History Literature / Carrie

28th Aug '16 10:00:17 PM ritzoreo
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ForegoneConclusion: In the first half of the book, the narration lets us know that there will be a tragedy and that at the very least Margaret White shall be dead (but not Sue Snell).
23rd Aug '16 5:01:17 PM gewunomox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** DaveGrohl's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDrNbc2OCZY Ice Bucket Challenge]].

to:

** DaveGrohl's Music/DaveGrohl's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDrNbc2OCZY Ice Bucket Challenge]].
24th Jul '16 11:00:35 AM SamuraiGal
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Carrie isn't EVIL, she was abused and mistreated her whole life and finally reached the breaking point.
23rd Jun '16 8:53:43 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* StockShoutOut: It's in ''TinyToonAdventures'' of all things!

to:

* StockShoutOut: It's in ''TinyToonAdventures'' ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' of all things!
23rd Jun '16 8:53:39 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** TinyToonAdventures had a scene where Shirley the Loon gets a bowl of red punch dropped on her. Babs worriedly cites the movie right before Shirley unleashes child-friendly telekinetic hell on the older students who were embarrassing them.

to:

** TinyToonAdventures ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' had a scene where Shirley the Loon gets a bowl of red punch dropped on her. Babs worriedly cites the movie right before Shirley unleashes child-friendly telekinetic hell on the older students who were embarrassing them.
27th Apr '16 7:20:37 PM jdemmer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DeadlyPrank: It ends up being this for almost the entire high school. In the TV remake, Tommy dies when the bucket falls on his head before Carrie's revenge even starts; in the book (and possibly the movie), he's only knocked unconscious, but dies with the rest of the students in the fire.
** In the '13 movie, [[spoiler:it's implied he died when the bucket hit him.]]

to:

* DeadlyPrank: It ends up being this for almost the entire high school. In the TV remake, Tommy dies when the bucket falls on his head before Carrie's revenge even starts; in the book (and possibly the movie), he's only knocked unconscious, but dies with the rest of the students in the fire.
** In the '13 movie, [[spoiler:it's implied he died when the bucket hit him.]]
starts.
20th Mar '16 12:46:45 PM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The 1999 sequel ''Film/TheRageCarrie2''.
* A [[MadeForTVMovie made-for-TV]] {{remake}} [[Film/{{Carrie 2002}} was made in 2002]]. This adaptation (written by Creator/BryanFuller and starring Creator/AngelaBettis, Creator/PatriciaClarkson, and Creator/EmilieDeRavin) stayed closer to King's novel than the 1976 film did -- with the exception of the ending, which the creators intended to [[PilotMovie lead into an NBC series]] that never happened. The film mirrors the novel's [[ScrapbookStory use of after-the-fact articles]] to tell its story; most of the film takes place in flashbacks while the police interview what few survivors remain after Carrie's rampage. Despite its obvious low budget, ConspicuousCG, and radically altered ending, this film has its share of fans. In some way, this version could perhaps be compared to the 1997 MiniSeries remake of ''Literature/TheShining'', though King wasn't involved with this one.

to:

* The 1999 sequel ''Film/TheRageCarrie2''.
''Film/TheRageCarrie2'' starred Emily Bergl and Jason London, and had Amy Irving reprise her role as Sue Snell. Set over twenty years after the original film, it has a new teen outcast, Rachel Lang, use her powers to get revenge on a group of {{Jerk Jock}}s who had [[DrivenToSuicide bullied her friend Lisa into killing herself]], while Sue, now a guidance counselor who remembers what had happened before, tries to stop things from getting out of control. A DolledUpInstallment (it was originally written as a standalone film called ''The Curse''), it met a poor reception from critics and was mostly forgotten at the box office, though it does have something of a cult fandom nowadays.
* A [[MadeForTVMovie made-for-TV]] {{remake}} [[Film/{{Carrie 2002}} was made in 2002]]. This adaptation (written by Creator/BryanFuller and starring Creator/AngelaBettis, Creator/PatriciaClarkson, and Creator/EmilieDeRavin) stayed closer to King's novel than the 1976 film did -- with the exception of the ending, which the creators intended to [[PilotMovie lead into an NBC series]] that never happened. The film mirrors the novel's [[ScrapbookStory use of after-the-fact articles]] to tell its story; most of the film takes place in flashbacks while the police interview what few survivors remain after Carrie's rampage. Despite its obvious low budget, ConspicuousCG, and radically altered ending, this film has its share of fans. In some way, this version could perhaps be compared to the 1997 MiniSeries remake of ''Literature/TheShining'', ''Literature/TheShining'' in terms of trying to be more faithful to the source material, though King wasn't involved with this one.
12th Mar '16 11:19:26 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''Carrie'' launched Stephen King's career and became a bestseller, but the film version arguably had the greater impact. Critics regard De Palma's adaptation as a landmark film, one of the best horror films of TheSeventies, and one of the best feature film adaptations of any of King's stories, to the point where King himself [[CreatorPreferredAdaptation feels that it's better than the book]]. The film became a major success for United Artists, as it ended up making over $33 million at the U.S. box office on a budget of just $1.8 million. The ending is notable for being perhaps the first use of a "shock" ending in a horror film, which has since become a staple of the genre. Film critics welcomed ''Carrie'' with immense acclaim ([[SciFiGhetto unusual for a horror film]] even today), which may have helped it gain two UsefulNotes/{{Academy Award}} nominations[[note]]And ''not'' in the technical categories, as is often the case with "genre" films. One nomination was for Creator/SissySpacek for Best Actress, and the other was a Best Supporting Actress nod for Piper Laurie. They lost to, respectively, Faye Dunaway and Beatrice Straight from ''Film/{{Network}}''.[[/note]] and a HugoAward.

to:

''Carrie'' launched Stephen King's career and became a bestseller, but [[Film/{{Carrie 1976}} the film version version]] arguably had the greater impact. Critics regard De Palma's adaptation as a landmark film, one of the best horror films of TheSeventies, and one of the best feature film adaptations of any of King's stories, to the point where King himself [[CreatorPreferredAdaptation feels that it's better than the book]]. The film became a major success for United Artists, as it ended up making over $33 million at the U.S. box office on a budget of just $1.8 million. The ending is notable for being perhaps the first use of a "shock" ending in a horror film, which has since become a staple of the genre. Film critics welcomed ''Carrie'' with immense acclaim ([[SciFiGhetto unusual for a horror film]] even today), which may have helped it gain two UsefulNotes/{{Academy Award}} nominations[[note]]And ''not'' in the technical categories, as is often the case with "genre" films. One nomination was for Creator/SissySpacek for Best Actress, and the other was a Best Supporting Actress nod for Piper Laurie. They lost to, respectively, Faye Dunaway and Beatrice Straight from ''Film/{{Network}}''.[[/note]] and a HugoAward.



* A [[MadeForTVMovie made-for-TV]] {{remake}} was made in 2002. This adaptation (written by Creator/BryanFuller and starring Creator/AngelaBettis, Creator/PatriciaClarkson, and Creator/EmilieDeRavin) stayed closer to King's novel than the 1976 film did -- with the exception of the ending, which the creators intended to [[PilotMovie lead into an NBC series]] that never happened. The film mirrors the novel's [[ScrapbookStory use of after-the-fact articles]] to tell its story; most of the film takes place in flashbacks while the police interview what few survivors remain after Carrie's rampage. Despite its obvious low budget, ConspicuousCG, and radically altered ending, this film has its share of fans. In some way, this version could perhaps be compared to the 1997 MiniSeries remake of ''Literature/TheShining'', though King wasn't involved with this one.
* Another adaptation was released in 2013. This version was directed by Kimberly Peirce (of ''Film/BoysDontCry'' fame), written by playwright, MarvelComics scribe, and ''Series/{{Glee}}'' writer/co-producer Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, and starred Creator/ChloeMoretz, Creator/JulianneMoore, and Creator/JudyGreer. It largely pulled elements from both the novel and De Palma's film; opinion on it is largely divided as to whether it should've been based more on the book or the movie. The overall reaction is that it's not bad, exactly, though it's still very much in the shadow of the original.

to:

* A [[MadeForTVMovie made-for-TV]] {{remake}} [[Film/{{Carrie 2002}} was made in 2002.2002]]. This adaptation (written by Creator/BryanFuller and starring Creator/AngelaBettis, Creator/PatriciaClarkson, and Creator/EmilieDeRavin) stayed closer to King's novel than the 1976 film did -- with the exception of the ending, which the creators intended to [[PilotMovie lead into an NBC series]] that never happened. The film mirrors the novel's [[ScrapbookStory use of after-the-fact articles]] to tell its story; most of the film takes place in flashbacks while the police interview what few survivors remain after Carrie's rampage. Despite its obvious low budget, ConspicuousCG, and radically altered ending, this film has its share of fans. In some way, this version could perhaps be compared to the 1997 MiniSeries remake of ''Literature/TheShining'', though King wasn't involved with this one.
* Another adaptation [[Film/{{Carrie 2013}} was released in 2013.2013]]. This version was directed by Kimberly Peirce (of ''Film/BoysDontCry'' fame), written by playwright, MarvelComics scribe, and ''Series/{{Glee}}'' writer/co-producer Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, and starred Creator/ChloeMoretz, Creator/JulianneMoore, and Creator/JudyGreer. It largely pulled elements from both the novel and De Palma's film; opinion on it is largely divided as to whether it should've been based more on the book or the movie. The overall reaction is that it's not bad, exactly, though it's still very much in the shadow of the original.
9th Mar '16 8:15:08 PM GrammarNavi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Don't confuse this work with [[Music/CarrieUnderwood the country singer]] (though her video for "Before He Cheats" is a {{homage}} to the film) or two other well-known [[SexAndTheCity fictional]] [[TheKingOfQueens Carries]].

to:

Don't confuse this work with [[Music/CarrieUnderwood the country singer]] (though her video for "Before He Cheats" is a {{homage}} to the film) or two other well-known [[SexAndTheCity [[Series/SexAndTheCity fictional]] [[TheKingOfQueens [[Series/TheKingOfQueens Carries]].
27th Feb '16 9:41:31 PM Willbyr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* PersonAsVerb: At the end of the novel, it's said that "to rip off a Carrie" passed into teen slang, meaning "to commit large-scale mayhem". In RealLife, "pulling a Carrie" or "going Carrie on [something]" became synonymous with someone [[BewareTheNiceOnes going crazy]] [[WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds after being humiliated]]. This one's become [[CulturalCrossReference so well-traveled]] that it even [[http://mangafox.me/manga/kareshi_kanojo_no_jijou/v09/c041/4.html appears]] in the ''KareKano'' manga as a visual-only metaphor for someone snapping under the strain of having perfectionist, controlling parents.

to:

* PersonAsVerb: At the end of the novel, it's said that "to rip off a Carrie" passed into teen slang, meaning "to commit large-scale mayhem". In RealLife, "pulling a Carrie" or "going Carrie on [something]" became synonymous with someone [[BewareTheNiceOnes going crazy]] [[WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds after being humiliated]]. This one's become [[CulturalCrossReference so well-traveled]] that it even [[http://mangafox.me/manga/kareshi_kanojo_no_jijou/v09/c041/4.html appears]] appears in the ''KareKano'' ''Manga/KareKano'' manga as a visual-only metaphor for someone snapping under the strain of having perfectionist, controlling parents.
This list shows the last 10 events of 319. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.Carrie