History Fridge / StarWars

25th May '18 11:17:50 PM Agent53
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* I was reading an article about how in Solo Han was portrayed as a gary sue, just like Rey is considered a mary sue. why do we keep getting Mary/Gary Sue's (because Anakin, certainly in episode 1 could be considered that)? The force wants them in certain places, at certain times, to do specific things, so it gifts them with the skills they need to get there, the force itself may be the biggest manipulator in the franchise!
9th Apr '18 1:12:23 PM TrashJack
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* [[Fridge/TheLastJedi Episode Eight: The Last Jedi]]
28th Mar '18 11:24:08 PM nombretomado
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*** Personally I've always seen it more as '''Palpatine''' being the imbalance in the Force. I mean, think about it, the Force isn't in balance when Palpatine and Vader die, there's still Luke, who is a Jedi. Going by the view that it's about the Jedi/Sith being in balance, there's simply no evidence that the Force is in balance, because there are more Jedi than Sith at the end of the movies. Plus, as the StarWarsExpandedUniverse shows us, the Jedi aren't the be all and end all of Force users, they're just the most famous group. So yeah, Palps is the imbalance, because when he dies, the Force is balanced once more.

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*** Personally I've always seen it more as '''Palpatine''' being the imbalance in the Force. I mean, think about it, the Force isn't in balance when Palpatine and Vader die, there's still Luke, who is a Jedi. Going by the view that it's about the Jedi/Sith being in balance, there's simply no evidence that the Force is in balance, because there are more Jedi than Sith at the end of the movies. Plus, as the StarWarsExpandedUniverse Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse shows us, the Jedi aren't the be all and end all of Force users, they're just the most famous group. So yeah, Palps is the imbalance, because when he dies, the Force is balanced once more.



* When Han, Leia, and the others get captured on Bespin, we see Han being tortured while Chewie and 3PO are in a cell. Leia is brought to the cell only after Han is. Where was Leia? Also being tortured. Why does she seem less affected by it than Han? First, because she's been tortured before, when a prisoner on the Death Star in Episode IV, and because she's been trained to withstand interrogation. But there's no question that she was being tortured. The horror is even worse than that, however. She was tortured by her ''father''. Imagine how it must have felt to find that out. Is it any wonder she won't forgive him in ''[[StarWarsExpandedUniverse Truce at Bakura]]''.

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* When Han, Leia, and the others get captured on Bespin, we see Han being tortured while Chewie and 3PO are in a cell. Leia is brought to the cell only after Han is. Where was Leia? Also being tortured. Why does she seem less affected by it than Han? First, because she's been tortured before, when a prisoner on the Death Star in Episode IV, and because she's been trained to withstand interrogation. But there's no question that she was being tortured. The horror is even worse than that, however. She was tortured by her ''father''. Imagine how it must have felt to find that out. Is it any wonder she won't forgive him in ''[[StarWarsExpandedUniverse Truce at Bakura]]''.''Literature/TheTruceAtBakura''.
17th Mar '18 12:09:43 PM nombretomado
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* When Qui-Gon died in ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'', many fans complained that he did not vanish as Obi-Wan and Yoda had, and that the revelation in ''RevengeOfTheSith'' that it was technique that Qui-Gon's Force spirit taught to them violated the original trilogy. Except that the original trilogy gives us no reason to think that this happens to all Force-users, or even that the Jedi knew about the technique before Vader's fall to the Dark Side:

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* When Qui-Gon died in ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'', many fans complained that he did not vanish as Obi-Wan and Yoda had, and that the revelation in ''RevengeOfTheSith'' ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' that it was technique that Qui-Gon's Force spirit taught to them violated the original trilogy. Except that the original trilogy gives us no reason to think that this happens to all Force-users, or even that the Jedi knew about the technique before Vader's fall to the Dark Side:



*** Lucas kind of screwed up the continuity there. The dialogue in ''RevengeOfTheSith'' makes it pretty clear that Artoo's quirky personality was a regular bone of contention between Obi-Wan and Anakin. They left Artoo (and Threepio) behind with Prince Bail, and then a couple decades later an identical R2 unit shows up having apparently come from Princess Leia, whom they also left with Prince Bail. So one would expect at least some sense of nostalgia, if not outright recognition, when Obi-Wan saw the two droids, even if they did not remember him. Yes, he could have been feigning ignorance. Although that kind of ties into the ManipulativeBastard problem that comes up in Obi-Wan's dealings with Luke, and the extent to which he concealed and distorted information in order to get Luke to do what he wanted.

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*** Lucas kind of screwed up the continuity there. The dialogue in ''RevengeOfTheSith'' ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' makes it pretty clear that Artoo's quirky personality was a regular bone of contention between Obi-Wan and Anakin. They left Artoo (and Threepio) behind with Prince Bail, and then a couple decades later an identical R2 unit shows up having apparently come from Princess Leia, whom they also left with Prince Bail. So one would expect at least some sense of nostalgia, if not outright recognition, when Obi-Wan saw the two droids, even if they did not remember him. Yes, he could have been feigning ignorance. Although that kind of ties into the ManipulativeBastard problem that comes up in Obi-Wan's dealings with Luke, and the extent to which he concealed and distorted information in order to get Luke to do what he wanted.
17th Mar '18 12:09:23 PM nombretomado
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** The novelization of RevengeOfTheSith includes an interesting dialogue between Obi-Wan and Mace Windu, in which the latter describes the inherent difference between how the Jedi and Sith operate: the Jedi, as Windu puts it, "create light" by always working selflessly for the good of the galaxy, but the Sith don't "create darkness", merely use the darkness which is and always has been there, the [[HumansAreBastards Sentient Beings Are Bastards]] factor. Obi-Wan, trying to clarify Windu's meaning, wonders if the Jedi have cast too much light. Later on in the novel, there's a nicely poetic passage explaining how "the brightest light casts the darkest shadow". The extended metaphor suggests that the new Sith were born as a result of the unyielding and immovable Jedi Order, casting too bright a light on the Galaxy, a little darkness being needed to restore order and renew everything. If a system in equilibrium will adjust itself to accommodate a stress applied so it can right itself, then the "Reset Button" theory seems more likely. Anakin's fall to the dark side was a necessary step in bringing balance to the Force -- the excessive light of the Jedi had to be extinguished, briefly replaced by the equally unnatural excessive darkness of the Sith, for the natural balance of light and dark to be reasserted.

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** The novelization of RevengeOfTheSith ''Literature/RevengeOfTheSith'' includes an interesting dialogue between Obi-Wan and Mace Windu, in which the latter describes the inherent difference between how the Jedi and Sith operate: the Jedi, as Windu puts it, "create light" by always working selflessly for the good of the galaxy, but the Sith don't "create darkness", merely use the darkness which is and always has been there, the [[HumansAreBastards Sentient Beings Are Bastards]] factor. Obi-Wan, trying to clarify Windu's meaning, wonders if the Jedi have cast too much light. Later on in the novel, there's a nicely poetic passage explaining how "the brightest light casts the darkest shadow". The extended metaphor suggests that the new Sith were born as a result of the unyielding and immovable Jedi Order, casting too bright a light on the Galaxy, a little darkness being needed to restore order and renew everything. If a system in equilibrium will adjust itself to accommodate a stress applied so it can right itself, then the "Reset Button" theory seems more likely. Anakin's fall to the dark side was a necessary step in bringing balance to the Force -- the excessive light of the Jedi had to be extinguished, briefly replaced by the equally unnatural excessive darkness of the Sith, for the natural balance of light and dark to be reasserted.



* Another case of FridgeBrilliance, you know how people often complain that Anakin's personality in Film/ThePhantomMenace seemed so contradictory to his original-trilogy personality, and that both personalities seemed contradictory to the personality he had in Film/AttackOfTheClones and Film/RevengeOfTheSith... but then again, [[TruthInTelevision adults often ARE quite different as adults than they were as children]], so Anakin's going to have different personalities as a child, as a teenager, and as an adult. Film/ThePhantomMenace's Anakin was a child, so he's going to be more sweet and friendly than he was later on. The Anakin of Film/AttackOfTheClones and Film/RevengeOfTheSith was a teenager, so he's going to be more whiny and arrogant than he was later or earlier on. The Vader of the original trilogy was an adult, much older than the Anakin of RevengeOfTheSith, so he's going to be more mature than any other version of Anakin. This is, if not perfectly in line with actual age difference, at least in line with PERCEIVED age differences, and if one is to complain about this, their real complaint is with popular age stereotypes, not StarWars movies. - [=neoYTPism=]

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* Another case of FridgeBrilliance, you know how people often complain that Anakin's personality in Film/ThePhantomMenace ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'' seemed so contradictory to his original-trilogy personality, and that both personalities seemed contradictory to the personality he had in Film/AttackOfTheClones ''Film/AttackOfTheClones'' and Film/RevengeOfTheSith...''Film/RevengeOfTheSith''... but then again, [[TruthInTelevision adults often ARE quite different as adults than they were as children]], so Anakin's going to have different personalities as a child, as a teenager, and as an adult. Film/ThePhantomMenace's ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'''s Anakin was a child, so he's going to be more sweet and friendly than he was later on. The Anakin of Film/AttackOfTheClones ''Film/AttackOfTheClones'' and Film/RevengeOfTheSith ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' was a teenager, so he's going to be more whiny and arrogant than he was later or earlier on. The Vader of the original trilogy was an adult, much older than the Anakin of RevengeOfTheSith, ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'', so he's going to be more mature than any other version of Anakin. This is, if not perfectly in line with actual age difference, at least in line with PERCEIVED age differences, and if one is to complain about this, their real complaint is with popular age stereotypes, not StarWars ''Franchise/StarWars'' movies. - [=neoYTPism=]
8th Jan '18 3:42:18 PM RadiatedRonin
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** There is also the possibility that the Stormtroopers weapons are just plain garbage. This parallels real life WW2 France, and the homemade Sten gun. Made out of any piping available, including bicycle pumps and sewer pipe, the Sten was great for putting out bullets, but had very low accuracy. The Empire requires a lot of weapons, so of course the lowest bidder is going to get the job. Imagine if Winchester suddenly started mass-producing arms in China, the overall quality would most definitely suffer. Now, take that analogy to a ''galaxy-wide'' level, and it is possible that all of the weapons the Empire gives to rank-and-file soldiers is not going to be top-tier equipment. Note how none of the characters willingly use a Stormtrooper rifle (with the exception of Luke, but he didn't have a personal weapon besides a laser sword he could barely use, and even then he hit only 2-3 Troopers in the entire escape) at any point, Han ditches it at the first opportunity for his personal side-arm which has proven much more reliable.
8th Jan '18 3:34:26 PM RadiatedRonin
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*** That.... makes a ridiculous amount of sense. Vader told the troops to "put on a show" to make the escape seem real, with added orders to not actually hit anyone. To add to this theory is the dialogue stated previously by Obi-Wan that "These blast points aren't random like sandpeople, only Stormtroopers are so precise." Adding further to this theory are the actions of Vader on the Death Star after his duel with Obi-Wan, he slowly makes his way towards the Falcon, but gets stopped by a blast door. ''Rogue One'' proved that Vader is scary fast when he needs to be, and the door could have been opened either by the use of the Force or the button that is sure to be there to open it (and Vader doesn't really need ''authorization'' to either override a lock), or he could, you know, use the ''lightsaber'' to cut through. This all points to the above suggestion being plausible.
17th Dec '17 12:31:22 PM I_love_dragons
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* So, did anyone other than Anakin and Sebulba actually survive the pod race?
** The guy who never got off the start line? That's on screen plus another gets an engine blown while stationary, so at least two others. According to Wookiepedia, six racers finished, two more dropped out while stationary (and both as noted were shown on screen), so yeah, at least seven others, plus the pedia says only one actually dies.
17th Dec '17 12:28:38 PM I_love_dragons
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*** It is pronounced with a long 'a', but it was probably unintentional with Vader coming from 'invader', like Sidious from 'insidious'.
10th Dec '17 5:46:05 PM korben600
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* Tie Fighters have no hyperdrive. Why? Because that makes Tie's extremely easy to control. They can't really run away, so any Imperial defectors better have a good plan to bail from the Empire, because otherwise, they'd have to take over an entire Star Destroyer (or an Imperial Shuttle) to get away. This works, as shown by the Rebels TV show, where pilots need to actually contact the Rebellion to leave instead of ditching on a whim, but at the expense of Tie Fighters being ludicrously underpowered compared to their Rebel counterparts.
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