History Fridge / StarWars

23rd Aug '16 9:48:10 AM WitchHatsFTW
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*** According to Wikia, the stormtrooper officer who told Vader of the political ramifications of Leia being imprisoned was highly respected by Vader. (NB: Stormtrooper officers are not always in armor and wear black uniforms.) The officer was very competent, dedicated, hardworking, and perceptive, traits which Vader (and previously Anakin) prized; he always made sure his stormtrooper squad was in tiptop shape; he was also the kinda guy to measure twice, cut only once. He also had a tendency to be very direct, even with his superiors, and he would not hesitate to point out potential problems with their plans. (Basically, he wasn't an @$$ kisser.) When he first started reporting to Vader and showed himself as being perceptive and direct, even with Vader (at times he would tell Vader about flaws in his plans), other officers who thought kissing @$$ was the way to go with Vader pronounced him a dead man walking; they were surprised when Vader later actually promoted the stormtrooper officer. As I'm sure you can tell in his personality from both the prequels and the original trilogy, Vader wasn't too much into having his @$$ kissed, but rather cared about getting the job done and getting it done right, so he liked having a highly competent, dedicated, and perceptive officer working for him, because it would minimize the risk of Vader making mistakes and, plus, that officer could get the job done. Also, although the stormtrooper officer was direct, he wasn't self-serving and arrogant like the admiral who talked back to Vader on the Death Star or Admiral Ozzel in ESB; Vader always prized his observations, because they often helped him tie up loose ends in his plans. It's a good thing for the Rebels that they didn't seem to have to encounter that stormtrooper officer or his squad again.

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*** According to Wikia, the stormtrooper officer who told Vader of the political ramifications of Leia being imprisoned was highly respected by Vader. (NB: Stormtrooper officers are not always in armor and wear black uniforms.) The officer was very competent, dedicated, hardworking, and perceptive, traits which Vader (and previously Anakin) prized; he always made sure his stormtrooper squad was in tiptop shape; he was also the kinda guy to measure twice, cut only once. He also had a tendency to be very direct, even with his superiors, and he would not hesitate to point out potential problems with their plans. (Basically, he wasn't an @$$ ass kisser.) When he first started reporting to Vader and showed himself as being perceptive and direct, even with Vader (at times he would tell Vader about flaws in his plans), other officers who thought kissing @$$ ass was the way to go with Vader pronounced him a dead man walking; they were surprised when Vader later actually promoted the stormtrooper officer. As I'm sure you can tell in his personality from both the prequels and the original trilogy, Vader wasn't too much into having his @$$ ass kissed, but rather cared about getting the job done and getting it done right, so he liked having a highly competent, dedicated, and perceptive officer working for him, because it would minimize the risk of Vader making mistakes and, plus, that officer could get the job done. Also, although the stormtrooper officer was direct, he wasn't self-serving and arrogant like the admiral who talked back to Vader on the Death Star or Admiral Ozzel in ESB; Vader always prized his observations, because they often helped him tie up loose ends in his plans. It's a good thing for the Rebels that they didn't seem to have to encounter that stormtrooper officer or his squad again.
29th Jul '16 6:38:01 PM Ambaryerno
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*** Rewatch the scene. Vader contacted Needa for an update immediately after the crew announced the ''Falcon'' vanished from their scopes. Needa didn't have ''time'' to personally direct a more thorough search, as Vader was demanding an update ''now''. Furthermore, he explicitly ordered his XO to continue searching the area, so he wasn't exactly giving up on it, either.
29th Jul '16 5:53:49 PM SirSapphire
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** But this brings us to Captain Needa, who by all accounts did an honorable and brave thing by apologizing to Vader in person for losing the Falcon. Normally this would look like something Vader would respect, and indeed he would, ''if Needa hadn't given up so easily.'' Needa assumed too quickly that the Falcon had gone into hyperspace or somehow cloaked the moment it disappeared from its sensors and his delay is what gave them time to hide and escape.
7th Jul '16 11:06:50 AM Ambaryerno
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** Another alternative: In the original film, Darth Vader was ''letting'' Luke's party escape so they could track them to the Rebel base. The Stormtroopers on the Death Star were missing because they were ''ordered'' to miss. Unfortunately, [[ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy it later became memetic]].
7th Jul '16 6:06:01 AM Morgenthaler
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* The graphic novel ''Jango Fett: Open Seasons'' has a rather interesting bit in the back matter where it points out all of the similarities between Jango Fett and Luke Skywalker's stories: both were born as poor farm boys on forgotten planets, both were taken in by wise mentors after the deaths of their families, and both of them rose up to lead nearly-extinct orders of warriors fighting for survival. All of those similarities become even more noticeable if you play the game ''VideoGame/StarWarsBountyHunter'', where the plot involves Jango being recruited into a galaxy-spanning adventure by [[TheObiWan a grey-bearded old Sith Lord]] fighting against [[APupilOfMineUntilHeTurnedToEvil his rogue former apprentice]].

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* The graphic novel ''Jango Fett: Open Seasons'' has a rather interesting bit in the back matter where it points out all of the similarities between Jango Fett and Luke Skywalker's stories: both were born as poor farm boys on forgotten planets, both were taken in by wise mentors after the deaths of their families, and both of them rose up to lead nearly-extinct orders of warriors fighting for survival. All of those similarities become even more noticeable if you play the game ''VideoGame/StarWarsBountyHunter'', where the plot involves Jango being recruited into a galaxy-spanning adventure by [[TheObiWan a grey-bearded old Sith Lord]] Lord fighting against [[APupilOfMineUntilHeTurnedToEvil his rogue former apprentice]].
18th May '16 10:45:48 AM CommanderVisor
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** [[Fridge/StarWarsRebels Rebels]]
7th Jan '16 8:59:27 AM Parthidens
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*Why are the Stormtroopers such terrible shots? You could put it down to Luke (and to some extent Leia) unconsciously using the Force in defence, but I think there's a more logical and simple explanation in the prequels:
**The Stormtroopers are the spiritual successors of the Clone Troopers, and the Clones had accelerated growth so they were battle-ready in a fraction of the time it would take to train up a normal army.
**Assuming that the rate of this accelerated growth stayed roughly the same, then by the time of Ep IV, the Clones would have been functionally around eighty years old. So it would make sense that the Empire started recruiting (or conscripting) ordinary, younger people for its army (and this also explains different Stormtrooper heights).
**But there's more: the Clones had already been trained by the time the Republic received them, so it's reasonable to suggest that the Republic/Empire initially had no training programme in place, and had to throw one together between Eps III and IV without knowing its true effectiveness.
**This shoddy planning was partly justified, however, since the Empire did not expect to be seriously threatened (at this point, the Separatists' armies had been deactivated, the Old Republic had been swept away, and the only major foes of the Empire were small bands of Rebels armed with clapped-out equipment), and so they could get away with having an ineffective army. All the Empire really needed to do to eliminate its enemy was put some new(ish) recruits into bulky armour and give them bigger and better weapons than the Rebels, even if those recruits were incapable of hitting the target or having any knowledge of military tactics.
6th Jan '16 8:12:47 PM Ambaryerno
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* The popular explanation for why the Prequel Trilogy duels are so much more elaborate than those of the Original Trilogy is because lightsaber combat "declined" after the fall of the Republic and destruction of the Jedi, and the full extent of the art of the lightsaber was lost. However:
** By the late Old Republic the Jedi assumed the Sith were destroyed, and there were fewer, if any, enemies the Jedi would regularly face who would use lightsabers. With the martial aspects of lightsaber combat becoming less important, the art continued to develop for the sake of the art itself. This parallels the development of longsword combat in Europe: When Liechtenauer's fechtbuch was written, the longsword was still a major battlefield weapon, and the focus of the art was on earnest combat. This is reflected by his simple, direct, and efficient style (and in fact he was outright disparaging of the flashy show-fighters of his day). However by the time of later masters such as Joachim Meyer, tournament fighting started to supplant martial and judicial combat as the focus of European swordsmanship because of the increasing presence and effectiveness of firearms. This led to a much more elaborate, flashier form of swordsmanship better-suited to entertaining crowds.
** With no further purpose for the more elaborate lightsaber arts of the late Republic, since under the Empire virtually ''no one'' was using them, this fancier style was abandoned and use of the lightsaber among the rare practitioners reverted to a much more efficient style better suited to the battlefield and personal defense, much like how Western Martial Arts today often focuses more on the earlier masters such as Liechtenauer and Fiore than the later tournament fighters. When Obi-Wan began training Luke, he taught him the older ''battlefield'' styles that would be much more effective at keeping him alive, than the elaborate techniques the Jedi developed among themselves to demonstrate their skill in the absence of any real enemies they would need to match in a duel.
5th Jan '16 12:50:26 AM NhazUl
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* Yoda's manner of speaking. By putting the subject and the modal/auxilliary verbs at the end, he makes sure that the more informative parts of the sentence come first.
28th Dec '15 7:02:26 PM TheWildWestPyro
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