History Main / ComicBookTime

15th Feb '17 3:10:10 PM Arcorann
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* ''Manga/SazaeSan'' is the representative Japanese example, to the point where the Japanese term for this trope is named after it.



* An interesting example is found in ''VideoGame/TheIdolmaster'' where each of the characters have a birthday. However over the course of a year they never celebrate their birthday or age. In the end, Iori is still 14, Haruka is still 16, and the twins are still 12 even if you pass their birthdays.
** This is almost averted in the second game which claims a year has passed from the first but this [[VoodooShark just raises further questions.]] Most characters have grown taller (or for some weird reason in the case of Hibiki ''shorter''), several have changed their hairstyle, and all have aged a year but nobody has improved much as an idol. Also Miki is unawakened and Ritsuko has quit being an idol. The official ending of the first game could be guessed at being the Futami Twins who only separate to debut solo in their best ending but neither is an A rank idol. It seems a year passed but the first game never happened... even though it did; and now I'm getting a headache.

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* An interesting example is found in ''VideoGame/TheIdolmaster'' where each of the characters have has a birthday. However over the course of a year they never celebrate their birthday or age. In the end, Iori is still 14, Haruka is still 16, and the twins are still 12 even if you pass their birthdays.
**
birthdays. This is almost averted most obvious in the second game ''One For All'' and ''Platinum Stars'', which claims both have a year has passed from continuous gameplay timeline instead of a fixed-length campaign, so several in-game years can pass as the first but this [[VoodooShark just raises further questions.]] Most player progresses. ''VideoGame/TheIdolmaster2'' permanently aged the characters have grown taller (or for some weird reason in the case of Hibiki ''shorter''), several have changed their hairstyle, and all have aged a year up one year, but nobody has improved much as an idol. Also Miki is unawakened and Ritsuko has quit being an idol. The official ending of the first game could be guessed at being the Futami Twins who only separate to debut solo in their best ending but neither is an A rank idol. It seems a year passed but the first game never happened... even though it did; and now I'm getting a headache.otherwise retained this trope.
13th Feb '17 5:16:34 PM Tdarcos
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Added DiffLines:

** However, in one episode Dorothy is asked if she has trouble getting to some things, and she says, "I can't even reach New Jersey on MCI." MCI didn't start offering long-distance telephone service until 1984.
12th Feb '17 6:41:44 PM Pren
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Added DiffLines:

* Lampshaded to hell and back in ''WesternAnimation/TheLEGOBatmanMovie'', which posits that the character's entire 78 year history really did happen, all involving the same guy, and no one finds the slightest thing odd about this beyond a line that he's aged phenomenally well.
22nd Jan '17 10:16:24 AM yisfidri
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** Literature/HerculePoirot is introduced during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI as a ''retired'' policeman. By the 1960s, although he has taken to dyeing his moustache, he still doesn't appear to be much over sixty. Similarly, Literature/MissMarple, originally presented as a subversion of the "Victorian Aunt" stereotype in 1920s fiction, is described as having had a Victorian Aunt of her own in ''At Bertram's Hotel'' (published 1965). Each series ends with one novel in which the protagonist has aged [[spoiler: and in fact Poirot dies in his novel]]; both books were written during the Blitz and were originally intended to finish the series if Christie was killed. They were instead published in the 1970s as is, which makes them somewhat anachronistic.

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** Literature/HerculePoirot is introduced during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI as a ''retired'' policeman. By the 1960s, although he has taken to dyeing his moustache, he still doesn't appear to be much over sixty. Similarly, Literature/MissMarple, originally presented as a subversion of the "Victorian Aunt" stereotype in 1920s fiction, is described as having had a Victorian Aunt of her own in ''At Bertram's Hotel'' ''Literature/AtBertramsHotel'' (published 1965). Each series ends with one novel in which the protagonist has aged [[spoiler: and in fact Poirot dies in his novel]]; both books were written during the Blitz and were originally intended to finish the series if Christie was killed. They were instead published in the 1970s as is, which makes them somewhat anachronistic.
7th Dec '16 12:08:48 PM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFight'' was originally set in 1989, the year it was originally released for the arcades, but since the game came out practically at the end of year, it was changed to 1990 for the export versions, which is also the date used in the Super Famicom/Super NES version. It was changed again to 1992 in the Sega CD version, ''Final Fight CD'', which also updated the main characters' ages by three years to reflect the time that has passed since the arcade version's original release. The GBA version, ''Final Fight One'', goes back to the original 1989 setting, turning it into a period piece.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFight'' was originally set in 1989, the year it was originally released for the arcades, but since the game came out practically at the end of year, it was changed to 1990 for the export versions, which is also the date used in the later Super Famicom/Super NES version. It was changed again to 1992 in the Sega CD version, ''Final Fight CD'', which also updated the main characters' ages by three years to reflect the time that has passed since the arcade version's original release. The GBA version, ''Final Fight One'', goes back to the original 1989 setting, turning it into a period piece.
5th Dec '16 10:33:50 PM Lloigor
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* This is averted in the Franchise/{{DCAU}}, however the indicators of how much time have passed are subtle and can be easy to miss (other than the fact that ''The New Batman Adventures'' takes place a few years after ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' and ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'' obviously takes place 40+years in the future). Supergirl is probably the best indicator of how much time has passed...she's 16 in her first appearance in ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', and it's mentioned to be her 21st birthday during her final appearance in ''[[WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague Justice League Unlimited]]''. Similarly, in another episode in the final season of JLU, Grodd's fight with the Flash (which happened in the first season of ''Justice League'') is mentioned to have happened a "couple of years ago". It can be said that the first season of Justice League takes place 1-2 years after the end of S:TAS and JL/JLU take place over the course of 3-4 years.

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* This is averted in the Franchise/{{DCAU}}, however Franchise/{{DCAU}}; however, the indicators of how much time have passed are subtle and can be easy to miss (other than the fact that ''The New Batman Adventures'' takes place a few years after ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' and ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'' obviously takes place 40+years in the future). Supergirl is probably the best indicator of how much time has passed...she's 16 in her first appearance in ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', and it's mentioned to be her 21st birthday during her final appearance in ''[[WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague Justice League Unlimited]]''. Similarly, in another episode in the final season of JLU, Grodd's fight with the Flash (which happened in the first season of ''Justice League'') is mentioned to have happened a "couple of years ago". It can be said that the first season of Justice League takes place 1-2 years after the end of S:TAS and JL/JLU take place over the course of 3-4 years.
1st Dec '16 4:47:42 PM Kid
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' combined this with NotAllowedToGrowUp. Just from the sheer number of episodes, some of which specifically take place over the course of multiple days, one would think that at least a year would've passed, but it doesn't. (Add in the fact that they have holiday specials almost all the way around the calendar, including multiple Valentine's Day episodes, and this gets a bit ridiculous. Then there was that ''not'' real-time pregnancy that nevertheless tried to pass itself off as the right amount of time (it was explicitly autumn when the pregnancy was discovered in a season finale, and summer in TheMovie in which Dil is born (released before the start of the following season), so nine months is to be assumed), yet no time actually passes for anyone else. Lampshaded by the anniversary special called "Decade in Diapers". Then they make up for it by [[TimeSkip applying all ten years of accumulated time]] [[WesternAnimation/AllGrownUp at once]]. Chuckie seems to be the only one to develop over the course of the series, moving from a crib to a bed (and all the anxiety therein), and in the second movie, says his first word to grown-ups. The second film has Chas trying a dating site, which implies a mid-to-late 1990s setting (which would mean ''All Grown Up'' took place in NextSundayAD when first released). Going by the date the show started the babies should have been born in the late 80s, however Charlotte herself as shown signs of being a teen in the early to mid 80s in certain episodes.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' combined this with NotAllowedToGrowUp. Just from the sheer number of episodes, some of which specifically take place over the course of multiple days, one would think that at least a year would've passed, but it doesn't. (Add in the fact that they have holiday specials almost all the way around the calendar, including multiple Valentine's Day episodes, and this gets a bit ridiculous. Then there was that ''not'' real-time pregnancy that nevertheless tried to pass itself off as the right amount of time (it was explicitly autumn when the pregnancy was discovered in a season finale, and summer in TheMovie in which Dil is born (released before the start of the following season), so nine months is to be assumed), yet no time actually passes for anyone else. Lampshaded by the anniversary special called "Decade in Diapers". Then they make up for it by [[TimeSkip applying all ten years of accumulated time]] [[WesternAnimation/AllGrownUp at once]]. Chuckie seems to be the only one to develop over the course of the series, moving from a crib to a bed (and all the anxiety therein), and in the second movie, says his first word to grown-ups. The second film has Chas trying a dating site, which implies a mid-to-late 1990s setting (which would mean ''All Grown Up'' took place in NextSundayAD when first released). Going by the date the show started the babies should have been born in the late 80s, however Charlotte herself as has shown signs of being a teen in the early to mid 80s in certain episodes.
1st Dec '16 4:39:57 PM Kid
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** Brian is always stated to be 7 or 8 years old in dog years and he is always mulling over about just how old he is getting, even though Brian never seems to get older at all. Lampshaded when Stewie asks Brian, "How can you have a teenage son when you yourself are only seven?" "Well those are dog years" "That doesn't make any sense" "You know what Stewie, if you don't like it, just go on the Internet and complain".

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** Brian is always stated to be 7 or 8 years old in dog years and he is always mulling over about just how old he is getting, even though Brian never seems to get older at all. Lampshaded when Stewie asks Brian, Brian:
-->'''Stewie:'''
"How can you have a teenage son when you yourself are only seven?" seven?"
-->'''Brian:'''
"Well those are dog years" years"
-->'''Stewie:'''
"That doesn't make any sense" sense"
-->'''Brian:'''
"You know what Stewie, if you don't like it, just go on the Internet and complain".
1st Dec '16 4:35:12 PM Kid
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** The featured the terms of an anthromorphic animal Bill Clinton and George Bush alike, yet Arthur and his friends are still in the third grade.

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** The series featured the terms of an anthromorphic animal Bill Clinton and George Bush alike, yet Arthur and his friends are still in the third grade.
1st Dec '16 4:21:40 PM Kid
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* ''ComicStrip/FunkyWinkerbean'' started off this way. The comic began in 1972 and the characters remained in high school for the first 20 years of the comic's existence. Then, in 1992, it was established that the characters had graduated high school in 1988, and the comic picked up in real time from just after their college days. In October of 2007, there was another TimeSkip, and the comic is now presumably taking place about 9 years into the future ([[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] says that the original main characters were to be 46 years old after the time skip, and based on graduating in 1988, they probably would've been born during the '69-'70 school year and should therefore have only been 37 just before the time skip.) So far, it's been impossible to tell the difference between the two eras. (It's not clear whether the current setting is circa 2020, or the pre-TimeSkip era has been retconned ''back'' 10 years, keeping the strip in the present day. Most of the evidence suggests the latter. Confusing matters further, however, is the SharedUniverse with ''ComicStrip/{{Crankshaft}}'', which also runs on Comic Book Time, but didn't have a timeskip. ''Crankshaft'' shows every signs of ''also'' being set in the present day, but when its characters appear in <i>Funky Winkerbean</i> they age ten years, and when <i>FW</i> characters appear in <i>Crankshaft</i> they appear as they did shortly before the timeskip.)

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* ''ComicStrip/FunkyWinkerbean'' started off this way. The comic began in 1972 and the characters remained in high school for the first 20 years of the comic's existence. Then, in 1992, it was established that the characters had graduated high school in 1988, and the comic picked up in real time from just after their college days. In October of 2007, there was another TimeSkip, and the comic is now presumably taking place about 9 years into the future ([[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] says that the original main characters were to be 46 years old after the time skip, and based on graduating in 1988, they probably would've been born during the '69-'70 school year and should therefore have only been 37 just before the time skip.) So far, it's been impossible to tell the difference between the two eras. (It's not clear whether the current setting is circa 2020, or the pre-TimeSkip era has been retconned ''back'' 10 years, keeping the strip in the present day. Most of the evidence suggests the latter. Confusing matters further, however, is the SharedUniverse with ''ComicStrip/{{Crankshaft}}'', which also runs on Comic Book Time, but didn't have a timeskip. ''Crankshaft'' shows every signs of ''also'' being set in the present day, but when its characters appear in <i>Funky Winkerbean</i> ''Funky Winkerbean'' they age ten years, and when <i>FW</i> ''FW'' characters appear in <i>Crankshaft</i> ''Crankshaft'' they appear as they did shortly before the timeskip.)
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ComicBookTime