History Main / AdaptationExplanationExtrication

22nd Apr '17 9:18:29 PM TheMightyHeptagon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The 1939 film version portrays the Winged Monkeys as the unquestioningly loyal servants of the Wicked Witch of the West, but never wastes any time explaining ''how'' they came into her service (the fact that they're her {{Mooks}} is presumably enough explanation for most people). But Creator/LFrankBaum's original novel, ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'', specifically explained that the Monkeys were magically bound to obey the Witch's commands because she possessed a magical golden cap that gave her power over them. It also explained that they ''weren't'' technically her Mooks, as they were only required to obey three commands from the bearer of the golden cap; the Witch used up her last command when she had the Monkeys capture Dorothy and her friends.
** [[ColorCodedForYourConvenience The significance of various colors]] was always a central part of the Oz mythos in the books, as Oz was portrayed as a society built around the celebration of color and beauty. This is why some of the most iconic elements of the story are instantly identifiable by their color: Dorothy wears [[IconicOutfit a blue gingham dress and red ruby slippers]] [[note]] Though they were silver in the book [[/note]], she travels along a yellow brick road to reach a city of green emeralds, there's a deliberate shot of a red brick road that leads in the opposite direction from the yellow brick road, and [[DeliberatelyMonochrome scenes in Oz are filmed in color while scenes in Kansas are filmed in monochrome]]. The movie retains the original book's striking use of color, but it generally doesn't explain ''why'' the various colors are significant. In the book, the Munchkins instantly trust Dorothy because she wears blue, which is the color of Munchkinland; various characters assume that Dorothy is a witch because her dress is patterned with white checks, and only sorceresses wear white; the Yellow Brick Road is yellow because it's the color of Winkie Country, the land West of Munchkinland ruled by the Wicked Witch; the Red Brick Road in Munchkinland leads to Quadling Country, whose color is red; and the Emerald City is green because it's an independent city-state that lies at the center of the four regions of Oz, and thus has its own color.

to:

** The 1939 film version portrays the Winged Monkeys as the unquestioningly loyal servants of the Wicked Witch of the West, but never wastes any time explaining ''how'' they came into her service (the fact that they're her {{Mooks}} is presumably enough explanation for most people). But Creator/LFrankBaum's original novel, ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'', specifically explained that the Monkeys were magically bound to obey the Witch's commands because she possessed a magical golden cap that gave her power over them. It also explained that they ''weren't'' technically her Mooks, as they were only required to obey three commands from the bearer of the golden cap; the Witch used up her last command when she had the Monkeys capture Dorothy and her friends.
** [[ColorCodedForYourConvenience The significance of various colors]] was always a central part of the Oz mythos in the books, as Oz was portrayed as a society built around the celebration of color and beauty. This is why some of the most iconic elements of the story are instantly identifiable by their color: Dorothy wears [[IconicOutfit a blue gingham dress and red ruby slippers]] [[note]] Though they were silver in the book [[/note]], she travels along a yellow brick road to reach a city of green emeralds, there's a deliberate shot of a red brick road that leads in the opposite direction from the yellow brick road, and [[DeliberatelyMonochrome scenes in Oz are filmed in color while scenes in Kansas are filmed in monochrome]]. The movie retains the original book's striking use of color, but it generally doesn't explain ''why'' the various colors are significant. In the book, the Munchkins instantly trust Dorothy because she wears blue, which is the color of Munchkinland; various characters assume that Dorothy is a witch because her dress is patterned with white checks, and only sorceresses wear white; the Yellow Brick Road is yellow because it's the color of it leads to Winkie Country, the Country (the land West of Munchkinland ruled by the Wicked Witch; Witch), whose color is yellow; the Red Brick Road in Munchkinland leads to Quadling Country, whose color is red; and the Emerald City is green because it's an independent city-state capital city that lies at the center of the four regions of Oz, and thus has its own color.color.
** Some viewers might wonder why everyone in Oz seems to accept the Wizard as the ruler of the Emerald City so casually, since he's an outsider who wasn't even born in Oz, and there must have been someone else ruling the Emerald City before he dropped in. For that matter, his departure can cause a bit of FridgeHorror when you think about the fact that he's essentially leaving a ''power vacuum'' in the capital of Oz, with no apparent plans to appoint a successor. The novel (and its sequels) explained both points: he named the Scarecrow as his successor before he left Oz, and it was later revealed that the previous ruler of Oz was a benevolent king named Pastoria who died shortly before the Wizard arrived, while his daughter Princess Ozma mysteriously vanished soon afterward. [[note]] The TwistEnding of ''Literature/TheMarvelousLandOfOz'' reveals that Ozma had her memories erased by an evil witch named Mombi, who transformed her into a young boy named "Tip" to hide her identity. Once Tip is unmasked as Ozma and turned back, she assumes the throne in the Emerald City again.[[/note]]
20th Mar '17 6:09:29 AM NNinja
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''Film/HarryPotter'' films from the third one onwards are full of these. One major reason why this series is so guilty of this is that the book series was still ongoing while the films were being made, so the scriptwriters had no idea what bits might provide pertinent background for future events... but an explanation being needed in the very same book/film certainly didn't stop them from leaving it out.
** In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheChamberOfSecrets'', Harry, hiding in a cupboard in a Diagon Alley shop, overhears a conversation that becomes crucial in a later book. In [[Film/HarryPotterAndTheChamberOfSecrets the movie]], he still enters the shop, gets his arm caught by one of the shop's products, and then immediately leaves, making the scene rather pointless. Harry does overhear the conversation in the extended version of the film.
** ''Film/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban'':
*** The movie adaptation of never bothered to explain that the Marauders were [[spoiler:James Potter, Remus Lupin, Sirius Black, and Peter Pettigrew]]. This makes Lupin's sudden knowledge of exactly what the Marauder's Map does inexplicable, as well as Sirius instantly knowing what the map is when it's brought up later on in the film. Besides, it leaves the map itself a silly unexplained plot device out of nowhere instead of something perfectly intertwined in the rest of the story. Harry dropping Sirius' nickname in the 5th film (as well as Pettigrew being called by his) also comes out of nowhere without the Marauder backstory.
*** The movie also never explains how Sirius Black escaped from Azkaban, but leaves in that it's a mystery how he escaped, as no one else ever has.
** ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'':
*** The only witness who can corroborate Harry's account of [[spoiler:Voldemort returning]] is Barty Crouch Jr. In the book, the malicious/incompetent Minister for Magic [[spoiler:brings a dementor to defend him, which [[FateWorseThanDeath sucks out Crouch's soul]]]]. Harry is disbelieved for most of the fifth book. In the film, this isn't brought up, leading a savvy viewer to wonder why nobody believes Harry.
*** Additional one is the fact that Harry gets his winnings from the Triwizard Tournament then gives them to the twins because "people are going to need a laugh soon." This gives them the funding for the (otherwise dirt poor) Weasleys to start the shop once they quit school. With the films they just suddenly manage to make enough in a few short months to have a big shop already established in Diagon Alley.
*** The film also leaves out the scoring for the first Triwizard task, but leaves it in for the second. As a result, non-readers may be confused when Harry is said to be tied for first place at the beginning of the third task, as earlier he was only said to have come in second place. In the books, Harry scored higher than Cedric in the first task, but lower than him in the second, causing them to tie when the two scores were averaged. Presumably this is true in the film as well, but it's not explained.
** ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'':
*** The Dementors attacking Harry at the beginning of the book is largely suspected to be thanks to Voldemort commanding them now, only to be revealed that Umbridge sent them - hoping to silence Harry or discredit him further. In the film, Umbridge never confesses to it - though Imelda Staunton does look quite guilty when delivering her line about Dumbledore suggesting a Ministry member ordering the attack. So it's never said who sent the Dementors after Harry.
*** Mr. Weasley is shown taking Harry to the Ministry of Magic by way of an elevator disguised as a phone booth. This seems to be an odd and impractical way to get there, especially since as soon as they step out of the elevator, people are shown [[TeleportersAndTransporters Apparating]] and using Floo Powder to arrive at the Ministry. In the book, it's explained that Mr. Weasley thought, since Harry is up on charges of illegally using magic, arriving at the Ministry in as non-magical a way as possible would give a good first impression.
*** There a scene where Harry & co. are rounded up by Draco and his goons in Professor Umbridge's office. In the book, Neville, Luna, and Ginny cause a ruckus as a distraction in the group's thought-out plan to sneak Harry into the office, but in the movie they outright skip the planning scenes and don't even hint at the trio's involvement. Draco simply brings them in, says "we caught 'em", without an explanation as to why they were caught.
** ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheHalfBloodPrince'':
*** Strangely inverted at the end when Snape reveals -- with every bit of dramaticism Alan Rickman can muster -- that he is, in fact, the half-blood prince whose annotated potions textbook Harry had been learning from on the side. While this does explain the way he's able to save Draco from a spell that Harry would think nobody would know, the film leaves out the follow-up scene in which Snape asks Harry for his potions textbook, which clues the audience in beforehand that Snape at least knows about the existence of the Half Blood Prince's book and instead, the audience is left wondering just why he's so damn ''serious'' about such a thing. That's because it's basically mentioned once in the movie; in the book the search for who the "prince" really is acts as the ''main subplot'', getting quite nearly as much time as the main plot itself.
*** Several scenes which explained Voldemort's background are missing, in particular, the scenes relating to which items he made into Horcruxes, making the nature of the Horcruxes in the subsequent movies seem much more random. There also isn't a lot of explanation to why Dumbledore [[spoiler:knew a horcrux would be lurking in that cave in the Half-Blood Prince film. Yes, a photo of the very cave is seen in Tom Riddle's childhood thus why Dumbledore would logically suspect its correct hiding place, but it's easy to miss and the "field trip" is not touched upon.]]
** ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'':
*** In the seventh film the question Lupin asks Harry to make sure he's not an impostor (what creature was in his office when Harry first visited) doesn't really make sense since Harry isn't shown in Lupin's office until the very end of the 3rd film and they spend all their scenes together out walking in the forest.
*** The movies never explain that Sirius willed his house - and by extension Kreacher - to Harry. So there's no explanation in ''Deathly Hallows Part 1'', when Kreacher obeys Harry's every command (despite his clear distaste for Ron and Hermione). Of course, if the director of ''Order of the Phoenix'' had cut Kreacher entirely as he originally intended, it would have made the scene even ''more'' incomprehensible to people unfamiliar with the books... According to Potter lore, J.K. Rowling intervened during the development of the fifth film, cryptically telling the director--and by extension, readers--that Kreacher would be pivotal to the at-the-time-unreleased seventh book and needed to be kept in the movie.
*** The shard of the mirror Harry broke in the end of the book of ''Order of the Phoenix'' magically appears in the final films and is every bit as useful as it was in the books - but with no prior explanation.
*** At the beginning of the eighth film, which adapted the second half of the seventh book, the main characters attempt to break into the wizard bank Gringotts by having Hermione impersonate Bellatrix Lestrange using Polyjuice Potion. At the end of the previous film, they had defeated Bellatrix and obtained her wand (which can work like ID in the wizarding world). In the book, it's explained that the Gringotts staff probably know that Bellatrix was attacked and ask Hermione for her wand as a trap (if she has it, it proves that she's a fake Bellatrix). In the film, this is not explained at all, but there is still a huge amount of dramatic tension when the Gringotts goblin asks for the wand, leaving the viewer to wonder why everyone is acting worried when they clearly recovered the wand at the end of the last film.
*** The films do explain the connection between Harry's wand and Voldemort's, but leave out Dumbledore's speculation that this connection had extended beyond the wands and to their users, causing Harry's wand to "recognize" Voldemort and defend Harry against him. This can leave movie viewers wondering why Voldemort's attempt to subvert the connection by using Lucius Malfoy's wand instead of his own didn't work.


Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/EdgeOfTomorrow'' soldiers use variety of guns but Rita Vrataski uses CoolSword instead. Why is she and only she using melee weapon is never explained. ''LightNovel/AllYouNeedIsKill'' from which the movie was adapted explains why. Guns have limited ammo which means no matter how good Rita will get she can only kill so much aliens in a single battle, and melee weapon removes this limitation. On the other hand it's DifficultButAwesome to use and the only reason why Rita is capable of using it effectively is because she was stuck in GroundhogDayLoop and had as much time to train as she wanted.
14th Mar '17 7:50:54 AM NightShade96
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Films -- Live-Action
** ''AdaptationExplanationExtrication/HarryPotter''
13th Mar '17 7:49:50 PM Salmobook
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Happens ''twice'' in the film version of ''Anime/HowlsMovingCastle:''

to:

* Happens ''twice'' multiple times in the film version of ''Anime/HowlsMovingCastle:''


Added DiffLines:

** In the movie, there is a peculiar and extremely intelligent dog that follows Sophie around. The dog was extremely significant in the book, but all of its plot relevance was shuffled into a minor book character, and it was left in the movie as just a weird dog.
** The book has a very clear explanation for Howl's mysterious background and odd personality quirks, [[spoiler:He's from Wales in the 1980s.]] In the movie, this is totally ignored.
12th Mar '17 4:41:40 PM NightShade96
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/GameOfThrones''
** In [[Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire the books]], Khal Drogo removes Mirri Maz Dur's poultice, relies on the Dothraki healers instead, and his wound gets infected. This lends some credibility to Mirri, who criticized the Dothraki methods. In the TV series, they use Mirri's method, Drogo gets infected anyway, and Danaerys still trusts her to heal him. [[spoiler:It's even heavily hinted that Mirri wanted him to die]]. It all makes Dany seem naive and oddly trusting of someone she knows little about.
** In the second season, The Hound offers to help Sansa escape while he's fleeing the city. She refuses, as she does in the books. In the books her situation is less perilous and she already has a plot to escape of her own. In the show, however, she has no other alternative, so there's no motive for her to refuse so out of hand.
** The Three-eyed Crow tells Bran that he has been watching over him with "a thousand eyes and ''one''," despite having two eyes rather than one.
** Daenerys names her dragons in honour of her late husband and brothers: Drogon (Drogo), Rhaegal (Rhaegar), and Viserion (Viserys), but this never comes up in the show.
** In the books, Barristan catches up to Daenerys at the end of her extended stay in Qarth, after word of her presence has spread extensively along the trade routes. In the show, she's just arrived in Astapor, making it a much more ContrivedCoincidence that Barristan happens to be there, especially since Astapor is only a backwater port for slaves while the heavy traffic to and from Qarth goes by way of New Ghis.
** If Craster seems overly offended by Karl simply calling him a "bastard" in "And Now His Watch Is Ended" it's because the show does not establish it as his BerserkButton by characterizing him as the resentful BastardBastard of a Night's Watch ranger as the books do.
** In "Kissed By Fire", Jaime refuses milk of the poppy for his surgery without offering an explanation. In the books (and the DVDCommentary) it's explained that Jaime doesn't trust Qyburn not to beg forgiveness rather than permission and take his whole arm off while he's incapacitated.
** In Season 3, Robb declares Walder Frey the only lord with the reinforcements he needs despite there being no on-screen reference to the Freys being anywhere but with Robb since joining him in Season 1. By contrast, the books make the Frey withdrawal after Robb's marriage a notable event in several viewpoints.
** The show hasn't yet gotten around to explaining who actually sent the assassin in "The Kingsroad", leaving one of the major instigating events of the story unresolved.
** In the books, the Unsullied are assigned new vermin names every day, which makes Grey Worm associating the name he drew the day he was freed with freedom and luck a bit more plausible than in the show where the names are never explained as anything more than standard slave names one would normally associate with the pains of slavery.
** While Tormund is presumably settling his people in the Gift, Dolorous Edd and more importantly Ghost are inexplicably absent when Jon is attacked in "Mother's Mercy". In the books, Edd is away serving as steward of Long Barrow and Jon has locked Ghost up to keep him from attacking the skinchanger Borroq's boar.
12th Mar '17 4:40:45 PM NightShade96
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

[[index]]
* Live-Action TV
** ''AdaptationExplanationExtrication/GameOfThrones''
[[/index]]
19th Feb '17 10:29:43 PM Gamermaster
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In the manga of ''Manga/MissKobayashisDragonMaid'', Tohru used magic to make the necessary paperwork for Kanna to go to school. The anime cut out this scene, [[AdaptationExpansion instead opting for a sequence of the two of them and Kobayashi going out to buy school supplies]].
10th Feb '17 2:15:23 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''BraveStory,'' Wataru (the main character) and Mitsuru (TheRival) are both racing to reach the place called the Tower of the Goddess and receive a wish from her. In TheFilmOfTheBook, it's never explicitly explained why it's important who gets there first, or if it is. In the book, it's much clearer: [[spoiler:Whoever makes it last will be sacrificed to keep the land of Vision in existence.]]

to:

* In ''BraveStory,'' ''Literature/BraveStory,'' Wataru (the main character) and Mitsuru (TheRival) are both racing to reach the place called the Tower of the Goddess and receive a wish from her. In TheFilmOfTheBook, it's never explicitly explained why it's important who gets there first, or if it is. In the book, it's much clearer: [[spoiler:Whoever makes it last will be sacrificed to keep the land of Vision in existence.]]
31st Jan '17 10:32:26 AM kingjello
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Inverted in ''Reunion and Trunabout''. In the case Phoenix's friend, Maya, who is a spirit medium, is accused of murdering her client while being possesed by a spirit she was supposed to channel. Turns out [[spoiler: the girl she was supposed to channel, Mimi Miney was actually alive and killed the client to keep it a secret, while Maya's [[EvilAunt aunt Morgan]], whose help was nessecary to pull this off, wanted Maya framed to get the position of the master of their clan.]] This however leads to FridgeLogic: [[spoiler: While Mimi had much to lose if it was found out she was alive it wasn't as much as a sentence for murder, and if she didn't know what kind of person Morgan is, how did she know she wouldn't turn her over to the police the moment she asks her for help with murder?]] Anime version of events explains this: [[spoiler: She didn't. Mimi's plan was to bribe Morgan into faking the channeling and it was ''Morgan'' who made Mimi into accomplice by threatening to reveal the fact that Mimi was alive. Since Morgan knew that Mimi was desperate to keep it secret she could have known Mimi would comply]]

to:

** Inverted in ''Reunion and Trunabout''. In the case Phoenix's friend, Maya, who is a spirit medium, is accused of murdering her client while being possesed by a spirit she was supposed to channel. Turns out [[spoiler: the girl she was supposed to channel, Mimi Miney was actually alive and killed the client to keep it a secret, while Maya's [[EvilAunt aunt Morgan]], whose help was nessecary to pull this off, wanted Maya framed to get the position of the master of their clan.]] This however leads to FridgeLogic: [[spoiler: While Mimi had much to lose if it was found out she was alive it wasn't as much as a sentence for murder, and if she didn't know what kind of person Morgan is, was, how did she know she wouldn't turn her over to the police the moment she asks asked her for help with the murder?]] Anime version of events explains this: [[spoiler: She didn't. Mimi's plan was to bribe Morgan into faking the channeling and it was ''Morgan'' who made Mimi into an accomplice by threatening to reveal the fact that Mimi was alive. Since Morgan knew that Mimi was desperate to keep it a secret she could would have known Mimi would comply]]
31st Jan '17 10:29:28 AM kingjello
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the beginning of ''Turnabout Big Top'' Phoenix is shown wearing pink sweater with huge heart and Ryu[[labelnote:Note]] short for Ryuichi, [[DubNameChange his japaneese name]][[/labelnote]] written on it. Since Phoenix was never shown to be fond of pink or cute things it may leave the viewer wondering why would he even have such thing. [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyTrialsAndTribulations The third game]](which wasn't adapted) shows why: the sweater was a handmade present from his first girlfriend.

to:

** In the beginning of ''Turnabout Big Top'' Phoenix is shown wearing pink sweater with huge heart and Ryu[[labelnote:Note]] short for Ryuichi, [[DubNameChange his japaneese name]][[/labelnote]] written on it. Since Phoenix was never shown to be fond of pink or cute things it may leave the viewer wondering why he would he even have such a thing. [[VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyTrialsAndTribulations The third game]](which wasn't adapted) shows why: the sweater was a handmade present from his first girlfriend.
This list shows the last 10 events of 431. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AdaptationExplanationExtrication