History Main / CallARabbitASmeerp

22nd Mar '17 1:55:43 PM dvorak
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Every language but English calls Pineapples "Ananas".
15th Mar '17 7:09:03 PM Pichu-kun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' has "longpaws" for humans, "loudcages" for cars, "sharpclaws" for cats, "Trap House" for the pound, "no-sun" for night, and "Leashed Dogs" for pet dogs.

to:

** ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' has "longpaws" for humans, "loudcages" for cars, "sharpclaws" for cats, "Trap House" for the pound, "no-sun" for night, and "Leashed Dogs" for pet dogs. dogs, and "loudsticks" for guns.
11th Mar '17 9:39:07 PM Pichu-kun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Compare YouMeanXmas, FutureSlang, YouAreTheTranslatedForeignWord, NotUsingTheZWord, MagicByAnyOtherName, and {{Uncoffee}}. See also SpaceX, HorseOfADifferentColor, CallAPegasusAHippogriff, FlintstoneTheming, and HoldYourHippogriffs. Contrast CallASmeerpARabbit, CapitalLettersAreMagic.

to:

Compare YouMeanXmas, FutureSlang, YouAreTheTranslatedForeignWord, NotUsingTheZWord, MagicByAnyOtherName, and {{Uncoffee}}. See also SpaceX, HorseOfADifferentColor, CallAPegasusAHippogriff, FlintstoneTheming, HoldYourHippogriffs, and HoldYourHippogriffs.HumansByAnyOtherName. Contrast CallASmeerpARabbit, CapitalLettersAreMagic.



[[folder:Films -- Animation]]

to:

[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Animation]]



[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]

to:

[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]



* [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Earth#Animal_species Wookieepedia]] has an exhaustive list of this trope as it applies to ''Franchise/StarWars''. Dice, for example, are called "chance cubes". ...Although actual dice with pips instead of colors have appeared and gone by "dice" in the EU.
* Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is a grab bag of names - looking at alcoholic drinks alone, there's lomin-ale, Corellian Whiskey (with brands like Whyren's Reserve), lum, juri juice, [[Literature/DeathStar A Walk In The Phelopean Forest]] (even the bartender doesn't know what's with the name), Savareen Brandy, and a [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Alcoholic_beverages lot more.]] There are occasional subversions; a duck is still a duck, for example.

to:

* [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Earth#Animal_species Wookieepedia]] has an exhaustive list of this trope as it applies to ''Franchise/StarWars''. Dice, for example, are called "chance cubes". ...cubes"... Although actual dice with pips instead of colors have appeared and gone by "dice" in the EU.
* Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' is a grab bag of names - looking at alcoholic drinks alone, there's lomin-ale, Corellian Whiskey (with brands like Whyren's Reserve), lum, juri juice, [[Literature/DeathStar A Walk In The Phelopean Forest]] (even the bartender doesn't know what's with the name), Savareen Brandy, and a [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Alcoholic_beverages lot more.]] There are occasional subversions; a duck is still a duck, for example.



** ''Literature/WarriorCats'' has "monsters" for vehicles, "Thunderpath" for roads, "Twolegs"/"housefolk"/"Upwalkers" for humans (depending on where the cat's from), "kittypet" for a cat owned by humans, and "The Cutter" for the vet.

to:

** ''Literature/WarriorCats'' has "monsters" for vehicles, "Thunderpath" for roads, "Twolegs"/"housefolk"/"Upwalkers" for humans (depending on where the cat's from), "monsters" for vehicles, "Thunderpath" for roads, "kittypet" for a cat owned by humans, and "The Cutter" for the vet. [[http://warriors.wikia.com/wiki/Clan_Terminology This page]] from the ''Warriors Wiki'' lists most of the terms and phrases.



** ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' has "longpaws" for humans, "loudcages" for cars, "sharpclaws" for cats, "Trap House" for the pound, "no-sun" for night, and "Fierce Dogs" for pet/guard dogs.

to:

** ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' has "longpaws" for humans, "loudcages" for cars, "sharpclaws" for cats, "Trap House" for the pound, "no-sun" for night, and "Fierce "Leashed Dogs" for pet/guard pet dogs.
11th Mar '17 9:28:16 PM AthenaBlue
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A story arc of ''ComicBook/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' Season 8 crosses over with ''{{ComicBook/Fray}}'', in which vampires are "lurks, a spin is a lie, toy is bad, but spled is good."
* The Swedish comic-book series "Det nya folket" takes place during the stone age and depicts the conflict between the Neanderthals and the new Cro-Magnon humans. The latter refer to the Neanderthals as "trolls" while the former call the Cro-Magnon "almost-humans".



* ''ComicBook/XenozoicTales'' takes place in a future where a cataclysm has both destroyed most of human civilization, and brought the dinosaurs back to life. The survivors, having no record the the dinosaurs' actual names, have come up with their own names for them, such as "Shivat" and "Rock-Hopper."
* The Swedish comic-book series "Det nya folket" takes place during the stone age and depicts the conflict between the Neanderthals and the new Cro-Magnon humans. The latter refer to the Neanderthals as "trolls" while the former call the Cro-Magnon "almost-humans".
* The "Hippy Hobbit Thief" Betty in ''ComicBook/RatQueens'' is consistently referred to as a "Smidgen" in the books themselves. We can presume that this is because the Tolkien estate is notoriously defensive about non-Tolkien writers referring to their halflings as "hobbits."
* An idiomatic version -- in ''[[ComicBook/{{Swordquest}} Swordquest: Waterworld]],'' Torr is drowning and refers to being trapped "in Davijoen's Locker."

to:

* ''ComicBook/XenozoicTales'' takes place in a future where a cataclysm has both destroyed most of human civilization, and brought the dinosaurs back to life. The survivors, having no record the the dinosaurs' actual names, have come up with their own names for them, such as "Shivat" and "Rock-Hopper."
* The Swedish comic-book series "Det nya folket" takes place during the stone age and depicts the conflict between the Neanderthals and the new Cro-Magnon humans. The latter refer to the Neanderthals as "trolls" while the former call the Cro-Magnon "almost-humans".
* The "Hippy Hobbit Thief" Betty in ''ComicBook/RatQueens'' is consistently referred to as a "Smidgen" in the books themselves. We can presume that this is because the Tolkien estate is notoriously defensive about non-Tolkien writers referring to their halflings as "hobbits."
* An idiomatic version -- in ''[[ComicBook/{{Swordquest}} Swordquest: Waterworld]],'' Torr is drowning and refers to being trapped "in Davijoen's Locker."
"hobbits".



* An idiomatic version -- in ''[[ComicBook/{{Swordquest}} Swordquest: Waterworld]],'' Torr is drowning and refers to being trapped "in Davijoen's Locker."



* ''ComicBook/XenozoicTales'' takes place in a future where a cataclysm has both destroyed most of human civilization, and brought the dinosaurs back to life. The survivors, having no record the the dinosaurs' actual names, have come up with their own names for them, such as "Shivat" and "Rock-Hopper".



(* A.C. Crispin's ''Han Solo Trilogy'' regular mentions mouse/rat-like creatures called "vrelts." The smeepriness is extended to common phrases featuring rats, "a deadly game of cat and vrelt."

to:

(* * A.C. Crispin's ''Han Solo Trilogy'' regular mentions mouse/rat-like creatures called "vrelts." The smeepriness is extended to common phrases featuring rats, "a deadly game of cat and vrelt."



* ''Series/BabylonFive'' parodied this trope with G'Kar's discovery that Swedish meatballs from Earth were exactly like a Narn delicacy called ''breen'', and furthermore that ''every'' other known race in the galaxy has a dish ''exactly'' like it. It's one of those mysteries whose answer would drive you mad were you to learn it.



* ''Series/BabylonFive'' parodied this trope with G'Kar's discovery that Swedish meatballs from Earth were exactly like a Narn delicacy called ''breen'', and furthermore that ''every'' other known race in the galaxy has a dish ''exactly'' like it. It's one of those mysteries whose answer would drive you mad were you to learn it.
* Series/{{Farscape}}: cycles are Earth years, solar days are Earth days, arns are hours, and microts are seconds. It is never mentioned why alien species on the other side of the galaxy would base their time units around the relationship between Earth and its sun, especially before they ever learn about Earth.

to:

* ''Series/BabylonFive'' parodied this trope In an episode of ''Series/CaptainKangaroo'', the Captain dreams that he is visited by aliens who need "a glunk full of gleeger" to fuel their spaceship. He tells them he has no idea where to get such a thing, but while they're there he offers them a glass of milk, and wouldn't you know it...
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** [[Recap/DoctorWho20thASTheFiveDoctors "The Five Doctors"]]: The Doctors and their respective companions find a small pyramid
with G'Kar's discovery symbols on it that Swedish meatballs from Earth were exactly like are supposedly in "Ancient Gallifreyan". Any university student who has studied math or joined a Narn delicacy called ''breen'', and furthermore fraternity/sorority can tell you that ''every'' other known race those letters are ''Greek''.
** LampshadeHanging
in the galaxy has a dish ''exactly'' like it. It's one novel ''The Gallifrey Chronicles'', where Rachel asks Marnel why the readouts on his Time Lord technology are in Greek, and he retorts that they're not, they're the letters of those mysteries whose answer would drive you mad were you to learn it.
the Gallifreyan "omegabet". (Note that "omegabet" is also calling a rabbit a smeerp; there's nothing that makes it different from an alphabet except that that's not what they call it.)
** Daleks count their time in "rels", not seconds.
* Series/{{Farscape}}: ''Series/{{Farscape}}'': cycles are Earth years, solar days are Earth days, arns are hours, and microts are seconds. It is never mentioned why alien species on the other side of the galaxy would base their time units around the relationship between Earth and its sun, especially before they ever learn about Earth.



-->D'Argo: One mipplebippi. Two mipplebippi.

to:

-->D'Argo: -->'''D'Argo:''' One mipplebippi. Two mipplebippi.mipplebippi.
* In the German ''Kapitän Blaubär'' show the ever-lying captain serves "Zorx mit Mürschlampf", some alleged alien food speciality, to his ever-nagging nephews. Luckily, this menu has an uncannily similarity to spaghetti with meatballs. (Frankly, it IS spaghetti with meatballs.)
* "Debbie" the Bloop in ''Series/LostInSpace'' looks indistinguishable from a chimpanzee. The movie adaptation improved on this by making her a far more alien googly-eyed chameleon/lemur creature with the help of ConspicuousCGI.
* In ''Series/StargateSG1'', the planets they visit are occasionally victim to this. The most common one is the Stargate itself, which is called everything from "The Great Circle" to a "chappa'ai", but they also use this trope on other words, including swear words every now and then.
-->'''Aris Boch:''' The System Lords think that you are a pain in the mit'ka.\\
'''Col. Jack O'Neill:''' Neck?\\
'''Teal'c:''' No.
** One episode had an alien trial; it turned out to be exactly like a trial on Earth, except the prosecutor, defendant, etc. had Smeerpy new titles. This was, of course, heavily {{lampshade|Hanging}}d by O'Neill and Carter.
*** This is somewhat justified in the Stargate verse, due to the "aliens" not actually being aliens at all, but humans that were kidnapped from Earth in the past. Thus most of the "alien" cultures are actually based on ancient Earth cultures.
** The episodes featuring Marty and ''[[ShowWithinAShow Wormhole X-treme]]'' are extensively used to Lampshade various writing and sci-fi Tropes, including this one. Marty gets into an argument with a prop guy for trying to use a bowl of apples as fruit on another planet, telling him to instead paint some kiwis red. "Okay, so now the script'll go, uh: 'Nick walks into the garden of kiwi trees, says 'how like Eden this world is' and bites into a painted kiwi.'"



* "Debbie" the Bloop in ''Series/LostInSpace'' looks indistinguishable from a chimpanzee. The movie adaptation improved on this by making her a far more alien goggly-eyed chameleon/lemur creature with the help of ConspicuousCGI.
* In the ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** Episode "The Five Doctors:" the Doctors and their respective companions find a small pyramid with symbols on it that are supposedly in "Ancient Gallifreyan". Any university student who has studied math or joined a fraternity/sorority can tell you that those letters are ''Greek''.
** LampshadeHanging in the novel ''The Gallifrey Chronicles'', where Rachel asks Marnel why the readouts on his Time Lord technology are in Greek, and he retorts that they're not, they're the letters of the Gallifreyan "omegabet". (Note that "omegabet" is also calling a rabbit a smeerp; there's nothing that makes it different from an alphabet except that that's not what they call it.)
** Daleks count their time in "rels", not seconds.
* In ''Series/StargateSG1'', the planets they visit are occasionally victim to this. The most common one is the Stargate itself, which is called everything from "The Great Circle" to a "chappa'ai", but they also use this trope on other words, including swear words every now and then.
--> '''Bounty Hunter''': The System Lords think that you are a pain in the mit'ka.
--> '''Col. Jack O'Neill''': Neck?
--> '''Teal'c''': No.
** One episode had an alien trial; it turned out to be exactly like a trial on Earth, except the prosecutor, defendant, etc. had Smeerpy new titles. This was, of course, heavily {{lampshade|Hanging}}d by O'Neill and Carter.
*** This is somewhat justified in the Stargate verse, due to the "aliens" not actually being aliens at all, but humans that were kidnapped from Earth in the past. Thus most of the "alien" cultures are actually based on ancient Earth cultures.
** The episodes featuring Marty and ''[[ShowWithinAShow Wormhole X-treme]]'' are extensively used to Lampshade various writing and sci-fi Tropes, including this one. Marty gets into an argument with a prop guy for trying to use a bowl of apples as fruit on another planet, telling him to instead paint some kiwis red. "Okay, so now the script'll go, uh: 'Nick walks into the garden of kiwi trees, says 'how like Eden this world is' and bites into a painted kiwi.'"
* In an episode of ''Series/CaptainKangaroo'', the Captain dreams that he is visited by aliens who need "a glunk full of gleeger" to fuel their spaceship. He tells them he has no idea where to get such a thing, but while they're there he offers them a glass of milk, and wouldn't you know it...
* A story arc of ''ComicBook/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' Season 8 crosses over with ''{{ComicBook/Fray}}'', in which vampires are "lurks, a spin is a lie, toy is bad, but spled is good."
* In the German "Kapitän Blaubär" show the ever-lying captain serves "Zorx mit Mürschlampf", some alleged alien food speciality, to his ever-nagging nephews. Luckily, this menu has an uncannily similarity to spaghetti with meatballs. (Frankly, it IS spaghetti with meatballs.)
11th Mar '17 9:22:31 PM AthenaBlue
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/LarryNiven:
** In ''[[Literature/{{Ringworld}} The Ringworld Throne]]'', Niven calls some tasty rabbit-like critters "smeerps", as a reference to the {{Trope Namer|s}}, the Website/TurkeyCityLexicon.
** In ''The Legacy of Heorot'', with Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes joining Niven to co-write, fish-like creatures swimming in the stream of a colony planet are referred to as "samlon" (much to his chagrin, it took some folks half the book to notice it wasn't "salmon"). Of course, they turn out to be rather more than that...
** In the universe of Niven's story ''Literature/TheMagicGoesAway'', several creatures get this treatment. Unicorns, for example, are referred to as "one-horns".
* Parodied in ''Literature/TheRestaurantAtTheEndOfTheUniverse'', which declared that every civilization in the galaxy has some kind of drink -- its exact composition varies (often drastically) from race to race and biochemistry to biochemistry -- whose name is pronounced something eerily like "gin and tonics".
** "Ouisghian Zodahs" are mentioned in the same paragraph. A page or two later, when Arthur and Ford get their jynnan tonnyx, Arthur finds that his tastes a lot like a whiskey and soda.

to:

* Creator/LarryNiven:
** In ''[[Literature/{{Ringworld}}
The Ringworld Throne]]'', Niven calls some tasty rabbit-like critters "smeerps", as a kind of science fantasy that gets lumped under the "SteamPunk" label likes to smeerp technology, in general.
* Neal Stephenson's ''Literature/{{Anathem}}'' both uses and inverts this trope. Devices that are obviously cell phones and video cameras respectively are called "jeejahs" and "speelycaptors", but vegetables and animals of the alien planet on which the novel is set are [[CallASmeerpARabbit named for their closest Earth equivalent]] and Earth Anglo units (feet, miles) are used. Inversions include names like 'fraa', which is
reference to what monks calling each other brother say in Latin, but distorted to remind you that's where the {{Trope Namer|s}}, name 'Friar' comes from too. In this case it's like calling a rabbit a Lapidine sclerodont, or a spade a schopfel.
* According to ''Literature/TheAreasOfMyExpertise'',
the Website/TurkeyCityLexicon.
** In ''The Legacy
word "lobster" used to refer to a type of Heorot'', with Jerry Pournelle East Coast sea otter (referred to as the Furry Old Lobster) before it was driven to extinction by the New Lobster. Also, during the '20s, "gorilla" was a slang term for a tough guy (this one is actually true), and Steven Barnes joining Niven to co-write, fish-like creatures swimming "mega-chimp" was a slang term for an actual gorilla (this one isn't true).
* Creator/ChinaMieville's uses "chymistry"
in his ''Literature/BasLagCycle'', though this may fall more into the stream "Magick With A K" category.
* L. Ron Hubbard's ''Literature/BattlefieldEarth'' prefers odd hyphenated versions
of a colony planet are common words; e.g. "man-animal", "picto-camera", "skull-bone".
* In ''Literature/TheBookOfTheNamed'', fire is
referred to as "samlon" (much to his chagrin, it took some folks half the book "Red Tongue". Ratha learns to notice tame it wasn't "salmon"). Of course, they turn out but believes it to be rather more than that...
** In the universe of Niven's story ''Literature/TheMagicGoesAway'', several creatures get this treatment. Unicorns, for example, are referred to as "one-horns".
* Parodied in ''Literature/TheRestaurantAtTheEndOfTheUniverse'',
a living being, which declared she calls her "creature".
* Played with in ''Literature/TheBookOfTheNewSun.'' e.g. noblemen and cavalry troopers ride on animals called "destriers". Readers might assume this is just the author using a fancy medieval word for "horse", until they learn
that every civilization in the galaxy has destriers have claws, eat meat and generally seem to be some kind of drink -- its exact composition varies (often drastically) from race to race and biochemistry to biochemistry -- whose name is pronounced something eerily like "gin and tonics".
** "Ouisghian Zodahs" are mentioned in the same paragraph. A page or two later, when Arthur and Ford get their jynnan tonnyx, Arthur finds that his tastes a lot like a whiskey and soda.
genetically-engineered jaguar.



* In ''Literature/{{Lacuna}}'', the resident alien talks about distinctly Earthly things, such as tomatoes, in her own language and can't physically speak English. It's unclear if she's using her own words or trying her best to pronounce it in English.
* The ''Dragon's Gold'' series by Creator/PiersAnthony creates new animal names by making a {{portmanteau}} out of the names of two similar animals that exist in the real world. For instance, when the book mentions an "allidile," this of course means a creature that is similar to both an alligator and a crocodile. Or, to stick with the rabbit example, the books would probably refer to a rabbit-like creature with a word like "harebit."
* In the foreword of ''Literature/{{Nightfall}}'', the authors explain that, in order to avert this trope, they are replacing alien measurements and terminology with Earthling equivalents (a move which itself may fall under LiteraryAgentHypothesis).
* In ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles'', the assorted oversized creatures of the overworld are given simpler names, allegedly by the people who live there. (Rats are known as "gnawers", spiders as "spinners", and so on.) This is what the creatures of the Underworld actually call themselves, just translated into the nearest thing in English. Humans have one of these names too among the Underworld creatures[[note]][[HumansAreTheRealMonsters "killer"]][[/note]], [[FantasticRacism but they don't like to hear it]].
* In the ''Literature/GuardiansOfGaHoole'' series, there are a large quantity of words made up in order to make the owls feel more like a unique culture.
* With the exception of ''Dragonsdawn'', all of the novels in the ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' series have replaced "horses", "cows", "dolphins" and "dogs" with "runnerbeast", "herdbeast", "shipfish" and "canines", to name a few examples. They add a bit of spice of the series, and they are at least easy to figure out what the alien word is referring to. These are explained to be versions of Terran animals genetically engineered for Pern. They don't look exactly like their ancestral species. The dolphins in particular are [[UpliftedAnimal uplifted.]]
* Creator/VernorVinge's ''Literature/ADeepnessInTheSky'' features arachnoid aliens which are described in very human-like terms. Played with in that it's eventually revealed that [[spoiler:they're really way more alien than that; we've been seeing them through the eyes of the brain-slaved human translating crew in orbit]].
* Creator/GeorgeRRMartin's ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' features a few such creatures, and one of the joys of the series is how immediately evocative most of the terms are. One of the best of these is the "lizard-lion", which almost every person who reads the series understands to be an alligator. Others include zorses (for zebras, and not actual zorses), puff fish, pricklefish, snow bears, and colorful talking birds. Certain inanimate substances also get this treatments, such as obsidian (dragonglass) and napalm or GreekFire (wildfire--although admittedly that's because it's probably not actually napalm[[note]]Napalm requires gasoline or similar petroleum distillates; suffice it to say that Westeros does not have the fractional-distillation technology required to produce gasoline[[/note]] and there are no Greeks in this world). It should be noted that zorses are actual zorses, hybrids of horses and some striped animal, possible a zebra. Lizard-lions casts doubts on the rest, as there are references to crocodiles and lizard-lions actually appear in another work of the author, Tuf Voyaging, and are described as a different animal, with only the snout of a alligator, with a whip-like tail thrice the size of the rest of the body and dagger teeth. It casts doubts on the other "smeerps", as the author would have used the Real World species names unless they are not from the Real World.
* According to ''TheAreasOfMyExpertise'', the word "lobster" used to refer to a type of East Coast sea otter (referred to as the Furry Old Lobster) before it was driven to extinction by the New Lobster. Also, during the '20s, "gorilla" was a slang term for a tough guy (this one is actually true), and "mega-chimp" was a slang term for an actual gorilla (this one isn't true).

to:

* Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs:
**
In ''Literature/{{Lacuna}}'', the resident alien talks about distinctly Earthly things, ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars'' series, several Barsoomian words are substituted for perfectly applicable English terms, such as tomatoes, in her own language and can't physically speak English. It's unclear if she's using her own words or trying her best to pronounce it in English.
* The ''Dragon's Gold'' series by Creator/PiersAnthony creates new animal names by making a {{portmanteau}} out of
calling kings "jeddaks".
** In
the names of two similar ''Literature/{{Pellucidar}}'' novels, various prehistoric animals that exist are called by names such as "tandor" (mammoth), "sithic" (labyrinthodont), "thipdar" (pteranodon), and "lidi" (diplodocus). Understandable, as having primitive natives call these animals by their highly-technical scientific names would've been pretty jarring.
* In Creator/TrudiCanavan's ''Literature/TheBlackMagicianTrilogy'' and ''Literature/TheAgeOfTheFive'', she renames everything to the point of needing a glossary
in the real world. For instance, when the book mentions an "allidile," back of every book. She justifies this of course means a creature in an interview by saying that is similar to both an alligator and coming across the word 'sheep' during a crocodile. Or, to stick fantasy novel can kinda spoil things. Amusingly, horses are still horses (at least in the Black Magician universe).
* ''The Court of the Air'' goes berserk
with the rabbit example, the books would probably refer to a rabbit-like creature with a word like "harebit."
* In the foreword of ''Literature/{{Nightfall}}'', the authors explain that, in order to avert
this trope, they are replacing alien measurements and terminology coming up with Earthling equivalents (a move which alternate Steam-Punky names for everything from journalists ("pensmen") to computers ("transaction engines") to the Sun itself may fall under LiteraryAgentHypothesis).
* In ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles'', the assorted oversized creatures
("the Circle"). Some of the overworld are given simpler names, allegedly by Smeerp-names, amusingly, also have entirely unrelated meanings in English, such as "cardsharps" for computer programmers (because they poke holes in punch-cards to operate the people who live there. (Rats are known as "gnawers", spiders as "spinners", and so on.) mechanical transaction engines). These names range from the understandable ("[[FantasyCounterpartCulture Carlists]]" instead of "[[DirtyCommies Marxists]]") to the baffling ("combination" instead of "[[WeirdTradeUnion union]]").
* In Clem Martini's ''The Crow Chronicles'', the crows do often have their own ways of describing human technology - including "moving boxes" instead of "cars".
This is what the creatures of the Underworld actually call themselves, just translated into the nearest thing in English. Humans have one of these names too among the Underworld creatures[[note]][[HumansAreTheRealMonsters "killer"]][[/note]], [[FantasticRacism but somewhat justified because, as crows, they don't like to hear it]].
* In the ''Literature/GuardiansOfGaHoole'' series, there are a large quantity of words made up in order to make the owls feel more like a unique culture.
* With the exception of ''Dragonsdawn'', all of the novels in the ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' series
have replaced "horses", "cows", "dolphins" and "dogs" with "runnerbeast", "herdbeast", "shipfish" and "canines", to name a few examples. They add a bit of spice of anywhere near the series, and they are at least easy to figure out what the alien word is referring to. These are explained to be versions of Terran animals genetically engineered for Pern. They don't look exactly like their ancestral species. The dolphins in particular are [[UpliftedAnimal uplifted.]]
* Creator/VernorVinge's ''Literature/ADeepnessInTheSky'' features arachnoid aliens which are described in very human-like terms. Played with in that it's eventually revealed that [[spoiler:they're really way more alien than that; we've been seeing them through the eyes of the brain-slaved human translating crew in orbit]].
* Creator/GeorgeRRMartin's ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' features a few such creatures, and one of the joys of the series is how immediately evocative most of the terms are. One of the best of these is the "lizard-lion", which almost every person who reads the series understands to be an alligator. Others include zorses (for zebras, and not actual zorses), puff fish, pricklefish, snow bears, and colorful talking birds. Certain inanimate substances also get this treatments, such as obsidian (dragonglass) and napalm or GreekFire (wildfire--although admittedly that's because it's probably not actually napalm[[note]]Napalm requires gasoline or similar petroleum distillates; suffice it to say that Westeros does not have the fractional-distillation
same technology required to produce gasoline[[/note]] and there are no Greeks in this world). It should be noted that zorses are actual zorses, hybrids of horses and some striped animal, possible a zebra. Lizard-lions casts doubts on the rest, as there are references to crocodiles and lizard-lions actually appear in another work of the author, Tuf Voyaging, and are described as a different animal, with only the snout of a alligator, with a whip-like tail thrice the size of the rest of the body and dagger teeth. It casts doubts on the other "smeerps", as the author would have used the Real World species names unless they are not from the Real World.
* According to ''TheAreasOfMyExpertise'', the word "lobster" used to refer to a type of East Coast sea otter (referred to as the Furry Old Lobster) before it was driven to extinction by the New Lobster. Also, during the '20s, "gorilla" was a slang term for a tough guy (this one is actually true), and "mega-chimp" was a slang term for an actual gorilla (this one isn't true).
we do.



* The various wolf terms in ''Literature/TheSight'', which is made even more confusing when this wolf vocabulary is mixed with its English equivalent. In particular, "varg" and "wolf" are used interchangeably. The author had previously done the same thing for deer in ''Firebringer'': sometimes they were 'deer', sometimes they were 'Herla'. Hedgehogs were occasionally 'brailah'.

to:

* Liliana Bodoc's ''Days of the Deer'' has both the narration and the inhabitants of the Fantasy South America setting calling horses 'animals with mane'. She does slip up and say 'horses' once, though.
* ''Literature/DespoilersOfTheGoldenEmpire'' features carriers ([[spoiler: horses]]), power weapons ([[spoiler: guns]]), and the Universal Assembly ([[spoiler: the Catholic Church]]). This is an odd example as it is the result of TranslationConvention; the story is deliberately translated fairly directly from Spanish and Latin into English for the purpose of misleading the reader as to who the story is about.
* In ''Literature/TheDinosaurLords'', many dinosaurs populating the world are called by different names - for example, allosauruses are matadors, and deinynochuses become horrors. Justified by those being local monikers, whereas "international" names are the ones we know.
* Largely averted in Gurney's {{Literature/Dinotopia}} books; flora and fauna are meticulously called by their scientific names, no matter how long those might be; it's mentioned that learning these is an essential part of a child's education. And no matter that the setting takes place before most dinosaurs were given these names. However, the trope ''is'' used with skybaxes, GiantFlyer pterosaurs who have appeared in every one to date. ''Journey to Chandara'' mentions in passing that they're Quetzalcoatlus, but people usually just call them skybaxes. They, and no others, are called by a common name. It's made odder because a larger Quetzalcoatlus subspecies showed up in a previous book and was mentioned to be ''Q. northropi''.
The various wolf Ovinutrix are another one. They are Oviraptors, but dislike the name because it is a mistaken reference to them eating eggs, which in real life was proven likely false. So they, particularly the hatchery attendants, use "Ovinutrix" or "Egg Nurse" instead of "Oviraptor" or "Egg Thief".
* Parodied a lot in ''Literature/{{Discworld}}''. In ''The Discworld Companion'', Creator/TerryPratchett explains that every young sci-fi/fantasy writer (presumably including himself) starts out carefully avoiding references to, e.g. "Toledo steel", but sooner or later throws their hands up and cries "What the hell?"
** In particular he likes using
terms that should not exist in ''Literature/TheSight'', a different world, and then justifying them with a bizarre parallel explanation. For example, "Pavlovian response" also exists in Discworld not because it was discovered by a man called Pavlov, but because the experiment involved the dog eating a strawberry meringue when the bell was rung.
** The ''Assassins' Guild Diary'' inverts the "bizarre parallel explanation" trope; it doesn't try to justify the word "byzantine" at all, but does claim the politics of the ancient Komplezian Empire were so byzantine, they led to the modern Morporkian word "complex".
** Creator/TerryPratchett parodies this in ''Pyramids'' by using the term "camels of the sea" (given that camels are "ships of the desert"...)
* Dragaerans from Creator/StevenBrust's Literature/{{Dragaera}} novels refer to all predatory birds as "hawks", even if they're owls, shrikes, or whatever. There are occasional mentions of an animal called a "mock-man",
which is made probably an ape to judge by its description.
* With the exception of ''Dragonsdawn'', all of the novels in the ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' series have replaced "horses", "cows", "dolphins" and "dogs" with "runnerbeast", "herdbeast", "shipfish" and "canines", to name a few examples. They add a bit of spice of the series, and they are at least easy to figure out what the alien word is referring to. These are explained to be versions of Terran animals genetically engineered for Pern. They don't look exactly like their ancestral species. The dolphins in particular are [[UpliftedAnimal uplifted.]]
* The ''Dragon's Gold'' series by Creator/PiersAnthony creates new animal names by making a {{portmanteau}} out of the names of two similar animals that exist in the real world. For instance, when the book mentions an "allidile," this of course means a creature that is similar to both an alligator and a crocodile. Or, to stick with the rabbit example, the books would probably refer to a rabbit-like creature with a word like "harebit".
* Jo Clayton's ''Literature/TheDuelOfSorceryTrilogy '' uses this—for example, ''chinin'', first mentioned in ''Moongather'', are clearly dogs (and explicitly identified as such in ''Changer's Moon''). However, there are also plenty of [[HorseOfADifferentColor beasts of different colors]], and
even more confusing when the occasional [[CallASmeerpARabbit smeerp identified as a rabbit]].
* David Eddings avoids
this wolf vocabulary for the most part, which makes it difficult to say whether or not he actually is mixed with its doing it. In the {{Belgariad}} series they encounter "rock wolves", which might be hyenas, or might simply be hyena-like monsters (vaguely wolfish, humped backs, hooting laugh). Since Garion does not know what a hyena is, he cannot contrast any differences the rock wolves might have.
* Fred Saberhagen's ''Literature/EmpireOfTheEast'' trilogy and sequel series, the ''Literature/BookOfSwords'', are both guilty of this to a somewhat ridiculous extent. Granted that they are set 50,000 years in the future and [[TranslationConvention the
English equivalent. In particular, "varg" language has been lost]]; is it really neccesary to call horses "riding-beasts" and "wolf" mules "load-beasts"? Not to mention "milk-beasts" and "wool-beasts". Yet birds are used interchangeably. The author had previously done birds, dragons are dragons, and "potatoes" are still a named vegetable. Also confusingly subverted when we are introduced to the "war-beast", apparently some new type of lion or puma hybrid which can also be ridden.
* In Creator/MercedesLackey and James Mallory's ''Literature/TheEnduringFlameTrilogy'', there are shotors, which from the description sounds like they are camels.
* In ''Literature/TheFirebringerTrilogy'', [[spoiler:horses]] are called ''daya''.
* ''Literature/ForgottenRealms'': ''Literature/WarOfTheSpiderQueen'' calls certain garments "''piwafwis''", but it could just as easily call them "cloaks". "Piwafwi" was established as the Drow word for "cloak" back in Salvatore's early Drizzt novels. In addition, piwafwis have certain characteristics that our cloaks do not, such as camouflaging the wearer to infrared vision. It ultimately comes down to
the same thing as calling a Japanese sword a katana: "Katana" is nothing but the Japanese translation for deer "sword", but it still contains extra information on what kind of sword it is.
* Robert Sobel's ''Literature/ForWantOfANail'' is an AlternateHistory classic with a failed UsefulNotes/AmericanRevolution as its PointOfDivergence that employs this trope, with terms like "vitavision" for television and "locomobiles" for automobiles.
* In the 1930 science-fiction story ''The Gostak and the Doshes'' by Dr. Miles Breuer, the sentence "The gostak distims the doshes" plays a major role. This sentence is not Dr. Breuer's invention; the credit goes to a writer named Andrew Ingraham, who coined it
in ''Firebringer'': sometimes they were 'deer', sometimes they were 'Herla'. Hedgehogs were occasionally 'brailah'.1903. The sentence became much more widely known as a result of its appearance in the 1923 book ''The Meaning of Meaning'', by C. K. Ogden and I. A. Richards.
* In Zilpha Keatley Snyder's ''Literature/GreenSkyTrilogy'', creatures that rather obviously appear to be rabbits and monkeys are respectively called "lapans" and "simas." Other creatures such as tree bears keep their recognizable names. "Pan-fruit" is probably breadfruit (if so, the Kindar have latex and insect repellent) and "tarbo root", eaten by Erdlings as a side dish with fried lapan, is possibly taro root. A lot of the special language is based on German and French words. Snyder implied in the first book that the inhabitants of the planet Green-sky are descendants of an Earth colony founded by German and French scientists (and at least one Israeli) with a large group of war orphans. She includes some credible examples of linguistic drift and coinage.
* In the ''Literature/GuardiansOfGaHoole'' series, there are a large quantity of words made up in order to make the owls feel more like a unique culture.



* Neal Stephenson's ''Literature/{{Anathem}}'' both uses and inverts this trope. Devices that are obviously cell phones and video cameras respectively are called "jeejahs" and "speelycaptors", but vegetables and animals of the alien planet on which the novel is set are [[CallASmeerpARabbit named for their closest Earth equivalent]] and Earth Anglo units (feet, miles) are used. Inversions include names like 'fraa', which is reference to what monks calling each other brother say in Latin, but distorted to remind you that's where the name 'Friar' comes from too. In this case it's like calling a rabbit a Lapidine sclerodont, or a spade a schopfel.
* In the ''[[Literature/TheNightsDawnTrilogy Night's Dawn]]'' sci-fi trilogy, author Peter Hamilton uses the word 'analogue' a lot to describe alien creatures not worth describing in detail (eg. wolf-analogue -- a creature similar to a wolf). Hamilton's later Void Trilogy describes the (telepathically) genetically engineered animals inside the Void by analogy to Earth animals, quite probably given the origin of human life in the Void the Earth animals from which they evolved.
* In ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', Creator/JRRTolkien refers to tobacco as "pipe-weed." This may have been to avoid the dissonance of placing New World flora in an Anglo-European FantasyCounterpartCulture. Though then again, they did have ''potatoes''. "Pipe-weed" is definitely tobacco, but, like just about everything Tolkien did, [[JustifiedTrope justified]] eventually. In the case of tobacco and potatoes in proto-Europe, the justification was that the Númenóreans, as great sailors, had sailed all over the world and brought back the plants from the proto-New World. We are left to assume that the European versions of the plants died out eventually.
** It has been suggested that it is ''pipe-weed'' rather than tobacco because Tolkien in [=LotR=] was trying to create a modern English saga, an heroic epic along the lines of Literature/{{Beowulf}}, and made a conscious decision to avoid English words of non-Germanic origins. There are many cases where Tolkien uses words which appear a little archaic, but where the modern equivalent is derived ultimately from Latin via French/Spanish, etc. Of particular note, the Westron names for the months are derived from the old Anglo-Saxon names (as opposed to our current names, which are from Latin). (This of course doesn't apply to the other languages he invented and used in the book, which are based on a wide range of sources such as Welsh, Finnish, etc. - but the main body of the text tends to follow this rule.)
** The original 1937 text of ''The Hobbit'' has Gandalf asking Bilbo to "bring out the cold chicken and tomatoes"; this particular reference bothered Tolkien enough in retrospect that when he revised the book, he changed it to "cold chicken and pickles".
* In Creator/TrudiCanavan's ''Literature/TheBlackMagicianTrilogy'' and ''Literature/TheAgeOfTheFive'', she renames everything to the point of needing a glossary in the back of every book. She justifies this in an interview by saying that coming across the word 'sheep' during a fantasy novel can kinda spoil things. Amusingly, horses are still horses (at least in the Black Magician universe).
* The rabbits of ''Literature/WatershipDown'' have their own Lapine language to describe things that are relevant to being a rabbit. Since the story's setting is recognizable to humans as 20th-century England, many of these words describe things that humans already have names for. ''Elil'' are animals that rabbits classify as predators, such as foxes, weasels, and humans; ''hraka'' is rabbit droppings; ''hrududu'' is anything with a motor, such as an automobile or a tractor. This often serves to illustrate very viscerally the differences in the way the rabbit view the world. For example, rabbits do consider "elil" to include what humans would recognise as predators...but they also consider ''roads'' to be elil. Likewise, a human would probably think that a train would be "hrududu" in rabbit speech; but when the rabbits encounter one they believe it's a divine being, because they don't have the knowledge base to grasp that it's essentially just a much larger vehicle driven by a much larger motor. However the Efrafan rabbits seem to be able to view things from a more human-like perspective as they explicitly refer to a rabbit's death being caused by a train.
* Similar to the ''Literature/WatershipDown'' example above, in Tad William's novel ''Literature/TailchasersSong'' the cats ("the folk" as they call themselves) have their own language. Dogs are ''growlers'', rodents are ''squeakers'', squirrels are ''rikchikchik'', birds are ''fla-fa'az'', humans are ''m'an'', and so on.
* Mercedes Lackey's ''[[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Silver Gryphon]]'' features this gem: "...a box, carved of a fragrant wood that the Haighlei called ''sadar''..." Since the box never comes up again, and the wood it was made out of was not in the least important, why on earth didn't she just say "cedar"? The sense is the same either way -- it's a foreign wood to these people -- so why obfuscate?

to:

* Neal Stephenson's ''Literature/{{Anathem}}'' both uses and inverts this trope. Devices that are obviously cell phones and video cameras respectively are called "jeejahs" and "speelycaptors", but vegetables and animals of the alien planet on which the novel is set are [[CallASmeerpARabbit named for their closest Earth equivalent]] and Earth Anglo units (feet, miles) are used. Inversions include names like 'fraa', which is reference to what monks calling each other brother say in Latin, but distorted to remind you that's where the name 'Friar' comes from too. In this case Although it's like calling not exactly a rabbit a Lapidine sclerodont, or a spade a schopfel.
* In
completely different world, in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'' Harry calls the ''[[Literature/TheNightsDawnTrilogy Night's Dawn]]'' wizards and witches walking around in lime-green robes with clipboards "doctors" and Ron says, "Doctors? Those muggle nutters who cut people up? Nah, they're ''healers''."
** Snape also has problems with the term "mind reading", and instead prefers legilimency (which is dog-latin [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin for "mind reading"]]).
** Similarly, instantaneous travel is called apparition instead of the Muggle
sci-fi trilogy, author Peter Hamilton uses the word 'analogue' a lot to describe alien creatures "teleportation", and animated corpses are inferi, not worth describing in detail (eg. wolf-analogue -- a creature similar to a wolf). Hamilton's later Void Trilogy describes the (telepathically) genetically engineered animals inside the Void by analogy to Earth animals, quite probably given the origin of human life in the Void the Earth animals from which they evolved.
* In ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', Creator/JRRTolkien refers to tobacco as "pipe-weed." This may have been to avoid the dissonance of placing New World flora in an Anglo-European FantasyCounterpartCulture. Though then again, they did have ''potatoes''. "Pipe-weed" is definitely tobacco, but, like just about everything Tolkien did, [[JustifiedTrope justified]] eventually. In the case of tobacco and potatoes in proto-Europe, the justification was that the Númenóreans, as great sailors, had sailed all over the world and brought back the plants from the proto-New World. We are left to assume that the European versions of the plants died out eventually.
** It has been suggested that it is ''pipe-weed'' rather than tobacco because Tolkien in [=LotR=] was trying to create a modern English saga, an heroic epic along the lines of Literature/{{Beowulf}}, and made a conscious decision to avoid English words of non-Germanic origins. There are many cases where Tolkien uses words which appear a little archaic, but where the modern equivalent is derived ultimately from Latin via French/Spanish, etc. Of particular note, the Westron names for the months are derived from the old Anglo-Saxon names (as opposed to our current names, which are from Latin). (This of course doesn't apply to the other languages he invented and used in the book, which are based on a wide range of sources such as Welsh, Finnish, etc. - but the main body of the text tends to follow this rule.)
** The original 1937 text of ''The Hobbit'' has Gandalf asking Bilbo to "bring out the cold chicken and tomatoes"; this particular reference bothered Tolkien enough in retrospect that when he revised the book, he changed it to "cold chicken and pickles".
* In Creator/TrudiCanavan's ''Literature/TheBlackMagicianTrilogy'' and ''Literature/TheAgeOfTheFive'', she renames everything to the point of needing a glossary in the back of every book. She justifies this in an interview by saying that coming across the word 'sheep' during a fantasy novel can kinda spoil things. Amusingly, horses are still horses (at least in the Black Magician universe).
* The rabbits of ''Literature/WatershipDown'' have their own Lapine language to describe things that are relevant to being a rabbit. Since the story's setting is recognizable to humans as 20th-century England, many of these words describe things that humans already have names for. ''Elil'' are animals that rabbits classify as predators, such as foxes, weasels, and humans; ''hraka'' is rabbit droppings; ''hrududu'' is anything with a motor, such as an automobile or a tractor. This often serves to illustrate very viscerally the differences in the way the rabbit view the world. For example, rabbits do consider "elil" to include what humans would recognise as predators...but they also consider ''roads'' to be elil. Likewise, a human would probably think that a train would be "hrududu" in rabbit speech; but when the rabbits encounter one they believe it's a divine being, because they don't have the knowledge base to grasp that it's essentially just a much larger vehicle driven by a much larger motor. However the Efrafan rabbits seem to be able to view things from a more human-like perspective as they explicitly refer to a rabbit's death being caused by a train.
* Similar to the ''Literature/WatershipDown'' example above, in Tad William's novel ''Literature/TailchasersSong'' the cats ("the folk" as they call themselves) have their own language. Dogs are ''growlers'', rodents are ''squeakers'', squirrels are ''rikchikchik'', birds are ''fla-fa'az'', humans are ''m'an'', and so on.
"zombies".
* Mercedes Lackey's ''[[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Silver Gryphon]]'' ''Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar'':
** ''Silver Gryphon''
features this gem: "...a box, carved of a fragrant wood that the Haighlei called ''sadar''..." Since the box never comes up again, and the wood it was made out of was not in the least important, why on earth didn't she just say "cedar"? The sense is the same either way -- it's a foreign wood to these people -- so why obfuscate?



* ''Literature/HisDarkMaterials'':
** "Anbaric" technology instead of "electric", based on the Arabic word for "amber" rather than the Greek (which is "electrum", also the name of a mineral compound). The books make it clear that it's otherwise ''exactly'' the same as the electricity in our world. TheMovie turned it into Glowing Blue Phlebotinum, however.
** "Chocolatl" is also used instead of "hot chocolate" (based on the Spanish spelling of the Aztec "xocolatl"), while "experimental theology" is used instead of "physics".
** You also hear of ethnic groups such as "Gyptians".
* ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'':
** Parodied in ''Literature/TheRestaurantAtTheEndOfTheUniverse'', which declared that every civilization in the galaxy has some kind of drink -- its exact composition varies (often drastically) from race to race and biochemistry to biochemistry -- whose name is pronounced something eerily like "gin and tonics".
** "Ouisghian Zodahs" are mentioned in the same paragraph. A page or two later, when Arthur and Ford get their jynnan tonnyx, Arthur finds that his tastes a lot like a whiskey and soda.
* In ''Literature/TheHungerGames'', the addictive painkiller in use around Panem is called "morphling" (morphine) and the people addicted to it are called "morphlings".
* Occurs in Creator/ErinHunter's books; usually the same typical words get different names for each series:
** ''Literature/WarriorCats'' has "monsters" for vehicles, "Thunderpath" for roads, "Twolegs"/"housefolk"/"Upwalkers" for humans (depending on where the cat's from), "kittypet" for a cat owned by humans, and "The Cutter" for the vet.
** ''Literature/SeekerBears'' has "flat-faces"/"no-claws"/"smooth-pelts" for humans (depending on the species saying it), "firebeasts" for vehicles, "[=BlackPath=]" for roads, and "death sticks" for guns.
** ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' has "longpaws" for humans, "loudcages" for cars, "sharpclaws" for cats, "Trap House" for the pound, "no-sun" for night, and "Fierce Dogs" for pet/guard dogs.
* In the light novel series ''LightNovel/KinosJourney'', author Keiichi Sigsawa includes notes introducing the reader to "persuaders" (guns) and "motorrads" (motorcycles, specifically Hermes). Motorrad also counts as GratuitousGerman.
* Rather bizarrely lampshaded in a short story called "A Delicate Shade of Kipney" by Creator/NancyKress, published in an early issue of ''Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine''; her characters, third- and fourth-generation descendants of a small group stranded on an alien planet with a nearly-opaque atmosphere, speak of such colors as "kipney" and "tlem" (to the dismay of their ancestors, who still insist the planet be called "Exile" rather than "Keedaithen"). Kress unfortunately doesn't realize that words ''come from somewhere'' -- that people who'd only heard of the colors you and I speak of every day wouldn't suddenly, spontaneously, start saying such things as "What a pretty shade of tlem."
* In ''Literature/{{Lacuna}}'', the resident alien talks about distinctly Earthly things, such as tomatoes, in her own language and can't physically speak English. It's unclear if she's using her own words or trying her best to pronounce it in English.
* ''Literature/TheLeagueOfPeoplesVerse'': Referenced and subverted in ''Expendable''. An explorer on an uncharted Earthlike planet glimpses a small brown animal jumping into the underbrush and immediately thinks "rabbit", even though she knows it probably isn't an actual rabbit. She suspects humans are hardwired for this. [[spoiler:Turns out it actually ''is'' a rabbit: the planet's nonintelligent life is identical to Earth's due to SufficientlyAdvancedAliens.]]



* The Seanchan of ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' ride ''s'redit'' (elephants).
** And are known to enjoy a good cup of ''[[{{Uncoffee}} kaf]]'' (coffee).
** The Aiel are growing ''zemai'' instead of corn, ''algode'' instead of cotton and ''t'mat'' for tomato. While these smeerps (and the Seanchan ones, too) are at least partially {{justified|Trope}}, being unknown outside the Aiel Waste, this is not so with tabac (this smeerp tends to get lost in translation, anyway).
** One suspects that he was acutally playing on linguistic drift here. ''Zemai'' is an anagram of maize. ''Algode'' is nearly ''algodon'', Spanish for ''cotton'', ''t'mat'' ought to be self explanatory, and ''tabac'' is an archaic word for ''tobacco''.
** Also, there are no slaves in TheWheelOfTime. They have ''da'covale'' in Seanchan, ''gai'shain'' (not exactly slaves if not captured by [[spoiler: Shaido Aiel]]) in the Waste, and people "sold like animals" in Shara.
** Many plants and animals have their names changed to more descriptive terms. Thus you might have someone taking shade under a leatherleaf tree and trying to shoo away the bitemes.
* In the ''Agent of Byzantium'' AlternateHistory short stories by Creator/HarryTurtledove, there are several examples due to things being discovered earlier and by different people. For example, gunpowder is "hellpowder" because it was first used for creating explosions by sappers dressed in devilish costumes rather than propelling cannonballs, the printing press makes "archetypes", and brandy is ''yperoinos'' (Greek for "superwine") as it was distilled from wine.
** In the ''Literature/Timeline191'' series, a fictional character with the last name Blackford is president during TheGreatDepression instead of UsefulNotes/HerbertHoover, resulting in shanty towns of unlucky stockholders being called Blackfordburgs rather than Hoovervilles. Also, with the [[RomanovsAndRevolutions Russian Revolution]] a dismal failure, the Molotov cocktail is renamed "Featherston fizz" after the series' UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler equivalent. Finally, tanks are called "barrels" because, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanks_in_World_War_I paralleling the origin of the Real Life term]], they were first made in a building labeled "the Barrel Works".
** Also, when an atomic bomb goes off, it produces a "toadstool cloud".
*** Furthermore, atomic bombs themselves are called "superbombs," and theoretical hydrogen bombs are "sunbombs."
** In the ''Literature/WorldWar'' series, humanity adopted some advanced technology from the Race and thus used their words for it; for example, lasers are called "shelkwank light" and optical storage disc players are likewise called "shelkwank players".
** The lizards also use their own terms for certain ranks and vehicles, most of these being [[WeWillUseWikiWordsInTheFuture wiki-words]]: "fleetlord" means admiral, "shiplord" means captain, "killercraft" means jet fighter, "landcruiser" means tank, "troopcarrier" means APC. Interestingly, certain words they use make no sense given what we are told about them. They call their spacecraft "ships", even though they're from a [[SingleBiomePlanet desert world]] with no large bodies of water and have never bothered to develop naval vessels. The word "landcruiser" implies other kinds of cruisers, except they have none. A Chinese woman is baffled by the Race's use of "ships", as their "planes-that-never-come-down" are most definitely not on water.
* Although it's not exactly a completely different world, in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'' Harry calls the wizards and witches walking around in lime-green robes with clipboards "doctors" and Ron says, "Doctors? Those muggle nutters who cut people up? Nah, they're ''healers''."
** Snape also has problems with the term "mind reading", and instead prefers legilimency (which is dog-latin [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin for "mind reading"]]).
** Similarly, instantaneous travel is called apparition instead of the Muggle sci-fi word "teleportation", and animated corpses are inferi, not "zombies".
* In Creator/DianeDuane's ''Franchise/StarTrek'' ''Literature/{{Rihannsu}}'' novels have quite a few examples: e.g. 'fresher instead of shower. Not to mention the [[ConLang "actual" Rihannsu words]]. ''The Empty Chair'', lampshades it with the sentence "like a conjurer with a ''smeerp'' up his sleeve." The [[IShouldWriteABookAboutThis introduction]] to ''The Empty Chair'' implies that TheFederation has been calling the Rihannsu [[CallASmeerpARabbit smeerps rabbits]] all along.

to:

* The Seanchan In ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', Creator/JRRTolkien refers to tobacco as "pipe-weed." This may have been to avoid the dissonance of ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' ride ''s'redit'' (elephants).
** And are known to enjoy a good cup
placing New World flora in an Anglo-European FantasyCounterpartCulture. Though then again, they did have ''potatoes''. "Pipe-weed" is definitely tobacco, but, like just about everything Tolkien did, [[JustifiedTrope justified]] eventually. In the case of ''[[{{Uncoffee}} kaf]]'' (coffee).
** The Aiel are growing ''zemai'' instead of corn, ''algode'' instead of cotton
tobacco and ''t'mat'' for tomato. While these smeerps (and potatoes in proto-Europe, the Seanchan ones, too) are at least partially {{justified|Trope}}, being unknown outside the Aiel Waste, this is not so with tabac (this smeerp tends to get lost in translation, anyway).
** One suspects
justification was that he was acutally playing on linguistic drift here. ''Zemai'' is an anagram of maize. ''Algode'' is nearly ''algodon'', Spanish for ''cotton'', ''t'mat'' ought to be self explanatory, the Númenóreans, as great sailors, had sailed all over the world and ''tabac'' is an archaic word for ''tobacco''.
** Also, there are no slaves in TheWheelOfTime. They have ''da'covale'' in Seanchan, ''gai'shain'' (not exactly slaves if not captured by [[spoiler: Shaido Aiel]]) in
brought back the Waste, and people "sold like animals" in Shara.
** Many
plants and animals have their names changed to more descriptive terms. Thus you might have someone taking shade under a leatherleaf tree and trying to shoo away from the bitemes.
* In
proto-New World. We are left to assume that the ''Agent European versions of Byzantium'' AlternateHistory short stories by Creator/HarryTurtledove, there are several examples due to things being discovered earlier and by different people. For example, gunpowder the plants died out eventually.
** It has been suggested that it
is "hellpowder" because it was first used for creating explosions by sappers dressed in devilish costumes ''pipe-weed'' rather than propelling cannonballs, tobacco because Tolkien in [=LotR=] was trying to create a modern English saga, an heroic epic along the printing press makes "archetypes", lines of Literature/{{Beowulf}}, and brandy made a conscious decision to avoid English words of non-Germanic origins. There are many cases where Tolkien uses words which appear a little archaic, but where the modern equivalent is ''yperoinos'' (Greek for "superwine") as it was distilled derived ultimately from wine.
** In
Latin via French/Spanish, etc. Of particular note, the ''Literature/Timeline191'' series, a fictional character with Westron names for the last name Blackford is president during TheGreatDepression instead of UsefulNotes/HerbertHoover, resulting in shanty towns of unlucky stockholders being called Blackfordburgs rather than Hoovervilles. Also, with the [[RomanovsAndRevolutions Russian Revolution]] a dismal failure, the Molotov cocktail is renamed "Featherston fizz" after the series' UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler equivalent. Finally, tanks months are called "barrels" because, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanks_in_World_War_I paralleling the origin of the Real Life term]], they were first made in a building labeled "the Barrel Works".
** Also, when an atomic bomb goes off, it produces a "toadstool cloud".
*** Furthermore, atomic bombs themselves are called "superbombs," and theoretical hydrogen bombs are "sunbombs."
** In the ''Literature/WorldWar'' series, humanity adopted some advanced technology
derived from the Race old Anglo-Saxon names (as opposed to our current names, which are from Latin). (This of course doesn't apply to the other languages he invented and thus used their words for it; for example, lasers in the book, which are called "shelkwank light" and optical storage disc players are likewise called "shelkwank players".
based on a wide range of sources such as Welsh, Finnish, etc. - but the main body of the text tends to follow this rule.)
** The lizards also use their own terms for certain ranks and vehicles, most original 1937 text of these being [[WeWillUseWikiWordsInTheFuture wiki-words]]: "fleetlord" means admiral, "shiplord" means captain, "killercraft" means jet fighter, "landcruiser" means tank, "troopcarrier" means APC. Interestingly, certain words they use make no sense given what we are told about them. They call their spacecraft "ships", even though they're from a [[SingleBiomePlanet desert world]] with no large bodies of water and have never bothered to develop naval vessels. The word "landcruiser" implies other kinds of cruisers, except they have none. A Chinese woman is baffled by the Race's use of "ships", as their "planes-that-never-come-down" are most definitely not on water.
* Although it's not exactly a completely different world, in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'' Harry calls the wizards and witches walking around in lime-green robes with clipboards "doctors" and Ron says, "Doctors? Those muggle nutters who cut people up? Nah, they're ''healers''."
** Snape also has problems with the term "mind reading", and instead prefers legilimency (which is dog-latin [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin for "mind reading"]]).
** Similarly, instantaneous travel is called apparition instead of the Muggle sci-fi word "teleportation", and animated corpses are inferi, not "zombies".
* In Creator/DianeDuane's ''Franchise/StarTrek'' ''Literature/{{Rihannsu}}'' novels have quite a few examples: e.g. 'fresher instead of shower. Not to mention the [[ConLang "actual" Rihannsu words]].
''The Empty Chair'', lampshades it with Hobbit'' has Gandalf asking Bilbo to "bring out the sentence "like a conjurer with a ''smeerp'' up his sleeve." The [[IShouldWriteABookAboutThis introduction]] to ''The Empty Chair'' implies cold chicken and tomatoes"; this particular reference bothered Tolkien enough in retrospect that TheFederation has been calling when he revised the Rihannsu [[CallASmeerpARabbit smeerps rabbits]] all along.book, he changed it to "cold chicken and pickles".
* Lots in ''Literature/TheMazeRunner''. Medics are called "Med-Jacks", butchers are called "Slicers", etc.



* The far-future Earth of A. A. Attanasio's novel ''Radix'' is rife with these, the most jarring being the standard currency, "zords." [[PowerRangers (No, not that kind.)]] A fantastic book by a brilliant author who was apparently unaware of this trope, or at least that sometimes [[TropesAreNotBad tropes really ARE bad]].
* Played with in ''Literature/TheBookOfTheNewSun.'' e.g. noblemen and cavalry troopers ride on animals called "destriers." Readers might assume this is just the author using a fancy medieval word for "horse," until they learn that the destriers have claws, eat meat and generally seem to be some kind of genetically-engineered jaguar.
* Creator/TamoraPierce does this from time to time. Her Literature/TortallUniverse in particular takes leaps and bounds in development from the earliest books to the latest ones, with all kinds of details added to keep what was a very eighties swords-and-sorcery world running smoothly, many of which seem suspiciously modern for their setting. Trouble is, she occasionally forgets what needs renaming and what doesn't. The process of a "new exercise" Kel learns as a page is meticulously described...and turns out to be a push-up. Which Alanna did in her first book, where they were identified by name and not explained. (One {{Justified}} example is "duckmole" for "platypus" -- actually a word coined by British settlers in Australia, since there's not exactly Ancient Greek or Latinization in Tortall.)
* TimothyZahn, in his Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse novels, generally tries, with the exception of hot chocolate, to keep to this trope, since the 'verse is very not Earth and involves humans, but few other Earth animals. He tends not to describe nonhumans in great detail, but will mention avians in the brush or hostile canid creatures. This does lead to some readers wondering how "avian" is less an Earthism than "bird", and why he'll use "snake".
* A.C. Crispin's ''Han Solo Trilogy'' regular mentions mouse/rat-like creatures called "vrelts." The smeepriness is extended to common phrases featuring rats, "a deadly game of cat and vrelt."
* Creator/AlanDeanFoster (ghost writing for Creator/GeorgeLucas), in the {{novelization}} of ''Film/ANewHope'', {{lampshade|Hanging}}s this during an early conversation between Obi-Wan and Luke, who grew up on a [[SingleBiomePlanet very dry planet]]:
--> '''Obi-Wan:''' Still, even a duck must be taught to swim.\\

to:

* In the foreword of ''Literature/{{Nightfall}}'', the authors explain that, in order to avert this trope, they are replacing alien measurements and terminology with Earthling equivalents (a move which itself may fall under LiteraryAgentHypothesis).
* In the ''[[Literature/TheNightsDawnTrilogy Night's Dawn]]'' sci-fi trilogy, author Peter Hamilton uses the word 'analogue' a lot to describe alien creatures not worth describing in detail (eg. wolf-analogue -- a creature similar to a wolf). Hamilton's later Void Trilogy describes the (telepathically) genetically engineered animals inside the Void by analogy to Earth animals, quite probably given the origin of human life in the Void the Earth animals from which they evolved.
* Creator/LarryNiven:
** In ''[[Literature/{{Ringworld}} The Ringworld Throne]]'', Niven calls some tasty rabbit-like critters "smeerps", as a reference to the {{Trope Namer|s}}, the Website/TurkeyCityLexicon.
** In ''The Legacy of Heorot'', with Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes joining Niven to co-write, fish-like creatures swimming in the stream of a colony planet are referred to as "samlon" (much to his chagrin, it took some folks half the book to notice it wasn't "salmon"). Of course, they turn out to be rather more than that...
** In the universe of Niven's story ''Literature/TheMagicGoesAway'', several creatures get this treatment. Unicorns, for example, are referred to as "one-horns".
* Eric Van Lustbader has the ''Pearl Saga'' where everything, even the race that seems to just be humans, has a different name. In fact, the only thing with a recognizable name seem to be dragons, which are just dragons.
* The far-future Earth of A. A. Attanasio's novel ''Radix'' is rife with these, the most jarring being the standard currency, "zords." "zords". [[PowerRangers (No, not that kind.)]] A fantastic book by a brilliant author who was apparently unaware of this trope, or at least that sometimes [[TropesAreNotBad tropes really ARE bad]].
* Played Mostly avoided in Literature/{{Redwall}} except for "hotroot pepper", which the evidence suggests is probably horseradish.
* Androids in ''Literature/RieselTalesTwoHunters'' are usually referred to as "Rets," short for "[=RetiNew=]". This was originally the name of a special line of social androids made to accompany their owners wherever they went, but has since become a generic term for all social androids.
* The various wolf terms in ''Literature/TheSight'', which is made even more confusing when this wolf vocabulary is mixed
with its English equivalent. In particular, "varg" and "wolf" are used interchangeably. The author had previously done the same thing for deer in ''Literature/TheBookOfTheNewSun.'' ''Firebringer'': sometimes they were 'deer', sometimes they were 'Herla'. Hedgehogs were occasionally 'brailah'.
* Creator/GeorgeRRMartin's ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' features a few such creatures, and one of the joys of the series is how immediately evocative most of the terms are. One of the best of these is the "lizard-lion", which almost every person who reads the series understands to be an alligator. Others include zorses (for zebras, and not actual zorses), puff fish, pricklefish, snow bears, and colorful talking birds. Certain inanimate substances also get this treatments, such as obsidian (dragonglass) and napalm or GreekFire (wildfire--although admittedly that's because it's probably not actually napalm[[note]]Napalm requires gasoline or similar petroleum distillates; suffice it to say that Westeros does not have the fractional-distillation technology required to produce gasoline[[/note]] and there are no Greeks in this world). It should be noted that zorses are actual zorses, hybrids of horses and some striped animal, possible a zebra. Lizard-lions casts doubts on the rest, as there are references to crocodiles and lizard-lions actually appear in another work of the author, Tuf Voyaging, and are described as a different animal, with only the snout of a alligator, with a whip-like tail thrice the size of the rest of the body and dagger teeth. It casts doubts on the other "smeerps", as the author would have used the Real World species names unless they are not from the Real World.
* In an odd variant, humans from the FunnyAnimal-populated world of ''Literature/{{Spellsinger}}'' are so accustomed to living amongst hundreds of other intelligent mammals that they (like everyone else) refer to what grows on top of their own heads as "fur", not "hair".
* In Creator/DianeDuane's ''Franchise/StarTrek'' ''Literature/{{Rihannsu}}'' novels have quite a few examples:
e.g. noblemen and cavalry troopers ride on animals called "destriers.'fresher instead of shower. Not to mention the [[ConLang "actual" Rihannsu words]]. ''The Empty Chair'', lampshades it with the sentence "like a conjurer with a ''smeerp'' up his sleeve." Readers might assume this is just the author using a fancy medieval word for "horse," until they learn The [[IShouldWriteABookAboutThis introduction]] to ''The Empty Chair'' implies that TheFederation has been calling the destriers have claws, eat meat and generally seem to be some kind of genetically-engineered jaguar.
* Creator/TamoraPierce does this from time to time. Her Literature/TortallUniverse in particular takes leaps and bounds in development from the earliest books to the latest ones, with
Rihannsu [[CallASmeerpARabbit smeerps rabbits]] all kinds of details added to keep what was a very eighties swords-and-sorcery world running smoothly, many of which seem suspiciously modern for their setting. Trouble is, she occasionally forgets what needs renaming and what doesn't. The process of a "new exercise" Kel learns as a page is meticulously described...and turns out to be a push-up. Which Alanna did in her first book, where they were identified by name and not explained. (One {{Justified}} example is "duckmole" for "platypus" -- actually a word coined by British settlers in Australia, since there's not exactly Ancient Greek or Latinization in Tortall.)
along.
* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':
**
TimothyZahn, in his Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse novels, generally tries, with the exception of hot chocolate, to keep to this trope, since the 'verse is very not Earth and involves humans, but few other Earth animals. He tends not to describe nonhumans in great detail, but will mention avians in the brush or hostile canid creatures. This does lead to some readers wondering how "avian" is less an Earthism than "bird", and why he'll use "snake".
* (* A.C. Crispin's ''Han Solo Trilogy'' regular mentions mouse/rat-like creatures called "vrelts." The smeepriness is extended to common phrases featuring rats, "a deadly game of cat and vrelt."
* ** Creator/AlanDeanFoster (ghost writing for Creator/GeorgeLucas), in the {{novelization}} of ''Film/ANewHope'', {{lampshade|Hanging}}s this during an early conversation between Obi-Wan and Luke, who grew up on a [[SingleBiomePlanet very dry planet]]:
--> ---> '''Obi-Wan:''' Still, even a duck must be taught to swim.\\



* The ''Literature/XWingSeries'' dealt more with everyday life than other entries in the EU, so we got a lot of smeerpy terms for ordinary objects like appliances. Refrigerators are "conservators", and bathrooms are "refreshers". Creator/AaronAllston uses the latter for a pun in ''Starfighters of Adumar'' when Tomer Darpen remarks that the facilities in the Adumari hotel Wedge et al. are staying in are more primitive than they're used to, and they may need to be taught how to use them. Hobbie immediately calls it "a refresher course". Janson gets irritated that Hobbie ninja'd his joke.
* The kind of science fantasy that gets lumped under the "SteamPunk" label likes to smeerp technology:
* ''Literature/HisDarkMaterials'':
** "Anbaric" technology instead of "electric", based on the Arabic word for "amber" rather than the Greek (which is "electrum", also the name of a mineral compound). The books make it clear that it's otherwise ''exactly'' the same as the electricity in our world. TheMovie turned it into Glowing Blue Phlebotinum, however.
** "Chocolatl" is also used instead of "hot chocolate" (based on the Spanish spelling of the Aztec "xocolatl"), while "experimental theology" is used instead of "physics".
** You also hear of ethnic groups such as "Gyptians".
* Creator/ChinaMieville's uses "chymistry" in his [[Literature/BasLagCycle New Crobuzon]] setting, though this may fall more into the "Magick With A K" category.
* ''The Court Of The Air'' goes berserk with this trope, coming up with alternate Steam-Punky names for everything from journalists ("pensmen") to computers ("transaction engines") to the sun itself ("the Circle"). Some of the Smeerp-names, amusingly, also have entirely unrelated meanings in English, such as "cardsharps" for computer programmers (because they poke holes in punch-cards to operate the mechanical transaction engines). These names range from the understandable ("[[FantasyCounterpartCulture Carlists]]" instead of "[[DirtyCommies Marxists]]") to the baffling ("combination" instead of "[[WeirdTradeUnion union]]").
* Parodied a lot in ''Literature/{{Discworld}}''. In ''The Discworld Companion'', Creator/TerryPratchett explains that every young sci-fi/fantasy writer (presumably including himself) starts out carefully avoiding references to, e.g. "Toledo steel", but sooner or later throws their hands up and cries "What the hell?"
** In particular he likes using terms that should not exist in a different world, and then justifying them with a bizarre parallel explanation. For example, "Pavlovian response" also exists in Discworld not because it was discovered by a man called Pavlov, but because the experiment involved the dog eating a strawberry meringue when the bell was rung.
** The ''Assassins' Guild Diary'' inverts the "bizarre parallel explanation" trope; it doesn't try to justify the word "byzantine" at all, but does claim the politics of the ancient Komplezian Empire were so byzantine, they led to the modern Morporkian word "complex".
** Creator/TerryPratchett parodies this in ''Pyramids'' by using the term "camels of the sea" (given that camels are "ships of the desert"...)
* Robert Sobel's ''Literature/ForWantOfANail'' is an AlternateHistory classic with a failed UsefulNotes/AmericanRevolution as its PointOfDivergence that employs this trope, with terms like "vitavision" for television and "locomobiles" for automobiles.
* In Zilpha Keatley Snyder's ''Literature/GreenSkyTrilogy'', creatures that rather obviously appear to be rabbits and monkeys are respectively called "lapans" and "simas." Other creatures such as tree bears keep their recognizable names. "Pan-fruit" is probably breadfruit (if so, the Kindar have latex and insect repellent) and "tarbo root", eaten by Erdlings as a side dish with fried lapan, is possibly taro root. A lot of the special language is based on German and French words. Snyder implied in the first book that the inhabitants of the planet Green-sky are descendants of an Earth colony founded by German and French scientists (and at least one Israeli) with a large group of war orphans. She includes some credible examples of linguistic drift and coinage.
* Rather bizarrely lampshaded in a short story called "A Delicate Shade of Kipney" by Creator/NancyKress, published in an early issue of ''Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine''; her characters, third- and fourth-generation descendants of a small group stranded on an alien planet with a nearly-opaque atmosphere, speak of such colors as "kipney" and "tlem" (to the dismay of their ancestors, who still insist the planet be called "Exile" rather than "Keedaithen"). Kress unfortunately doesn't realize that words ''come from somewhere'' -- that people who'd only heard of the colors you and I speak of every day wouldn't suddenly, spontaneously, start saying such things as "What a pretty shade of tlem."
* L. Ron Hubbard's ''Literature/BattlefieldEarth'' prefers odd hyphenated versions of common words; e.g. "man-animal", "picto-camera", "skull-bone".

to:

* ** The ''Literature/XWingSeries'' dealt more with everyday life than other entries in the EU, so we got a lot of smeerpy terms for ordinary objects like appliances. Refrigerators are "conservators", and bathrooms are "refreshers". Creator/AaronAllston uses the latter for a pun in ''Starfighters of Adumar'' when Tomer Darpen remarks that the facilities in the Adumari hotel Wedge et al. are staying in are more primitive than they're used to, and they may need to be taught how to use them. Hobbie immediately calls it "a refresher course". Janson gets irritated that Hobbie ninja'd his joke.
* The kind of science fantasy that gets lumped under the "SteamPunk" label likes to smeerp technology:
* ''Literature/HisDarkMaterials'':
** "Anbaric" technology instead of "electric", based on the Arabic word for "amber" rather than the Greek (which is "electrum", also the name of a mineral compound). The books make it clear that it's otherwise ''exactly'' the same as the electricity in our world. TheMovie turned it into Glowing Blue Phlebotinum, however.
** "Chocolatl" is also used instead of "hot chocolate" (based on the Spanish spelling of the Aztec "xocolatl"), while "experimental theology" is used instead of "physics".
** You also hear of ethnic groups such as "Gyptians".
* Creator/ChinaMieville's uses "chymistry" in his [[Literature/BasLagCycle New Crobuzon]] setting, though this may fall more into the "Magick With
''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'': A K" category.
* ''The Court Of The Air'' goes berserk with this trope, coming up with alternate Steam-Punky names for everything from journalists ("pensmen") to computers ("transaction engines")
PlayedForLaughs example. Due to the sun itself ("the Circle"). Some of the Smeerp-names, amusingly, also have entirely unrelated meanings in English, such as "cardsharps" for computer programmers (because they poke holes in punch-cards to operate the mechanical transaction engines). These names range from the understandable ("[[FantasyCounterpartCulture Carlists]]" instead of "[[DirtyCommies Marxists]]") to the baffling ("combination" instead of "[[WeirdTradeUnion union]]").
* Parodied a lot in ''Literature/{{Discworld}}''. In ''The Discworld Companion'', Creator/TerryPratchett explains that every young sci-fi/fantasy writer (presumably including himself) starts out carefully avoiding references to, e.g. "Toledo steel", but sooner or later throws their hands up and cries "What the hell?"
** In particular he likes using terms that should not exist in a different world, and then justifying them with a
[[BizarreAlienBiology bizarre parallel explanation. For example, "Pavlovian response" also exists in Discworld not because it was discovered by a man called Pavlov, but because the experiment involved the dog eating a strawberry meringue when the bell was rung.
** The ''Assassins' Guild Diary'' inverts the "bizarre parallel explanation" trope; it doesn't try to justify the word "byzantine" at all, but does claim the politics
nature of the ancient Komplezian Empire were so byzantine, they led to the modern Morporkian word "complex".
** Creator/TerryPratchett parodies this in ''Pyramids'' by using the term "camels of the sea" (given that camels are "ships of the desert"...)
* Robert Sobel's ''Literature/ForWantOfANail'' is an AlternateHistory classic with a failed UsefulNotes/AmericanRevolution as its PointOfDivergence that employs this trope, with terms like "vitavision" for television and "locomobiles" for automobiles.
* In Zilpha Keatley Snyder's ''Literature/GreenSkyTrilogy'', creatures that rather obviously appear to be rabbits and monkeys are respectively called "lapans" and "simas." Other creatures such as tree bears keep their recognizable names. "Pan-fruit" is probably breadfruit (if so, the Kindar have latex and insect repellent) and "tarbo root", eaten by Erdlings as a side dish with fried lapan, is possibly taro root. A lot of the special language is based on German and French words. Snyder implied in the first book that the inhabitants
ecosystem]], very little of the planet Green-sky are descendants of an Earth colony founded by German contains anything we would recognize or have names for--except Shinovar, which has plants and French scientists (and at least one Israeli) with animals comparable to Earth, specifically Europe. They've exported a large group number of war orphans. She includes some credible examples these animals to the rest of linguistic drift the continent, horses and coinage.
* Rather bizarrely lampshaded in a short story called "A Delicate Shade of Kipney" by Creator/NancyKress, published in an early issue of ''Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine''; her characters, third- and fourth-generation descendants of a small group stranded on an alien planet with a nearly-opaque atmosphere, speak of such colors as "kipney" and "tlem" (to
chickens being the dismay of their ancestors, who still insist most prominent. The thing is, the planet be called "Exile" rather than "Keedaithen"). Kress unfortunately rest of the continent doesn't realize that words ''come from somewhere'' -- that people who'd have any birds, so the rare non-chicken birds still get called chickens. In one chapter, Shallan encounters a trained parrot, and wonders how the multicolored chicken with only heard a small bit of shell (the beak) could survive.
* Similar to
the colors you ''Literature/WatershipDown'' example below, in Tad William's novel ''Literature/TailchasersSong'' the cats ("the folk" as they call themselves) have their own language. Dogs are ''growlers'', rodents are ''squeakers'', squirrels are ''rikchikchik'', birds are ''fla-fa'az'', humans are ''m'an'', and I speak of every day wouldn't suddenly, spontaneously, start saying such things as "What a pretty shade of tlem."
* L. Ron Hubbard's ''Literature/BattlefieldEarth'' prefers odd hyphenated versions of common words; e.g. "man-animal", "picto-camera", "skull-bone".
so on.



* Several of Jo Clayton's works use this—for example, ''chinin'', first mentioned in ''[[Literature/TheDuelOfSorceryTrilogy Moongather]]'', are clearly dogs (and explicitly identified as such in ''Changer's Moon''). However, there are also plenty of [[HorseOfADifferentColor beasts of different colors]], and even the occasional [[CallASmeerpARabbit smeerp identified as a rabbit]].
* Mostly avoided in Literature/{{Redwall}} except for "hotroot pepper", which the evidence suggests is probably horseradish.
* Eric Van Lustbader has the Pearl Saga where everything, even the race that seems to just be humans, has a different name. In fact, the only thing with a recognizable name seem to be dragons, which are just dragons.
* Largely averted in Gurney's {{Literature/Dinotopia}} books; flora and fauna are meticulously called by their scientific names, no matter how long those might be; it's mentioned that learning these is an essential part of a child's education. And no matter that the setting takes place before most dinosaurs were given these names. However, the trope ''is'' used with skybaxes, GiantFlyer pterosaurs who have appeared in every one to date. ''Journey To Chandara'' mentions in passing that they're Quetzalcoatlus, but people usually just call them skybaxes. They, and no others, are called by a common name. It's made odder because a larger Quetzalcoatlus subspecies showed up in a previous book and was mentioned to be ''Q. northropi''. The Ovinutrix are another one. They are Oviraptors, but dislike the name because it is a mistaken reference to them eating eggs, which in real life was proven likely false. So they, particularly the hatchery attendants, use "Ovinutrix" or "Egg Nurse" instead of "Oviraptor" or "Egg Thief".

to:

* Several of Jo Clayton's works use this—for example, ''chinin'', first mentioned in ''[[Literature/TheDuelOfSorceryTrilogy Moongather]]'', are clearly dogs (and explicitly identified as such in ''Changer's Moon''). However, there are also plenty of [[HorseOfADifferentColor beasts of different colors]], and even In Fiona Patton's ''Literature/TalesOfTheBranionRealm'' fantasy series, the occasional [[CallASmeerpARabbit smeerp identified as a rabbit]].
* Mostly avoided in Literature/{{Redwall}} except for "hotroot pepper",
monarch is called not King or Queen, but the unisex "Aristok", which might be derived from "aristocrat".
* Mitch Benn's ''Terra'' practically epitomises this trope. Here he is describing a sports match: "To Fthfth's delight, Terra's gfrg skills came on in leaps and bounds (quite literally; there's a fair bit of leaping and bounding goes on in gshkth). She would convert Fthfth's zmms into zdds, smashing frkts and forcing yk yks and slotting
the evidence suggests is probably horseradish.
* Eric Van Lustbader has the Pearl Saga where everything, even the race
bdkt neatly to Fthfth so that seems Fthfth could ram home a victorious ghhh, to just be humans, has a different name. In fact, the only thing rapturous hisses of their classmates." To be fair, it's a children's book, and children might well find that quite amusing.
* Creator/TamoraPierce does this from time to time. Her Literature/TortallUniverse in particular takes leaps and bounds in development from the earliest books to the latest ones,
with a recognizable name seem all kinds of details added to be dragons, keep what was a very eighties swords-and-sorcery world running smoothly, many of which are just dragons.
* Largely averted in Gurney's {{Literature/Dinotopia}} books; flora
seem suspiciously modern for their setting. Trouble is, she occasionally forgets what needs renaming and fauna are what doesn't. The process of a "new exercise" Kel learns as a page is meticulously described...and turns out to be a push-up. Which Alanna did in her first book, where they were identified by name and not explained. (One {{Justified}} example is "duckmole" for "platypus" -- actually a word coined by British settlers in Australia, since there's not exactly Ancient Greek or Latinization in Tortall.)
* In the ''Agent of Byzantium'' AlternateHistory short stories by Creator/HarryTurtledove, there are several examples due to things being discovered earlier and by different people. For example, gunpowder is "hellpowder" because it was first used for creating explosions by sappers dressed in devilish costumes rather than propelling cannonballs, the printing press makes "archetypes", and brandy is ''yperoinos'' (Greek for "superwine") as it was distilled from wine.
** In the ''Literature/Timeline191'' series, a fictional character with the last name Blackford is president during TheGreatDepression instead of UsefulNotes/HerbertHoover, resulting in shanty towns of unlucky stockholders being
called by Blackfordburgs rather than Hoovervilles. Also, with the [[RomanovsAndRevolutions Russian Revolution]] a dismal failure, the Molotov cocktail is renamed "Featherston fizz" after the series' UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler equivalent. Finally, tanks are called "barrels" because, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanks_in_World_War_I paralleling the origin of the Real Life term]], they were first made in a building labeled "the Barrel Works".
** Also, when an atomic bomb goes off, it produces a "toadstool cloud".
*** Furthermore, atomic bombs themselves are called "superbombs," and theoretical hydrogen bombs are "sunbombs."
** In the ''Literature/WorldWar'' series, humanity adopted some advanced technology from the Race and thus used
their scientific names, no matter how long those might be; it's mentioned that learning words for it; for example, lasers are called "shelkwank light" and optical storage disc players are likewise called "shelkwank players".
** The lizards also use their own terms for certain ranks and vehicles, most of
these is an essential part of a child's education. And being [[WeWillUseWikiWordsInTheFuture wiki-words]]: "fleetlord" means admiral, "shiplord" means captain, "killercraft" means jet fighter, "landcruiser" means tank, "troopcarrier" means APC. Interestingly, certain words they use make no matter that the setting takes place before most dinosaurs were sense given these names. However, the trope ''is'' used with skybaxes, GiantFlyer pterosaurs who have appeared in every one to date. ''Journey To Chandara'' mentions in passing that what we are told about them. They call their spacecraft "ships", even though they're Quetzalcoatlus, but from a [[SingleBiomePlanet desert world]] with no large bodies of water and have never bothered to develop naval vessels. The word "landcruiser" implies other kinds of cruisers, except they have none. A Chinese woman is baffled by the Race's use of "ships", as their "planes-that-never-come-down" are most definitely not on water.
* In ''Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles'', the assorted oversized creatures of the overworld are given simpler names, allegedly by the
people usually who live there. (Rats are known as "gnawers", spiders as "spinners", and so on.) This is what the creatures of the Underworld actually call themselves, just call them skybaxes. They, and no others, are called by a common name. It's made odder because a larger Quetzalcoatlus subspecies showed up translated into the nearest thing in a previous book and was mentioned to be ''Q. northropi''. The Ovinutrix are another one. They are Oviraptors, English. Humans have one of these names too among the Underworld creatures[[note]][[HumansAreTheRealMonsters "killer"]][[/note]], [[FantasticRacism but dislike the name because it is a mistaken reference they don't like to them eating eggs, which in real life was proven likely false. So they, particularly the hatchery attendants, use "Ovinutrix" or "Egg Nurse" instead of "Oviraptor" or "Egg Thief".hear it]].



* In Clem Martini's "The Crow Chronicles", the crows do often have their own ways of describing human technology - including "moving boxes" instead of "cars." This is somewhat justified because, as crows, they don't have anywhere near the same technology we do.

to:

* In Clem Martini's "The Crow Chronicles", the crows do often The rabbits of ''Literature/WatershipDown'' have their own ways Lapine language to describe things that are relevant to being a rabbit. Since the story's setting is recognizable to humans as 20th-century England, many of describing these words describe things that humans already have names for. ''Elil'' are animals that rabbits classify as predators, such as foxes, weasels, and humans; ''hraka'' is rabbit droppings; ''hrududu'' is anything with a motor, such as an automobile or a tractor. This often serves to illustrate very viscerally the differences in the way the rabbit view the world. For example, rabbits do consider "elil" to include what humans would recognise as predators...but they also consider ''roads'' to be elil. Likewise, a human technology - including "moving boxes" instead of "cars." This is somewhat justified because, as crows, would probably think that a train would be "hrududu" in rabbit speech; but when the rabbits encounter one they believe it's a divine being, because they don't have anywhere near the same technology we do.knowledge base to grasp that it's essentially just a much larger vehicle driven by a much larger motor. However the Efrafan rabbits seem to be able to view things from a more human-like perspective as they explicitly refer to a rabbit's death being caused by a train.
* The Seanchan of ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' ride ''s'redit'' (elephants).
** And are known to enjoy a good cup of ''[[{{Uncoffee}} kaf]]'' (coffee).
** The Aiel are growing ''zemai'' instead of corn, ''algode'' instead of cotton and ''t'mat'' for tomato. While these smeerps (and the Seanchan ones, too) are at least partially {{justified|Trope}}, being unknown outside the Aiel Waste, this is not so with tabac (this smeerp tends to get lost in translation, anyway).
** One suspects that he was acutally playing on linguistic drift here. ''Zemai'' is an anagram of maize. ''Algode'' is nearly ''algodon'', Spanish for ''cotton'', ''t'mat'' ought to be self explanatory, and ''tabac'' is an archaic word for ''tobacco''.
** Also, there are no slaves in TheWheelOfTime. They have ''da'covale'' in Seanchan, ''gai'shain'' (not exactly slaves if not captured by [[spoiler: Shaido Aiel]]) in the Waste, and people "sold like animals" in Shara.
** Many plants and animals have their names changed to more descriptive terms. Thus you might have someone taking shade under a leatherleaf tree and trying to shoo away the bitemes.
* ''Literature/WingsofFire'': Dragons refer to humans as Scavengers.



* David Eddings avoids this for the most part, which makes it difficult to say whether or not he actually is doing it. In the {{Belgariad}} series they encounter "rock wolves," which might be hyenas, or might simply be hyena-like monsters (vaguely wolfish, humped backs, hooting laugh). Since Garion does not know what a hyena is, he cannot contrast any differences the rock wolves might have.
* In an odd variant, humans from the FunnyAnimal-populated world of ''Literature/{{Spellsinger}}'' are so accustomed to living amongst hundreds of other intelligent mammals that they (like everyone else) refer to what grows on top of their own heads as "fur", not "hair".
* In ''Literature/TheFirebringerTrilogy'', [[spoiler:horses]] are called ''daya''.
* Referenced and subverted in ''[[Literature/TheLeagueOfPeoplesVerse Expendable]]'' by James Alan Gardner. An explorer on an uncharted Earthlike planet glimpses a small brown animal jumping into the underbrush and immediately thinks "rabbit", even though she knows it probably isn't an actual rabbit. She suspects humans are hardwired for this. [[spoiler:Turns out it actually ''is'' a rabbit: the planet's nonintelligent life is identical to Earth's due to SufficientlyAdvancedAliens.]]
* Dragaerans from Creator/StevenBrust's Literature/{{Dragaera}} novels refer to all predatory birds as "hawks", even if they're owls, shrikes, or whatever. There are occasional mentions of an animal called a "mock-man", which is probably an ape to judge by its description.
* In Creator/MercedesLackey and James Mallory's ''Literature/TheEnduringFlameTrilogy'', there are shotors, which from the description sounds like they are camels.
* Occurs in Creator/ErinHunter's books; usually the same typical words get different names for each series:
** ''Literature/WarriorCats'' has "monsters" for vehicles, "Thunderpath" for roads, "Twolegs"/"housefolk"/"Upwalkers" for humans (depending on where the cat's from), "kittypet" for a cat owned by humans, and "The Cutter" for the vet.
** ''Literature/SeekerBears'' has "flat-faces"/"no-claws"/"smooth-pelts" for humans (depending on the species saying it), "firebeasts" for vehicles, "[=BlackPath=]" for roads, and "death sticks" for guns.
** ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' has "longpaws" for humans, "loudcages" for cars, "sharpclaws" for cats, "Trap House" for the pound, "no-sun" for night, and "Fierce Dogs" for pet/guard dogs.
* In Fiona Patton's ''Literature/{{Branion}}'' fantasy series, the monarch is called not King or Queen, but the unisex "Aristok," which might be derived from "aristocrat."
* Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs:
** In the ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars'' series, several Barsoomian words are substituted for perfectly applicable English terms, such as calling kings "jeddaks".
** In the ''Literature/{{Pellucidar}}'' novels, various prehistoric animals are called by names such as "tandor" (mammoth), "sithic" (labyrinthodont), "thipdar" (pteranodon), and "lidi" (diplodocus). Understandable, as having primitive natives call these animals by their highly-technical scientific names would've been pretty jarring.
* ''Literature/WarOfTheSpiderQueen'' calls certain garments "''piwafwis''", but it could just as easily call them "cloaks". "Piwafwi" was established as the Drow word for "cloak" back in Salvatore's early Drizzt novels. In addition, piwafwis have certain characteristics that our cloaks do not, such as camouflaging the wearer to infrared vision. It ultimately comes down to the same thing as calling a Japanese sword a Katana: "Katana" is nothing but the Japanese translation for "sword", but it still contains extra information on what kind of sword it is.
* Mitch Benn's ''Terra'' practically epitomises this trope. Here he is describing a sports match: "To Fthfth's delight, Terra's gfrg skills came on in leaps and bounds (quite literally; there's a fair bit of leaping and bounding goes on in gshkth). She would convert Fthfth's zmms into zdds, smashing frkts and forcing yk yks and slotting the bdkt neatly to Fthfth so that Fthfth could ram home a victorious ghhh, to the rapturous hisses of their classmates." To be fair, it's a children's book, and children might well find that quite amusing.
* Androids in ''Literature/RieselTalesTwoHunters'' are usually referred to as "Rets," short for "[=RetiNew=]". This was originally the name of a special line of social androids made to accompany their owners wherever they went, but has since become a generic term for all social androids.
* Fred Saberhagen's ''Literature/EmpireOfTheEast'' trilogy and sequel series, the ''Literature/BookOfSwords'', are both guilty of this to a somewhat ridiculous extent. Granted that they are set 50,000 years in the future and [[TranslationConvention the English language has been lost]]; is it really neccesary to call horses "riding-beasts" and mules "load-beasts"? Not to mention "milk-beasts" and "wool-beasts". Yet birds are birds, dragons are dragons, and "potatoes" are still a named vegetable. Also confusingly subverted when we are introduced to the "war-beast", apparently some new type of lion or puma hybrid which can also be ridden.
* Liliana Bodoc's ''Days of the Deer'' has both the narration and the inhabitants of the Fantasy South America setting calling horses 'animals with mane'. She does slip up and say 'horses' once, though.
* ''Literature/DespoilersOfTheGoldenEmpire'' features carriers ([[spoiler: horses]]), power weapons ([[spoiler: guns]]), and the Universal Assembly ([[spoiler: the Catholic Church]]). This is an odd example as it is the result of TranslationConvention; the story is deliberately translated fairly directly from Spanish and Latin into English for the purpose of misleading the reader as to who the story is about.
* Literature/WingsofFire Dragons refer to humans as Scavengers.
* Lots in ''Literature/TheMazeRunner''. Medics are called "Med-Jacks", butchers are called "Slicers", etc.
* ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'': A PlayedForLaughs example. Due to the [[BizarreAlienBiology bizarre nature of the ecosystem]], very little of the planet contains anything we would recognize or have names for--except Shinovar, which has plants and animals comparable to Earth, specifically Europe. They've exported a number of these animals to the rest of the continent, horses and chickens being the most prominent. The thing is, the rest of the continent doesn't have any birds, so the rare non-chicken birds still get called chickens. In one chapter, Shallan encounters a trained parrot, and wonders how the multicolored chicken with only a small bit of shell (the beak) could survive.
* In ''Literature/TheHungerGames'', the addictive painkiller in use around Panem is called "morphling" (morphine) and the people addicted to it are called "morphlings."
* In ''Literature/TheDinosaurLords'', many dinosaurs populating the world are called by different names - for example, allosauruses are matadors, and deinynochuses become horrors. Justified by those being local monikers, whereas "international" names are the ones we know.
* In the light novel series ''LightNovel/KinosJourney'', author Keiichi Sigsawa includes notes introducing the reader to "persuaders" (guns) and "motorrads" (motorcycles, specifically Hermes). Motorrad also counts as GratuitousGerman.
* In ''Literature/TheBookOfTheNamed'', fire is referred to as the "Red Tongue". Ratha learns to tame it but believes it to be a living being, which she calls her "creature".
* In the 1930 science-fiction story ''The Gostak and the Doshes'' by Dr. Miles Breuer, the sentence "The gostak distims the doshes" plays a major role. This sentence is not Dr. Breuer's invention; the credit goes to a writer named Andrew Ingraham, who coined it in 1903. The sentence became much more widely known as a result of its appearance in the 1923 book ''The Meaning of Meaning'', by C. K. Ogden and I. A. Richards.

to:

* David Eddings avoids this for the most part, ''Literature/ZonesOfThought'': ''Literature/ADeepnessInTheSky'' features arachnoid aliens which makes it difficult to say whether or not he actually is doing it. In the {{Belgariad}} series they encounter "rock wolves," which might be hyenas, or might simply be hyena-like monsters (vaguely wolfish, humped backs, hooting laugh). Since Garion does not know what a hyena is, he cannot contrast any differences the rock wolves might have.
* In an odd variant, humans from the FunnyAnimal-populated world of ''Literature/{{Spellsinger}}''
are so accustomed to living amongst hundreds of other intelligent mammals described in very human-like terms. Played with in that they (like everyone else) refer to what grows on top of their own heads as "fur", not "hair".
* In ''Literature/TheFirebringerTrilogy'', [[spoiler:horses]] are called ''daya''.
* Referenced and subverted in ''[[Literature/TheLeagueOfPeoplesVerse Expendable]]'' by James Alan Gardner. An explorer on an uncharted Earthlike planet glimpses a small brown animal jumping into the underbrush and immediately thinks "rabbit", even though she knows it probably isn't an actual rabbit. She suspects humans are hardwired for this. [[spoiler:Turns out it actually ''is'' a rabbit: the planet's nonintelligent life is identical to Earth's due to SufficientlyAdvancedAliens.]]
* Dragaerans from Creator/StevenBrust's Literature/{{Dragaera}} novels refer to all predatory birds as "hawks", even if they're owls, shrikes, or whatever. There are occasional mentions of an animal called a "mock-man", which is probably an ape to judge by its description.
* In Creator/MercedesLackey and James Mallory's ''Literature/TheEnduringFlameTrilogy'', there are shotors, which from the description sounds like they are camels.
* Occurs in Creator/ErinHunter's books; usually the same typical words get different names for each series:
** ''Literature/WarriorCats'' has "monsters" for vehicles, "Thunderpath" for roads, "Twolegs"/"housefolk"/"Upwalkers" for humans (depending on where the cat's from), "kittypet" for a cat owned by humans, and "The Cutter" for the vet.
** ''Literature/SeekerBears'' has "flat-faces"/"no-claws"/"smooth-pelts" for humans (depending on the species saying it), "firebeasts" for vehicles, "[=BlackPath=]" for roads, and "death sticks" for guns.
** ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' has "longpaws" for humans, "loudcages" for cars, "sharpclaws" for cats, "Trap House" for the pound, "no-sun" for night, and "Fierce Dogs" for pet/guard dogs.
* In Fiona Patton's ''Literature/{{Branion}}'' fantasy series, the monarch is called not King or Queen, but the unisex "Aristok," which might be derived from "aristocrat."
* Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs:
** In the ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars'' series, several Barsoomian words are substituted for perfectly applicable English terms, such as calling kings "jeddaks".
** In the ''Literature/{{Pellucidar}}'' novels, various prehistoric animals are called by names such as "tandor" (mammoth), "sithic" (labyrinthodont), "thipdar" (pteranodon), and "lidi" (diplodocus). Understandable, as having primitive natives call these animals by their highly-technical scientific names would've been pretty jarring.
* ''Literature/WarOfTheSpiderQueen'' calls certain garments "''piwafwis''", but it could just as easily call them "cloaks". "Piwafwi" was established as the Drow word for "cloak" back in Salvatore's early Drizzt novels. In addition, piwafwis have certain characteristics that our cloaks do not, such as camouflaging the wearer to infrared vision. It ultimately comes down to the same thing as calling a Japanese sword a Katana: "Katana" is nothing but the Japanese translation for "sword", but it still contains extra information on what kind of sword it is.
* Mitch Benn's ''Terra'' practically epitomises this trope. Here he is describing a sports match: "To Fthfth's delight, Terra's gfrg skills came on in leaps and bounds (quite literally; there's a fair bit of leaping and bounding goes on in gshkth). She would convert Fthfth's zmms into zdds, smashing frkts and forcing yk yks and slotting the bdkt neatly to Fthfth so that Fthfth could ram home a victorious ghhh, to the rapturous hisses of their classmates." To be fair,
it's a children's book, and children might well find eventually revealed that quite amusing.
* Androids in ''Literature/RieselTalesTwoHunters'' are usually referred to as "Rets," short for "[=RetiNew=]". This was originally the name of a special line of social androids made to accompany their owners wherever they went, but has since become a generic term for all social androids.
* Fred Saberhagen's ''Literature/EmpireOfTheEast'' trilogy and sequel series, the ''Literature/BookOfSwords'', are both guilty of this to a somewhat ridiculous extent. Granted that they are set 50,000 years in the future and [[TranslationConvention the English language has been lost]]; is it
[[spoiler:they're really neccesary to call horses "riding-beasts" and mules "load-beasts"? Not to mention "milk-beasts" and "wool-beasts". Yet birds are birds, dragons are dragons, and "potatoes" are still a named vegetable. Also confusingly subverted when we are introduced to way more alien than that; we've been seeing them through the "war-beast", apparently some new type of lion or puma hybrid which can also be ridden.
* Liliana Bodoc's ''Days
eyes of the Deer'' has both the narration and the inhabitants of the Fantasy South America setting calling horses 'animals with mane'. She does slip up and say 'horses' once, though.
* ''Literature/DespoilersOfTheGoldenEmpire'' features carriers ([[spoiler: horses]]), power weapons ([[spoiler: guns]]), and the Universal Assembly ([[spoiler: the Catholic Church]]). This is an odd example as it is the result of TranslationConvention; the story is deliberately translated fairly directly from Spanish and Latin into English for the purpose of misleading the reader as to who the story is about.
* Literature/WingsofFire Dragons refer to humans as Scavengers.
* Lots
brain-slaved human translating crew in ''Literature/TheMazeRunner''. Medics are called "Med-Jacks", butchers are called "Slicers", etc.
* ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'': A PlayedForLaughs example. Due to the [[BizarreAlienBiology bizarre nature of the ecosystem]], very little of the planet contains anything we would recognize or have names for--except Shinovar, which has plants and animals comparable to Earth, specifically Europe. They've exported a number of these animals to the rest of the continent, horses and chickens being the most prominent. The thing is, the rest of the continent doesn't have any birds, so the rare non-chicken birds still get called chickens. In one chapter, Shallan encounters a trained parrot, and wonders how the multicolored chicken with only a small bit of shell (the beak) could survive.
* In ''Literature/TheHungerGames'', the addictive painkiller in use around Panem is called "morphling" (morphine) and the people addicted to it are called "morphlings."
* In ''Literature/TheDinosaurLords'', many dinosaurs populating the world are called by different names - for example, allosauruses are matadors, and deinynochuses become horrors. Justified by those being local monikers, whereas "international" names are the ones we know.
* In the light novel series ''LightNovel/KinosJourney'', author Keiichi Sigsawa includes notes introducing the reader to "persuaders" (guns) and "motorrads" (motorcycles, specifically Hermes). Motorrad also counts as GratuitousGerman.
* In ''Literature/TheBookOfTheNamed'', fire is referred to as the "Red Tongue". Ratha learns to tame it but believes it to be a living being, which she calls her "creature".
* In the 1930 science-fiction story ''The Gostak and the Doshes'' by Dr. Miles Breuer, the sentence "The gostak distims the doshes" plays a major role. This sentence is not Dr. Breuer's invention; the credit goes to a writer named Andrew Ingraham, who coined it in 1903. The sentence became much more widely known as a result of its appearance in the 1923 book ''The Meaning of Meaning'', by C. K. Ogden and I. A. Richards.
orbit]].



* ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'' complained that ''Franchise/StarWars'' ExpandedUniverse writers take this kind of thing to ridiculous extremes:
-->'''Gabe:''' These goddamned ''Star Wars'' writers just don't know when to stop. This jackass just said that something can go "[[HoldYourHippogriffs through a ferrocrete bunker like a neutrino through plasma]]." I get it, man. It says ''Star Wars'' on the cover. I know I'm reading about ''Star Wars''. It's like, do they not have butter in space? Or hot knives to cut it with?



* ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}'' comments on this in [[http://xkcd.com/483/ strip 483]] and [[http://xkcd.com/890/ strip 890]].

to:

* ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}'' comments on ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' uses the actual word "smeerp" itself to describe an animal that the Ewocs[[note]]Not "Ewoks"[[/note]] hunt.
* ''Webcomic/{{Erfworld}}'' parodies
this in [[http://xkcd.com/483/ strip 483]] with its "dwagons", "gwiffons", "spidews", and [[http://xkcd.com/890/ strip 890]].other such beasts. Main character Parson Gotti, from Earth, explains to his boss Stanley that he's used to "dragons" and "griffons" on Earth. Stanley replies that they sound stupid, especially "Earth".
* Averted and Lampshaded in ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive''; The author decided to concede and call his not-exactly-a-vampire thing a "vampire" because he knew the readers would accuse him of trying to pawn a vampire off as something else. A character in the story was telling her friends about a monster conceded to her listener's suggestion that it is a vampire because no matter what she says that is what they are going to hear.
* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'':
** Parodied with the trolls, who use an exaggerated form of U- and non-U-English. Where a low-class troll like Sollux would say "ablution trap", a higher-blooded troll like Equius would say "bathtub". Additionally, Alternian versions of Earth animals are named after a word relating to the animal with the suffix "-beast." For example, horses are "hoofbeasts"." [[note]](Sheep are "woolbeasts", but wool is "woolbeast material". Figure that one out.)[[/note]] Also, professions are given combat-related names, even if they have nothing to do with combat (so lawyers are "legislacerators".) Justified in this case, as [[ProudWarriorRace literally every troll is in the military or will be in the future.]] Also, some celebrities on earth have troll counterparts, who are literally called "Troll (name)".
** The Felt, meanwhile, have the game of table stickball, which is in every way identical to pool.



* ''Webcomic/{{Erfworld}}'' parodies this with its "dwagons," "gwiffons," "spidews," and other such beasts. Main character Parson Gotti, from Earth, explains to his boss Stanley that he's used to "dragons" and "griffons" on Earth. Stanley replies that they sound stupid, especially "Earth."

to:

* ''Webcomic/{{Erfworld}}'' parodies ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'' complained that the ''Franchise/StarWars'' ExpandedUniverse writers take this with its "dwagons," "gwiffons," "spidews," and other such beasts. Main character Parson Gotti, from Earth, explains kind of thing to his boss Stanley ridiculous extremes:
-->'''Gabe:''' These goddamned ''Star Wars'' writers just don't know when to stop. This jackass just said
that he's used to "dragons" and "griffons" something can go "[[HoldYourHippogriffs through a ferrocrete bunker like a neutrino through plasma]]." I get it, man. It says ''Star Wars'' on Earth. Stanley replies that the cover. I know I'm reading about ''Star Wars''. It's like, do they sound stupid, especially "Earth."not have butter in space? Or hot knives to cut it with?



* Averted and Lampshaded in ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive''; The author decided to concede and call his not-exactly-a-vampire thing a "vampire" because he knew the readers would accuse him of trying to pawn a vampire off as something else. A character in the story was telling her friends about a monster conceded to her listener's suggestion that it is a vampire because no matter what she says that is what they are going to hear.
* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'':
** Parodied with the trolls, who use an exaggerated form of U- and non-U-English. Where a low-class troll like Sollux would say "ablution trap", a higher-blooded troll like Equius would say "bathtub". Additionally, Alternian versions of Earth animals are named after a word relating to the animal with the suffix "-beast." For example, horses are "hoofbeasts"." [[note]](Sheep are "woolbeasts", but wool is "woolbeast material". Figure that one out.)[[/note]] Also, professions are given combat-related names, even if they have nothing to do with combat (so lawyers are "legislacerators".) Justified in this case, as [[ProudWarriorRace literally every troll is in the military or will be in the future.]] Also, some celebrities on earth have troll counterparts, who are literally called "Troll (name)".
** The Felt, meanwhile, have the game of table stickball, which is in every way identical to pool.
* ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' uses the actual word "smeerp" itself to describe an animal that the Ewocs[[note]]Not "Ewoks"[[/note]] hunt.

to:

* Averted and Lampshaded in ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive''; The author decided to concede and call his not-exactly-a-vampire thing a "vampire" because he knew the readers would accuse him of trying to pawn a vampire off as something else. A character in the story was telling her friends about a monster conceded to her listener's suggestion that it is a vampire because no matter what she says that is what they are going to hear.
* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'':
** Parodied with the trolls, who use an exaggerated form of U- and non-U-English. Where a low-class troll like Sollux would say "ablution trap", a higher-blooded troll like Equius would say "bathtub". Additionally, Alternian versions of Earth animals are named after a word relating to the animal with the suffix "-beast." For example, horses are "hoofbeasts"." [[note]](Sheep are "woolbeasts", but wool is "woolbeast material". Figure that one out.)[[/note]] Also, professions are given combat-related names, even if they have nothing to do with combat (so lawyers are "legislacerators".) Justified in
''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}'' comments on this case, as [[ProudWarriorRace literally every troll is in the military or will be in the future.]] Also, some celebrities on earth have troll counterparts, who are literally called "Troll (name)".
** The Felt, meanwhile, have the game of table stickball, which is in every way identical to pool.
* ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' uses the actual word "smeerp" itself to describe an animal that the Ewocs[[note]]Not "Ewoks"[[/note]] hunt.
[[http://xkcd.com/483/ strip 483]] and [[http://xkcd.com/890/ strip 890]].



* ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'':
** Marvin the Martian's weapon of choice is the Illudium PU-36 Explosive Space Modulator, which to the untrained eye looks just like an ordinary stick of dynamite. The original name "Uranium Pu-36" changed to "Illudium Q-36 " in subsequent cartoons. Pu is the chemical symbol for Plutonium. Either Uranium Pu-36 didn't sound "spacey" enough or they wished to not have kids think of nuclear weapons whenever it was referenced.
** In one early Foghorn Leghorn cartoon, Henery Hawk is left in the dark as to what a chicken really looks like (his grandfather made up all kinds of lies about it to dissuade him from accompanying him to get a chicken, as he would get in the way). When he sees Foghorn, he doesn't think that he is a chicken, but rather a "loud-mouthed shnook". The rooster spends much of the cartoon trying to convince Henery otherwise. Eventually, Henery throws a lit stick of dynamite into the barnyard dog's doghouse, and Foghorn tries to stop the dynamite from blowing up, fearing he will get blamed for it. Naturally, of course, he fails; the dynamite explodes, and the dog slams Foghorn against the ground repeatedly as punishment, after which he calls him a "no-good chicken". That's all Henery needs to hear -- he knocks out Foghorn with a shovel and drags him off, not caring whether he is a chicken or a shnook, only that he would be good in his oven.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Chowder}}'' does this with food. Butter is now "blutter", coriander is now "snoriander", pizza is now "feetsa", etc. It should be noted that the characters themselves are named after actual foods, such as Chowder , Truffles, Schnitzel, Gorgonzola, Panini, etc.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'':
** Marvin the Martian's weapon of choice
''WesternAnimation/TheAdventuresOfTeddyRuxpin'': Teddy Ruxpin is the Illudium PU-36 Explosive Space Modulator, which to the untrained eye looks just like an ordinary stick of dynamite. "Illiop". The original name "Uranium Pu-36" changed to "Illudium Q-36 " in subsequent cartoons. Pu is the chemical symbol for Plutonium. Either Uranium Pu-36 didn't sound "spacey" enough or they wished to not have kids think of nuclear weapons whenever it was referenced.
** In one early Foghorn Leghorn cartoon, Henery Hawk is left in the dark as to what a chicken really looks like (his grandfather made up all kinds of lies about it to dissuade him from accompanying him to get a chicken, as he would get in the way). When he sees Foghorn, he doesn't think that he is a chicken, but rather a "loud-mouthed shnook". The rooster spends much of the cartoon trying to convince Henery otherwise. Eventually, Henery throws a lit stick of dynamite into the barnyard dog's doghouse, and Foghorn tries to stop the dynamite from blowing up, fearing he will get blamed for it. Naturally, of course, he fails; the dynamite explodes, and the dog slams Foghorn against the ground repeatedly as punishment, after which he
Brazilian-Portuguese translation [[AvertedTrope calls him a "no-good chicken". That's all Henery needs to hear -- he knocks out Foghorn with a shovel and drags him off, not caring whether he is a chicken or a shnook, only that he would be good in his oven.
them bears]] anyway.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Chowder}}'' does this with food. Butter is now "blutter", coriander is now "snoriander", pizza is now "feetsa", etc. It should be noted that the characters themselves are named after actual foods, such as Chowder , Chowder, Truffles, Schnitzel, Gorgonzola, Panini, etc.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': "Behold, the two-headed dog, born with only one head! And behold, out of the mists of time, the legendary Esquilax, [[MixAndMatchCritters a horse with the head of a rabbit, and the body... of a rabbit!]]"



** "Satomobiles," automobiles with sedan-chair flair, named after their in-universe creator, [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed Henry Ford-like]] industrialist Hiroshi Sato. Although it is a little different: automobiles are called automobiles, while "Satomobiles" are automobiles made by Hiroshi's company. It still applies, as Satomobile [[BrandNameTakeover is still slang for any automobile]].

to:

** "Satomobiles," "Satomobiles", automobiles with sedan-chair flair, named after their in-universe creator, [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed Henry Ford-like]] industrialist Hiroshi Sato. Although it is a little different: automobiles are called automobiles, while "Satomobiles" are automobiles made by Hiroshi's company. It still applies, as Satomobile [[BrandNameTakeover is still slang for any automobile]].



* {{Downplayed|Trope}} In the ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats2011'' episode "Song of the Petalars" when Wilykat teases his sister Wilykit for kissing an 8-legged amphibian he calls a "froog" on a dare from him.
* ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' does this with anything that didn't specifically originate on Earth, which also helps explain some of the political problems they have. Best example? They're not Cybertronians, even though they all originate from Cybertron. They're either Autobots or Decepticons. Or Sharkticons or Junkions or Velocitrons and so on.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheAdventuresOfTeddyRuxpin'': Teddy Ruxpin is an "Illiop". The Brazilian-Portuguese translation [[AvertedTrope calls them bears]] anyway.
* ''The Legend of Zelda'' example is parodied in the ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo'' episode, [[ShoutOut "Video Game References"]] where Starfire, in a pastiche of the game, comes across a women trying to rein in a rowdy "coocalacka". "You mean, the chicken?" "Nooooo! Coocalacka!"

to:

* {{Downplayed|Trope}} In ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'':
** Marvin
the ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats2011'' episode "Song Martian's weapon of choice is the Petalars" when Wilykat teases his sister Wilykit Illudium PU-36 Explosive Space Modulator, which to the untrained eye looks just like an ordinary stick of dynamite. The original name "Uranium Pu-36" changed to "Illudium Q-36 " in subsequent cartoons. Pu is the chemical symbol for kissing an 8-legged amphibian he calls a "froog" on a dare from him.
* ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' does this with anything that
Plutonium. Either Uranium Pu-36 didn't specifically originate on Earth, sound "spacey" enough or they wished to not have kids think of nuclear weapons whenever it was referenced.
** In one early Foghorn Leghorn cartoon, Henery Hawk is left in the dark as to what a chicken really looks like (his grandfather made up all kinds of lies about it to dissuade him from accompanying him to get a chicken, as he would get in the way). When he sees Foghorn, he doesn't think that he is a chicken, but rather a "loud-mouthed shnook". The rooster spends much of the cartoon trying to convince Henery otherwise. Eventually, Henery throws a lit stick of dynamite into the barnyard dog's doghouse, and Foghorn tries to stop the dynamite from blowing up, fearing he will get blamed for it. Naturally, of course, he fails; the dynamite explodes, and the dog slams Foghorn against the ground repeatedly as punishment, after
which also helps explain he calls him a "no-good chicken". That's all Henery needs to hear -- he knocks out Foghorn with a shovel and drags him off, not caring whether he is a chicken or a shnook, only that he would be good in his oven.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': "Behold, the two-headed dog, born with only one head! And behold, out of the mists of time, the legendary Esquilax, [[MixAndMatchCritters a horse with the head of a rabbit, and the body... of a rabbit!]]"
* In the ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' episode "The Royal Drum", Grandpa Smurf tells a story of when he went to Africa. The Smurfs being a reclusive medieval European culture, he obviously doesn't know what the local animals are called so he refers to a giraffe as a "long-necked leaf-eater," a herd of zebras as "black-and-white striped horses" and a lion as a "Smurf-toothed monster cat". The other Smurfs don't believe him until
some of the political problems they have. Best example? They're not Cybertronians, even though they all originate from Cybertron. They're either Autobots or Decepticons. Or Sharkticons or Junkions or Velocitrons and so on.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheAdventuresOfTeddyRuxpin'': Teddy Ruxpin is an "Illiop". The Brazilian-Portuguese translation [[AvertedTrope calls them bears]] anyway.
* ''The Legend of Zelda'' example is parodied in
animals are brought to their country by the ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo'' episode, [[ShoutOut "Video Game References"]] where Starfire, in a pastiche princess of an African tribe that Grandpa Smurf befriended.
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'': [[Recap/StarWarsRebelsS3E17DoubleAgentDroid "Double Agent Droid"]] brings back
the game, comes across a women trying ''[[Franchise/StarWarsLegends Legends]]'' term "refresher", as opposed to rein in a rowdy "coocalacka". "You mean, the chicken?" "Nooooo! Coocalacka!""toilet".



* ''The Legend of Zelda'' example is parodied in the ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo'' episode, [[ShoutOut "Video Game References"]] where Starfire, in a pastiche of the game, comes across a women trying to rein in a rowdy "coocalacka". "You mean, the chicken?" "Nooooo! Coocalacka!"
* {{Downplayed|Trope}} In the ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats2011'' episode "Song of the Petalars" when Wilykat teases his sister Wilykit for kissing an 8-legged amphibian he calls a "froog" on a dare from him.



* In the ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' episode "The Royal Drum", Grandpa Smurf tells a story of when he went to Africa. The Smurfs being a reclusive medieval European culture, he obviously doesn't know what the local animals are called so he refers to a giraffe as a "long-necked leaf-eater," a herd of zebras as "black-and-white striped horses" and a lion as a "Smurf-toothed monster cat". The other Smurfs don't believe him until some of the animals are brought to their country by the princess of an African tribe that Grandpa Smurf befriended.

to:

* In the ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' episode "The Royal Drum", Grandpa Smurf tells a story of when he went to Africa. The Smurfs being a reclusive medieval European culture, he obviously doesn't know what the local animals are called so he refers to a giraffe as a "long-necked leaf-eater," a herd of zebras as "black-and-white striped horses" and a lion as a "Smurf-toothed monster cat". The other Smurfs don't believe him until ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' does this with anything that didn't specifically originate on Earth, which also helps explain some of the animals are brought to their country by the princess of an African tribe that Grandpa Smurf befriended.political problems they have. Best example? They're not Cybertronians, even though they all originate from Cybertron. They're either Autobots or Decepticons. Or Sharkticons or Junkions or Velocitrons and so on.
8th Mar '17 8:20:12 AM TheGoodWario
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In the Ride/DisneyThemeParks 3D attractions, the necessary glasses are given other names to match the story of the ride. [[Film/HoneyIShrunkTheKids Honey I Shrunk the Audience]] has "Safety Goggles" [[note]] Which is appropriate, as TheFourthWallWillNotProtectYou[[/note]]. [[WesternAnimation/ABugsLife It's Tough To Be A Bug]] has "Bug Eyes", Ride/MickeysPhilharmagic has "Opera Glasses". MuppetVision3D and Film/CaptainEO however do not do this.
6th Mar '17 2:29:22 AM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** No, they're not dinosaurs, they're ''tyrannids''[[note]] Possibly a ShoutOut to Warhammer40000's Tyranids[[/note]].

to:

** No, they're not dinosaurs, they're ''tyrannids''[[note]] Possibly a ShoutOut to Warhammer40000's TabletopGame/Warhammer40000's Tyranids[[/note]].
28th Feb '17 2:42:23 PM Amahn
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The episodes featuring Marty and ''[[ShowWithinAShow Wormhole X-treme]]'' are extensively used to Lampshade various writing and sci-fi Tropes, including this one. Marty gets into an argument with a prop guy for trying to use a bowl of apples as fruit on another planet, telling him to instead paint some kiwis red. "Okay, so now the script'll go, uh: 'Nick walks into the garden of kiwi trees, says 'how like Eden this world is' and bites into a painted kiwi.'"
26th Feb '17 2:51:39 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In a less-convoluted form of this, Europeans consistently call members of the species ''Rangifer tarandus'' "caribou" when they live in Alaska or the Canadian Arctic...even though the ''exact same animals'' in Russia and the Nordic Countries they are called "reindeer."

to:

** In a less-convoluted form of this, Europeans consistently call members of the species ''Rangifer tarandus'' are called "caribou" when they live in Alaska or the Canadian Arctic...even though when Europeans first encountered them, the ''exact same animals'' were known to them in Russia and the Nordic Countries they are called as "reindeer."
26th Feb '17 2:50:16 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* There's a bit of this, combined with CallASmeerpARabbit, going on with the naming of a number of large species of deer in North America:
** When Europeans first encountered the species ''Cervus canadensis'' in North America, they [[CallASmeerpARabbit called it the "elk" after the large deer species of Northern Europe]]. Unfortunately, they soon found out that European "elks"--''Alces alces''--''also'' live in North America. To reduce the confusion, they began calling North American ''A. alces'' by the native Algonquian name, "moose."
** Eventually, Europeans discovered that not only did ''A. alces'' live in North America, but ''C. canadensis'' lived in East Asia. Because ''A. alces'' also lives in East Asia (albeit further north), Europeans decided to call the Asian specimens of ''C. canadensis''...wapiti. Which is a lesser-known term for ''C. canadensis'' from the Cree language...which is spoken in Canada. Yes.
** In a less-convoluted form of this, Europeans consistently call members of the species ''Rangifer tarandus'' "caribou" when they live in Alaska or the Canadian Arctic...even though the ''exact same animals'' in Russia and the Nordic Countries they are called "reindeer."
This list shows the last 10 events of 259. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.CallARabbitASmeerp