in quotes because in reality, it was immediately dominated by elite oligarch families, many of whom were already in power before Martial Law sidelined them in 1972, or else by upstart political dynasties founded by appointees whom Cory placed in various jurisdictions[[/note]]. Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport.Airport[[note]]not that this has stopped the airport from deteriorating over the years to the point that it's landed on several "worst airport in the world" lists for several years running, and has been plagued with various maintenance and legal problems besides[[/note]]. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won).
19th Jan '18 11:51:29 PM mirisu92
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This is actually a common trope in Philippine politics—the phenomenon of grieving wives or relatives running to supposedly "continue the legacy" of their dead loved ones. Current vice president Leni Robredo, as one example, decided to run for Congress in 2013 (and then the vice-presidency in 2016), after her husband, erstwhile Interior & Local Government Secretary Jesse Robredo, died in a plane crash in 2012. Critics took to calling her a GenerationXerox of Cory Aquino (even if they weren't directly related) given all the parallels—a yellow motif, a grieving and very devoutly Catholic widow, and an association with the Philippine Liberal Party. The phenomenon of "candidates running in the stead of dead relatives" happens often enough that it's gotten its own name: ''necropolitics''.

to:

** This is actually a common trope in Philippine politics—the phenomenon of grieving wives or relatives running to supposedly "continue the legacy" of their dead loved ones.ones[[note]]so common, in fact, that it's gotten its own name: ''necropolitics''[[/note]]. Current vice president Leni Robredo, as one example, decided to run for Congress in 2013 (and then the vice-presidency in 2016), after her husband, erstwhile Interior & Local Government Secretary Jesse Robredo, died in a plane crash in 2012. Critics took to calling her a GenerationXerox of Cory Aquino (even if they weren't directly related) given all the parallels—a yellow motif, a grieving and very devoutly Catholic widow, and an association with the Philippine Liberal Party. The phenomenon of "candidates running in the stead of dead relatives" happens often enough that it's gotten its own name: ''necropolitics''.
Party.
19th Jan '18 11:50:35 PM mirisu92
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to "democracy"[[note]]in quotes because in reality, it was immediately dominated by elite oligarch families, many of whom were already in power before Martial Law sidelined them in 1972;
or else by upstart political dynasties founded by appointees whom Cory placed in various jurisdictions[[/note]]. Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won).
** This is actually a common trope in Philippine politics—the phenomenon of grieving wives or relatives running to supposedly "continue the legacy" of their dead loved ones. Current vice president Leni Robredo, as one example, decided to run for Congress in 2013 (and then the vice-presidency in 2016), after her husband, erstwhile Interior & Local Government Secretary Jesse Robredo, died in a plane crash in 2012. Critics took to calling her a GenerationXerox of Cory Aquino (even if they weren't directly related) given all the parallels—a yellow motif, a grieving and very devoutly Catholic widow, and an association with the Philippine Liberal Party.

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to "democracy"[[note]]in quotes because in reality, it was immediately dominated by elite oligarch families, many of whom were already in power before Martial Law sidelined them in 1972;
1972, or else by upstart political dynasties founded by appointees whom Cory placed in various jurisdictions[[/note]]. Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won).
** This is actually a common trope in Philippine politics—the phenomenon of grieving wives or relatives running to supposedly "continue the legacy" of their dead loved ones. Current vice president Leni Robredo, as one example, decided to run for Congress in 2013 (and then the vice-presidency in 2016), after her husband, erstwhile Interior & Local Government Secretary Jesse Robredo, died in a plane crash in 2012. Critics took to calling her a GenerationXerox of Cory Aquino (even if they weren't directly related) given all the parallels—a yellow motif, a grieving and very devoutly Catholic widow, and an association with the Philippine Liberal Party.
Party. The phenomenon of "candidates running in the stead of dead relatives" happens often enough that it's gotten its own name: ''necropolitics''.
19th Jan '18 11:48:49 PM mirisu92
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to democracy. Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won).
** This is actually a common trope in Philippine politics—grieving wives or relatives running to supposedly "continue the legacy" of their dead loved ones. Current vice president Leni Robredo decided to run for Congress in 2013, after her husband, erstwhile Interior & Local Government Secretary Jesse Robredo, died in a plane crash in 2012. Critics took to calling her a GenerationXerox of Cory Aquino (even if they weren't directly related) given all the parallels—a yellow motif, a grieving and very Catholic widow, and an association with the Philippine Liberal Party.

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corazon_Aquino Maria Corazon "Cory" Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino]], wife and widow of Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino Jr., and probably one of, if not THE most DeterminedWidow in recent history. Her husband was the primary political opponent of the dictator (though his official title was "President") of the Philippines, Ferdinand Marcos. Ninoy had been exiled to the United States, and on the day of his arrival back to the Philippines, he was assassinated via BoomHeadshot. Ninoy's death was the catalyst [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution that drove the people of the Philippines into a non-violent revolution against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand Marcos]], led by Cory herself. Long story short, Marcos was booted out of office, and Cory became the 11th President of the Philippines, and returned the country back to democracy."democracy"[[note]]in quotes because in reality, it was immediately dominated by elite oligarch families, many of whom were already in power before Martial Law sidelined them in 1972;
or else by upstart political dynasties founded by appointees whom Cory placed in various jurisdictions[[/note]].
Ninoy later had the Manila International Airport renamed in his honor, and it is now officially known as the Ninoy Aquino International Airport. The anniversary of his death was made into a national holiday, and his portrait is on the 500 peso bill along with one of his most famous quotes "The Filipino is worth dying for." His wife's portrait later joined his in a reprinting of the bill after she passed away in 2009 (which in turn prompted their ''son''—Benigno III, a.k.a. Noynoy—to run himself for president in 2010, which he won).
** This is actually a common trope in Philippine politics—grieving politics—the phenomenon of grieving wives or relatives running to supposedly "continue the legacy" of their dead loved ones. Current vice president Leni Robredo Robredo, as one example, decided to run for Congress in 2013, 2013 (and then the vice-presidency in 2016), after her husband, erstwhile Interior & Local Government Secretary Jesse Robredo, died in a plane crash in 2012. Critics took to calling her a GenerationXerox of Cory Aquino (even if they weren't directly related) given all the parallels—a yellow motif, a grieving and very devoutly Catholic widow, and an association with the Philippine Liberal Party.
19th Jan '18 7:18:58 AM mirisu92
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** This is actually a common trope in Philippine politics—dead wives or relatives running to supposedly "continue the legacy" of their dead loved ones. Current vice president Leni Robredo decided to run for Congress in 2013, after her husband, erstwhile Interior & Local Government Secretary Jesse Robredo, died in a plane crash in 2012. Critics took to calling her a GenerationXerox of Cory Aquino (even if they weren't directly related) given all the parallels—a yellow motif, a grieving and very Catholic widow, and an association with the Philippine Liberal Party.

to:

** This is actually a common trope in Philippine politics—dead politics—grieving wives or relatives running to supposedly "continue the legacy" of their dead loved ones. Current vice president Leni Robredo decided to run for Congress in 2013, after her husband, erstwhile Interior & Local Government Secretary Jesse Robredo, died in a plane crash in 2012. Critics took to calling her a GenerationXerox of Cory Aquino (even if they weren't directly related) given all the parallels—a yellow motif, a grieving and very Catholic widow, and an association with the Philippine Liberal Party.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DeterminedWidow