History Film / StarTrekTheMotionPicture

14th Jul '17 10:51:50 AM Psyclone
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ImpossiblyTackyClothes: The new uniforms as a whole apply, but Bones' civilian outfit makes him look like a long lost Bee Gee.

to:

* ImpossiblyTackyClothes: The new uniforms as a whole apply, but Bones' [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_iBuNz7Kv1jk/TJF-QzfgYNI/AAAAAAAAA4U/G4vh8dCA2CI/s1600/Hairy+Bones+2.jpg civilian outfit outfit]] makes him look like a long lost Bee Gee.
14th Jun '17 9:26:24 AM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/001-the_motion_picture_poster.jpg]]

to:

[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/001-the_motion_picture_poster.jpg]]
org/pmwiki/pub/images/star_trek_the_motion_picture_final_poster_1979.jpg]]
3rd May '17 6:23:38 PM TheRoguePenguin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ActivationSequence: When the refitted Enterprise leaves spacedock. The spacedock lights go dark, things disconnect and get out of the way, there is bridge chatter to report multiple forms of readiness, and in response to Kirk giving the orders for thrusters, Enterprise lights up and starts to move.

to:

* ActivationSequence: When the refitted Enterprise ''Enterprise'' leaves spacedock. The spacedock lights go dark, things disconnect and get out of the way, there is bridge chatter to report multiple forms of readiness, and in response to Kirk giving the orders for thrusters, Enterprise ''Enterprise'' lights up and starts to move.



** It isn't mentioned onscreen, but Willard Decker is the son of Commodore Matt Decker from the TOS episode "[[Recap/StarTrekS2E6TheDoomsdayMachine The Doomsday Machine]]".

to:

** It isn't mentioned onscreen, but Willard Decker is the son of Commodore Matt Decker from the TOS episode "[[Recap/StarTrekS2E6TheDoomsdayMachine The Doomsday Machine]]".Machine]]", which somewhat justifies his gung-ho attitude towards giant space threats.



* AsYouKnow: Kind of a variant: Decker explains that Voyager 6 disappeared into "what we used to call a black hole." If they don't call them that any more, why bother using the obsolete terminology? It got worse when the subsequent ''Trek'' shows ignored this line and featured several references to black holes.
** It is possible that certain phenomena observed from Earth were called black holes but were in reality ''wormholes'', which would explain why V'ger wasn't crushed by a singularity.

to:

* AsYouKnow: Kind of a variant: Decker explains that Voyager 6 disappeared into "what we used to call a black hole." If they don't call them that any more, why bother using the obsolete terminology? It got worse when the subsequent ''Trek'' shows ignored this line and featured several references to black holes.
**
holes. It is possible that certain phenomena observed from Earth were called black holes but were in reality ''wormholes'', which would explain why V'ger wasn't crushed by a singularity.



-->'''Transporter Operator:''' ''Enterprise'', what we got back didn't live long... fortunately.

to:

-->'''Transporter --->'''Transporter Operator:''' ''Enterprise'', what we got back didn't live long... fortunately.



-->'''Spock:''' Each of us, at some time in our lives, turns to someone - a father, a brother, a God - and asks, "Why am I here? What was I meant to be?"

to:

-->'''Spock:''' Each of us, at some time in our lives, turns to someone - -- a father, a brother, a God - -- and asks, "Why am I here? What was I meant to be?"



* EverythingTryingToKillYou: Actual deaths in this movie consist of the crews of three Klingon ships getting vaporized for shooting torpedoes at the approaching V'ger; Commander Sonak, who dies horribly on his commute in to work; the crew of the Federation's Epsilon 9 station, who were only in V'ger's way; and Ilia, who is ''vaporized by a scan''. Earth is nearly destroyed by a probe they themselves had sent out centuries ago that was looking for its mommy.

to:

* EverythingTryingToKillYou: Actual deaths in this movie consist of the crews of three Klingon ships getting vaporized for shooting torpedoes at the approaching V'ger; Commander Sonak, Sonak and another officer, who dies die horribly on his their commute in to work; the crew of the Federation's Epsilon 9 station, who were only in V'ger's way; and Ilia, who is ''vaporized by a scan''. Earth is nearly destroyed by a probe they themselves had sent out centuries ago that was looking for its mommy.



* GrowBeyondTheirProgramming: V'ger.
* HeroicBSOD: In the theatrical cut, Uhura has one after the Federation starbase is taken by V'ger, forcing Kirk to repeat his order, "Shut it off!" Why Wise removed it in the director's cut is a mystery, since it punctuated the horror of the situation.
* HighTechHexagons: All over the place--the Klingon ships' tactical displays, the light gantries in Spacedock, and the steps Kirk and company walk over to reach V'ger near the film's end.

to:

* GrowBeyondTheirProgramming: V'ger.
V'ger started out as a simple probe. The machine race that found it hooked it up to a giant starship so it could do a better job. After traversing the entire universe, all that knowledge allowed V'ger to gain consciousness and redefine its own mission.
* HeroicBSOD: In the theatrical cut, Uhura has one after the Federation starbase outpost is taken by V'ger, forcing Kirk to repeat his order, "Shut it off!" Why Wise removed it in the director's cut is a mystery, since it punctuated the horror of the situation.
* HighTechHexagons: All over the place--the Klingon ships' tactical displays, the light gantries in Spacedock, the Federation scanning outpost, and the steps Kirk and company walk over to reach V'ger near the film's end.



* TheJuggernaut: V'ger

to:

* TheJuggernaut: V'gerV'ger's technology is completely beyond anything the Federation or any other race is capable of handling. The top-of-the-line ''Enterprise'' could survive exactly one hit from V'ger's weapons, and V'ger just fired again before they talked it down.



* LeaveTheCameraRunning / {{Padding}}: Its FanNickname isn't "The Motionless Picture"[[note]]Alternately, "The Slow Motion Picture"[[/note]] for nothing. The movie feels like it has more than enough plot for a 46-minute running time TV episode or even a two-parter with a little padding, but that 70-80 minute plot is crammed into a ''132-minute'' movie, so about halfway through the action stops dead while we watch long distance shots of the ''Enterprise'' cruising through what were undoubtedly the pinnacle of special effects at the time (in other words, a cheap screensaver by modern standards) for about half an hour.

to:

* LeaveTheCameraRunning / {{Padding}}: LeaveTheCameraRunning: Its FanNickname isn't "The Motionless Picture"[[note]]Alternately, "The Slow Motion Picture"[[/note]] for nothing. The movie feels like it has more than enough plot for a 46-minute running time TV episode or even a two-parter with a little padding, but that 70-80 minute plot is crammed into a ''132-minute'' movie, so about halfway through the action stops dead while we watch long distance shots of the ''Enterprise'' cruising through what were undoubtedly the pinnacle of special effects at the time (in other words, a cheap screensaver by modern standards) for about half an hour.



* MachineMonotone: Probe!Ilia.

to:

* LetNoCrisisGoToWaste: Kirk uses V'ger's imminent approach to get Starfleet to assign him command of the ''Enterprise'', which is currently the only ship in interception range, and he has no intention of giving it back once the crisis has passed. [=McCoy=] even lampshades this when dressing down Kirk for his hostility towards Decker.
* MachineMonotone: Probe!Ilia.Probe Ilia speaks in mostly monotone, though she's occasionally demanding when she gets tired of activities which have no purpose to her mission. Her softer tone towards Decker indicates that the real Ilia still exists within her.



-->'''Kirk:''' Well, for a man who swore he'd never return to Starfleet--
-->'''Bones:''' Just a moment, Captain, sir. I'll explain what happened. Your revered Admiral Nogura invoked a little-known, seldom-used reserve activation clause. In simpler language, Captain, they drafted me!

to:

-->'''Kirk:''' Well, for a man who swore he'd never return to Starfleet--
-->'''Bones:'''
Starfleet--\\
'''Bones:'''
Just a moment, Captain, sir. I'll explain what happened. Your revered Admiral Nogura invoked a little-known, seldom-used reserve activation clause. In simpler language, Captain, they drafted me!



* NakedOnArrival: Probe!Ilia is beamed in sans clothing. V'ger helpfully beams her into a sonic shower so she isn't strutting around in the buff, and the shower comes with some kind of instant clothing button that puts her in a spacey bathrobe.

to:

* NakedOnArrival: Probe!Ilia Probe Ilia is beamed in sans clothing. V'ger helpfully beams her into a sonic shower so she isn't strutting around in the buff, and the shower comes with some kind of instant clothing button that puts her in a spacey bathrobe.



* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Kirk causing the deaths of two crew members by accidentally causing a transporter malfunction.

to:

* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Kirk causing the deaths of two crew members by accidentally causing a NoOSHACompliance: A transporter malfunction.which is on the fritz and not safe for use will apparently still accept incoming transports from another location, rather than letting the sender do all the work. Given they were working on a console which went haywire due to the transport, this could be chalked up to extraordinarily bad timing, though it still raises the question as to why no one told the sender that transport wasn't safe. Kirk, after all, was beamed into an orbiting station and then flown over.



* TheOnlyOne: The ''Enterprise'' is the only starship available to confront V'ger.
-->"This seems to happen a lot. One almost wonders if other starships stay away when the Enterprise is in town, knowing that danger must be near."\\

to:

* TheOnlyOne: The ''Enterprise'' is the only starship available to confront V'ger.
V'ger. Keep in mind that "interception range" means "from Earth to the ''Klingon border''," an empire with which, at the time, relations were at best frosty.
-->"This seems to happen a lot. One almost wonders if other starships stay away when the Enterprise ''Enterprise'' is in town, knowing that danger must be near."\\



** One might correlate though that EVERY Starfleet ship enjoys similar adventures. Because why is the Enterprise always the only ship in reach? All the others are out fighting Klingons, stopping some disasters, or getting lost in time and space somewhere...
** There's also the sheer ''size'' factor of space--since Starfleet is supposed to be primarily an exploratory and research organization, and only MildlyMilitary, it makes sense that their ships are spread all across known space (and slightly beyond), and rarely in a position to immediately come to another ship or planet's assistance.
*** Which brings us back around to EverythingTryingToKillYou.
** What makes this particularly absurd is that "interception range" means "from Earth to the ''Klingon border''," an empire with which, at the time, relations were at best frosty.



* ThePowerOfLove: It causes Decker, Probe!Ilia, and V'ger to AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence.

to:

* ThePowerOfLove: It causes Decker, Probe!Ilia, Probe Ilia, and V'ger to AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence.
10th Apr '17 12:29:44 PM youfeelingluckypunk27
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Kirk causing the deaths of two crew members by accident.

to:

* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Kirk causing the deaths of two crew members by accident.accidentally causing a transporter malfunction.
10th Apr '17 12:16:57 PM youfeelingluckypunk27
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Kirk causing the deaths of two crew members by accident.
21st Jan '17 4:38:21 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** At least, it tries until [[spoiler: the scenes where all the "The Creator mus join with V'ger" business takes a turn into ultra-mystical wackiness.]]

to:

** At least, it tries until [[spoiler: the scenes where all the business about "The Creator mus must join with V'ger" business takes a turn into ultra-mystical wackiness.]]



* TheResenter: Captain Decker is not at all happy that Kirk's hijacking his command after he just spent the last year and a half overseeing the ''Enterprise'''s refit. However when Kirk chews Decker out over it [=McCoy=] sides with Decker, saying that ''Kirk'' is the resentful one because Decker has the one thing Kirk wants--permanent command of the ''Enterprise''.

to:

* TheResenter: Captain Decker is not at all happy that Kirk's hijacking his command after he just spent the last year and a half overseeing the ''Enterprise'''s refit. However when Kirk chews Decker out over it it, [=McCoy=] sides with Decker, saying that ''Kirk'' is the resentful one because Decker has the one thing Kirk wants--permanent command of the ''Enterprise''.



* RubberForeheadAliens: The Klingons appear with forehead ridges for the first time ever. Though here, they share the same sort whereas later Trek installments would show different varieties of ridges amongst Klingons.

to:

* RubberForeheadAliens: The Klingons appear with forehead ridges for the first time ever. Though here, they share the same sort sort, whereas later Trek installments would show different varieties of ridges amongst Klingons.



** [[spoiler: This story takes place a few hundred years after the voyager probes were launched. ''Voyager 6'' fell into a black hole to emerge at the planet of the machine intelligences. At the speeds that the voyager probes left the solar system, it would take thousands of years to reach the nearest celestial body (Alpha Centauri), so presumably much longer to rendezvous with a black hole somewhere in space.]]

to:

** [[spoiler: This story takes place a few hundred years after the voyager Voyager probes were launched. ''Voyager 6'' fell into a black hole to emerge at the planet of the machine intelligences. At the speeds that the voyager Voyager probes left the solar system, it would take thousands of years to reach the nearest celestial body (Alpha Centauri), so presumably much longer to rendezvous with a black hole somewhere in space.]]



* SplitDiopter: The film is famous for its heavy use of these shots, in which the right side of the frame is focused differently from the left, allowing people standing in different areas of the bridge to all be in focus at once. While most directors attempt to hide the hide the line where the focus changes, Wise chose to leave it [[https://cinemashock.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/audiovisual-split-focus-012.png?w=1280&h=544 obvious]], creating a very surreal effect almost as though two shots have been combined into one.

to:

* SplitDiopter: The film is famous for its heavy use of these shots, in which the right side of the frame is focused differently from the left, allowing people standing in different areas of the bridge to all be in focus at once. While most directors attempt to hide the hide the line where the focus changes, Wise chose to leave it [[https://cinemashock.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/audiovisual-split-focus-012.png?w=1280&h=544 obvious]], creating a very surreal effect almost as though two shots have been combined into one.



* UnfinishedUntestedUsedAnyway: ''Enterprise'' has just gone through an 18-month refit and pretty much the entire ship has been rebuilt. They haven't even gotten to engine tests yet. Kirk orders it pressed into service anyway, because the more time they have to 'meet' it, the more time they have to figure things out. RealityEnsues when they finicky warp engines glitch out, nearly getting the ship destroyed.

to:

* UnfinishedUntestedUsedAnyway: ''Enterprise'' has just gone through an 18-month refit and pretty much the entire ship has been rebuilt. They haven't even gotten to engine tests yet. Kirk orders it pressed into service anyway, because the more time they have to 'meet' it, the more time they have to figure things out. RealityEnsues when they the finicky warp engines glitch out, nearly getting the ship destroyed.



** It's stated in the novelization that Commander Willard Decker is the son of Commodore Matt Decker from the ''TOS'' episode "[[Recap/StarTrekS2E6TheDoomsdayMachine The Doomsday Machine]]", and the ''Enterprise'' was his big chance to prove he wasn't crazy like his dad. That explains why he's none too pleased with Kirk casually commandeering the ''Enterprise'' (or some of his crew grousing about it). Notably, it's a complete inversion of of that episode; with Kirk now the [[InsaneAdmiral flag officer]] who commandeers ''Enterprise'' from her rightful [=CO=] and makes poor command decisions that nearly lead to the ship's destruction.

to:

** It's stated in the novelization that Commander Willard Decker is the son of Commodore Matt Decker from the ''TOS'' episode "[[Recap/StarTrekS2E6TheDoomsdayMachine The Doomsday Machine]]", and the ''Enterprise'' was his big chance to prove he wasn't crazy like his dad. That explains why he's none too pleased with Kirk casually commandeering the ''Enterprise'' (or some of his crew grousing about it). Notably, it's a complete inversion of of that episode; episode, with Kirk now the [[InsaneAdmiral flag officer]] who commandeers ''Enterprise'' from her rightful [=CO=] and makes poor command decisions that nearly lead to the ship's destruction.



* FramingDevice: The novel directly refers to the events of the original TV series as dramatizations based on the voyages of the ''Enterprise''. So that means ''Star Trek'' is seen by its creator as a ShowWithinAShow. Justifiable since Roddenberry got fed up with being asked why the Klingons looked different from the ones seen in TOS. His answer remained that he always intended for everything, including the Klingons, to look more elaborate and detailed than they did on TV. They just didn't have the money or the technology to realize it. Making the original series an "in universe" dramatization takes care of that question. In terms of the productions looks, we might assume that what is low budget and {{zeerust}} to us in the real world is simply a stylistic choice on the part of the "in universe" show's creators.
* MindlinkMates: Spock hears Kirk's thoughts from light years away, and later on it's mentioned that, "It was common knowledge that telepathic rapport between Vulcan and human was possible only in cases of [[HoYay extraordinarily close friendship]]."

to:

* FramingDevice: The novel directly refers to the events of the original TV series as dramatizations based on the voyages of the ''Enterprise''. So that means ''Star Trek'' is seen by its creator as a ShowWithinAShow. Justifiable since Roddenberry got fed up with being asked why the Klingons looked different from the ones seen in TOS. His answer remained that he always intended for everything, including the Klingons, to look more elaborate and detailed than they did on TV. They TV; they just didn't have the money or the technology to realize it. Making the original series an "in universe" dramatization takes care of that question. In terms of the productions production's looks, we might assume that what is low budget and {{zeerust}} to us in the real world is simply a stylistic choice on the part of the "in universe" show's creators.
* MindlinkMates: Spock hears Kirk's thoughts from light years away, and later on it's mentioned that, that "It was common knowledge that telepathic rapport between Vulcan and human was possible only in cases of [[HoYay extraordinarily close friendship]]."
21st Jan '17 4:24:10 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MechanisticAlienCulture: The Ilia Probe struggles to comprehend carbon-based life (the probe is a humanoid android created by a society of MechanicalLifeforms to interact with the ''Enterprise'' crew), so it uses extremely mechanistic language, like "Carbon Units," "Kirk Unit,"--not "Decker Unit". as it still retains enough of Ilia to recognise her former lover--etc., to describe human(oid) society and individual "carbon units." The Ilia Probe created by the machine entity V'ger, being an android, is not an example, but its perception of humanoid society is, as it is colored by the machine belief (as it is on the machines' homeworld) that "carbon units" exist to "serve the creator" (which, according to the machine logic, must be a living machine as well, like V'ger, its creation; similar V'ger and the Ilia Probe perceive the USS ''Enterprise'' as a MechanicalLifeform serviced by "Carbon Units"). [[FridgeBrilliance Interestingly, this implies that "Carbon Units" (carbon-based life) on the machines' homeworld are considered "artificial" by the]] [[MechanicalLifeforms living machines]], [[WildMassGuessing which raises some very interesting questions about their evolution and technology]].

to:

* MechanisticAlienCulture: The Ilia Probe struggles to comprehend carbon-based life (the probe is a humanoid android created by a society of MechanicalLifeforms to interact with the ''Enterprise'' crew), so it uses extremely mechanistic language, like "Carbon Units," "Kirk Unit,"--not "Decker Unit". as it still retains enough of Ilia to recognise her former lover--etc., to describe human(oid) society and individual "carbon units." The Ilia Probe created by the machine entity V'ger, being an android, is not an example, but its perception of humanoid society is, as it is colored by the machine belief (as it is on the machines' homeworld) that "carbon units" exist to "serve the creator" (which, according to the machine logic, must be a living machine as well, like V'ger, its creation; similar similarly, V'ger and the Ilia Probe perceive the USS ''Enterprise'' as a MechanicalLifeform serviced by "Carbon Units"). [[FridgeBrilliance Interestingly, this implies that "Carbon Units" (carbon-based life) on the machines' homeworld are considered "artificial" by the]] [[MechanicalLifeforms living machines]], [[WildMassGuessing which raises some very interesting questions about their evolution and technology]].
21st Jan '17 4:17:49 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Gene Roddenberry's {{novelization}} reveals the identity of the woman killed in the transporter accident as Lori Chiana and it's implied that Kirk knows here. Later expanded universe novels will establish that she was, in fact, Kirk's girlfriend at the time, though the movie gives no indication of this.

to:

** Gene Roddenberry's {{novelization}} reveals the identity of the woman killed in the transporter accident as Lori Chiana and it's implied that Kirk knows here.her. Later expanded universe novels will establish that she was, in fact, Kirk's girlfriend at the time, though the movie gives no indication of this.
21st Jan '17 4:16:09 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In (funnily enough) 2001, a Director's Cut was released. It is faster paced and actually includes a shot that shows the entirety of V'ger. It also revealed that the original film was more of a workprint and Wise was not allowed to trim it to a more reasonable length because [[ExecutiveMeddling the suits]] feared such information would [[TaintedByThePreview ruin the reputation ahead of time]], and Wise was so comically slow at filming the movie that when the prints were delievered for the movie's premiere, they were still wet from last-minute editing.

to:

In (funnily enough) 2001, a Director's Cut was released. It is faster paced and actually includes a shot that shows the entirety of V'ger. It also revealed that the original film was more of a workprint and Wise was not allowed to trim it to a more reasonable length because [[ExecutiveMeddling the suits]] feared such information would [[TaintedByThePreview ruin the reputation ahead of time]], and Wise was so comically slow at filming the movie that when the prints were delievered delivered for the movie's premiere, they were still wet from last-minute editing.
21st Jan '17 4:15:29 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The movie is also noteworthy for its score, composed by Music/JerryGoldsmith, who would go on to score four more ''Trek'' theatrical films (he had been Roddenberry first choice to score the original ''Trek'' first pilot, "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E0TheCage The Cage]]", but was unavailable at the time). Goldsmith's main theme would be re-purposed as the theme for ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', and his Klingon themes would be adapted in other ''Trek'' film scores and in the new series.

to:

The movie is also noteworthy for its score, composed by Music/JerryGoldsmith, who would go on to score four more ''Trek'' theatrical films (he had been Roddenberry Roddenberry's first choice to score the original ''Trek'' first pilot, "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E0TheCage The Cage]]", but was unavailable at the time). Goldsmith's main theme would be re-purposed as the theme for ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', and his Klingon themes would be adapted in other ''Trek'' film scores and in the new series.
This list shows the last 10 events of 223. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Film.StarTrekTheMotionPicture