History Main / AdaptationExplanationExtrication

20th Sep '16 12:30:00 AM Tyrathius
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*** The film also leaves out the scoring for the first Triwizard task, but leaves it in for the second. As a result, non-readers may be confused when Harry is said to be tied for first place at the beginning of the third task, as earlier he was only said to have come in second place. In the books, Harry scored higher than Cedric in the first task, but lower than him in the second, causing them to tie when the two scores were averaged. Presumably this is true in the film as well, but it's not explained.
19th Sep '16 12:23:15 PM ObsequiousEscargot
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*** Oh BTW, Catwoman now has black hair, much like her mainstream comic-book counterpart, instead of [[Film/BatmanReturns her movie counterpart]]. She explains in [[ComicBook/TheBatmanAdventures the tie-in comic]] that her blonde look was a dye job. She discontinued it when she discovered that the company that made the hair dye, owned by [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Roland Daggett]], was unethically testing the chemicals on animals.
8th Aug '16 4:40:28 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* In ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'', after the kids become kings and queens of Narnia, the narration tells how they ruled successfully for years and years and were given nicknames: King Peter {{the Magnificent}}, Queen Susan the Gentle, King Edmund the Just, Queen Lucy the Valiant. [[Film/TheChroniclesOfNarnia In the film of the book]], they're crowned with these names while still kids just after winning their victory, which makes them seem slightly ridiculous and over-the-top -- especially in the case of Edmund, whose main contribution to the plot was betraying his siblings to the White Witch before he got better.
** It's also explained in the book that the White Witch's Turkish Delight is [[VerySpecialEpisode instantly addictive]], making Edmund's betrayal over a supply of candy seem far less petty.
* ''Film/StarshipTroopers'', adaptation of ''Literature/StarshipTroopers'' had the Mobile Infantry fighting battles that were ''extremely'' unsound tactically. Infantry, unsupported by armor or artillery, making direct frontal attacks on a numerically-superior enemy? HollywoodTactics at their worst. ''However'', it's also true to the book... sort of. The Mobile Infantry ''did'' operate without armor or artillery support, but only because their powered armor suits let the MI itself fill the traditional roles of [[SwissArmyWeapon armor, artillery, and even close air support (up to and including nuclear weapons.)]] When the powered armor was taken out of the movie, the justification for the MI operating unsupported went with it.
** There is artillery in the book, but it's a separate unit from the Mobile Infantry, and so gets glossed over by the narrator, who's generally more interested in describing only his small piece of the action.
** The film is a satire of patriotic propaganda, so that is most likely just a parody of HollywoodTactics.
* In ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'', Bella runs into some nasty characters who are going to hurt and possibly rape her. In the book, she has gotten lost by this point and does not know where to run, so prepares to scream and fight. It also says that if she tried to run, she would probably trip over her own feet. In the movie, she's still clumsy, but not ''that'' clumsy, and is still in sight of a reputable book store. Why she doesn't just turn around is not addressed.

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* ''Film/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'':
**
In ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'', after the kids become kings and queens of Narnia, the narration tells how they ruled successfully for years and years and were given nicknames: King Peter {{the Magnificent}}, Queen Susan the Gentle, King Edmund the Just, Queen Lucy the Valiant. [[Film/TheChroniclesOfNarnia In the film of the book]], film, they're crowned with these names while still kids just after winning their victory, which makes them seem slightly ridiculous and over-the-top -- especially in the case of Edmund, whose main contribution to the plot was betraying his siblings to the White Witch before he got better.
** It's also explained in the book that the White Witch's Turkish Delight is [[VerySpecialEpisode instantly addictive]], making Edmund's betrayal over a supply of candy seem far less petty.
* ''Film/StarshipTroopers'', adaptation of ''Literature/StarshipTroopers'' had the Mobile Infantry fighting battles that were ''extremely'' unsound tactically. Infantry, unsupported by armor or artillery, making direct frontal attacks on a numerically-superior enemy? HollywoodTactics at their worst. ''However'', it's also true to the book... sort of. The Mobile Infantry ''did'' operate without armor or artillery support, but only because their powered armor suits let the MI itself fill the traditional roles of [[SwissArmyWeapon armor, artillery, and even close air support (up to and including nuclear weapons.)]] When the powered armor was taken out of the movie, the justification for the MI operating unsupported went with it.
** There is artillery in the book, but it's a separate unit from the Mobile Infantry, and so gets glossed over by the narrator, who's generally more interested in describing only his small piece of the action.
** The film is a satire of patriotic propaganda, so that is most likely just a parody of HollywoodTactics.
* In ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'', ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'':
**
Bella runs into some nasty characters who are going to hurt and possibly rape her. In the book, she has gotten lost by this point and does not know where to run, so prepares to scream and fight. It also says that if she tried to run, she would probably trip over her own feet. In the movie, she's still clumsy, but not ''that'' clumsy, and is still in sight of a reputable book store. Why she doesn't just turn around is not addressed.



* In ''Film/SpiderMan3'', Peter gains his infamous black symbiote but other than adapting to his costume and making him more hostile, the nature of the symbiote is not explained that much. When it comes time for Eddie Brock to put on the costume, there is no explanation given as to why he now has spider-powers and the audience is left to assume based on the comics.

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* In ''Film/SpiderMan3'', ''Film/SpiderMan3'':
**
Peter gains his infamous black symbiote but other than adapting to his costume and making him more hostile, the nature of the symbiote is not explained that much. When it comes time for Eddie Brock to put on the costume, there is no explanation given as to why he now has spider-powers and the audience is left to assume based on the comics.



* One of these shows up in the film version of ''Literature/AScannerDarkly''. In the novel, Bob and friends freak out and get angry because Barris brings home an 18 speed bike he bought from someone, but Luckman only counts 9 gears (6 in back, 3 in front), leading them to think Barris got ripped off. Later, when Bob gets debriefed by his superiors, he's told that they're pulling him out because the drugs he uses while undercover are starting to affect his brain too much. They saw the group's reaction to the bike gears, due to the house being under surveillance, and they explain to Bob that the problem was that the group was adding the two sets of gears instead of multiplying them, which is how multiple speed bikes work. Bob's inability to figure out the problem indicates to them that his cognitive faculties are being eroded along with the other users. In the movie, this is not brought up in the debriefing, and the bicycle scene remains somewhat bizarre and unexplained.

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* One of these shows up in the film version of ''Literature/AScannerDarkly''. ''Film/AScannerDarkly'':
**
In the novel, Bob and friends freak out and get angry because Barris brings home an 18 speed bike he bought from someone, but Luckman only counts 9 gears (6 in back, 3 in front), leading them to think Barris got ripped off. Later, when Bob gets debriefed by his superiors, he's told that they're pulling him out because the drugs he uses while undercover are starting to affect his brain too much. They saw the group's reaction to the bike gears, due to the house being under surveillance, and they explain to Bob that the problem was that the group was adding the two sets of gears instead of multiplying them, which is how multiple speed bikes work. Bob's inability to figure out the problem indicates to them that his cognitive faculties are being eroded along with the other users. In the movie, this is not brought up in the debriefing, and the bicycle scene remains somewhat bizarre and unexplained.



* Inverted in ''Film/JohnCarter'', the big screen adaptation of Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs' ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars''. The book never explains how Carter gets to Mars, vaguely referring to some sort of astral projection. The film has him finding a cave of gold and getting attacked by a [[HigherTechSpecies Thern]]. He shoots the Thern and takes his medallion, after the dying Thern has spoken a few words into it, causing it to glow. The Thern's last word is "Barsoom" (the Martian name for their planet), which John repeats while holding the medallion, activating the teleportation sequence. Also, it's not clear in the first book that John Carter's body on Mars is actually a duplicate, while his real body is still in that cave, unconscious and not aging. In the film, he figures it out after [[ActionGirl Dejah]] translates a few Thern symbols about halfway through the movie.
** Played straight with how quickly John learns Barsoomian. The book states that all Barsoomians have some PsychicPowers. The only explanation for this in the film is that Sola is speaking to him in the "voice of Barsoom".

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* Inverted in ''Film/JohnCarter'', the big screen adaptation of Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs' ''Literature/JohnCarterOfMars''. The book never explains how Carter gets to Mars, vaguely referring to some sort of astral projection. The film has him finding a cave of gold and getting attacked by a [[HigherTechSpecies Thern]]. He shoots the Thern and takes his medallion, after the dying Thern has spoken a few words into it, causing it to glow. The Thern's last word is "Barsoom" (the Martian name for their planet), which John repeats while holding the medallion, activating the teleportation sequence. Also, it's not clear in the first book that John Carter's body on Mars is actually a duplicate, while his real body is still in that cave, unconscious and not aging. In the film, he figures it out after [[ActionGirl Dejah]] translates a few Thern symbols about halfway through the movie.
** Played straight with
''Film/JohnCarter'': how quickly John learns Barsoomian. The book states that all Barsoomians have some PsychicPowers. The only explanation for this in the film is that Sola is speaking to him in the "voice of Barsoom".Barsoom."



* In the film version of ''Film/TheHuntForRedOctober'', when Ryan is trying to convince his superiors that Ramius is defecting to the United States, he mentions that, "today is the first anniversary of his wife's death," leaving it unexplained why this is significant. [[Literature/TheHuntForRedOctober In the book]] his wife died due to a botched operation by a doctor who escaped punishment due to his Party connections, leading Ramius to decide that "the State must be made to pay".
** It is implied more subtly, and in a way more chillingly, in the coldly impersonal way Putin says "Her death was... unfortunate."
** There is also the fact that in the movie, [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation it was implied that]] Ramius was more concerned about the possibility of his submarine being used as a first strike weapon than punishing the party for his wife's death. Mentioning his wife's death in this context was more about the issue that he no longer had anyone to go home to.



** If you didn't read the book, you could be forgiven for not realizing that the Mind Game is a WideOpenSandbox rather than a simple linear fantasy game -- which is problematic, since the famous "Giant's Drink" sequence can end up looking a tad ridiculous if you don't know that. With the Mind Game as a sprawling, open-ended universe, it's understandable that Ender's fixation on [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard the Giant's Drink challenge]] could come off as disturbing, since most children would simply dismiss the challenge as unwinnable and move on to another part of the game. Presented as one level in a linear game, Ender's solution ([[spoiler:[[CuttingTheKnot murdering the Giant]]]]) becomes the obvious one, and his persistence just makes him look like a {{Determinator}}.

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** If you didn't read the book, you could be forgiven for not realizing that the Mind Game is a WideOpenSandbox rather than a simple linear fantasy game -- which is problematic, since the famous "Giant's Drink" sequence can end up looking a tad ridiculous if you don't know that. With the Mind Game as a sprawling, open-ended universe, it's understandable that Ender's fixation on [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard the Giant's Drink challenge]] could come off as disturbing, since most children would simply dismiss the challenge as unwinnable and move on to another part of the game. Presented as one level in a linear game, Ender's solution ([[spoiler:[[CuttingTheKnot murdering ([[spoiler:murdering the Giant]]]]) Giant]]) becomes the obvious one, and his persistence just makes him look like a {{Determinator}}.



* ''Film/TheHungerGames'': In the movie, we never find out the symbolic significance of the mockingjay, nor what the Muttations are made out of (in the book, it [[spoiler:''appeared to be'' dead tributes mixed with wolf.]]) Losing the first person perspective also means we lose Katniss's thoughts and motivations.
** [[spoiler:The original concept art for individual Muttations was in fact [[http://www.comicbookmovie.com/fansites/nailbiter111/news/?a=57771 based on facial features of the actors playing dead tributes]]. This was dropped for various reasons.]]
** Katniss and Gale's conversation about how many times their names are in the bowl is not given direct explanation like it was in the book -- it's explained in Katniss's parting words to Primrose, but it's easily missed.

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* ''Film/TheHungerGames'': In the movie, we never find out the symbolic significance of the mockingjay, nor what the Muttations are made out of (in the book, it [[spoiler:''appeared to be'' dead tributes mixed with wolf.]]) Losing the first person perspective also means we lose Katniss's thoughts and motivations.
** [[spoiler:The original concept art for individual Muttations was in fact [[http://www.comicbookmovie.com/fansites/nailbiter111/news/?a=57771 based on facial features of the actors playing dead tributes]]. This was dropped for various reasons.]]
** Katniss and Gale's conversation about how many times their names are in the bowl is not given direct explanation like it was in the book -- it's explained in Katniss's parting words to Primrose, but it's easily missed.
7th Aug '16 2:19:59 PM CaptainCrawdad
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*** There is also the fact that the Hound is given little if any reason to go to Sansa's room. In the novel, the two have many scenes together, and the Hound seems to warm to her somewhat. It is actually he who directly tells Sansa the story of what happened to his face, something he never would do with anyone else, and he also storms back into the rabid crowd to rescue her without anyone asking him, implying that he genuinely cares for her. In the books, when Joffrey has the Kingsguard beat Sansa, the Hound objects and tells Joffrey to stop. In the television series, he shows her exactly ''one'' moment of kindness, if it can even be called that, and only goes to rescue Sansa from the crowd after Ser Meryn refuses. Having shown Sansa no special attention in the TV series, it comes off rather strangely that after abandoning the king, his first act is to go to her room and try and convince her to come with him.
7th Aug '16 2:18:21 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Film/XMen'':
** In both the comics and films, Magneto's intentions seem to change quite a bit, but in the comics the greater development of his background as a Holocaust survivor was generally used to make him realize he was becoming just as bad as the Nazis, and to shift him away from advocating genocide of all non-mutants. In at least the second film (the first and third leave it ambiguous) however, Magneto retains the seemingly contradictory positions of being both an advocate and a victim of genocide.
* ''Film/JurassicPark'' the movie is occasionally criticized for the film claiming its moral is about the unpredictability of nature, when it was really all [[spoiler:the programmer Nedry's]] fault. [[Literature/JurassicPark The book]] covers this by showing evidence from the park's own data that the populations were indeed out of control. [[spoiler:Nedry]] wasn't the sole cause of the collapse, but he was the final crack to the foundation.
** The movie ''does'' bother to show that one fairly important part of the park's control system failed for reasons entirely unrelated to [[spoiler:Nedry]]: [[spoiler:the dinosaurs are supposed to be kept from breeding as they are all female, but evidence is found that for [[GenderBender one reason]] or [[TrulySingleParent another]], this hasn't been that effective...]]

to:

* ''Film/XMen'':
''Film/JurassicPark''
** In both the comics and films, Magneto's intentions seem to change quite a bit, but in the comics the greater development of his background as a Holocaust survivor was generally used to make him realize he was becoming just as bad as the Nazis, and to shift him away from advocating genocide of all non-mutants. In at least the second film (the first and third leave it ambiguous) however, Magneto retains the seemingly contradictory positions of being both an advocate and a victim of genocide.
* ''Film/JurassicPark''
the movie is occasionally criticized for the film claiming its moral is about the unpredictability of nature, when it was really all [[spoiler:the programmer Nedry's]] fault. [[Literature/JurassicPark The book]] covers this by showing evidence from the park's own data that the populations were indeed out of control. [[spoiler:Nedry]] wasn't the sole cause of the collapse, but he was the final crack to the foundation.
** The movie ''does'' bother to show that one fairly important part of the park's control system failed for reasons entirely unrelated to [[spoiler:Nedry]]: [[spoiler:the dinosaurs are supposed to be kept from breeding as they are all female, but evidence is found that for [[GenderBender one reason]] or [[TrulySingleParent another]], this hasn't been that effective...]]
foundation.
3rd Aug '16 11:56:31 PM NNinja
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* ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'':
** In ''Brotherhood'', at one point in the series Envy turns into Lan Fan in order to get Ling Yao to lower his guard down and get eaten by Gluttony. In the manga, Envy personally fought the two and saw just how important she was to him, but the anime cuts this entire scene out and thus Envy never personally even encounters Ling prior to this scene. What saves it from being a complete plothole is we briefly see Envy spying on Ling and Lan Fan right before Gluttony goes crazy. This also is explained with why Envy transforms into Lan Fan masked in the manga and unmasked in the anime: in the manga when they fought she had her mask on the entire time, while in the anime it had been destroyed prior to him spying on everyone.
** During the episode where the baby gets born, Ed is furious with himself because he is useless during critical moments. This seems weird because he has no medical experience, so it shouldn't hit him that hard. Turns out, in the manga, Ed actually attempts (and fails) to build a bridge for Dominic to get the doctor. This, of course, makes more sense because it's within Ed's area of expertise.

to:

* ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'':
** In ''Brotherhood'', at one point in the series Envy turns into Lan Fan in order to get Ling Yao to lower his guard down and get eaten by Gluttony. In the manga, Envy personally fought the two and saw just how important she was to him, but the anime cuts this entire scene out and thus Envy never personally even encounters Ling prior to this scene. What saves it from being a complete plothole is we briefly see Envy spying on Ling and Lan Fan right before Gluttony goes crazy. This also is explained with why Envy transforms into Lan Fan masked in the manga and unmasked in the anime: in the manga when they fought she had her mask on the entire time, while in the anime it had been destroyed prior to him spying on everyone.
**
''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'': During the episode where the baby gets born, Ed is furious with himself because he is useless during critical moments. This seems weird because he has no medical experience, so it shouldn't hit him that hard. Turns out, in the manga, Ed actually attempts (and fails) to use alchemy to build a bridge for Dominic to get the doctor. This, of course, makes more sense because it's within Ed's area of expertise.
3rd Aug '16 11:28:44 PM NNinja
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* ''Series/TheFlash2014'': Speedforce is mentioned several times in the series but it's never really explained what it really is, leaving those who don't read the comics terribly confused.
19th Jul '16 9:39:37 AM Pichu-kun
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* In ''The Birth Of Mewtwo'' short that accompanies ''Anime/PokemonTheFirstMovie'', it's never mentioned how Amber died. In the original radio drama it was shown that Amber had died when she was hit by a car.



* In ''The Birth Of Mewtwo'' short that accompanies ''Anime/PokemonTheFirstMovie'', it's never mentioned how Amber died. In the original radio drama it was shown that Amber had died when she was hit by a car.
19th Jul '16 9:26:23 AM Pichu-kun
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* In ''The Birth Of Mewtwo'' short that accompanies ''Anime/PokemonTheFirstMovie'', it's never mentioned how Amber died. In the original radio drama it was shown that Amber had died when she was hit by a car.
2nd Jul '16 12:32:09 PM nombretomado
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* In ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}} 2'', the heroes never showcase possessing any elemental powers, until the very end when they unite them to defeat the villain. It's never explained why they don't use them in any other scene, making the ending come off as an AssPull. They have actually used up all their powers in the books that the movie entirely glosses over, and can only use them in the final scene because that's how long it took for them to "refill".

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* In ''Franchise/{{Bionicle}} ''WesternAnimation/{{Bionicle}} 2'', the heroes never showcase possessing any elemental powers, until the very end when they unite them to defeat the villain. It's never explained why they don't use them in any other scene, making the ending come off as an AssPull. They have actually used up all their powers in the books that the movie entirely glosses over, and can only use them in the final scene because that's how long it took for them to "refill".
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