History Literature / HeartOfDarkness

17th Sep '16 11:57:24 AM jamespolk
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* EvilColonialist: All the Belgians committing unspeakable atrocities in the Congo. Kurtz isn't that much worse than the rest.
21st Aug '16 9:29:06 PM Ploopyandproud
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* HumanSacrifice: The "unspeakable rites" that Kurtz takes part in are suggested to be this, although Marlow isn't explicit about it.
23rd Jun '16 11:39:03 PM PaulA
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* AntiHero: Marlow.



* DarkestAfrica: Marlow subverts the trope by telling his audience that "this also...has been one of the dark places of the earth," referring to Britain. The ancient Romans, he says, must have regarded Britain as a "savage" land where colonists had to be "men enough to face the darkness".

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* DarkestAfrica: ''Heart of Darkness'' codifies and partly names it. Marlow subverts the trope by telling his audience that "this also...has been one of the dark places of the earth," referring to Britain. The ancient Romans, he says, must have regarded Britain as a "savage" land where colonists had to be "men enough to face the darkness". While it was seen then and now as an anti-colonialist book, author Creator/ChinuaAchebe criticized Conrad for using Africa as a background to project the VillainousBreakdown of a European man while portraying Africans as a stereotypical "other".



* GoneMadFromTheRevelation: Kurtz's reaction to the jungle, and to the darkness it has revealed within himself, definitely qualifies.

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* GoneMadFromTheRevelation: GoMadFromTheRevelation: Kurtz's reaction to the jungle, and to the darkness it has revealed within himself, definitely qualifies. himself.
27th Feb '16 6:21:55 AM Lusketrollet
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* MightyWhitey: Subverted. In spades.
22nd Feb '16 6:08:34 PM MasoTey
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* StartOfDarkness: Marlow, who has claimed that he detests lies, lies to the Brickmaker to help Kurtz (whom he didn't even know), but then feels regret and realizes that he's not different from the 'Pilgrims'. At the end, however, he notices that nothing bad happened after he deceived Kurtz's fiancee, after all...
29th Jan '16 7:56:27 AM ComingSecond
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** As well as [[NobleSavage incredibly tolerant]], given the Company doesn't pay or even feed them. Marlow himself cannot fathom why they don't revolt and eat the crew, given they are slowly starving the entire time.
3rd Jan '16 3:20:47 PM SantosLHalper
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The novella went on to inspire or serve as the [[Film/ApocalypseNow base]] [[VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine of]] [[Film/AguirreTheWrathOfGod countless]] [[VideoGame/FarCry2 other]] [[Literature/ThingsFallApart works]], and has long been held as the archetypal anti-colonialist novel for its harsh depictions of the exploitative "grab for Africa" policies used by European powers.

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The novella went on to inspire or serve as the [[Film/ApocalypseNow base]] [[VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine of]] [[Film/AguirreTheWrathOfGod countless]] [[VideoGame/FarCry2 other]] [[Literature/ThingsFallApart works]], and has long been held as the archetypal anti-colonialist novel for its harsh depictions of the exploitative "grab "Scramble for Africa" policies used by European powers.of the late 19th century.
6th Dec '15 5:44:30 AM JakesBrain
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-->To tear treasure out of the bowels of the land was their desire, with no more moral purpose at the back of it than there is in burglars breaking into a safe.
6th Dec '15 5:41:32 AM JakesBrain
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The book starts in the 19th century with five close friends on a boat in the Thames river just outside London, waiting for the tide to go out. As they fill the time with pleasant conversation, one of them suddenly speaks of how the very land they are on was once "one of the dark places of the earth" i.e. how the island of Great Britain was once savage, untamed, and incredibly inhospitable to all who entered. He goes on to explain how he got to know this darkness, along with its effect on people, so incredibly well. It all started when he was just starting out as a seaman... This serves as a FramingDevice for the tale of woe.

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The book starts in the 19th century with five close friends on a boat in the Thames river just outside London, waiting for the tide to go out. As they fill the time with pleasant conversation, one of them suddenly speaks of how the very land river they are on was once "one of the dark places of the earth" earth," i.e. how the island of Great Britain was once savage, untamed, and incredibly inhospitable to all who entered.outsiders. He goes on to explain how he got to know this darkness, along with its effect on people, so incredibly well. It all started when he was just starting out as a seaman... This serves as a FramingDevice for the tale of woe.



* CharacterFilibuster: A seventy-page novella with sixty-four pages being pure, uninterrupted dialogue from Marlow. Justified though, since none of the others felt like talking at all during their gloomy trip, not even to interrupt Marlow, and might as well have been asleep. The format of the book is essentially him telling the story anyway.

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* CharacterFilibuster: A seventy-page novella with sixty-four pages being pure, uninterrupted dialogue from Marlow. Justified though, since none of the others felt like talking at all during their the gloomy trip, evening, not even to interrupt Marlow, and might as well have been asleep. The format of the book is essentially him telling the story anyway.



* DarkestAfrica: Marlow subverts the trope by telling his audience that "this also...has been one of the dark places of the earth" referring to Britain. The ancient Romans, he says, must have regarded Britain as a "savage" land where colonists had to be "men enough to face the darkness".

to:

* DarkestAfrica: Marlow subverts the trope by telling his audience that "this also...has been one of the dark places of the earth" earth," referring to Britain. The ancient Romans, he says, must have regarded Britain as a "savage" land where colonists had to be "men enough to face the darkness".



-->But this must have been before his—let us say—nerves, went wrong, and caused him to preside at certain midnight dances ending with unspeakable rites, which—as far as I reluctantly gathered from what I heard at various times—were offered up to him—do you understand?—to Mr. Kurtz himself.

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-->But this must have been before his—let his -- let us say—nerves, say -- nerves, went wrong, and caused him to preside at certain midnight dances ending with unspeakable rites, which—as which -- as far as I reluctantly gathered from what I heard at various times—were times -- were offered up to him—do him -- do you understand?—to understand? -- to Mr. Kurtz himself.


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-->But the wilderness had found him out early, and had taken on him a terrible vengeance for the fantastic invasion. I think it had whispered to him things which he did not know, things of which he had no conception till he took counsel with this great solitude -- and the whisper had proved irresistibly fascinating. It echoed loudly within him because he was hollow at the core [...] his soul was mad. Being alone in the wilderness, it had looked within itself, and by heavens! I tell you, it had gone mad.
7th Nov '15 5:27:34 AM JakesBrain
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The book starts in the 19th century with five close friends on a boat in the Thames river just outside London, waiting for the tide to go out. As they fill the time with pleasant conversation, one of them suddenly speaks of how the very land they are on was once "one of the dark places on earth" i.e. how the land was once savage, untamed, and incredibly inhospitable to all who entered. He goes on to explain how he got to know this darkness, along with its effect on people, so incredibly well. It all started when he was just starting out as a seaman... This serves as a FramingDevice for the tale of woe.

to:

The book starts in the 19th century with five close friends on a boat in the Thames river just outside London, waiting for the tide to go out. As they fill the time with pleasant conversation, one of them suddenly speaks of how the very land they are on was once "one of the dark places on of the earth" i.e. how the land island of Great Britain was once savage, untamed, and incredibly inhospitable to all who entered. He goes on to explain how he got to know this darkness, along with its effect on people, so incredibly well. It all started when he was just starting out as a seaman... This serves as a FramingDevice for the tale of woe.



** One character describes a French attempt to quash rebellious locals. They used a warship to bombard open brush, regardless of the fact that they didn't even know of anyone hiding in it, basically shelling the continent itself.

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** One character describes a French attempt to quash rebellious locals. They used a warship to bombard open brush, regardless of the fact that they didn't even know of whether anyone was hiding in it, basically shelling the continent itself.it. Marlow describes them as aimlessly "firing into a continent."



* ClothingReflectsPersonality: Every single major person Marlowe encounters as he goes upriver has worse and worse clothing to reflect the increasing divisions from European society and civility. While the Chief Accountant at the outer station wears fancy and rich clothing, Kurtz is nearly naked.

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* ClothingReflectsPersonality: Every single major person Marlowe Marlow encounters as he goes upriver has worse and worse clothing to reflect the increasing divisions from European society and civility. While the Chief Accountant at the outer station wears fancy and rich clothing, Kurtz is nearly naked.



* DarkestAfrica: Marlow subverts the trope by telling his audience that "this also...has been one of the dark places of the earth" referring to Britain. The ancient Romans, he says, regarded Britain as a "savage" land where colonists had to be "men enough to face the darkness".

to:

* DarkestAfrica: Marlow subverts the trope by telling his audience that "this also...has been one of the dark places of the earth" referring to Britain. The ancient Romans, he says, must have regarded Britain as a "savage" land where colonists had to be "men enough to face the darkness".



* {{Foil}}: Kurtz is in the story for only a short time and there's little to suggest his motivations or internal conflicts. However, his presence easily adds much more insight to Marlowe's character.

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* {{Foil}}: Kurtz is in the story for only a short time and there's little to suggest his motivations or internal conflicts. However, his presence easily adds much more insight to Marlowe's Marlow's character.



* GoneMadFromTheRevelation: Kurtz's reaction to the jungle definitely qualifies.

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* GoneMadFromTheRevelation: Kurtz's reaction to the jungle jungle, and to the darkness it has revealed within himself, definitely qualifies.



* InfallibleNarrator: Marlowe remembers every single detail of his voyage, and the events before and after it, despite his story taking place over at least a few months.
* InformedAbility: Everyone who meets Kurtz can speak of him only in the most hyperbolic praise. He's a genius without equal and has a mesmerizing presence that causes people to worship and adore him (see below). However, none of this is actually demonstrated to the reader, so you just have to take their word for it.

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* InfallibleNarrator: Marlowe Marlow remembers every single detail of his voyage, and the events before and after it, despite his story taking place over at least a few months.
* InformedAbility: Everyone who meets Kurtz can speak of him only in the most hyperbolic praise. He's a genius without equal and has a mesmerizing presence that causes people to worship and adore him (see below). However, none of this is actually demonstrated to the reader, so you just have to take their word for it. Marlow doesn't even bother trying to quote most of Kurtz's delirious ramblings in the last days of his life; he settles for summarizing them, here and there.



* SympathyForTheDevil: Marlow respects Kurtz even after seeing his misdeeds.

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* SympathyForTheDevil: Marlow respects Kurtz can't help respecting Kurtz, even after seeing his misdeeds.



* WhamLine: "The last word he pronounced was - your name."

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* WhamLine: "The last word he pronounced was - -- your name."
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