History Main / CutLexLuthoraCheck

27th May '17 3:08:10 PM StarSword
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* ''Franchise/MassEffect'': In ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'', one sidequest deals with a pair of crime bosses fighting over their organization. Should you take one of them out and then convince the other to give up their life of crime, she turns up in the next game on [[WretchedHive Omega]], [[GoodFeelsGood using her people skills and knowledge of the criminal underworld for social work]].
-->'''Paragon Shepard:''' That's... more noble than I expected.
* In the ''TabletopGame/ForgottenRealms'' setting, the Red Wizards of Thay are mostly known as a tyrannical {{magocracy}} with aspirations to world conquest. In ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights2'''s second expansion ''Storm of Zehir'', though, there's a magic shop in Neverwinter run by a Red Wizard who says making money selling magic items is a better use of his associates' time.
23rd May '17 11:52:53 AM Linda58
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* Lampshaded and discussed in ''[[http://archiveofourown.org/works/1069149/chapters/2145105 Marry the Knight]]''. Poison Ivy, in an attempt to kill her husband Bruce Wayne, creates a plant whose leaves when consumed act as a much cheaper and superior form of Viagra, but kills the user very quickly. Barbara Gordon sends a sample to Swamp Thing, who both makes it safe and plans to mass produce it making a fortune.
-->'''Starfire:''' Ivy would do far more good if she used her abilities for niceness instead of evil. Why invent such a thing only to use as a murder weapon? Why not patent it, sell it for profit, and use the proceeds to simply ''buy'' the woodlands she wants preserved?”
-->'''Barbara:''' Well, she’s a crazy person.
23rd May '17 9:28:59 AM merotoker
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* The Riddler is almost the patron-saint of this trope. It's been shown countless times over multiple media that, if Edward Nigma actually used his amazing intellect for honest endeavors, he'd be rolling in cash. It's also been shown that he also could be [[IneffectualSympatheticVillain a MUCH more formidable criminal mastermind than he is]] if he merely focused on the task at hand instead of following his obsession with riddles and trying to prove he's smarter than everyone else. On occasion he's ''tried'' to commit robberies without leaving riddles, but he just can't resist the compulsion to send them Batman's way. At which point the Riddler came to the realization that he really is insane and needed treatment.
* ''SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom'' could have probably taken over the world ''financially'' in far less time, with less effort and without any legal opposition if he just incorporated rather than maintaining his feudal {{Ruritania}} and venting his ComplexityAddiction. Especially since people in the ''Franchise/MarvelUniverse'' are constantly shown to value security over freedom. This is mirrored by his heroic counterpart, {{Trope Namer|s}} [[ReedRichardsIsUseless Reed Richards]], who seemingly makes more money patenting and then ''not'' selling his inventions, and thus not overly-disrupting the similarities between Marvel Earth and RealLife.

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* The Riddler ComicBook/TheRiddler is almost the patron-saint of this trope. It's been shown countless times over multiple media that, if Edward Nigma actually used his amazing intellect for honest endeavors, he'd be rolling in cash. It's also been shown that he also could be [[IneffectualSympatheticVillain a MUCH more formidable criminal mastermind than he is]] if he merely focused on the task at hand instead of following his obsession with riddles and trying to prove he's smarter than everyone else. On occasion he's ''tried'' to commit robberies without leaving riddles, but he just can't resist the compulsion to send them Batman's way. At which point the Riddler came to the realization that he really is insane and needed treatment.
* ''SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom'' ''ComicBook/DoctorDoom'' could have probably taken over the world ''financially'' in far less time, with less effort and without any legal opposition if he just incorporated rather than maintaining his feudal {{Ruritania}} and venting his ComplexityAddiction. Especially since people in the ''Franchise/MarvelUniverse'' are constantly shown to value security over freedom. This is mirrored by his heroic counterpart, {{Trope Namer|s}} [[ReedRichardsIsUseless Reed Richards]], who seemingly makes more money patenting and then ''not'' selling his inventions, and thus not overly-disrupting the similarities between Marvel Earth and RealLife.



* Double subverted in a comic featuring the mercenary Paladin vs the heroic female version of the Scorpion. She confronts him while he's attempting to rob a cache of weapons and equipment confiscated from various supervillains captured by law enforcement over the years, intending to sell whatever he can obtain of value. At one point during the fight Paladin comes across the "alchemy gun" once used by supervillain Chemistro, upon which he remarks "What an idiot that guy was! He invents a gun that can turn anything into gold, and he uses it to rob banks!" Immediately after saying that the light bulb goes off in his head and he says "You know what? Forget the rest of the stuff, I'm good with just this." He immediately tries to escape with his prize, realizing of course that he won't need to steal and fence the other items once he has a device that can make gold, but unfortunately the Scorpion destroys the gun while trying to subdue him and prevent his escape. He is understandably furious.



** Subverted, perhaps even Deconstruced, with retcon-villain Clash, from the Post-Secret-Wars Learning To Crawl subseries in The Amazing Spider-Man. A brilliant nerd (not unlike Peter) who was present as Spider-Man's first fight with Crusher Hogan, Clash begins using his supreme intellect to craft a "superhero" identity for himself, utilizing sound wave. His intention is to be an entertainment act, like Spider-Man was before Uncle Ben's murder. Instead, he winds up quite believably sliding down the Slippery Slope before becoming a full-on supervillain, who gets thrashed by Spidey, arrested, and because of his criminal record, forced to be a henchmen for several years. Finally, he runs into Spider-Man again, who promptly offers him a job at Parker Industries (on the condition that he leaves his Clash shenanigans behind).

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** Subverted, perhaps even Deconstruced, Deconstructed, with retcon-villain Clash, from the Post-Secret-Wars Learning To Crawl subseries in The Amazing Spider-Man. A brilliant nerd (not unlike Peter) who was present as Spider-Man's first fight with Crusher Hogan, Clash begins using his supreme intellect to craft a "superhero" identity for himself, utilizing sound wave. His intention is to be an entertainment act, like Spider-Man was before Uncle Ben's murder. Instead, he winds up quite believably sliding down the Slippery Slope before becoming a full-on supervillain, who gets thrashed by Spidey, arrested, and because of his criminal record, forced to be a henchmen for several years. Finally, he runs into Spider-Man again, who promptly offers him a job at Parker Industries (on the condition that he leaves his Clash shenanigans behind).



* Because many settings are written partially to address the FridgeLogic of earlier settings, DungeonsAndDragons alternate settings and expansion books are famous for repurposing magic and rituals that are capital-E Evil of the cosmic, a-god-will-smite-you variety to instead serve some sort of useful purpose in the setting, with even preconstructed adventures in Greyhawk often throwing in the use of zombies as low-cost, low-injury blue collar workers and substitutes for living people in dangerous areas like poison swamps. The ultimate example of this is the Eberron setting, which begins with the gods disappearing and leaving the mortals to figure out their own morality and ends up with:

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* Because many settings are written partially to address the FridgeLogic of earlier settings, DungeonsAndDragons ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' alternate settings and expansion books are famous for repurposing magic and rituals that are capital-E Evil of the cosmic, a-god-will-smite-you variety to instead serve some sort of useful purpose in the setting, with even preconstructed adventures in Greyhawk often throwing in the use of zombies as low-cost, low-injury blue collar workers and substitutes for living people in dangerous areas like poison swamps. The ultimate example of this is the Eberron setting, which begins with the gods disappearing and leaving the mortals to figure out their own morality and ends up with:



* ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJt8yzR2aoY 'So You've Learned To Teleport']]'' is a neat little YouTube video by a guy named Tom Scott that could be the TropeCodifier for this entire trope, as he explains how someone with the power of teleportation could literally ''become a billionaire overnight''... [[StatusQuoIsGod instead of taking the tired old route of becoming a superhero and fighting crime.]]

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* ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJt8yzR2aoY 'So You've Learned To Teleport']]'' is a neat little YouTube Website/YouTube video by a guy named Tom Scott that could be the TropeCodifier for this entire trope, as he explains how someone with the power of teleportation could literally ''become a billionaire overnight''... [[StatusQuoIsGod instead of taking the tired old route of becoming a superhero and fighting crime.]]
]]



* COBRA in ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeARealAmericanHero''. The majority of the plots in the cartoon involved stealing/kidnapping someone and ransoming them off for absurd amounts of money, through which they would be able to attain ultimate power. Only about a third of their plots directly incorporated demands of, "Hand over the keys to the entire world, or else!" This was {{lampshade|Hanging}}d by Tomax and Xamot at one point, when they pointed out that Cobra ''already'' had absurd amounts of money from its front corporations, black market operations, etc, which is how they got all their ridiculous contraptions to pull off the schemes in the first place. It eventually gets deconstructed in later seasons as we learn that COBRA cannot possibly exist as anything other than a criminal organization. The entirety of its R&D routinely violates every aspect of the Geneva Convention, and the second GI JOE cartoon movie details that Cobra Commander is an exile from a supremacist fictional country called Cobra-la that believes the entirety of the world is its birthright and the citizens should consider themselves lucky if they get to live long enough to be enslaved.

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* COBRA in ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeARealAmericanHero''. The majority of the plots in the cartoon involved stealing/kidnapping someone and ransoming them off for absurd amounts of money, through which they would be able to attain ultimate power. Only about a third of their plots directly incorporated demands of, "Hand over the keys to the entire world, or else!" This was {{lampshade|Hanging}}d by Tomax and Xamot at one point, when they pointed out that Cobra ''already'' had absurd amounts of money from its front corporations, black market operations, etc, which is how they got all their ridiculous contraptions to pull off the schemes in the first place. It eventually gets deconstructed in later seasons as we learn that COBRA cannot possibly exist as anything other than a criminal organization. The entirety of its R&D routinely violates every aspect of the Geneva Convention, and the second GI JOE cartoon movie ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeTheMovie'' details that Cobra Commander is an exile from a supremacist fictional country called Cobra-la that believes the entirety of the world is its birthright and the citizens should consider themselves lucky if they get to live long enough to be enslaved.



* In the Marvel comic ''ComicBook/HeroesForHire'', a mercenary named Paladin breaks into a special armory where the props and weapons of various former gimmick villains are stored, seeking valuable weapons to both arm himself with and to sell. He comes across the "alchemy gun" of the former supervillain Chemistro, and comments amusedly that "This guy invented a gun that could turn lead into gold, and all he could think of was to rob banks with it". Moments later, he had a lightbulb moment, saying "Waitaminute -- this thing turns lead into gold... I'm good with just this!" and attempts to escape with it. Unfortunately, the gun is destroyed in the course of fighting his way out. He presumably was unaware of the fact that any object transmuted by the alchemy gun turns into dust after exposure to heat or after a certain amount of time.

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* In the Marvel comic ''ComicBook/HeroesForHire'', a mercenary named Paladin breaks into a special armory where the props and weapons of various former gimmick villains are stored, seeking valuable weapons to both arm himself with and to sell. He comes across the "alchemy gun" of the former supervillain Chemistro, and comments amusedly that "This guy invented a gun that could turn lead into gold, and all he could think of was to rob banks with it". Moments later, he had a lightbulb moment, saying "Waitaminute -- this thing turns lead into gold... "You know what? Forget the rest of the stuff, I'm good with just this!" and attempts this." He immediately tries to escape with it. Unfortunately, his prize, realizing of course that he won't need to steal and fence the other items once he has a device that can make gold, but unfortunately the heroic female version of the Scorpion destroys the gun is destroyed in the course of fighting while trying to subdue him and prevent his way out.escape. He is understandably furious. He presumably was unaware of the fact that any object transmuted by the alchemy gun turns into dust after exposure to heat or after a certain amount of time.



** Another minor league supervillain, the Water Wizard, originally got the power to [[MakingASplash control water]] after a freak accident, but simply couldn't figure out what to do with it. It was only after a friend of his suggested he use his powers for crime that he became a supervillain, although he turned out to be an [[{{Pun}} utter washout]] as a supervillain. He improved somewhat after changing his codename to Aqueduct, but not by much.

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** * Another minor league supervillain, the Water Wizard, originally got the power to [[MakingASplash control water]] after a freak accident, but simply couldn't figure out what to do with it. It was only after a friend of his suggested he use his powers for crime that he became a supervillain, although he turned out to be an [[{{Pun}} utter washout]] as a supervillain. He improved somewhat after changing his codename to Aqueduct, but not by much.



** Averted in "A Kind Of Stopwatch", Patrick [=McNulty=] gets a stopwatch that can freeze time and the first thing he does after discovering its power is try to market it to his former boss. Though, he'd been fired for giving pointless ideas earlier so the boss doesn't bother to listen to him

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** Averted in "A Kind Of Stopwatch", Patrick [=McNulty=] gets a stopwatch that can freeze time and the first thing he does after discovering its power is try to market it to his former boss. Though, he'd been fired for giving pointless ideas earlier so the boss doesn't bother to listen to himhim.



** ''Knight'': Not only does he have Riddler Trophies and puzzles around the place, like usual, but he's also got a fair amount of robots, which he's capable of modifying on the fly. Plus, y'know, the massive race/puzzle tracks he's secretly built somehow. Oh, and his plotline ends with [[spoiler:him deploying a MiniMecha with an energy shield to fight Batman.]]

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** ''Knight'': Not only does he have Riddler Trophies and puzzles around the place, like usual, but he's also got a fair amount of robots, which he's capable of modifying on the fly. Plus, y'know, the massive race/puzzle tracks he's secretly built somehow. Oh, and his plotline ends with [[spoiler:him deploying a MiniMecha with an energy shield to fight Batman.]]Batman]].



* ''Website/{{Cracked}}'' has [[http://www.cracked.com/article_18618_6-people-who-turned-life-crime-into-legitimate-careers.html 6 People Who Turned a Life of Crime into Legitimate Careers]], based on RealLife examples.

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* ''Website/{{Cracked}}'' has ''Website/{{Cracked}}''
**
[[http://www.cracked.com/article_18618_6-people-who-turned-life-crime-into-legitimate-careers.html 6 People Who Turned a Life of Crime into Legitimate Careers]], based on RealLife examples.



* Often noted in Jabootu recaps of '' Challenge of the WesternAnimation/SuperFriends'' episodes. For example, commenting on the potential uses of [[http://www.jabootu.com/cotsftt.htm a time machine]]:

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* Often noted in Jabootu recaps of '' Challenge of the WesternAnimation/SuperFriends'' episodes. For example, commenting on the potential uses of [[http://www.[[http://web.archive.org/web/20160309170850/http://www.jabootu.com/cotsftt.htm a time machine]]:



** And then UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 rolls around, and [[spoiler:the government starts recruiting supervillains and superheroes to fight Nazi super-science. America even ends up with the guy who ''ran'' said super-science program. Between things going right and things going wrong, we get plotlines running through several seasons.

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** And then UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 UsefulNotes/WorldWarII rolls around, and [[spoiler:the government starts recruiting supervillains and superheroes to fight Nazi super-science. America even ends up with the guy who ''ran'' said super-science program.program]]. Between things going right and things going wrong, we get plotlines running through several seasons.



** The Changelings motives are explored more in Season 6. They ''[[HorrorHunger need]]'' the love and it's generally not a pleasant experience, as seen by [[TokenHeroicOrc good Changeling Thorax]]. Then, in [[spoiler: the Season 6 finale, we find out Chrysalis has kidnapped nearly anypony that could thwart her plans and she wishes for her Changelings to bring her the ponies... so ''she'' can grow more powerful. She's been intentionally starving her hive to make them more obedient and hiding that by sharing the love, it would end the HorrorHunger. When Thorax realizes this, he shares love and becomes new King, with all the Changelings following suit, except for her. All of the Changelings' motives boiled down to being in perpetual starvation and just wanting to stop being hungry; Chrysalis, though, wanted power and manipulated her people just so she can get more powerful and rule over Equestria. It ends with Starlight triumphing over her, the Changelings redeemed under Thorax, and Chrysalis on the run, her subject and kingdom gone.]]

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** The Changelings motives are explored more in Season 6. They ''[[HorrorHunger need]]'' the love and it's generally not a pleasant experience, as seen by [[TokenHeroicOrc good Changeling Thorax]]. Then, in [[spoiler: the Season 6 finale, we find out Chrysalis has kidnapped nearly anypony that could thwart her plans and she wishes for her Changelings to bring her the ponies... so ''she'' can grow more powerful. She's been intentionally starving her hive to make them more obedient and hiding that by sharing the love, it would end the HorrorHunger. When Thorax realizes this, he shares love and becomes new King, with all the Changelings following suit, except for her. All of the Changelings' motives boiled down to being in perpetual starvation and just wanting to stop being hungry; Chrysalis, though, wanted power and manipulated her people just so she can get more powerful and rule over Equestria. It ends with Starlight triumphing over her, the Changelings redeemed under Thorax, and Chrysalis on the run, her subject and kingdom gone.]]gone]].



* In ''Westernanimation/{{The Simpsons}}'' Treehouse of Horror 27, Sideshow Bob FINALLY succeeds in his goal of killing Bart only to find his life afterwards unsatisfying, so he builds a machine that can reanimate the dead so he can kill Bart again. This is a machine that can demonstrated to be able to bring the dead back to life, without being zombified or otherwise [[CameBackWrong coming back wrong,]] with no noticeable side effects, and with mental facilities just as they were in life from anything up to and including the remains being burned to ashes, and the only thing Bob can think of to do with it is kill a ten year old boy over and over again.

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* In ''Westernanimation/{{The Simpsons}}'' Treehouse ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' "Treehouse of Horror 27, 27", [[TheBadGuyWins Sideshow Bob FINALLY succeeds in his goal of killing Bart Bart]] only to find his life afterwards unsatisfying, so he builds a machine that can reanimate the dead so he can kill Bart again. This is a machine that can demonstrated to be able to bring the dead back to life, without being zombified or otherwise [[CameBackWrong coming back wrong,]] with no noticeable side effects, and with mental facilities just as they were in life from anything up to and including the remains being burned to ashes, and the only thing Bob can think of to do with it is kill a ten year old boy over and over again.
20th May '17 3:58:02 PM ElSquibbonator
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* Many of the ''WesternAnimation/CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' villains. Dr. Blight, for example, can invent a time machine, but her best plan for making money with it is to ''sell a nuke to Hitler.'' Dr. Blight did occasionally work directly for other villains for money, such as in the episode on overpopulation where she invented a duplicator ray for Luten Plunder (so that he could use it to clone an Indonesian child laborer ad infinitum to have endless dirt-cheap factory labor). Averted, however, with Sly Sludge, who eventually ''does'' go legit after being told recycling could be just as profitable as his usual poaching/polluting gigs (except for metals, it isn't). Hoggish Greedly ended up doing the same thing, applying his savvy for get-rich-quick schemes in a more legitimate and eco-friendly direction in the last season. Justified for Verminous Skumm, whose goal is to basically terraform Earth to make it more hospitable to RatMen.

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* Many of the ''WesternAnimation/CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' villains. Dr. Blight, for example, can invent a time machine, but her best plan for making money with it is to ''sell a nuke to Hitler.'' Dr. Blight did occasionally work directly for other villains for money, such as in the episode on overpopulation where she invented a duplicator ray for Luten Plunder (so that he could use it to clone an Indonesian child laborer ad infinitum to have endless dirt-cheap factory labor). Averted, however, with Sly Sludge, who eventually ''does'' go legit after being told recycling could be just as profitable as his usual poaching/polluting gigs (except (in real life, this is only true for metals, it isn't).metals). Hoggish Greedly ended up doing the same thing, applying his savvy for get-rich-quick schemes in a more legitimate and eco-friendly direction in the last season. Justified for Verminous Skumm, Skumm and Duke Nukem, whose goal is to basically terraform Earth to make it more hospitable to RatMen.RatMen and radioactive mutants like themselves, and for Zarm, who is a GodOfEvil.
19th May '17 12:33:26 PM ztyran
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* In ''WebAnimation/HowItShouldHaveEnded'' for ''Film/TheHungerGames'' the scientist points out with all the technology they have they could have solved the food crisis instead of making kids fight to the death.

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* In ''WebAnimation/HowItShouldHaveEnded'' for ''Film/TheHungerGames'' the scientist points out with all the technology they have they could have solved the food crisis instead of making kids fight to the death. It can be justified, however, as one of the methods [[TheEmpire the Capitol]] uses to keep the population from being able to rebel.
19th May '17 12:03:23 AM Alas_Poor_Donny
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* Because many settings are written partially to address the FridgeLogic of earlier settings, DungeonsAndDragons alternate settings and expansion books are famous for repurposing magic and rituals that are capital-E Evil of the cosmic, a-god-will-smite-you variety to instead serve some sort of useful purpose in the setting, with even preconstructed adventures in Greyhawk often throwing in the use of zombies as low-cost, low-injury blue collar workers and substitutes for living people in dangerous areas like poison swamps. The ultimate example of this is the Eberron setting, which begins with the gods disappearing and leaving the mortals to figure out their own morality and ends up with:
** Summoning demons and imps to cast illusion spells and paint images inside of tiny boxes, giving them photography and video.
** Using a vampiric transformation to render an entire race's elderly population quasi-immortal, keeping them just fed enough to stick around and give advice.
** Creating sentient golems and then giving them full citizens' privileges after a civil rights movement
** Using hell-planes as shortcuts to make the trains run on time
** An entire playable class whose sole purpose is to convert magic into reusable devices so that it can be more easily resold.
18th May '17 5:20:32 PM TheBigBopper
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When a person is pursuing a goal, especially if it's something tempting like wealth, fame, or political power, there may come a time when they have to choose between doing what's easy and doing what's right. At that moment the legitimate method of earning it may be slow, difficult, or unprofitable, while at the same time there's an illegal or unethical option that offers quicker gains to whoever can get away with it. On the other hand, some people wrongly assume that the immoral or illegal route is ''always'' expedient, even in cases where it's clearly not. They may think they're acting in their own interest, but often they screw themselves over because they don't realize that they could have done better by honest means, or at least reduced the risk of being caught and defeated by the heroes.

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When a person is pursuing a goal, especially if it's something tempting like wealth, fame, or political power, there may come a time when they have to choose between doing what's easy and doing what's right. At that moment the legitimate method of earning it may be slow, difficult, or unprofitable, while at the same time there's an illegal or unethical option that offers quicker gains to whoever can get away with it. On the other hand, some people wrongly assume assuming that the immoral or illegal route shady option is ''always'' expedient, even in cases where it's clearly not. the most expedient is a mistake that leaves a lot of would-be villains not only punished, but broke as well. They may think they're acting in their own interest, but often they screw themselves over because they don't realize that they could have done better by honest means, or better--or at least reduced the risk of being caught and defeated by the heroes.
heroes--by using more honest means.
18th May '17 4:53:59 PM TheBigBopper
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Sometimes we have to choose between what is expedient and what is right. There are situations where the socially acceptable path looks like a lot of work, and fraud, theft, or violence look like shortcuts to success. Because of this, some people wrongly assume that the immoral or illegal route is ''always'' expedient, even in cases where it's clearly not. They may think they're acting in their own interest, but often they screw themselves over because they don't realize that they could have done better by honest means, or at least reduced the risk of being caught and defeated by the heroes.

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Sometimes we When a person is pursuing a goal, especially if it's something tempting like wealth, fame, or political power, there may come a time when they have to choose between what is expedient doing what's easy and what is doing what's right. There are situations where At that moment the socially acceptable path looks like a lot legitimate method of work, and fraud, theft, earning it may be slow, difficult, or violence look like shortcuts unprofitable, while at the same time there's an illegal or unethical option that offers quicker gains to success. Because of this, whoever can get away with it. On the other hand, some people wrongly assume that the immoral or illegal route is ''always'' expedient, even in cases where it's clearly not. They may think they're acting in their own interest, but often they screw themselves over because they don't realize that they could have done better by honest means, or at least reduced the risk of being caught and defeated by the heroes.
11th May '17 7:11:40 AM dmcreif
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* ''Series/BreakingBad'': Walt could have swallowed his pride and accepted his old friend's handout to save his family, but Walt insists on building his nest egg himself through illegal drug manufacture.

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* ''Series/BreakingBad'': Walt could have swallowed his pride and accepted his old friend's handout Gretchen and Elliott's handouts to save his family, but Walt insists on building his nest egg himself through illegal drug manufacture.


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* ''Series/LukeCage2016'': If a real-life club could pull the headliners that Cottonmouth is able to host at Harlem's Paradise, the owner would be a multi-millionaire. But Cottonmouth doesn't seem to notice or care that he has, without a shade of competition, one of the best nightclubs in all of Manhattan. Mariah even points out that his legitimate business interests are successful enough on their own that he doesn't need to run drugs or guns in order to be one of the most powerful men in Harlem.
10th May '17 12:41:46 PM PlasmaTalon
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* Lampshaded in ''VideoGame/MassEffectAndromeda''. The raider captain in Liam's loyalty mission salvaged and restored a derelict Kett ship to... [[TheAllegedCar mostly working order]]. The team notes that with the mechanical skills he must have to accomplish this he could've easily become a technician or engineer.
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