History Main / DangerDeadpan

12th Nov '16 10:01:48 PM Ambaryerno
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Maybe there's just something about flying as Red Leader that keeps you calm: when it's Wedge's turn with the callsign in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' this time ''he's'' the one staying professional as everyone else gets jumpy.

to:

** Maybe there's just something about flying as Red Leader that keeps you calm: when it's Wedge's turn with the callsign in ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' this time ''he's'' the one staying professional as everyone else gets jumpy. It's actually a bit of CharacterDevelopment for Wedge, as in the original film Red Leader has to admonish him to keep the channel clear, and he's still rather excitable at Hoth.


Added DiffLines:

** Luke himself qualifies in ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'', calmly issuing orders to his squadron throughout the Battle of Hoth, including directing Wedge to make his attack on a walker moments after his own gunner was killed by ground fire. The only real tension in Luke's voice during the battle is when his speeder is fatally damaged and he reports in he's been hit.
*** Rogue Two is shot up, and even ''bleeding'' from cuts on his face, yet still calmly issues instructions to his gunner right up to the point his cockpit explodes in flames when his speeder takes a direct hit.
** [[Film/TheForceAwakens Poe Dameron]] averts the trope; there isn't a surface in his cockpit that doesn't get gnawed on when he's flying.
12th Oct '16 4:10:57 AM LentilSandEater
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic fanfic Fanfic/ThirtySecondsOverToKiRin, this is irst played straight and then [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] by fighter pilot Dusk Skyshine as he begins to realize exactly how much trouble his wingman Dash Firehooves is in. Culminating in

to:

* In WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic fanfic Fanfic/ThirtySecondsOverToKiRin, this a downplayed version is irst played straight and then [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] used by fighter pilot Dusk Skyshine as he begins to realize exactly how much trouble his wingman Dash Firehooves is in. Culminating in
14th Aug '16 6:58:23 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* One level of ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' includes several crashed human aircraft. Standing near one reveals some interesting radio chatter regarding a space-battle above, including the calmly-stated line "I've lost avionics, I'm gonna try and hit their carrier. Goodbye guys."
** The UNSC for some reason really likes to hire laidback Texan women to pilot their Pelicans. The version in the first game was even given a nickname, [[MauveShirt Foehammer]], and survived until the last level.
*** Foehammer's calm demeanor and steadfast reliability through the entire game [[spoiler:made her death in the last seconds of the game ''heartbreaking'']].

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'':
**
One level of ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' includes several crashed human aircraft. Standing near one reveals some interesting radio chatter regarding a space-battle above, including the calmly-stated line "I've lost avionics, I'm gonna try and hit their carrier. Goodbye guys."
** The UNSC for some reason really likes to hire laidback Texan women to pilot their Pelicans. The version one in the [[VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved first game game]] was even given a nickname, [[MauveShirt Foehammer]], and survived until the last level.
*** Foehammer's
level; her calm demeanor and steadfast reliability through the entire game [[spoiler:made her death in the last seconds of the game ''heartbreaking'']].
4th Aug '16 12:26:09 AM CaptEquinox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TruthInTelevision. In real life, Chuck Yeager, the first pilot to break the sound barrier, originated this voice and this trope. The phenomenon of how real-world pilots all started talking like him, for no other reason than that he was [[RuleOfCool so cool]], is described in the nonfiction novel ''TheRightStuff'', and to a lesser extent in the movie version of same.

to:

* TruthInTelevision. In real life, Chuck Yeager, the first pilot to break the sound barrier, originated this voice and this trope. The phenomenon of how real-world pilots all started talking like him, for no other reason than that he was [[RuleOfCool so cool]], is described in the Creator/TomWolfe nonfiction novel ''TheRightStuff'', and to a lesser extent in the movie version of same.



-->"Now, folks, uh… this is the captain... ummmm... We've got a little ol' red light up here on the control panel that's tryin' to tell us that the landin' gears're not... uh... lockin' into position when we lower 'em... Now... I don't believe that little ol' red light knows what it's talkin' about—I believe it's that little ol' red light that isn' workin' right. But... I guess to play it by the rules, we oughta humor that little ol' light… so we're gonna take her down to about, oh, two or three hundred feet over the runway at Kennedy, and the folks down there on the ground are gonna see if they caint give us a visual inspection of those ol' landin' gears and if I'm right... they're gonna tell us everything is copacetic all the way aroun' an' we'll jes take her on in.
-->"Well, folks, those folks down there on the ground—it must be too early for 'em or somethin'—I 'spect they still got the sleepers in their eyes... 'cause they say they caint tell if those ol' landin' gears are all the way down or not... But, you know, up here in the cockpit we're convinced they're all the way down, so we're jes gonna take her on in... And oh, while we take a little swing out over the ocean an' empty some of that surplus fuel we're not gonna be needin' anymore -- that's what you might be seein' comin' out of the wings -- our lovely little ladies... if they'll be so kind... they're gonna go up and down the aisles and show you how we do what we call 'assumin' the position'."

to:

* Elsewhere in ''The Right Stuff'', Tom Wolfe describes Yeager as having originated the archetypal voice of ''the airline pilot'' "with a particular drawl, a particular folksiness, a particular down-home calmness that is so exaggerated it begins to parody itself..." and provides this example, from a flight from Phoenix getting into Kennedy Airport just past dawn:
-->"Now, folks, uh… this is the captain... ummmm... We've got a little ol' red light up here on the control panel that's tryin' to tell us that the landin' ''lan''din' gears're not... uh... lockin' ''loc''kin' into position when we lower 'em... Now... I don't believe that little ol' red light knows what it's talkin' ''talkin''' about—I believe it's that little ol' red light that isn' iddn' workin' right. But... right (faint chuckle, long pause as if to say, ''I'm not even sure all this is really worth going into... still, it may amuse you...'' ''But''... I guess to play it by the rules, we oughta humor ''humor'' that little ol' light… so we're gonna take her down to about, oh, two or three hundred feet over the runway at Kennedy, and the folks down there on the ground are gonna see if they caint give us a visual ''vis''ual inspection of those ol' landin' gears and if I'm right... they're gonna tell us everything is copacetic copa''cet''ic all the way aroun' an' we'll jes take her on in.
in. (And after a couple of low passes over the field, the voice returns:)
-->"Well, folks, those folks down there on the ground—it must be too early for 'em or somethin'—I 'spect they still got the sleepers in their eyes... 'cause they say they caint cain't tell if those ol' landin' gears are all the way down or not... But, you know, up here in the cockpit we're convinced they're all the way down, so we're jes gonna take her on in... And oh, (''I almost forgot'') while we take a little swing out over the ocean an' empty some of that surplus fuel we're not gonna be needin' anymore -- that's what you might be seein' comin' out of the wings -- our lovely little ladies... if they'll be so kind... they're gonna go up and down the aisles and show you how we do what we call 'assumin' the position'."
3rd Aug '16 10:22:49 AM CaptEquinox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This was also invoked to a degree on STS-27. Space shuttle Atlantis had suffered extensive tile damage that concerned the crew. Due to poor images Mission Control said it was of no concern. While the astronauts did not like that assessment, they decided to carry on with the mission regardless. Mission commander Robert Gibson later said that if the shuttle began to experience trouble during reentry, he would tell Misson Control "exactly what (he) thought of their analysis."

to:

*** Back on the ground, Mission Control spokesman Steve Nesbitt did this as he reported "obviously a major malfunction" and "We have a report from the flight dynamics officer that the vehicle has exploded." [[http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2011-01-20-RW_Challenger_Nesbitt_ST_N.htm He speaks about it here.]]
** This was also invoked to a degree on STS-27. Space shuttle Atlantis had suffered extensive tile damage that concerned the crew. Due to poor images Mission Control said it was of no concern. While the astronauts did not like that assessment, they decided to carry on with the mission regardless. Mission commander Robert Gibson later said that if the shuttle began to experience trouble during reentry, he would tell Misson Mission Control "exactly what (he) thought of their analysis."
29th Jun '16 1:28:22 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Wraith pilot from ''StarCraft''.

to:

* The Wraith pilot from ''StarCraft''.''VideoGame/StarCraft''.



* When ''TheSimpsons'' fly home from Japan, the Chuck Yeager pilot keeps his cool even when the plane is grabbed and shaken about by Godzilla.

to:

* When ''TheSimpsons'' ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' fly home from Japan, the Chuck Yeager pilot keeps his cool even when the plane is grabbed and shaken about by Godzilla.



* Parodied in ''MonkeyDust'' - [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YPkKEttKIQU a pilot who got perfect scores in his pilot exam is rejected]] because his voice is goofy, while a terrible pilot gets through when he brushes off the fact he failed his exam with "a little spot of bother there, but we're through the worst of it" in a suave, clipped voice.

to:

* Parodied in ''MonkeyDust'' ''WesternAnimation/MonkeyDust'' - [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YPkKEttKIQU a pilot who got perfect scores in his pilot exam is rejected]] because his voice is goofy, while a terrible pilot gets through when he brushes off the fact he failed his exam with "a little spot of bother there, but we're through the worst of it" in a suave, clipped voice.
8th Jun '16 11:11:07 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''Discovery's'' mission controller in ''TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'', who was played by an actual U.S. Air Force radio operator stationed in England, whom Kubrick hired because he couldn't find any actors who could do this kind of voice.

to:

* The ''Discovery's'' mission controller in ''TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'', ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'', who was played by an actual U.S. Air Force radio operator stationed in England, whom Kubrick hired because he couldn't find any actors who could do this kind of voice.
19th May '16 12:44:35 PM TheOneWhoTropes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* RockosModernLife - Rocko and Heffer are just about to start a plane trip when the Captain comes over the intercom and mentions in a deadpan voice that he'll do his best not to pass out at high altitude like he usually does.

to:

* RockosModernLife WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife - Rocko and Heffer are just about to start a plane trip when the Captain comes over the intercom and mentions in a deadpan voice that he'll do his best not to pass out at high altitude like he usually does.
17th Apr '16 2:09:05 AM bt8257
Is there an issue? Send a Message


When a stereotypical airplane (or spaceship) pilot speaks over the radio, either to flight controllers on the ground or to his own passengers, he does so in a very soft, smooth register, just barely loud enough to pick up on the radio, probably with a faint American Southern accent (unless he's British, in which case it is [[StiffUpperLip an upper-class one]]). He uses radio jargon, even when he doesn't really need to. A true DangerDeadpan never loses his cool or changes his tone of voice [[CasualDangerDialog under any circumstances whatsoever]], a habit which is often played for laughs.

to:

When a stereotypical airplane (or spaceship) pilot speaks over the radio, either to flight controllers on the ground or to his own passengers, he does so in a very soft, smooth register, just barely loud enough to pick up on the radio, probably with a faint American Southern accent (unless he's British, in which case it is [[StiffUpperLip an upper-class one]]). He uses radio jargon, even when he doesn't really need to. A true DangerDeadpan never loses his cool or changes his tone of voice [[CasualDangerDialog under any circumstances whatsoever]], a habit which is often played {{played for laughs.
laughs}}.
9th Mar '16 1:12:42 PM Hossmeister
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[NeverMindTheBuzzcocks Phill Jupitus]] has a routine about this in his ''Quadrophobia'' show, in which he contrasts the Danger Deadpan approach seen in ''Film/{{Apollo 13}}'' with the probable result if the astronauts had been British: not so much "Houston, we have a problem" as "THE F**KING ROCKET'S F**KING F**KED!!" Notable as an example of an inversion of BritishStuffiness.

to:

* [[NeverMindTheBuzzcocks [[Series/NevermindTheBuzzcocks Phill Jupitus]] has a routine about this in his ''Quadrophobia'' show, in which he contrasts the Danger Deadpan approach seen in ''Film/{{Apollo 13}}'' with the probable result if the astronauts had been British: not so much "Houston, we have a problem" as "THE F**KING ROCKET'S F**KING F**KED!!" Notable as an example of an inversion of BritishStuffiness.
This list shows the last 10 events of 139. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DangerDeadpan