History Literature / LettersToHisSon

28th May '15 11:53:49 AM VenomLancerHae
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* CommonSense: "Common sense (which, in truth, very uncommon) is the best sense I know of: abide by it, it will counsel you best. Read and hear, for your amusement, ingenious systems, nice questions subtilly agitated, with all the refinements that warm imaginations suggest; but consider them only as exercitations for the mind, and turn always to settle with common sense." (letter 52)
28th May '15 11:46:57 AM VenomLancerHae
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* EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench: Also in German. "'das, der donner [sic] dich erschlage'[[note]]That the thunder shall strike you down[[/note]], must no doubt, make a tremendously fine piece of 'recitativo', when uttered by an angry hero, to the rumble of a whole orchestra, including drums, trumpets, and French horns." (letter 207)

to:

* EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench: Also Scarier in German. "'das, der donner [sic] dich erschlage'[[note]]That the thunder shall strike you down[[/note]], must no doubt, make a tremendously fine piece of 'recitativo', when uttered by an angry hero, to the rumble of a whole orchestra, including drums, trumpets, and French horns." (letter 207)
28th May '15 11:45:34 AM VenomLancerHae
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* UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution: Mentioned in the latest letters. Note that the Earl was opposed to the infamous Stamp Act which angered the Americans so much and pointed out that this new tax may at best raise 80000 pounds, but the costs caused by reduced trade would be over a million. (He even underestimated the latter number - the real sum would turn out to be almost two millions--to say nothing of the untold millions that Britain might have reaped had the Colonies remained loyal.)



* {{Cloudcuckoolander}} / AbsentMindedProfessor: What he didn't recommend to be in high society. "Sir UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton, Mr. Locke, and (it may be) five or six more, since the creation of the world, may have had a right to absence, from that intense thought which the things they were investigating required." (letter 1)

to:

* {{Cloudcuckoolander}} / AbsentMindedProfessor: {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: What he didn't recommend to be in high society. "Sir UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton, Mr. Locke, and (it may be) five or six more, since the creation of the world, may have had a right to absence, from that intense thought which the things they were investigating required." (letter 1)



* UsefulNotes/{{Deism}}: "The object of all the public worships in the world is the same; it is that great eternal Being who created everything." (letter 29)
** Lord Bolingbroke also was this: "He professes himself a deist; believing in a general Providence, but doubting of, though by no means rejecting (as is commonly supposed) the immortality of the soul and a future state." (letter 95)



* [[EducationMama Education Papa]]: He expected his son to learn not only Latin and Greek, but to speak the important languages of the continent - that is, French, German, Spanish and Italian - as well as his native language. Not like the average speaker, but at the level of a courtier - with spirit and perfect manners. Also, he should have a foundation in geography and history. And know the basics of various arts and sciences, like architecture, geometry, astronomy, logic... And know about the important parts of economy of the various countries, their political/judicial systems and military. Or rather, gather these informations by himself while in other countries. After all, he expected his son to become a minister one day. Note: His son was ''fourteen'' when he left Britain. Also note that the Earl did ''not'' expect his son to learn to play a musical instrument, deeming this as below a gentleman's dignity. TakeThat, Amy Chua!

to:

* [[EducationMama Education Papa]]: EducationMama: He expected his son to learn not only Latin and Greek, but to speak the important languages of the continent - that is, French, German, Spanish and Italian - as well as his native language. Not like the average speaker, but at the level of a courtier - with spirit and perfect manners. Also, he should have a foundation in geography and history. And know the basics of various arts and sciences, like architecture, geometry, astronomy, logic... And know about the important parts of economy of the various countries, their political/judicial systems and military. Or rather, gather these informations by himself while in other countries. After all, he expected his son to become a minister one day. Note: His son was ''fourteen'' when he left Britain. Also note that the Earl did ''not'' expect his son to learn to play a musical instrument, deeming this as below a gentleman's dignity. TakeThat, Amy Chua!



* [[EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench Everything Sounds Scarier in German]]: "'das, der donner [sic] dich erschlage'[[note]]That the thunder shall strike you down[[/note]], must no doubt, make a tremendously fine piece of 'recitativo', when uttered by an angry hero, to the rumble of a whole orchestra, including drums, trumpets, and French horns." (letter 207)

to:

* [[EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench Everything Sounds Scarier EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench: Also in German]]: German. "'das, der donner [sic] dich erschlage'[[note]]That the thunder shall strike you down[[/note]], must no doubt, make a tremendously fine piece of 'recitativo', when uttered by an angry hero, to the rumble of a whole orchestra, including drums, trumpets, and French horns." (letter 207)



* UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat: Mentioned and praised as the ablest prince in Europe.



* HumansAreBastards / HumansAreFlawed: "In the mass of mankind, I fear, there is too great a majority of fools and, knaves; who, singly from their number, must to a certain degree be respected, though they are by no means respectable. And a man who will show every knave or fool that he thinks him such, will engage in a most ruinous war, against numbers much superior to those that he and his allies can bring into the field. Abhor a knave, and pity a fool in your heart; but let neither of them, unnecessarily, see that you do so." (letter 60)

to:

* HumansAreBastards / HumansAreFlawed: HumansAreBastards: "In the mass of mankind, I fear, there is too great a majority of fools and, knaves; who, singly from their number, must to a certain degree be respected, though they are by no means respectable. And a man who will show every knave or fool that he thinks him such, will engage in a most ruinous war, against numbers much superior to those that he and his allies can bring into the field. Abhor a knave, and pity a fool in your heart; but let neither of them, unnecessarily, see that you do so." (letter 60)



* Creator/JonathanSwift: Recommended by the Earl.



* ThePope: The son meets the current one.
** "The popes, who have generally been both the ablest and the greatest knaves in Europe, wanted all the power and money of the East; for they had all that was in Europe already." (Letter 185)



* Creator/LaRochefoucauld: Mentioned very positively in letter 32.



* UsefulNotes/SevenYearsWar: Often mentioned during the later letters (203 to 254)



* Creator/{{Voltaire}}: The Earl read his writings, enjoyed them and was in contact with him.
23rd Apr '15 3:54:13 AM jormis29
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* FrederickTheGreat: Mentioned and praised as the ablest prince in Europe.

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* FrederickTheGreat: UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat: Mentioned and praised as the ablest prince in Europe.
22nd Apr '15 11:35:22 PM jormis29
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* SevenYearsWar: Often mentioned during the later letters (203 to 254)

to:

* SevenYearsWar: UsefulNotes/SevenYearsWar: Often mentioned during the later letters (203 to 254)
5th Apr '15 8:26:32 PM Angeldeb82
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* [[EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench Everything Sounds Scarier In German]]: "'das, der donner [sic] dich erschlage'[[note]]That the thunder shall strike you down[[/note]], must no doubt, make a tremendously fine piece of 'recitativo', when uttered by an angry hero, to the rumble of a whole orchestra, including drums, trumpets, and French horns." (letter 207)

to:

* [[EverythingSoundsSexierInFrench Everything Sounds Scarier In in German]]: "'das, der donner [sic] dich erschlage'[[note]]That the thunder shall strike you down[[/note]], must no doubt, make a tremendously fine piece of 'recitativo', when uttered by an angry hero, to the rumble of a whole orchestra, including drums, trumpets, and French horns." (letter 207)



* EvilStepmother: Conversed. "For my part, I never saw a froward child mended by whipping; and I would not have the mother country become a stepmother." (letter 283)



* ForeignCussWord: "merde". He must have considered this the equivalent of a PrecisionFStrike today.

to:

* ForeignCussWord: "merde"."Merde". He must have considered this the equivalent of a PrecisionFStrike today.



** AltumVidetur



** GratuitousLatin



* TheUnSmile: "both men and women upon whom unkind nature has inflicted a surliness and ferocity of countenance, do at least all they can, though often without success, to soften and mitigate it; they affect 'douceur', and aim at smiles, though often in the attempt, like [[ParadiseLost the Devil in Milton]], they GRIN HORRIBLY A GHASTLY SMILE." (letter 189)

to:

* TheUnSmile: "both men and women upon whom unkind nature has inflicted a surliness and ferocity of countenance, do at least all they can, though often without success, to soften and mitigate it; they affect 'douceur', and aim at smiles, though often in the attempt, like [[ParadiseLost [[Literature/ParadiseLost the Devil in Milton]], they GRIN HORRIBLY A GHASTLY SMILE." (letter 189)


Added DiffLines:

* WickedStepmother: Conversed. "For my part, I never saw a froward child mended by whipping; and I would not have the mother country become a stepmother." (letter 283)
30th Oct '14 11:19:21 AM Patachou
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* CaligulasHorse: Discussed. "He [=the Cardinal de Retz] is persuaded that when Caligula made his horse a Consul, the people of Rome, at that time, were not greatly surprised at it, having necessarily been in some degree prepared for it, by an insensible gradation of extravagances from the same quarter." (letter 50)

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* CaligulasHorse: Discussed. "He [=the Cardinal de Retz] is persuaded that when Caligula UsefulNotes/{{Caligula}} made his horse a Consul, the people of Rome, at that time, were not greatly surprised at it, having necessarily been in some degree prepared for it, by an insensible gradation of extravagances from the same quarter." (letter 50)



* {{Cloudcuckoolander}} / AbsentMindedProfessor: What he didn't recommend to be in high society. "Sir Isaac Newton, Mr. Locke, and (it may be) five or six more, since the creation of the world, may have had a right to absence, from that intense thought which the things they were investigating required." (letter 1)

to:

* {{Cloudcuckoolander}} / AbsentMindedProfessor: What he didn't recommend to be in high society. "Sir Isaac Newton, UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton, Mr. Locke, and (it may be) five or six more, since the creation of the world, may have had a right to absence, from that intense thought which the things they were investigating required." (letter 1)



* InsistentTerminology: The Earl refers to MariaTheresa generally as "the Queen of Hungary".

to:

* InsistentTerminology: The Earl refers to MariaTheresa UsefulNotes/MariaTheresa generally as "the Queen of Hungary".



** The Earl describes the ArabianNights as "Oriental ravings and extravagances".

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** The Earl describes the ArabianNights Literature/ArabianNights as "Oriental ravings and extravagances".



** "I love 'la belle nature'; Rembrandt paints caricatures" (letter 142)

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** "I love 'la belle nature'; Rembrandt UsefulNotes/RembrandtVanRijn paints caricatures" (letter 142)
26th Jun '14 6:14:59 AM LongLiveHumour
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* LikeAnOldMarriedCouple: "the Duke of Newcastle and [[WilliamPittTheElder Mr. Pitt]] jog on like man and wife; that is, seldom agreeing, often quarreling; but by mutual interest, upon the whole, not parting." (letter 221)

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* LikeAnOldMarriedCouple: "the Duke of Newcastle and [[WilliamPittTheElder [[UsefulNotes/WilliamPittTheElder Mr. Pitt]] jog on like man and wife; that is, seldom agreeing, often quarreling; but by mutual interest, upon the whole, not parting." (letter 221)
15th Jan '14 3:33:15 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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* TheAmericanRevolution: Mentioned in the latest letters. Note that the Earl was opposed to the infamous Stamp Act which angered the Americans so much and pointed out that this new tax may at best raise 80000 pounds, but the costs caused by reduced trade would be over a million. (He even underestimated the latter number - the real sum would turn out to be almost two millions--to say nothing of the untold millions that Britain might have reaped had the Colonies remained loyal.)

to:

* TheAmericanRevolution: UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution: Mentioned in the latest letters. Note that the Earl was opposed to the infamous Stamp Act which angered the Americans so much and pointed out that this new tax may at best raise 80000 pounds, but the costs caused by reduced trade would be over a million. (He even underestimated the latter number - the real sum would turn out to be almost two millions--to say nothing of the untold millions that Britain might have reaped had the Colonies remained loyal.)



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25th Dec '13 2:21:06 PM LongLiveHumour
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** In a certain way, this: "What can be more adorned than {{Cicero}}'s Philosophical Works? What more than {{Plato}}'s? It is their eloquence only that has preserved and transmitted them down to us through so many centuries; for the philosophy of them is wretched, and the reasoning part miserable." (letter 200)

to:

** In a certain way, this: "What can be more adorned than {{Cicero}}'s Creator/{{Cicero}}'s Philosophical Works? What more than {{Plato}}'s? Creator/{{Plato}}'s? It is their eloquence only that has preserved and transmitted them down to us through so many centuries; for the philosophy of them is wretched, and the reasoning part miserable." (letter 200)
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