History Fridge / StarWars

20th Mar '17 3:23:30 PM AFP
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** Yet another theory, implied in ''Film/RogueOne'', was that the Stormtroopers miss the heroes because The Force wills it. If The Force flows through everyone and everything and binds the universe together, that implies that it has some part to play in Fate as well.
19th Mar '17 11:48:11 AM nombretomado
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** And one line that perfectly enhances that theme is in ''ANewHope''. When Luke is disappointed to learn that Han and Chewie will not stay to help the Rebels fight the Death Star, Leia tells him that "He [Han] has got to follow his own path. No one can choose it for him." - Tropers/{{Premonition45}}

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** And one line that perfectly enhances that theme is in ''ANewHope''.''Film/ANewHope''. When Luke is disappointed to learn that Han and Chewie will not stay to help the Rebels fight the Death Star, Leia tells him that "He [Han] has got to follow his own path. No one can choose it for him." - Tropers/{{Premonition45}}



* Another thing, and this sort of combines FridgeHorror with FridgeBrilliance... in the original trilogy, Palpatine and Vader seem perfectly aware of the Force, and Vader is shown mentioning it to other Imperial officers in ANewHope, but they seem to perceive it as just another religion. However, they (or at least some of them) also seem to be aware that the Jedi were mostly wiped out, as implied by one of Tarkin's conversations with Vader, in which Tarkin says ''"you, my friend, are all that is left of their religion."'' Now think about this in light of the prequel trilogy. ''"Order 66"'' was already [[MoralEventHorizon heinous]], but we know from the context that it was at least somewhat pragmatic; Palpatine wiped out the Jedi because they were the only rivals to himself and Vader in knowledge of the force. Tarkin, however, not believing in the force, is probably unaware that this was the reason. Now think about what he said once more. ''"All that is left of their religion."'' In other words, he [[ANaziByAnyOtherName condones having people rounded up and killed for their religious beliefs]]. Sure, we knew he was bad news from the start, [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain but still]]... - [=neoYTPism=]

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* Another thing, and this sort of combines FridgeHorror with FridgeBrilliance... in the original trilogy, Palpatine and Vader seem perfectly aware of the Force, and Vader is shown mentioning it to other Imperial officers in ANewHope, ''Film/ANewHope'', but they seem to perceive it as just another religion. However, they (or at least some of them) also seem to be aware that the Jedi were mostly wiped out, as implied by one of Tarkin's conversations with Vader, in which Tarkin says ''"you, my friend, are all that is left of their religion."'' Now think about this in light of the prequel trilogy. ''"Order 66"'' was already [[MoralEventHorizon heinous]], but we know from the context that it was at least somewhat pragmatic; Palpatine wiped out the Jedi because they were the only rivals to himself and Vader in knowledge of the force. Tarkin, however, not believing in the force, is probably unaware that this was the reason. Now think about what he said once more. ''"All that is left of their religion."'' In other words, he [[ANaziByAnyOtherName condones having people rounded up and killed for their religious beliefs]]. Sure, we knew he was bad news from the start, [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain but still]]... - [=neoYTPism=]



* When Qui-Gon died in ''ThePhantomMenace'', many fans complained that he did not vanish as Obi-Wan and Yoda had, and that the revelation in ''RevengeOfTheSith'' that it was technique that Qui-Gon's Force spirit taught to them violated the original trilogy. Except that the original trilogy gives us no reason to think that this happens to all Force-users, or even that the Jedi knew about the technique before Vader's fall to the Dark Side:
** In ''ANewHope'', Vader is clearly surprised when Obi-Wan vanishes, and prods the empty robes like "Was there a trap door or something?" He was a former Jedi, and Obi-Wan's pupil, but did not expect the disappearing act.
** In ''ReturnOfTheJedi'', Anakin's body does not disappear when he dies, but he is still able to return as a Force spirit.

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* When Qui-Gon died in ''ThePhantomMenace'', ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'', many fans complained that he did not vanish as Obi-Wan and Yoda had, and that the revelation in ''RevengeOfTheSith'' that it was technique that Qui-Gon's Force spirit taught to them violated the original trilogy. Except that the original trilogy gives us no reason to think that this happens to all Force-users, or even that the Jedi knew about the technique before Vader's fall to the Dark Side:
** In ''ANewHope'', ''Film/ANewHope'', Vader is clearly surprised when Obi-Wan vanishes, and prods the empty robes like "Was there a trap door or something?" He was a former Jedi, and Obi-Wan's pupil, but did not expect the disappearing act.
** In ''ReturnOfTheJedi'', ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'', Anakin's body does not disappear when he dies, but he is still able to return as a Force spirit.



* I've been watching these movies, reading the books, and playing the video games my whole life, and I can't believe that in all that time I hadn't wondered about this much earlier. But it hit me when I was playing ''KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' and was introduced to the Wookiee named Zaalbar. If you're a Wookiee and you want to introduce yourself to a human, your ''name'' ought to sound the same in Basic as it does in Shyriiwook, right? So when somebody asks Chewbacca what his name is, and he says "Urf-rawr-growl," people are going to call him "Urf-rawr-growl," right? For people to call Chewbacca or Zaalbar "Chewbacca" and "Zaalbar", the Wookiee would need to be able to make the sounds that make up his name...right? That's how it works with other languages in the SW universe; despite speaking his own language, Greedo still distinctly says "Solo" and "Jabba" in ''ANewHope''.

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* I've been watching these movies, reading the books, and playing the video games my whole life, and I can't believe that in all that time I hadn't wondered about this much earlier. But it hit me when I was playing ''KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' and was introduced to the Wookiee named Zaalbar. If you're a Wookiee and you want to introduce yourself to a human, your ''name'' ought to sound the same in Basic as it does in Shyriiwook, right? So when somebody asks Chewbacca what his name is, and he says "Urf-rawr-growl," people are going to call him "Urf-rawr-growl," right? For people to call Chewbacca or Zaalbar "Chewbacca" and "Zaalbar", the Wookiee would need to be able to make the sounds that make up his name...right? That's how it works with other languages in the SW universe; despite speaking his own language, Greedo still distinctly says "Solo" and "Jabba" in ''ANewHope''.''Film/ANewHope''.



* In the original trilogy, Palpatine and Vader seem perfectly aware of the force, and Vader is shown mentioning it to other Imperial officers in ANewHope, but they seem to perceive it as just another religion. However, they (or at least some of them) also seem to be aware that the Jedi were mostly wiped out, as implied by one of Tarkin's conversations with Vader, in which Tarkin says ''"you, my friend, are all that is left of their religion."'' Now think about this in light of the prequel trilogy. ''"Order 66"'' was already [[MoralEventHorizon heinous]], but we know from the context that it was at least somewhat pragmatic; Palpatine wiped out the Jedi because they were the only rivals to himself and Vader in knowledge of the force. Tarkin, however, not believing in the Force, is probably unaware that this was the reason. Now think about what he said once more. ''"All that is left of their religion."'' In other words, he [[ANaziByAnyOtherName condones having people rounded up and killed for their religious beliefs]]. Sure, we know he was bad news from the start, [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain but still]]...

to:

* In the original trilogy, Palpatine and Vader seem perfectly aware of the force, and Vader is shown mentioning it to other Imperial officers in ANewHope, ''Film/ANewHope'', but they seem to perceive it as just another religion. However, they (or at least some of them) also seem to be aware that the Jedi were mostly wiped out, as implied by one of Tarkin's conversations with Vader, in which Tarkin says ''"you, my friend, are all that is left of their religion."'' Now think about this in light of the prequel trilogy. ''"Order 66"'' was already [[MoralEventHorizon heinous]], but we know from the context that it was at least somewhat pragmatic; Palpatine wiped out the Jedi because they were the only rivals to himself and Vader in knowledge of the force. Tarkin, however, not believing in the Force, is probably unaware that this was the reason. Now think about what he said once more. ''"All that is left of their religion."'' In other words, he [[ANaziByAnyOtherName condones having people rounded up and killed for their religious beliefs]]. Sure, we know he was bad news from the start, [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain but still]]...
10th Mar '17 12:12:37 AM MawofWinter
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*** There is no need for namecalling Newton. While the Star Wars does take plenty of shortcuts with overcoming the laws of Physics, nowhere (that I know of) is there mentioned that the laws of Physics are different from our world. All the spaceships in Star Wars setting have artificial gravity for crew comfort, they serve a specific purpose. Those artificial gravity generators don't exist just because. What exactly would be the purpose of putting an artificial gravity generator into a lightsaber just to prevent it from jerking a little when the blade shuts down while not being held? That would be quite a vanity modification highly uncharacteristic of the jedi.
9th Mar '17 9:13:32 AM Ambaryerno
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*** You do realize you're talking a setting with a technology level so high that it makes Newton their bitch, right? We see the ''Falcon'', X-wings, and TIE fighters carrying out maneuvers at speeds which ''should'' reduce their crews to a fine paste on the inside of their cockpits.
9th Mar '17 8:00:48 AM MawofWinter
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*** Lightsaber's blade cannot be several pounds. There have been instances of lightsaber blades retracting into the hilt while no one was holding it, sometimes rather quickly. If the blade having a mass of several pounds suddenly moves into the hilt, the Newton's third law would have jerked the hilt in the opposite direction. Therefore the mass of the blade must be significantly smaller than the hilt's mass minus the plasma. Therefore either the blade is not plasma or its mass is too small to make a difference.
7th Mar '17 6:14:03 AM Ambaryerno
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*** Considering a real sword can hang on a belt just fine without ripping itself free, and a real longsword generally maxes out around 3-3.5lbs, I don't think weight would be an issue.
7th Mar '17 6:03:53 AM MawofWinter
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*** True, plasma does have mass, but plasma is also the ''thinnest'' state of matter. Plasma has negligible mass. This troper is not familiar enough with physics, how densely plasma can be squeezed together, before it becomes gas again outside the core of a Star, so it is prudent to speculate that the plasma's density couldn't be much greater than the air surrounding the blade. That would suggest a negligible blade mass. Given that in any case whatever mass exists in the blade must be stored inside the handle when the blade is not on, the mass of the blade cannot be all that massive or those lighsaber handles would rip themselves free from the jedis' belts. The air drag theory is still the likelier explanation.
4th Mar '17 9:56:37 AM TheLearnedSoldier
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*** Following through with the above, it's very likely that the DS1 was filled with civilian workers and forced labour when it was destroyed(and this is outright stated in EU material on a couple occasions), as, as mentioned, it had just finished construction and had its first weapons test on Jedha and then again on Scarif and Alderaan, with the intent to blow Yavin IV to hell as well. At no point did they stop for a breath and let the workers off; they were constantly chasing the Rebels from point A to point B from the moment of completion. Was it necessary to destroy the Death Star to prevent the destruction of the Rebellion and the solidification of Imperial Dominance? Yes. Is a Necessary Evil any less Evil? No. The Rebels have always been morally grey; Rogue One is just the first film to out-and-out say, "Yeah, they're the protagonists, but they aren't morally good." Worth noting the opposite of this is why people were up in arms about Disney; they thought it would get softer, and we got the single darkest film in the canon from them(And, quite rightly, one hailed as being the best since Empire).
4th Mar '17 7:01:06 AM Ambaryerno
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** Alternately, if the blade of a lightsaber is made of plasma (which is one of the most popular models for how they work) it's ''not'' just weightless energy. The fourth state of matter plasma ''does'' have mass. Therefore lightsabers behave as if the blades have mass simply because they ''do''.
4th Mar '17 5:56:30 AM TheLearnedSoldier
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* Rewatching TPM, I realized the theme playing during Qui-Gon's funeral is, in fact, the same theme playing during the birth of Darth Vader in ROTS. Vader was born the moment Qui-Gon had died. -- Tropers/{{Premonition45}}

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* Rewatching TPM, I realized the theme playing during Qui-Gon's Qui-Gonn's funeral is, in fact, the same theme playing during the birth of Darth Vader in ROTS. Vader was born the moment Qui-Gon had died. -- Tropers/{{Premonition45}}Tropers/{{Premonition45}}
** There's actually a fairly popular fan theory that Qui-Gonn was the only Jedi available to take on a padawan that would have been able to stop Anakin's fall--Qui-Gonn is a 'Grey Jedi', which is a Jedi who goes against tradition and believes that both the restraint of the light and the emotion of the dark are needed to fight in balance, and was a better warrior because of it, but also a pariah. This is referenced repeatedly throughout TPM. If Anakin had been mentored by someone who believed this way, like Qui-Gonn or Mace Windu, he would never have repressed and internalised his emotions, and thus would never have been anywhere near as susceptible to the Dark Side. And it's entirely possible that someone like Qui-Gonn who put little faith in blind tradition would be entirely able to not only keep Anakin and Padme's relationship a secret but empathise with it, and his knowledge could have helped save Padme down the line. In short; as mentioned above, the entirety of Star Wars is riddled with 'vergences' or 'shatterpoints', where a single aspect of reality is all that keeps galactic history from being radically different; the fact that Obi-Wan, someone who was very much a staunch traditionalist and who believed the Jedi dogma until that faith was shattered in Episode III was Anakin's mentor instead of Qui-Gonn was one such vergence and directly or indirectly led to the events of the next five movies.
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