History Literature / WarAndPeace

11th Jul '17 10:35:12 PM jamespolk
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* CaliforniaDoubling: This version was shot in Italy - being an American production during UsefulNotes/TheColdWar, filming in Russia wasn't really an option.
11th Jul '17 10:34:15 PM jamespolk
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* CaliforniaDoubling: This version was shot in Italy - being an American production during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, filming in Russia wasn't really an option

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* CaliforniaDoubling: This version was shot in Italy - being an American production during the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, UsefulNotes/TheColdWar, filming in Russia wasn't really an optionoption.
* CallBack: As the French are pulling out of Moscow, a fancy Russian lady is riding away in a fancy carriage. Pierre contemptuously compares such army groupies to the lice that have to stick around a dog. A later scene shows soldiers struggling to get the fancy Russian lady's fancy carriage through a field of thick soupy mud. Still later, after the snows have come, we see the fancy carriage stuck in a drift. A soldier opens the door to the carriage and the frozen corpse of the Russian lady tumbles out.
* OffIntoTheDistanceEnding: Ends with Pierre and Natasha walking away arm in arm through the grounds of the Rostov estate in Moscow, having found each other again.
* SnowMeansDeath: It certainly does for the straggling remnant of the French army retreating from Moscow. The retreat, which had already become difficult, becomes harrowing as the cold of winter arrives, and corpses start getting left behind in the snow.




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* YouKnowWhatToDo: Dolokhov says this word for word to his men as they are leading some bedraggled French prisoners away. Shots ring out offscreen as the Russians execute the prisoners.
10th Jul '17 11:05:26 AM jamespolk
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The book was adapted to film several times. The 1956 American version, directed by Creator/KingVidor, starring Creator/AudreyHepburn as Natasha and Creator/HenryFonda as Count Bezukhov, cut out a lot of things so it was "only" 208 minutes long. The [[Film/{{War and Peace|1966}} Soviet version made in the 1960s]] by Creator/SergeiBondarchuk (who also starred as Pierre) was more accurate. It was released in four parts in 1966 and 1967, with a total running time of 431 minutes. With inflation taken into account, it's the most expensive film in history. The version released in the United States in 1968 was cut down to about 5 1/2 hours; it won the UsefulNotes/AcademyAwardForBestForeignLanguageFilm, setting a record for "longest movie to win an Oscar" that lasted until ''Film/OJMadeInAmerica'' won the award for Documentary Feature for 2016.

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The book was adapted to film several times. The 1956 American version, directed by Creator/KingVidor, starring Creator/AudreyHepburn as Natasha and Creator/HenryFonda as Count Bezukhov, cut out a lot of things so it was "only" 208 minutes long. The [[Film/{{War and Peace|1966}} Soviet version made in the 1960s]] by Creator/SergeiBondarchuk (who also starred as Pierre) was more accurate. It was released in four parts in 1966 and 1967, with a total running time of 431 minutes. With inflation taken into account, it's the most expensive film in history. The version released in the United States in 1968 was cut down to about 5 1/2 hours; it won the UsefulNotes/AcademyAwardForBestForeignLanguageFilm, setting a record for "longest movie to win an Oscar" that lasted until ''Film/OJMadeInAmerica'' won the award for Documentary Feature for 2016.\n



* ThatRussianSquatDance: Apparently upper-class Russians do it doo, as seen at a drunken party attended by Pierre early in the film.

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* ThatRussianSquatDance: Apparently upper-class Russians do it doo, too, as seen at a drunken party attended by Pierre early in the film.
10th Jul '17 8:57:08 AM jamespolk
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The book was adapted to film several times. The 1956 American version, directed by Creator/KingVidor, starring Creator/AudreyHepburn as Natasha and Creator/HenryFonda as Count Bezukhov, cut out a lot of things so it was "only" 208 minutes long. The Soviet version made in the 1960s by Creator/SergeiBondarchuk (who also starred as Pierre) was more accurate. It was released in four parts in 1966 and 1967, with a total running time of 431 minutes. With inflation taken into account, it's the most expensive film in history. The version released in the United States in 1968 was cut down to about 5 1/2 hours; it won the UsefulNotes/AcademyAwardForBestForeignLanguageFilm, setting a record for "longest movie to win an Oscar" that lasted until ''Film/OJMadeInAmerica'' won the award for Documentary Feature for 2016.

to:

The book was adapted to film several times. The 1956 American version, directed by Creator/KingVidor, starring Creator/AudreyHepburn as Natasha and Creator/HenryFonda as Count Bezukhov, cut out a lot of things so it was "only" 208 minutes long. The [[Film/{{War and Peace|1966}} Soviet version made in the 1960s 1960s]] by Creator/SergeiBondarchuk (who also starred as Pierre) was more accurate. It was released in four parts in 1966 and 1967, with a total running time of 431 minutes. With inflation taken into account, it's the most expensive film in history. The version released in the United States in 1968 was cut down to about 5 1/2 hours; it won the UsefulNotes/AcademyAwardForBestForeignLanguageFilm, setting a record for "longest movie to win an Oscar" that lasted until ''Film/OJMadeInAmerica'' won the award for Documentary Feature for 2016.



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!!Tropes unique to the 1966-67 film:

* AbandonedArea: Moscow, after almost everyone evacuates in Part IV. Bits of paper drift through empty streets.
* BreakingTheFourthWall: Pierre has a little bit of a breakdown while being held by the French in Part IV, going LaughingMad for a bit and ranting straight at the camera about how the French are holding not only him but his "immortal soul".
* {{Cliffhanger}}: Part II ends with a bang, as the domestic drama of Pierre, Natasha, and Andrei is suddenly swept aside by the French invading Russia in 1812.
* DutchAngle: Seen in moments of emotional distress. In Part I the camera tilts and sways repeatedly during Pierre's duel with Dolokhov. In Part III the camera is tilting around again when the French are marching through a burning village. In Part IV this is used multiple times during the chaotic sack and burning of Moscow.
* EpicMovie: Cripes. Filming lasted for four years. Bondarchuk had 12,000 extras for the battle scenes. The original Russian version was originally released in four parts in 1966 and 1967. The four parts are:
** Part I: Andrei Bolkonsky (released March 1966)
** Part II: Natasha Rostova (July 1966)
** Part III: 1812 (July 1967)
** Part IV: Pierre Bezhukov (November 1967)
* EpicTrackingShot: Natasha's entrance into her first grand ball is accompanied with a shot of a little over 2 1/2 minutes in which the camera swoops into, out of, and around the main ballroom. This appears to have been done with trickery, as people pass in front of the camera multiple times in ways that could hide a cut.
* GorgeousPeriodDress: Bondarchuk did not stint in his recreation of early 19th century Russian aristocratic life.
* ImmediateSequel: Part III begins exactly where Part II left off, with the same scene in fact; Napoleon's horde crossing the river into Russia in June 1812.
* ImpairmentShot: A POV shot in Part I from the perspective of dying Count Kyrill has the picture blurring in and out.
* MatchCut: Between an angry Pierre turning away from Anatol, and Andrei turning back to Pierre as he returns Natasha's letters.
* ScareChord: Heard in Part I when General Mack shows up unexpectedly at the Russian HQ. This turns out to be very bad news--Mack's Austrian army has been captured at the battle of Ulm, which means the Russians are screwed.
* SplitScreen: Used by Bondarchuk many times.
** Used in Part I for an ImagineSpot in which Andrei Bolkonsky imagines himself winning glory in battle and being hailed by the troops.
** Part II kicks off with a three-way split screen that shows Napoleon and Alexander I meeting in a barge in the Neman River to sign the 1807 Treaty of Tilsit, while their armies watch from each bank.
** Another split screen for the Part II scene in which Andrei and Natasha are both proclaiming their love for each other after the ball.
** A split screen in Part II when Anatol is explaining his plan to run away with Natasha while she sleeps on the other side of the screen.
** Part IV has a split screen shot showing the many horrors Pierre sees as Moscow burns--a hanged man, a man being shot by firing squad, statuses being pulled down, churches burning, French soldiers looting a wine cellar.
* StaggeredZoom: For the introduction of Natasha (Ludmila Savelyeva).
9th Jul '17 6:52:26 PM jamespolk
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* ThatRussianSquatDance: Apparently upper-class Russians do it doo, as seen at a drunken party attended by Pierre early in the film.
9th Jul '17 6:36:42 PM jamespolk
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* SpreadingDisasterMapGraphic: The very first shot is a graphic showing Napoleon's france taking over Western Europe.
18th May '17 8:47:54 PM Prinzenick
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* CompressedAdaptation: By necessity, the film adaptations all greatly streamline and simplify the story as much as possible to make it remotely filmable.

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* CompressedAdaptation: By necessity, the film adaptations all greatly streamline and simplify the story as much as possible to make it remotely filmable.filmable, and some of them ''still'' have exceedingly long runtimes.
18th May '17 8:46:30 PM Prinzenick
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Added DiffLines:

* CompressedAdaptation: By necessity, the film adaptations all greatly streamline and simplify the story as much as possible to make it remotely filmable.
3rd May '17 2:34:11 PM Ciara25
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* BrotherSisterIncest: Between Helene and Anatole.

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* BrotherSisterIncest: Between Hinted between Helene and Anatole.Anatole, as much as Tolstoy possibly could in the nineteenth century. Flat-out shown in the 2016 version, where Anatole comes in to wake Helene up, then climbs into bed with her. "Oh, that feels nice, do that again."
11th Apr '17 10:33:41 AM CarolC
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* AlasPoorVillain: Despite all that she's done, the viewer still feels deeply for Helene in the 2016 version when she becomes pregnant thanks to an extra-marital affair, is utterly shunned by St. Petersburg society, [[spoiler: and either mistakenly takes too much abortifacient or deliberately commits suicide.]] Upon learning of this, Pierre acknowledges the [spoiler: tragedy of her dying alone].

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* AlasPoorVillain: Despite all that she's done, the viewer still feels deeply for Helene in the 2016 version when she becomes pregnant thanks to an extra-marital affair, is utterly shunned by St. Petersburg society, [[spoiler: and either mistakenly takes too much abortifacient or deliberately commits suicide.]] Upon learning of this, Pierre acknowledges the [spoiler: [[spoiler: tragedy of her dying alone].alone]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.WarAndPeace