History Literature / ThePrimeOfMissJeanBrodie

14th Sep '16 7:17:10 AM fearlessnikki
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AdaptationalContextChange:
** Jean's nightdress being discovered in Mr Lowther's bed happens further along in the novel, and it's found by two teachers who try to use it to discredit her. In the film, it's found earlier by the girls during a weekend at Crammond - and it's more light-hearted, with the girls giggling about it.
** Jean Brodie's BadassBoast about her ancestor Willie Brodie has a different effect in the film. In the book, she casually tells the girls about him during one of their afternoon teas. In the film, she [[spoiler: shouts it at Sandy after discovering she's betrayed her]].



* AdaptationalVillainy: [[spoiler: Sandy's betrayal of Jean in the film appears to be partially motivated by jealousy, and she calls her out epically for it, giving her a ReasonYouSuckSpeech towards the end. In the book, she remains at Jean's side until her death, and Jean never finds out who betrays her]].



* HeelFaceDoorSlam: [[spoiler: An almost literal example. Sandy runs to Jean's house with news of Mary's death and bangs frantically on the door. Jean, who had been in the shower, does not hear her and Sandy is gone by the time she comes to the door. This serves as the final time Sandy goes to Jean for help, and she betrays her shortly afterwards.]]



* IntimateOpenShirt: Teddy Lloyd wears his shirt like this in his studio where he paints Jean, and later has an affair with Sandy.



* LonelyRichKid: The wealthy orphan Mary [[=McGregor=].

to:

* LonelyRichKid: The wealthy orphan Mary [[=McGregor=].[=McGregor=]. The other girls are in shock when they hear how much money she gets from the bank.



* OohMeAccentsSlipping: Pamela Franklin's Scottish accent slips in her climactic scene with Jean. Especially the line "you professed to be a great admirer of conquerors".



** Teddy Lloyd is a stand-in for Miss Brodie's first love, Hugh, who died during the Great War (although it's possible he is only a figment of her romantic imagination). Despite a genuine attraction to Teddy, however, Jean refuses to get involved with him and uses Mr. Lowther as a substitute.
*** The Hugh character certainly seems more like a fiction in the film, with every description of him reflecting Lowther and Lloyd, since Brodie seems quite youthful (Smith being 35) to have really been having a long full blown affair with someone in 1917.

to:

** Teddy Lloyd is a stand-in for Miss Brodie's first love, Hugh, who died during the Great War (although it's possible he is only a figment of her romantic imagination). Despite a genuine attraction to Teddy, however, Jean refuses to get involved with him and uses Mr. Lowther as a substitute.
***
substitute. The Hugh character certainly seems more like a fiction in the film, with every description of him reflecting Lowther and Lloyd, since Brodie seems quite youthful (Smith being 35) to have really been having a long full blown affair with someone in 1917.



* TheReasonYouSuckSpeech: Sandy to Brodie.

to:

* TheReasonYouSuckSpeech: Sandy dishes them out both to Brodie.Teddy Lloyd and [[spoiler: Jean Brodie after she's betrayed her]].



* TurnCoat - Sandy. She has her reasons, however.

to:

* TurnCoat - Sandy. She TurnCoat: [[spoiler: Sandy betrays Jean after Mary has her reasons, however.gotten killed and she's seen Teddy for who he really is]].
17th Aug '16 5:50:00 AM aft85
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** The Hugh character certainly seems more like a fiction in the film, with every description of him reflecting Lowther and Lloyd, since Brodie seems quite youthful (Smith being 35) to have really been having a long full blown affair with someone in 1917.
22nd Apr '16 6:39:28 AM fearlessnikki
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AssimilationAcademy: Marcia Blaine School is an interesting example as its conservatism is somewhat diminished in the face of Brodie's fascism.
** This is played up in the film: where the grey uniforms and interiors of Marcia Blaine are contrasted with Brodie's colourful outfits.

to:

* AmbiguouslyGay: Sandy at times thinks Jean might be a lesbian, since she doesn't marry Mr Lowther.
* AnachronicOrder: The story is told in flashback. As the events at Marcia Blaine progress linearly, the fates of the Brodie Set are revealed before the ending.
* AssimilationAcademy: Marcia Blaine School is an interesting example as its conservatism is somewhat diminished in the face of Brodie's fascism.
**
fascism. This is played up in the film: where the grey uniforms and interiors of Marcia Blaine are contrasted with Brodie's colourful outfits.



* DeceptiveDisciple: Sandy.

to:

* CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass: Discussed. At one point Jean considers that Mary [=McGregor=] was the one who betrayed her, after years of being their scapegoat. A few of them say "I should have been nicer to Mary."
* DeceptiveDisciple: Sandy. Even after betraying Miss Brodie, she still keeps in contact with her.



* TheDitz: Poor Mary [=McGregor=]

to:

* TheDitz: Poor Mary [=McGregor=][=McGregor=].



* {{Foreshadowing}}: In a chemistry lesson, Mary gets scared and runs around from flame to flame. This foreshadows her eventual death in a hotel fire where she can't find her way out - at the age of twenty-four.



* HotTeacher: Mr. Lowther and Mr. Lloyd certainly seem to think so. Mr. Lloyd himself falls into this trope, with several of the girls swooning over him

to:

* HotTeacher: Mr. Lowther and Mr. Lloyd certainly seem to think so. Mr. Lloyd himself falls into this trope, with several of the girls swooning over himhim. Mr Lowther gets some of this as well, with Sandy and Jenny having a couple of sexual fantasies about him.



* OneGenderSchool

to:

* OneGenderSchoolNotWhatItLooksLike: Jean assumes that Teddy is painting Rose because they will soon begin an affair. Teddy merely finds Rose a good model, and she only poses because she needs the money.
* OneGenderSchool: As such, the girls fantasise about the two male teachers rather than students.



*** Joyce Emily fits this in later episodes; heck, she even dies trying to curry Brodie's favour.

to:

*** ** Joyce Emily fits this in later episodes; heck, she even dies trying to curry Brodie's favour.



* AdaptationalHeroism: As noted under LighterAndSofter below, Jean Brodie is a bit more sympathetic in the film. It's shown she unambiguously cares for the girls, does not bully any of them and treats them as surrogate daughters. [[spoiler: Her dismissal at the end]] is presented as a somewhat tragic thing.

to:

* AdaptationalHeroism: AdaptationExplanationExtrication: Miss Brodie says to Sandy of Teddy "you know his religion" as a way to discourage her. This makes more sense in the book, which emphasises the school's Calvinist teachings. Part of Sandy's attraction to Teddy is because he's Roman Catholic and she eventually converts to become a nun herself. In the film, these elements are downplayed.
* AdaptationalContextChange:
** Jean's nightdress being discovered in Mr Lowther's bed happens further along in the novel, and it's found by two teachers who try to use it to discredit her. In the film, it's found earlier by the girls during a weekend at Crammond - and it's more light-hearted, with the girls giggling about it.
** Jean Brodie's BadassBoast about her ancestor Willie Brodie has a different effect in the film. In the book, she casually tells the girls about him during one of their afternoon teas. In the film, she [[spoiler: shouts it at Sandy after discovering she's betrayed her]].
* AdaptationalHeroism:
**
As noted under LighterAndSofter below, Jean Brodie is a bit more sympathetic in the film. It's shown she unambiguously cares for the girls, does not bully any of them and treats them as surrogate daughters. [[spoiler: Her dismissal at the end]] is presented as a somewhat tragic thing.thing.
** Miss [=McKay=] is far more manipulative in the novel, where she tries to weasel information out of the girls at several instances. She tries to even make up slanderous rumours about Jean - such as her being an alcoholic - which she does not in the film.



* CompositeCharacter: The film removes Joyce and Rose, giving their storylines to Mary and Jenny.

to:

* CompositeCharacter: CompositeCharacter:
**
The film removes Joyce and Rose, giving their storylines to Mary and Jenny.Jenny. Monica is also merged with Eunice. Mary meanwhile gets to be the one who sees Jean and Teddy kissing instead of Monica.
** Miss Gaunt becomes combined with the Kerr sisters, who investigate Miss Brodie against her will. As does Miss Lockhart, taking the Kerr sisters' roles as the one who doesn't disapprove of Miss Brodie.


Added DiffLines:

* FourGirlEnsemble: With the set down to four girls in the film, they fall into these roles initially. Mary is the childish one, Jenny the pretty one, Monica the mannish one and Sandy the wise one. But eventually Mary's naivete [[spoiler: gets her killed]], Jenny doesn't become a great lover as Miss Brodie predicted and Sandy [[spoiler: has an affair with Teddy and betrays Miss Brodie]].


Added DiffLines:

* TheGhost:
** Mary's delinquent brother who never appears on-screen. He provides motivation for [[spoiler: Mary to run off to Spain and eventually get killed]].
** Teddy Lloyd's wife Deirdre. She appears in the book, where Sandy has tea at her house, but is offscreen in the film.
24th Mar '16 7:22:49 AM fearlessnikki
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DownerEnding

to:

* DownerEndingDownerEnding: [[spoiler: One of the girls has died, Jean Brodie is fired from the school and all her pupils have their lives wrecked due to her influence. She goes her whole life never knowing who betrayed her; only on her deathbed does she consider that it could have been Sandy]].



* AdaptationalHeroism: As noted under LighterAndSofter below, Jean Brodie is a bit more sympathetic in the film. It's shown she unambiguously cares for the girls, does not bully any of them and treats them as surrogate daughters. [[spoiler: Her dismissal at the end]] is presented as a somewhat tragic thing.



* BettyAndVeronica:
** Male example - Jean Brodie's two suitors are the kind and down-to-earth Gordon Lowther (Betty) and the sexy artist Teddy Lloyd (Veronica).
** Jean herself is the Veronica to Sandy's Betty, where Teddy Lloyd is concerned.



* BrokenBird: Sandy
* BrutalHonesty: Teddy Lloyd, when he tells Miss Brodie that she is a frustrated schoolmarm with dangerous delusions of grandeur. He is also brutally honest about himself when he calls himself a second rate artist.

to:

* BrokenBird: Sandy
Sandy becomes broken and cynical as a result of [[spoiler: Teddy painting Jean's face on her body, Mary getting killed and finally realising what kind of person Jean really is]].
* BrutalHonesty: BrutalHonesty:
**
Teddy Lloyd, when he tells Miss Brodie that she is a frustrated schoolmarm with dangerous delusions of grandeur. He is also brutally honest about himself when he calls himself a second rate artist.



* FieryRedhead: Jean Brodie.

to:

* FieryRedhead: ExpositoryHairstyleChange: Sandy has bobbed hair at the start of the film. As she gets older and wiser, her hair grows longer. It's past shoulder-length by the end.
* FieryRedhead:
**
Jean Brodie.Brodie - red haired and determined. She's quite quick to fire up at the headmistress.



* GirlishPigtails: Sweet and naive Mary has her hair always in pigtails.



* HufflepuffHouse: With the Brodie Set down to four girls, Sandy has her place as Jean's most trusted girl, Jenny is the one to be painted by Teddy, Mary is TheWoobie [[spoiler: who gets killed]] and Monica has no role whatsoever. Possibly for this reason, Jean first assumes that Monica is the one who betrayed her.



* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: The ending shot shows Sandy walking down the street, tears slowly falling down her face. It implies [[spoiler: she knows that betraying Jean was a NecessaryEvil, but she still feels guilt over it]].



*** Miss Brodie appoints her favorite girl Jenny (red-haired like herself) to be her proxy as far as Teddy Lloyd is concerned (bluntly lampshaded when he accuses her of trying to put Jenny in his bed in her place). When Jenny is no longer in her class, she chooses Clara, also red-haired, to replace Jenny, and even confuses the two of them when she has an emotional breakdown in class.
**** Mr Lowther when he tires of being strung alone by Miss Brodie transfers his interested to Miss Lockhart, the chemistry teacher.
***** Teddy Lloyd uses Sandy as a substitute model and lover for Miss Brodie, much to her hurt and anger when she catches on.

to:

*** ** Miss Brodie appoints her favorite girl Jenny (red-haired like herself) to be her proxy as far as Teddy Lloyd is concerned (bluntly lampshaded when he accuses her of trying to put Jenny in his bed in her place). When Jenny is no longer in her class, she chooses Clara, also red-haired, to replace Jenny, and even confuses the two of them when she has an emotional breakdown in class.
**** ** Mr Lowther when he tires of being strung alone by Miss Brodie transfers his interested to Miss Lockhart, the chemistry teacher.
***** ** Teddy Lloyd uses Sandy as a substitute model and lover for Miss Brodie, much to her hurt and anger when she catches on.


Added DiffLines:

* SkewedPriorities: Sandy calls Jean out on this towards the end, where she worries about things in this order - a) someone has betrayed her, b) who will be her proxy in Teddy's love affair, and c) [[spoiler: Mary's death]].
--> "Are you aware of the order of importance in which you place your anxieties?"
26th Dec '15 2:44:41 AM Trippetta
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* LighterAndSofter: The character Jean Brodie is somewhat toned down compared to how she was in the novel. In the book she continually bullies and is a fan of Hitler as as well as Mussolini.
* nLonelyRichKid: The wealthy orphan Mary [[=McGregor=].

to:

* LighterAndSofter: The character Jean Brodie is somewhat toned down compared to how she was in the novel. In the book she continually bullies Mary and is a fan of Hitler as as well as Mussolini.
* nLonelyRichKid: LonelyRichKid: The wealthy orphan Mary [[=McGregor=].
26th Dec '15 2:43:05 AM Trippetta
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HighSchoolDance: Featuring a gramophone, a punch bowl, dozens of senior girls in white dresses, beige stockings and black heels, but no males except for a handful of male teachers.


Added DiffLines:

* HighSchoolDance: Featuring a gramophone, a punch bowl, dozens of senior girls in white dresses, beige stockings and black heels, but no males except for a handful of male teachers.
26th Dec '15 2:41:22 AM Trippetta
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* HighSchoolDance: Featuring a gramophone, a punch bowl, dozens of senior girls in white dresses, beige stockings and black heels, but no males except for a handful of male teachers.
26th Dec '15 2:34:50 AM Trippetta
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheVoiceless: Miss Gaunt, the mousy but rather sinister secretary of Miss McKay who enlists her in her effort to bring down Miss Brodie.

to:

* TheVoiceless: Miss Gaunt, the mousy but rather sinister secretary of Miss McKay [=McKay=] who enlists her in her effort to bring down Miss Brodie.
26th Dec '15 2:29:26 AM Trippetta
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* LighterAndSofter: The character Jean Brodie is somewhat toned down compared to how she was in the novel. In the book she continually bullies Mary McGregor and is a fan of Hitler as as well as Mussolini.
* nLonelyRichKid: The wealthy orphan Mary McGregor.

to:

* LighterAndSofter: The character Jean Brodie is somewhat toned down compared to how she was in the novel. In the book she continually bullies Mary McGregor and is a fan of Hitler as as well as Mussolini.
* nLonelyRichKid: The wealthy orphan Mary McGregor.[[=McGregor=].
26th Dec '15 2:27:39 AM Trippetta
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* LonelyRichKid: The wealthy orphan Mary McGregor.

to:

* LonelyRichKid: LighterAndSofter: The character Jean Brodie is somewhat toned down compared to how she was in the novel. In the book she continually bullies Mary McGregor and is a fan of Hitler as as well as Mussolini.
*nLonelyRichKid:
The wealthy orphan Mary McGregor.
This list shows the last 10 events of 29. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.ThePrimeOfMissJeanBrodie