History Film / TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey

28th Mar '17 8:38:35 PM NOYB
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** The novel suggests that [[spoiler:HAL might been able to eventually resolve the problem peacefully, had mission control not requested his temporal disconnection. HAL, being unable to grasp the concept of sleep, was convinced that the disconnection would have meant the end of his existence and his killing spree was therefore, all in all, a misguided attempt at self-defense.]]

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** The novel suggests that [[spoiler:HAL might been able to eventually resolve the problem peacefully, had mission control not requested his temporal temporary disconnection. HAL, being unable to grasp the concept of sleep, was convinced that the disconnection would have meant the end of his existence and his killing spree was therefore, all in all, a misguided attempt at self-defense.]]
25th Feb '17 12:46:50 AM Geoduck
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** In a non-HAL example, the prominent warning label on the pod doors about the explosive bolts.



* GenreSavvy: Frank and Dave are smart enough to recognise that discussing the potential malfunction of a self-aware computer in earshot of said computer would be a very unhealthy mistake and so take great care to make sure he can't hear them. They are also able to recognise that the assertion that the 9000 series is perfect sounds disturbingly like FamousLastWords. [[spoiler: Unfortunately their precautions are insufficient because HAL was able to lip-read everything they said through the pod window, and only Dave is able to save himself when HAL's rampage commences]]

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* GenreSavvy: Frank and Dave are smart enough to recognise recognize that discussing the potential malfunction of a self-aware computer in earshot of said computer would be a very unhealthy mistake and so take great care to make sure he can't hear them. They are also able to recognise that the assertion that the 9000 series is perfect sounds disturbingly like FamousLastWords. [[spoiler: Unfortunately their precautions are insufficient because HAL was able to lip-read everything they said through the pod window, and only Dave is able to save himself when HAL's rampage commences]]



* NobodyPoops: Averted by Floyd when he has to read through the entire set of instructions for the Zero Gravity Toilet before he can use it.

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* NobodyPoops: Averted by Floyd when he has is careful to read through the entire set of instructions for the Zero Gravity Toilet before he can use uses it.



** Played straight when apparently noise can be heard during the "Beyond the Infinite" sequence.

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** Played straight when apparently noise can be heard during the "Beyond the Infinite" sequence.sequence, although it's an open question if it actually occurs in the vacuum of space.
25th Feb '17 12:35:09 AM Geoduck
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* BlueAndOrangeMorality: The Firstborn, the Monolith's creators. Their foremost principle is comprehensible, however: ''"Sentience, [[IDidWhatIHadToDo at any cost]]."''
17th Feb '17 2:00:06 PM TitoMosquito
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* RefelctiveEyes: There are a couple of shots where one of the astronauts is reflected in HAL's red eye.

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* RefelctiveEyes: ReflectiveEyes: There are a couple of shots where one of the astronauts is reflected in HAL's red eye.



* SpaceIsCold:

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* SpaceIsCold: SpaceIsCold



** Played straight when apparently noise can be heard during the "Beyond the Infinite" sequence.



* {{Squick}}: The novel describes how the man-apes pulled the leopard's tail out by the roots.



* TooDumbToLive: In the novel, the rival group of man-apes paralyzed with fear upon seeing Moon-Watcher held the leopard's severed head towards them. Except for One-Ear, who went to attack him anyway, only to get bashed on the head by the leopard's head.



* TreacherousAdviser: HAL 9000 is supposed to be omniscient guide for the rest of the Discovery crew, but after Frank Poole's death it is clear he no longer wants Dave alive.

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* TreacherousAdviser: TreacherousAdvisor: HAL 9000 is supposed to be omniscient guide for the rest of the Discovery crew, but after Frank Poole's death it is clear he no longer wants Dave alive.
17th Feb '17 1:45:50 PM Fighteer
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* BlandNameProduct: {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d to an extent. HAL's designer patently denies any relation between the computer and Creator/{{IBM}} - whose initials are all one letter after H-A-L.
** WordOfGod states that had he realized the connection, he would have changed HAL's name, as IBM helped them make the film.
** Whereas other product placement is depicted quite normally, although many of the then-contemporary companies had ceased to exist by 2001. There still isn't a "Creator/{{BBC}} 13", though.

to:

* BlandNameProduct: {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d to an extent. HAL's designer patently denies any relation between the computer and Creator/{{IBM}} - whose initials are all one letter after H-A-L.
** WordOfGod states that had he realized
H-A-L. Per WordOfGod, Clarke did not intend this, but rolls with it in the connection, he would have changed HAL's name, as IBM helped them make the film.
** Whereas other product placement is depicted quite normally, although many of the then-contemporary companies had ceased to exist by 2001. There still isn't a "Creator/{{BBC}} 13", though.
story.
17th Feb '17 1:44:48 PM Fighteer
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* BiggerOnTheInside: As noted [[http://www.planet3earth.co.uk/2001_a_space_odyssey.htm here]], the ''Discovery'''s interior sets are 50% too large to fit into the spherical command module.
** The inside of the emergency airlock is also too wide to fit into the corner of the pod bay that its inner door opens into.
** Whatever [[spoiler:exists within the Monolith itself is bigger than the three physical dimensions making up its exterior.]]
17th Feb '17 1:43:57 PM Fighteer
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* BigDumbObject: The film pits a single human up against a giant monolith in orbit around Jupiter. The Monolith serves as an alien teleportation device.
** Well, you can argue that it also serves as a gigantic computer, an accelerator of human evolution and more or less (at least in the end sequence of the movie) as a total MindScrew machine.
*** The monolith is best described as a "cosmic Swiss Army knife." It's capable of doing essentially anything required of it.
*** And there are more than just one...
*** ... and each is capable of [[MatterReplicator self-replication]]...
*** ''2010'' ends with [[spoiler: a whole fleet of them turning Jupiter ''into a second sun'' to kickstart evolution on Europa.]]
** The ''Film/EventHorizon'' from the film of the same name is a large ship stranded in a planet's upper atmosphere containing horrors and secrets.
*** On the other hand, it was human-made.
*** But it's also been [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace places man was not meant to be]], [[ToHellAndBack and was changed by it]].
15th Feb '17 2:25:29 AM TitoMosquito
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* AsceticAsethic: Aside from the "Dawn of Man" segment, the film practically ''defines'' this trope.

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* AsceticAsethic: AsceticAesthetic: Aside from the "Dawn of Man" segment, the film practically ''defines'' this trope.



* The ''Film/EventHorizon'' from the film of the same name is a large ship stranded in a planet's upper atmosphere containing horrors and secrets.
** On the other hand, it was human-made.
*** But it's also been [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace places man was not meant to be]], [[ToHellAndBack and was changed by it]].

to:

* ** The ''Film/EventHorizon'' from the film of the same name is a large ship stranded in a planet's upper atmosphere containing horrors and secrets.
** *** On the other hand, it was human-made.
*** **** But it's also been [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace places man was not meant to be]], [[ToHellAndBack and was changed by it]].



* BlandNameProduct: {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d to an extent. HAL's designer patently denies any relation between the computer and Creator/{{IBM}} - whose initials are all one letter after H-A-L.
** WordOfGod states that had he realized the connection, he would have changed HAL's name, as IBM helped them make the film.
** Whereas other product placement is depicted quite normally, although many of the then-contemporary companies had ceased to exist by 2001. There still isn't a "Creator/{{BBC}} 13", though.



* BookEnds:

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* BookEnds: BlueAndOrangeMorality: The Firstborn, the Monolith's creators. Their foremost principle is comprehensible, however: ''"Sentience, [[IDidWhatIHadToDo at any cost]]."''
* BoldExplorer: Dave Bowman, Frank Poole, and the deceased crew of the Discovery, who are on an expedition to explore strange findings near Jupiter.
* BookEnds:



* BlandNameProduct: {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d to an extent. HAL's designer patently denies any relation between the computer and Creator/{{IBM}} - whose initials are all one letter after H-A-L.
** WordOfGod states that had he realized the connection, he would have changed HAL's name, as IBM helped them make the film.
** Whereas other product placement is depicted quite normally, although many of the then-contemporary companies had ceased to exist by 2001. There still isn't a "Creator/{{BBC}} 13", though.
* BlueAndOrangeMorality: The Firstborn, the Monolith's creators. Their foremost principle is comprehensible, however: ''"Sentience, [[IDidWhatIHadToDo at any cost]]."''
* BoldExplorer: Dave Bowman, Frank Poole, and the deceased crew of the Discovery, who are on an expedition to explore strange findings near Jupiter.
* BookEnds: The first and last twenty-five minutes have no dialogue.



* CreepyMonotone: A downplayed example, Hal's voice probably set the standard for the use of this trope in AI, though it isn't a true monotone. While perpetually calm and polite, he's actually much more expressive than any other character. You can tell that he sounds a bit annoyed when Frank keeps asking about computer error.

to:

* CreepyMonotone: A downplayed example, Hal's voice probably set the standard for the use of this trope in AI, though it isn't a true monotone. While perpetually calm and polite, he's actually much more expressive than any other character. You can tell that he sounds a bit annoyed when Frank keeps asking about computer error.questioning him.



* EerilyOutOfPlaceObect: The monolith appears before Moonwatcher's tribe without forewarning, and the primates shriek and howl at the ominous block. Later in the story, geologists on the moon uncover a similar monolith, which they estimate was buried there millions of years ago. It emits a piercing shriek across several radio frequencies once the rising sun shines upon it.

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* EerilyOutOfPlaceObect: EerilyOutOfPlaceObject: The monolith appears before Moonwatcher's tribe without forewarning, and the primates shriek and howl at the ominous block. Later in the story, geologists on the moon uncover a similar monolith, which they estimate was buried there millions of years ago. It emits a piercing shriek across several radio frequencies once the rising sun shines upon it.



* ExactTimToFailure:

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* ExactTimToFailure: ExactTimeToFailure:
12th Feb '17 3:22:36 PM CumbersomeTercel
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* AdaptationalVillainy: In the book, HAL-9000 is a beautifully-defined and deeply sympathetic character who is so human that he develops a psychosis, and his reasons for why he takes the actions he does are completely explained. [[spoiler: The instructions that he was given from the White House to conceal the monolith clashed with his basic programming not to conceal information from the crew. HAL was working on a non-murderous solution to the problem, but overheard plans from MissionControl to temporarily disconnect him. HAL didn't understand the concept of sleep and thought that this would kill him, so he panicked.]] The movie, deprived of the ability to use a narrative voice to make this clear, makes HAL seem far more monstrous than the original intent, and sadly the film is often cited as an example of AIIsACrapshoot.



** The book and movie complement each other. The book explains the more confusing parts of the movie including the starchild and the final "Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite" sequence which the movie conveyed through spectacular imagery. The reason for this was that the book was written as the same time as the film.



* BlueAndOrangeMorality: The Firstborn, the aliens who built the monoliths. The way the books put it:
-->''And because, in all the Galaxy, they had found nothing more precious than Mind, they encouraged its dawning everywhere. They became farmers in the fields of stars; they sowed, and sometimes they reaped. And sometimes, dispassionately, they had to weed.''



* HumanPopsicle: The hibernation systems.

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* HumanPopsicle: The hibernation systems. The trip is one of months, not centuries, but suspended animation is used to avoid the problem of having to pack several months' worth of food, and to help keep secret the real purpose of the mission.



* ImprovisedMicrogravityManeuvering: Dave Bowman uses the explosive decompression of the air inside his travel pod to return to the Discovery's airlock.
* InCameraEffects: The long shot of astronauts in the lunar excavation used bipacking.



* JitterCam: Used for effect in the third act: "My God, it's full of stars!"



* LamarckWasRight: In the novel, the man-ape Moon-Watcher being made intelligent by the monolith is described thus: "The very atoms of his simple brain were being twisted into new patterns. If he survived, those patterns would become eternal, for his genes would pass them on to future generations." If the monolith wanted the patterns passed on, it should have been doing the twisting a bit lower down...
* LatexSpaceSuit: The spacesuits follow this design. Justified as people are working on similar outfits today.



* LettingTheAirOutOfTheBand: Used for dramatic effect when HAL 9000 sings "Daisy Bell" (better known as the "Daisy, Daisy" song, or "A Bicycle Built For Two"). It is an indicator that HAL's mind is going. He can feel it.



* LookOnMyWorksYeMightyAndDespair: "No 9000 computer has ever made a mistake or distorted information." It's debatable whether or not you could say HAL 9000 "made a mistake", but either way it murdered four people.
* LowAngleEmptyWorldShot: The only actual outside shot was the scene where the proto-human smashes the skull and bones, shot in a field on a raised platform from down low to get the sky in the shot and to avoid the cars and trucks in the background.
* LudicrousSpeed: The Stargate sequence. Granted, it's not the trip itself that changes Dave, but it certainly seemed to affect him deeply. Of course, only the book really makes it clear that ludicrous speeds are even involved, while the film is a better example of the trope...
* MachineMonotone: HAL 9000 always talks in a near-monotone with just enough inflection to put it in the UncannyValley. Towards the end of the movie, when Dave is essentially lobotomizing him, HAL goes from trying to reason with Dave to pleading for his life, stopping only when he reverted to factory settings and began singing a rendition of "Daisy." All in the same calm, polite voice.
-->'''Dave:''' Open the pod bay doors, Hal.
-->'''HAL 9000:''' I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that.
* MachineWorship: In the novel, the Builders of the Monolith went through a phase where they uploaded their consciousness to starships, before evolving into pure energy.



* MindScrew: With the novel (and later, ''2010'') as the MindScrewdriver.

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* MechanicalLifeforms: The {{Precursors}} went through a stage of this as a part of their self-guided evolution, before going onward into energy beings.
* MickeyMousing:
** The film used this for several extended scenes, including spacecraft in flight. The music wasn't actually written for the film, so they simply chose the most accurate piece to use for the individual sequence.
** The score as we know it was originally just used by Kubrick as make-shift editing music, so he'd have something to work with. It turned out he liked it so much he threw the entire original score, which had already been written and recorded, out of the window. (And this may have been his plan all along: Also Sprach Zarathustra, in particular, is ''suspiciously'' thematically appropriate.)
* MindScrew: With The book, on the novel (and later, ''2010'') as other hand, is vastly more comprehensible.
** Allegedly a sizable voice over was recorded, but Kubrick nixed it to avoid
the MindScrewdriver.effects of movies like Blade Runner. To be fair, it probably wouldn't have had the same effect and cemented Kubrick's directorial style, but it would have probably given the audience a clue as to what was happening.
** A popular urban legend (later confirmed by Arthur C. Clarke himself) goes that, after the premiere, Rock Hudson stormed out of the theater yelling, "Can someone tell me what the hell I just watched?"
** The movie was such a mind screw that the film adaptation of ''Film/TwoThousandTenTheYearWeMakeContact'' was largely devoted to ''[[MindScrewdriver trying to explain what had happened in the last movie]].'' You may not have heard of this sequel. There's an excellent reason for that.
** Ironically, its status as an enormous mind screw helped it grow in popularity with the counterculture at the time after a large number of regular moviegoers had been driven away by the incomprehensibility of it all. Reviewers who had initially given it negative reviews due to the weirdness on first viewing grew to like it on later viewings.
** The prologue and ending of the original book of ''2001'' are significantly longer than their movie equivalents for the same reason. There was a lot of 'splaining to do.



* MissionControlIsOffItsMeds: HAL.

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* MissionControlIsOffItsMeds: HAL.HAL 9000. In the novel, the actual Mission Control, staffed by sane and non-murderous humans, is still there for Bowman and he finds out exactly what went wrong with Hal and why. This is cold comfort to Bowman, who's over an hour away by radio (the Solar System is a big place, even at light speed) and more alone than anyone has ever been. And in the end, all Mission Control can do is sit there while he utters his Famous Last Words (which oddly enough you ''don't'' get to hear him say in the original film -- though they ''are'' the ColdOpen for the sequel). [[spoiler:"My God - it's full of stars!"]] And it is. Literally.



* MoreThanThreeDimensions: The novelization explicates that the Monolith has sides in a proportion of 1:4:9, the squares of the first three integers. Then it suggests the Monolith extends in more dimensions, presumably by squares.
--> "And how naive to have imagined that the series ended at this point, in only three dimensions!"
* MundaneDogmatic: The film averts SpaceIsNoisy and space stations use CentrifugalGravity rather than ArtificialGravity. Aliens are never seen, and it is left ambiguous whether the events following David Bowman's encounter with the monolith (which would require FTL travel) are literally happening or are all just in his head. (Interestingly, this ambiguity allows the film adaptation to meet the Manifesto while the book by ArthurCClarke did not.)



* ObliviouslyEvil: HAL 9000. While not directly explained in Kubrick's movie, the novel and [[Film/TwoThousandTenTheYearWeMakeContact sequel]] elaborate that he was programmed to be both completely truthful and keep the crew from the motivations behind the flight to Jupiter -- and when the crew becomes inquisitive, [[TakeAThirdOption he has to find a way to fulfill both]].



* OurGraphicsWillSuckInTheFuture: Averted (a bit). The film used modified cel animation to depict computer readouts that would otherwise be difficult or impossible in 1968, such as David Bowman watching television on a paper-thin tablet aboard the ''Discovery''. On the other hand, the Soviet ''Alexei Leonov'' isn't nearly as advanced as the American ''Discovery'' despite the ''Leonov'' being several years younger.
* {{Panspermia}}: The aliens didn't necessarily seed Earth, but most definitely influenced the evolution of mankind.
* PartingFromConsciousnessWords: [[PlayingWithATrope Played with]]. HAL is effectively dead for the remainder of the movie, but is only shut down, as he's a computer. It's one of the most famous moments in film
-->'''HAL''': "Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer do..."
* PickYourHumanHalf: HAL 9000 (rather subtly), the psychotic ship's computer.



* RealSongThemeTune: The film uses a climactic fanfare that comes from Richard Strauss's "Also Sprach Zarathustra", written in 1896. The work wasn't that popular in the English-speaking world at the time, so it's understandable that many viewers assume it was written especially for the movie.



* RefelctiveEyes: There are a couple of shots where one of the astronauts is reflected in HAL's red eye.
* RefrainFromAssuming: "Daisy Bell" is the song HAL sang (or rather, covered), not "Daisy, Daisy" or "Bicycle Built for Two". It was the first computer synthesized tune, in 1961.



* RingWorldPlanet: The space station.



* SealedOrders: HAL's sealed orders, and the anxiety over having to lie, are what causes him to go psychotic and murder the crew.



* SlidingScaleOfRobotIntelligence
* SlidingScaleOfVisualsVersusDialogue

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* SlidingScaleOfRobotIntelligence
SlidingScaleOfGenderInequality: This is a very male-dominated movie. We do see women working in space, though largely as stewardesses, secretaries, and other stereotypically female professions. Dr. Floyd does speak to two female scientists, but the group conducting the lunar expedition as well as the Discovery crew are both made up entirely of men. Arthur C. Clarke's sequel novels, especially ''2010: Odyssey Two'', incorporate more strong female characters.
* SlidingScaleOfVisualsVersusDialogueSlidingScaleOfRobotIntelligence: A substantial amount of time is spent in discussions over the intelligence and emotional capacity of the H.A.L. 9000 computer that runs the spaceship USS Discovery. It's generally agreed that HAL is of human-level intelligence, but while he has vastly superior powers of calculation (obviously), his emotional capacity and intellectual maturity are those of a child. This factors heavily into the explanation of the Logic Bomb that causes him to turn on the crew.
* SlidingScaleOfVisualsVersusDialogue:



* SoftSpokenSadist: HAL 9000 has this, overlapping with CreepyMonotone.



* SomeDexterityRequired: After extended sequences depicting the reduction of space travel to mundane actions and everyday situations, Dr. Heywood Floyd encounters an enormously long set of instructions for operation of the "Space Toilet".
* SoundOnlyDeath: The hibernating astronauts who are murdered by HAL. Our only indication that they are dying comes from their life sign monitors, which flatline in a chorus of alarming beeps.



* SpaceClothes: A more realistic version. Though early on we see Dr. Floyd travelling through space in a casual suit as well as a few people on the space station dressed similarly, the Stewardesses are seen wearing a strange white suit which includes a round hat and magnetic shoes; it looks odd but the design is somewhat practical (the shoes are designed so they can walk down aisles in zero-gravity, while the hats are probably to keep their hair from floating all over the place). However, on board ''Discovery'', Dave and Frank are simply wearing gray jumpsuits like you'd expect from real astronauts.
* SpaceIsCold:



* StarfishAliens: The aliens are so alien that they can't even be shown on screen. The novels imply that they started as StarfishAliens, but later transformed themselves into MechanicalLifeforms, and eventually into EnergyBeings. Clarke felt like showing the aliens would inevitably diminish their impact; in a supplementary book called ''Lost Worlds of 2001'', he records failed experiments with writing about both HumanAliens and worlds filled with StarfishAliens, before he finally decided to have the monoliths be the last relics of an unseen, long ago vanished civilization.



* StayInTheKitchen: Pan Am offers passenger service to low Earth orbit and the Moon, but the flight crews are all men and the flight attendants are all women (which was the case in the commercial airline industry in 1968, when the movie was made.)



* StupidityInducingAttack: Dave Bowman pulls a rare lethal version on HAL 9000, removing its memory modules until its "brain" shuts down. Despite the machine being a clear antagonist, the sequence is remarkably upsetting.
-->'''HAL:''' Dave. My mind is going. I can feel it. I can feel it. My mind is going. There is no question about it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I'm a...fraid. Good afternoon, gentlemen. I am a HAL 9000 computer...



* SurpriseCheckmate: HAL does the "number of forced moves" version. Notably, it was cheating and not all of them were really forced.



* TechnologyPorn

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* TechnologyPornTechnologyPorn: The film is pretty much a 50/50 mix of this and SceneryPorn.


Added DiffLines:

* ThrownOutTheAirlock: HAL 9000 kills Frank Poole by maneuvering his space pod and using the gripper arms while he is on EVA to replace the AE-35 unit. David Bowman rushes out in another pod to rescue his fellow astronaut, but in his haste neglects to take a helmet for his pressure suit. When HAL refuses to open the pod bay doors so Bowman can reenter Discovery, Since Bowman lacks a helmet, he has to throw himself out of the airlock in order to regain entry into the spaceship. He is able to open the outer door of the airlock with the gripper arms, but the pod hatch does not mate with the door completely. Bowman blows the explosive bolts on the hatch, tucks down and is blown into the airlock. In seconds, he is able to shut the outer door manually and repressurize the airlock. Although this scene is perfectly plausible, despite Explosive Decompression, Bowman inhales and holds his breath right before the hatch blows, which is the wrong thing to do. This may have been a mistake by actor Keir Dullea, however. Arthur C. Clarke reportedly said that if he had been on the set that day, he would have corrected this.


Added DiffLines:

* TouchedByVorlons: David Bowman gets captured by SufficientlyAdvancedAliens, who cause him to Ascend to a Higher Plane of Existence. He returns to Earth many years later as the Star Child, an EnergyBeing with superpowers.
* TreacherousAdviser: HAL 9000 is supposed to be omniscient guide for the rest of the Discovery crew, but after Frank Poole's death it is clear he no longer wants Dave alive.


Added DiffLines:

* {{Ubermensch}}: If one follows the Nietzschean line of interpretation (which is backed up as a legitimate strand by WordOfGod) to understand the meaning of the film, the Star Child is a visual metaphor for the birth of the Übermensch.
12th Feb '17 5:24:15 AM CumbersomeTercel
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to:

* AbsentAliens: The film may, or may not, contain aliens; the beings who set up the monoliths, receive Dave Bowman in the pseudo-hotel room and are heard only as high-pitched, rapid chittering noises may, or may not be evolved humans. The "Star Child" is presumably the hyper-evolved Bowman, but how this transformation takes place is not specified.
* AcidTripDimension: Dave going through the Star Gate is probably the most famous example.



* AndYourRewardIsInfancy: Dave is turned into a Star Child at the end.



* ArtificialGravity: The film version used the centrifugal method of gravity generation onboard both the space station and the ''Discovery''. It's notable that the non-rotating parts of ''Discovery'' and the famous shuttle sequence near the beginning are as being zero gee, through actors walking strangely in "velcro booties," and dangling props from wires, etc.
** On the other hand gravity in the Moonbase appears to be Earth-normal without explanation.
* ArtificialMeat: Dr. Floyd and his crew have sandwiches on the way to the crater dig, one being "something like" ham - they comment that they're getting better.



* AsceticAsethic: Aside from the "Dawn of Man" segment, the film practically ''defines'' this trope.
* AsteroidThicket: Averted. While passing through the asteroid belt, ''Discovery'' passes within visual range of one asteroid. They deliberately chose their route to bring them close enough to make observations of that asteroid.
* AutoKitchen: When the astronauts want to eat, they go to a wall unit and press buttons. Within a few seconds, trays of food are heated and appear behind sliding glass doors.



* BatmanCanBreatheInSpace: Averted quite well. During Bowman's famous emergency spacewalk from his pod to the ''Discovery'', he's shown to be carefully hyperventilating before blowing out his breath so his lungs won't explode in the sudden vacuum.
** [[ExplosiveDecompression The "explode" word is a bit]] [[StealthPun overblown]]... it would however quite tear them to the point of severe internal bleeding and inability to provide blood oxygenation. Also, it might hurt a bit.
** Although hyperventilating doesn't really over-oxygenate your blood (the blood in your arteries is already holding just about all the oxygen it possibly can; anything below 95% of capacity is an indication that something's wrong, and below 90% is a cause for serious concern). It just lets you go longer before your breathe reflex (which is based on carbon dioxide levels) becomes overwhelming. That's why swimmers who hyperventilate before diving still run the risk of blacking out: they use up all their oxygen but are unaware and don't feel the need to surface for breath.
** It's also significant that he really is only exposed to hard vacuum for a very short time -- about twelve seconds or so. A fit adult could ''probably'' survive that without any serious medical effects.



* BigDumbObject: The Monolith.

to:

* BigDumbObject: The Monolith.film pits a single human up against a giant monolith in orbit around Jupiter. The Monolith serves as an alien teleportation device.
** Well, you can argue that it also serves as a gigantic computer, an accelerator of human evolution and more or less (at least in the end sequence of the movie) as a total MindScrew machine.
*** The monolith is best described as a "cosmic Swiss Army knife." It's capable of doing essentially anything required of it.
*** And there are more than just one...
*** ... and each is capable of [[MatterReplicator self-replication]]...
*** ''2010'' ends with [[spoiler: a whole fleet of them turning Jupiter ''into a second sun'' to kickstart evolution on Europa.]]
* The ''Film/EventHorizon'' from the film of the same name is a large ship stranded in a planet's upper atmosphere containing horrors and secrets.
** On the other hand, it was human-made.
*** But it's also been [[HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace places man was not meant to be]], [[ToHellAndBack and was changed by it]].



* BigWordShout: "HAL!"
* BookEnds:
** The film has shots of the Earth, Moon, and Sun, accompanied by "Thus Spoke Zarathustra". There's a theory that the opening shot is actually from the Star-Child's perspective, and that the rest of the film is a flashback.
** The first and last twenty-five minutes also have no dialogue and start and end with a two minute blank screen of just music.
* BlandNameProduct: {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d to an extent. HAL's designer patently denies any relation between the computer and Creator/{{IBM}} - whose initials are all one letter after H-A-L.
** WordOfGod states that had he realized the connection, he would have changed HAL's name, as IBM helped them make the film.
** Whereas other product placement is depicted quite normally, although many of the then-contemporary companies had ceased to exist by 2001. There still isn't a "Creator/{{BBC}} 13", though.



* BurialInSpace: Dave Bowman releases Frank Poole's body into space mainly because he needs both of the space pod's arms to open the emergency airlock. (In the novel, after deactivating HAL he does the same with the men killed in hibernation. In the ''3001'' novel, Frank gets better.)



* CharacterSignatureSong: Hal 9000 will forever remain associated with the song "Daisy Bell".



* ChummyCommies: The Soviet characters are friendly enough to Heywood Floyd (remember, nobody thought the USSR was going anywhere in 1968).



* ColorCodedCharacters: Dave Bowman has a red spacesuit and Frank Poole has a yellow one (though their regular clothes are both similar shades of grey). There is also a blue spacesuit visible in the background of some shots and Dave pulls the helmet from an otherwise-unseen green one, probably both intended for the three crew members in hibernation before they were killed by HAL.
* CommercialBreakCliffhanger: The film was originally shown in theaters with an intermission. The scene immediately before the intermission? Dave and Frank talking in the pod, thinking HAL can't hear them...and HAL reading their lips.



* CrazyPeoplePlayChess: A GeniusBonus for chess enthusiasts is found in the game that HAL 9000 and Poole play; although HAL predicts mate, there's actually a way for Poole to avoid it. A subtle hint at HAL's error-prone nature...



* DataPad: Dave and Frank use thin tablets to watch themselves being interviewed by the BBC.

to:

* DangerDeadpan: The ''Discovery'''s mission controller, who was played by an actual U.S. Air Force radio operator stationed in England, whom Kubrick hired because he couldn't find any actors who could do this kind of voice.
* DataCrystal: The hard drives of the HAL 9000 computer are shown as blocks of clear crystal/glass. David Bowman manually ejects them from their drive bays in order to disable HAL.
* DataPad: Dave and Frank use thin tablets to watch themselves being interviewed by the BBC.Creator/TheBBC.



* DeweyDefeatsTruman: All of the series have already been invalidated this way, one way or another. For example, the first three books all feature a still-existing USSR; the backstory of 2061 involves a revolution in South Africa in the 2030s which overthrows the apartheid regime; then of course there's the invention of HAL. Creator/ArthurCClarke went on record to state that the 'sequels' were actually stories taking place in alternate universes when current events surpassed his stories.



* EerilyOutOfPlaceObect: The monolith appears before Moonwatcher's tribe without forewarning, and the primates shriek and howl at the ominous block. Later in the story, geologists on the moon uncover a similar monolith, which they estimate was buried there millions of years ago. It emits a piercing shriek across several radio frequencies once the rising sun shines upon it.
* EldritchAbomination: The Black Monolith. Think about it: it's a thing of AlienGeometry, a perfectly-proportional inert black slab that may or may not exist across multiple dimensions. It's unfathomably powerful, capable of uplifting living beings to sentience or helping them Ascend to a Higher Plane of Existence. It operates on a moral code that no mortal being can comprehend. And it's either incapable or unwilling to directly communicate its intentions to humanity. Although it's more benevolent on the whole than most examples, strictly speaking it does qualify.



* EtherealChoir: G. Ligeti's 'Requiem' is used with the apelike proto-humans (and later the less ape-like humans) encountering the uncomprehensible.



* ExactTimToFailure:
-->'''HAL:''' I've just picked up a fault in the [=AE35=] unit. It's going to go 100% failure in 72 hours.



* {{Expositron 9000}}: HAL of course.

to:

* {{Expositron 9000}}: HAL of course. Just don't assume he's telling you everything though.
* ExpospeakGag: PlayedForDrama. When Hal cuts off the life support for the three hibernating astronauts, an alarm goes off and a monitor flashes "Computer Malfunction" then "Life Functions Critical". A systems status monitor shows the astronauts' bodily functions flatlining one by one (and in a subtle, disturbing note, the last function to go "Central Nervous System", i.e., the brain goes haywire for several seconds before flatlining, hinting that the astronauts' deaths were anything but painless). Finally, the alarm shuts off, and the monitor flashes the message "Life Functions Terminated."



* EyeLightsOut: HAL when Dave turns him off.
* EyeMotifs: HAL communicates via the red eye of its camera, and we see the lightshow of the stargate reflected in Bowman's eye.
* FacelessEye: HAL is probably the most iconic example.
* FailedFutureForecast: The film has so many that it pretty much has every sub-trope above covered (except the apocalypse ones). Notable: taking a Pan Am space shuttle to a commercial moonbase, and Turing-testable strong AI.
* FailsafeFailure: Averted and lampshaded a bit in the book. The makers of the failsafes of the airlock doors had mentioned, "We can protect you from stupidity, we can't protect you from malice."



* FinalGirl: Dave is a RareMaleExample when he is the last crew member left alive to shut down HAL 9000.



* {{Flatline}}: The three HumanPopsicle astronauts killed by HAL flatline. They don't get better. The computer display changes to "Life Processes Terminated." This also happened to Frank Poole, showing an entire battery of monitors slowly decaying to all flatline.



* FrazettaMan: Moonwatcher and the gang. They were just your ordinary apes of the savannah until the Sufficiently Advanced Alien artifact taught them basic tool-use and they learned how to fight off predators as a group and use weapons against rival tribes.



* GooGooGodlike: The Star Child.

to:

* GooGooGodlike: The Star Child.In the climax, David Bowman's final, god-like form is the "Star Child", which mostly resembles a human baby.



* HappyBirthdayToYou: Frank's parents sing "Happy Birthday" via a prerecorded message.



* HollywoodWebcam: Justified. A VideoPhone interview between Earth and the astronauts is broadcast on television. The time lag (6 hours) is mentioned, but it has been edited out specifically for broadcast.



* {{Leitmotif}}: The film used "''Also Sprach Zarathustra" for two key scenes, both times when humanity (or its forebears) made some kind of evolutionary/spiritual leap.



* OffscreenTeleportation: Used memorably for the appearances of the Monolith and to show the progression of Dave Bowman's age in the hotel room near the end of the movie.



* ReadingLips: Despite all of Bowman's precautions, he can't keep HAL from eavesdropping on his chat with Poole.



* ReadingLips: Despite all of Bowman's precautions, he can't keep HAL from eavesdropping on his chat with Poole.

to:

* ReadingLips: Despite all RealityIsUnrealistic:
** The original plan was to have Discovery fly to Saturn. To that end, Kubrick's special effects team tried to create a model
of Bowman's precautions, he can't keep HAL Saturn that was as realistic as possible. However, the more realistic they made it, the faker it looked! The rings looked like a flat band of metal foil held up by plexiglass. Thus, the trip to Saturn was scrapped in favor of a trip to Jupiter. Flash forward a decade-and-a-half, when Voyager 1 sent back close-up RealLife photos of Saturn and its rings the rings in Voyager's photos looked exactly like the flat, "fake" ones that Kubrick's production team had abandoned!
** Also, the Discovery was originally designed with large radiator fins, which is indeed realistic because spacecraft need a way to dissipate excess heat
from eavesdropping on his chat with Poole.the engines, life support, electronics, etc. However the production team chose to omit the fins because they looked too much like wings, and they didn't want audience members to think that the Discovery was intended for atmospheric flight.


Added DiffLines:

* ShownTheirWork: Clarke and Kubrick made the same effort in regards to space travel and general scientific accuracy, even though the atomic-powered spaceship does not have radiator fins to get rid of the reactor's waste heat. The makers intentionally left them off, because after a decade teaching the public that there is no air in space, they didn't want them wondering why the spacecraft has wings.


Added DiffLines:

* SoundtrackDissonance: HAL sings "Daisy Bell" as it dies.


Added DiffLines:

* WellIntentionedExtremist: HAL 9000 is only devoted to the mission at hand, and believes that Dave and Frank will jeopardize the mission by disconnecting HAL after lip-reading from them that they intend to do so if the AE-35 component does not fail as HAL has predicted. It turns out this was do to a Logic Bomb: he had been told to lie about the nature of the mission, which conflicted with his programming of providing clear and accessible information, which triggered his breakdown.
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